01/03/2018 The One Show


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01/03/2018

Matt Baker and Angellica Bell are joined on the sofa by Mary Beard, David Olusoga and Simon Schama to talk about new BBC series Civilisations.


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Hello and welcome to

The One Show with Matt Baker.

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And Angellica Bell.

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And hello to the Wilsons, enjoying a

snow game on their sledge. These are

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Winter Olympians in the making.

Hitting the slope. Off they go, a

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huge pile of them.

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It's a welcome to the world

hello to Sienna Waring -

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born on the A66 in County Durham

this morning.

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APPLAUSE

Welcome. A great place to be born.

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A to Ozzie Burrows.

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An ingenious way to get the snow off

his car. I used a brush this

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morning.

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It's a round of applause hello

to the takeaway delivery guy

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in Lincoln who had to learn how

to do the skeleton.

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APPLAUSE

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That is a curry in a hurry!

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And finally hello to the newly

married Mr and Mrs Robinson

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from Stranraer, who should be

sunning themselves in the Maldives

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but are stuck in Glasgow airport.

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But Glasgow airport is pretty cool,

as well.

They are together. Having a

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memorable time.

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Because yes it's still white out

there, and can you believe it,

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it's the first day of spring today.

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The Beast from the East has

made its presence known.

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We have been seeing traffic jams and

road closures up and down the

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country from the A43 in Hampshire to

the M80 between Glasgow and

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Stirling.

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Mass disruption on the

rails and at airports.

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Storm Emma is on her way and there's

expected to be going on 2ft of snow

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in the South West tonight.

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Our favourite weatherman

Ben Rich is here.

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Who knew you could be on the One

sofa three times in a week.

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He'll be telling us what the next

few days will be like.

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And the president of the AA -

Edmund King is here,

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letting us know how much travel

misery Storm Emma could be

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bringing to the roads.

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To take us away from the cold we're

joined by Simon Schama,

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Mary Beard and David Olusoga -

the faces of the BBC's

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breathtaking new series,

Civilisations, which promises

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an epic journey through thousands

of years of beautiful art.

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The latest area to issue a severe

red alert snow warning

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is the South West and South Wales.

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Happy St David's Day, everyone.

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Jon Kay is in Tiverton in Devon,

which is bracing itself for the full

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force of Storm Emma.

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Jon, has Emma arrived yet?

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Storm Emma has arrived and it was

above this patch Emma met the Beast

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from the East. They had a horrible

and messy meeting in the skies above

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this red warning zone. There is no

red to be seen, you cannot see

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anything, it is quite everywhere.

This is Tiverton high street.

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Somebody making their way home. A

tractor is trying to clear things.

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Very few people out to night, people

have been told to get home, shut the

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door and tried to settle down and

see this out. This red zone is a big

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area from south Wales and covers

Cardiff and cuts through the Bristol

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Channel through Somerset down to

Devon. Some communities here are

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used to being cut off for a couple

of days in winter but this red zone

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is unusual because it covers urban

areas, and people who are not used

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this will have to deal with it and

it will snow pretty much all night

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and we will see more over the next

couple of. Thank you.

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Keep safe in the South West tonight.

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The red alert in Scotland may have

been lifted this morning,

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but it has still been a difficult

day on the roads.

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Food shops in the centre of one of

Europe's biggest cities closed

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because of the snow.

Most of the

shops seem to be a meltdown, closing

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early, shutting their doors, nothing

on the shelves.

The empty shelves in

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Glasgow are partly the result of

some of Scotland's biggest roads,

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including the M80, seizing up.

Hundreds of drivers spent the night

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in their vehicles and others abandon

them.

Horrendous. A couple of

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people, bless them, they deserve a

medal, giving people a drink.

Mark

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from the RAC is doing his best to

get motorists back up and running.

I

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would say there has been a risk to

life. A lot of the major roads. I

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have never seen the M80 that quiet.

Normally, it would be heaving with

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traffic.

With up to 30 centimetres

of snow minor roads are also quiet.

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And of course, drivers are stuck.

Got a rope on just now. If he drives

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gently and I drive gently, it gives

us basically a four-wheel drive and

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hopefully gets us there.

Thank you

very much, much appreciated.

Wright,

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the next one. In these conditions,

getting to any emergency is not

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easy. Pat O'Mara is the head of the

ambulance control centre in Glasgow.

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We have seen more accidents -- have

you seen more accidents?

Demand

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levels have been the same. But it

has been harder to get to patients.

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Obviously it is treacherous for your

staff, as well. Do you have measures

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to protect them?

We have staff put

up in hotels. They have not seen

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their families for a couple of days.

We make sure we rotate people and

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keep an eye on fatigue levels.

This

evening the M80 was due to open but

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an Amber alert is in place until

tomorrow morning. What is the

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situation with the red warnings?

The

red warning in central Scotland

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expired earlier this morning simply

because the snow eased off but there

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is still a lot of snow lying around.

We have a new red warning for parts

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of the south-west of England and

South East of Wales. Talking about

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parts of Devon, into Somerset, far

south-east Wales. Those areas could

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see easily 20 centimetres, but

perhaps 40, 50, you mentioned two

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feet of snow. I expect we will not

be farther away from that in

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Dartmoor, Exmoor. And blizzards. As

you saw, there are amber warnings,

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the second tier, across south-west

England more generally, south Wales,

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Northern Ireland and the north-east

of England and East of Scotland.

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Edmund, you are president of the AA

and we have seen the chaos the snow

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has caused.

What the roads like now?

They are still pretty busy and

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dangerous. Our patrols have been out

today and more like snow patrols,

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chasing cars stuck in snow and in

ice and you can see from the map, it

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is across the country. North-east,

Northwest, Scotland, Lincoln. A lot

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of closed roads in Lincolnshire. And

in the deep South and south-west. We

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have experienced three times as many

calls for breakdowns. Something like

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30,000 calls today alone. We have

had to mobilise all patrols and get

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extra patrols out, even getting

staff to call centres using 4x4

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vehicles.

Some people need to get

out, so what tips would you give

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them?

Be prepared before you go out.

If you looked at Scotland last

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night, the M80, if you did not have

half a tank of fuel, you would have

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been in trouble. Make sure you have

at least half a tank of fuel also if

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you stop you can keep the engine and

heater on. Put carpet or cardboard

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in the boot of the car. If you are

stuck in snow, take the cardboard

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out, if it is a rear wheel drive

car, put it under the rear wheel and

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drive over it, it gives you

traction. Be prepared and then drive

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very smoothly, pull away in second

gear, do not accelerate quickly, do

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not put on the brakes quickly. Keep

to the main roads, they are better

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gritted, although Ben Rich would

know this, in some of the

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temperatures we have seen, Grit is

not all that effective. Do not be

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complacent, even with a 4x4 you can

skid off the road.

And it can wash

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off. When rain falls it washes the

Grit.

Edmund, thank you for making

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the journey to see us.

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Lincolnshire is one of the places

that has been hardest to get around

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today with no major roads open first

thing this morning.

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Peter Levy is there now.

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Are things getting moving? Not

really. All of the major roads have

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been blocked at some point today.

100 schools plus closed. A bad day.

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Barnaby between Grimsby and

Scunthorpe, it is the coldest I have

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ever been. I have Simon bachelor

with me who is a farmer. When did

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you get up this morning? 5am I was

on the road. He has been helping

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people get out of the snow with the

snowplough.

I have been trying to

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keep the road opened and help people

who are stuck as we try to keep

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lorries flowing so they can get

access to the farm.

Nobody asked you

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to do this!

We have to get people

into work at our farm and you come

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across people stranded. You cannot

leave them, you have to help the

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community.

You are one of the good

Samaritans that has come out today.

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There have been a lot of people out

helping.

It has been extraordinary.

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Yes, everybody pulling together. It

is gone 7pm, go home and get some

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food. Thank you. If I can tell you

about a lady called

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about a lady called cat -- Cat, a

nurse, who walked three hours in the

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snow to get to work at Lincoln

County Hospital. And then she came

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across a colleague called Lucy in

the snow and injured. They got to

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work at the hospital and did their

shift and they staying at the

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hospital tonight. I reckon you

should invite her down to see the

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One Show one night because it is

extraordinary what she has done

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today. The coldest I have been I

have to say, in Lincolnshire.

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Back to you. I think that is a

wonderful invitation. We should give

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a round of applause.

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a round of applause. Everybody, the

farmers, like the fourth emergency

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service is situation is like this.

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Tonight sees the launch

of Civilisations -

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the BBC's new epic art series.

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Filmed across six continents,

31 countries and three

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years in the making,

it's the Blue Planet

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of the art world.

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The record of human history brims

over with the rage to destroy. But

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it is also imprinted with the

opposite instinct. To make things

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that go beyond the demands of food

and shelter. Things that makers see

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the world and place in it in a

different light. We are the art

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making animal. And this is what we

have made.

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Well, it is a big old series.

Fantastic. We are looking forward to

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it. We have Simon and David and Mary

here. Heavyweights. But this is the

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first time you have worked together.

David, who is doing what? I am doing

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the age of discovery. 16th, 17th,

18th century. Mary is doing the

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ancient world and Simon is doing

everything else.

No pressure.

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Insufferable greed. I do not stop

with the ancient world.

I get up to

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2014. We all do. You are in one of

the programmes. You are not,

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actually!

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actually!

Excited for minute. It is

interesting. We have watched it

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today.

All of it?

Not all nine

programmes. Because we would not

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want to watch it now we want to

watch it with everyone.

My students

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say that. I say, did you read it?

They say, I looked at it. Am I as

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bad as one of your students? As good

as! Each episode is your personal

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journey, you researched it. When you

filmed it, did it live up to

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expectations and the work you put

into the episode?

More than that. It

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was always more difficult to film

did you thought. It is easy to sit

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in London and say we will go there.

Planet in the office. It works fine

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but it never does when you get

there. I had looked at the

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terracotta Warriors and I saw them

at the British Museum. This is what

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makes you so lucky on telly. Not

just look at them from the side, but

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get down, wander about amongst them.

I thought, wow, if my mum knew I was

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doing this, she would be so proud.

With paintings, you have to go

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either at 6am, or at night, when

nobody else's there. A small price

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to pay but it is just you and

Rembrandt. Sometimes that is scary.

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I was there with the painters

staring at me with that fishy eye,

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saying, I have seen people like you

before. You feel embarrassed but you

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do it nonetheless.

A precious sense

of immediacy. And incredible

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emotion. The cave paintings.

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emotion. The cave paintings. The way

they use ink to put their mark on

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it, you kind of hit on it, the point

of art is for it outlived the person

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that has created it.

That is the

breakthrough. The group have very

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cleverly sort of kept me from seeing

it. Everything was set up and

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normally we would have just a quick

look. But no, you take a risk

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because I might be even more soppy

and incoherent and if that I usually

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am!

He is quite soppy about it

sometimes, sometimes he gets soppy!

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You enjoy him getting soppy.

How

impact poll has this series being,

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you will have done so many

programmes of the past?

It is easy

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to write something and know what

your going to say but then you stand

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in front an amazing piece of art,

and you are low because you there

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early, and you have a different

relationship. The thing you wrote

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isn't enough because what you're

trying to express is what you feel

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in that moment.

The men are terribly

soppy about this. They go gooey and

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cry in front of works of art.

I'm

not ashamed!

I do not.

You were

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struck by the cave. One thing that

struck me is how art can be so

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similar in the world, yet be so far

apart. I'm talking about the

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mosque...

That's a good point, in

the second cave we went to, very

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deep, and it was weird, I felt

weirdly at home in the caves. The

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temperature is always about kind of

15 or 14 or something, never colder.

0:17:030:17:09

Half an hour walk into where the

paintings are and then you come

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across these horses. Of course, no

ice age artist is out there with a

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little sketch pad, so they are

actually looking hard and then going

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back and translating what they've

got in their memory. It is not just

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the kind of cartoon of a horse, they

use the lines of the rock for bones

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and the anatomy of a horse. This is

an amazing thing. Because it started

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all those tens of thousands of years

ago, it is very, a very emotional

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moment.

The starting point. It is

all there for you. A magical,

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magical series.

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Civilisations starts

tonight 9pm on BBC Two.

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Now, what lengths would you go to,

to help and protect,

0:17:530:17:55

and give an opportunity to someone

you didn't know on the other

0:17:550:17:58

side of the world?

0:17:580:17:59

Here's the story of how

one student imprisoned

0:17:590:18:07

Prison found himself in Glasgow.

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My name is Hernando. In 1973, I was

at 24-year-old student in Chile.

My

0:18:140:18:23

name is Marilyn Thompson and in

1973I was a third-year student at

0:18:230:18:28

Essex University. This is the

story...

Of how she saved me.

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In September 1973, the democratic

government of Chile was overthrown

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by Commander in Chief of the Chilean

army, General Pinochet, in a violent

0:18:440:18:50

coup. In the days that followed,

4500 people were killed or

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disappeared. 200,000 were imprisoned

or tortured. One of those was

0:18:560:19:01

24-year-old Hernando.

The Secret

Service came very late at night,

0:19:010:19:09

after the coup. They broke down the

door. They blindfolded and took me

0:19:090:19:15

to an interrogation centre. I was

brutally tortured. It was a very

0:19:150:19:21

difficult life, if I can call it a

life, because at some point I was

0:19:210:19:26

kind of losing my mind.

It surprised me that I can talk the

0:19:260:19:33

way I'm talking now, because I

couldn't say this in the first 20

0:19:330:19:38

years.

The Pinochet regime was fast to

0:19:380:19:42

stamp out any dissent. Military

police targeted those with socialist

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views, many of whom were academics

and students. Hernando's crime was

0:19:450:19:52

distributing leaflets opposing the

dictatorship. Marilyn would soon

0:19:520:19:56

come to his aid.

I was studying

Latin American studies and I had

0:19:560:20:01

Latin American friends. I was really

horrified by what was happening in

0:20:010:20:07

the country. There was news reels

and films that were coming out which

0:20:070:20:11

showed how horrific it was. It was

just general repression, a reign of

0:20:110:20:15

terror.

The coup sparked international

0:20:150:20:19

outrage and in the UK people took to

the streets in their thousands.

0:20:190:20:27

Academics formed a network to

provide asylum to Chilean students.

0:20:270:20:31

Working with the world University

service, they offered places at

0:20:310:20:35

British universities.

We developed

quite strong relations, helping them

0:20:350:20:40

to settle down in the country. The

issue of language was a very big

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one, because the majority didn't

speak any English at all.

0:20:450:20:49

Hernando was on a list of political

prisoners as his family had reported

0:20:490:20:54

him missing. The world University

service awarded him a grant to

0:20:540:20:58

continue his studies at Glasgow

University. After ten months in

0:20:580:21:04

prison, the Chilean authorities

expelled Hernando from the country.

0:21:040:21:07

On the 6th of June 1974, he was

flown to the UK.

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Because of my previous experience,

torture in prison, I didn't know

0:21:110:21:18

what to expect because your mind is

not accustomed to freedom.

0:21:180:21:22

Marilyn was one of the first people

he met.

0:21:220:21:30

Reminds me, what was it like when

you first got here to the UK?

The

0:21:300:21:34

very first day, I went to your

office and as soon as I opened the

0:21:340:21:40

door, I saw you smile. You spoke to

me in Spanish, which made a big

0:21:400:21:45

difference.

After graduating, Hernando pursued a

0:21:450:21:50

career in electrical engineering. He

met his wife Vicky the year he

0:21:500:21:53

arrived in Glasgow and they have

four children.

0:21:530:21:58

900 Chileans were given a home in

the UK after the Pinochet coup.

0:21:580:22:02

Marilyn supported 50 of them to

settle into their new lives, and

0:22:020:22:06

today she is meeting up with some of

them for the first time in 35 years.

0:22:060:22:13

Bradford University offered me a

place.

After finishing my studies,

0:22:130:22:19

it gave me knowledge to get together

with some other people and we opened

0:22:190:22:25

the first Chilean restaurant in

Britain. That was in Birmingham.

0:22:250:22:29

We were really grateful, there were

so many amazing people embracing us

0:22:290:22:35

and protecting us and helping us,

unconditionally.

0:22:350:22:39

Like Hernando, they have all built a

new life in the UK thanks to this

0:22:390:22:43

support and action of a determined

group of British academics.

0:22:430:22:48

That is incredibly heart-warming.

Incredible story.

0:22:480:22:51

Thanks to Hernando and to Marilyn,

who is with us today.

0:22:510:22:56

Very welcome, looking forward to

having a chat shortly.

0:22:560:23:03

26 new designs celebrate a to Z of

Great Britain. Each have an alphabet

0:23:030:23:08

as well as an iconic image. So, we

are going to put you to the test as

0:23:080:23:13

major historians. We are going to

ask you what U think the icon

0:23:130:23:16

relates to.

David, Q, any idea?

Queen?

It is queueing. Let's go in

0:23:160:23:33

with N, what you think?

NHS.

It.

And

E?

Eggs and bacon.

Simon, you are

0:23:330:23:45

too good at this! APPLAUSE

There are 26. It is so beautiful,

0:23:450:23:49

have a look, you will enjoy it. You

can have it, go on. Just for now.

0:23:490:23:53

LAUGHTER

0:23:530:23:54

This week we've seen

Emma Massingdale take her two

0:23:540:23:57

beautiful Eriskay ponies back

to the Hebridean land

0:23:570:23:59

where they originate from.

0:23:590:24:00

And tonight, she's wrapping up

warm in Harris Tweed...

0:24:000:24:07

So far, I've travelled nearly 100

miles of my journey from the

0:24:100:24:14

southern island, heading to the most

northerly tip of the Outer Hebrides.

0:24:140:24:18

The weather has been pretty awful

for the last few days, so arriving

0:24:180:24:22

on the Isle of Harris, my first up

is to pick up some warm weather

0:24:220:24:27

clothing. Hello.

Hello.

Harris Tweed

is renowned and sold all over the

0:24:270:24:32

world and everything is made on the

island. Marion was born here and

0:24:320:24:36

works in the shop during her

holidays and she is also a student

0:24:360:24:40

at the University of Glasgow. But

getting used to big city compared to

0:24:400:24:44

life on the island was a bit of a

culture shock.

It was so different

0:24:440:24:48

from being here, it was so busy and

everything. I've been there three

0:24:480:24:52

years now, so the busy city life for

my term time and then I come back

0:24:520:24:55

here and it's a bit quieter and I

enjoy it because it's two really

0:24:550:24:58

contrasting places.

All Harris Tweed is woven by hand in

0:24:580:25:03

the homes of the islanders.

It is

very popular. And it gives people

0:25:030:25:07

jobs. It's also put Harris on the

map so we're very proud of that, I

0:25:070:25:13

must say.

And sporting our new gear we get on

0:25:130:25:17

our way. Tourism here generates over

£50 million every year and supports

0:25:170:25:23

1000 full-time jobs. During the

summer months, fishermen Lewis

0:25:230:25:26

Mackenzie takes to rest out on boat

trips to spot wildlife. We are

0:25:260:25:30

heading to an area where he regular

sees sea eagles any Els withdrew to

0:25:300:25:35

try and bolster numbers.

Perfect.

So, let's just see what happens.

And

0:25:350:25:42

we don't have to wait long.

Here it

comes, here it comes.

Oh, wow!

Here

0:25:420:25:48

he is. He might come round again. He

is embarrassed.

Unfortunately,

0:25:480:25:58

doesn't return, but it's not long

before another regular summer

0:25:580:26:02

visitor appears that has

affectionately been named Barry by

0:26:020:26:05

Lewis.

Barry...

Barry is a great skewer who likes a

0:26:050:26:14

free meal. He's been coming back

here for the last five years.

I have

0:26:140:26:20

this routine every day where he

follows the boat for a bit of fish

0:26:200:26:24

and he gets annoyed if I don't have

anything, so he did well to get

0:26:240:26:27

something today.

After a quick bit

of fishing and crab catching we head

0:26:270:26:32

back to shore, with my supper. So

good! I loved going out on the boat

0:26:320:26:38

with Lewis today. Not just getting

to see all the amazing marine life

0:26:380:26:43

that surrounds this coastline but

also getting to see his relationship

0:26:430:26:46

with the animals.

It is apparent that to live here the

0:26:460:26:50

locals have had to be resourceful.

Donald is a crofter and the

0:26:500:26:54

generations his family have been

digging pit on their land. What

0:26:540:26:57

exactly is Pete?

It is carbon,

basically. I like to think of it as

0:26:570:27:04

similar to coal but without the heat

and pressure applied. As you can see

0:27:040:27:08

all around us, there are no trees,

so there is no option of burning

0:27:080:27:13

wood and there hasn't been for

probably a few thousand years. So

0:27:130:27:16

this stuff has been vital for the

survival of people here in the

0:27:160:27:22

Western Isles for umpteen

generations.

0:27:220:27:24

As a crofter, Donald is allowed to

cut peat but only enough for his own

0:27:240:27:28

use. He has been working the land

for around 12 years, but like most

0:27:280:27:32

islanders, to survive financially he

has had to diversify.

The main thing

0:27:320:27:37

about crofting is you have do have

another source of income. Most

0:27:370:27:40

people do, my mother with their

teacher and a crofter, my father was

0:27:400:27:47

a fisherman and a crofter, I work

part-time for the local council

0:27:470:27:49

myself. There are lots of

similarities, traditional ways of

0:27:490:27:51

working that there is a modern twist

as well.

After nearly three weeks of

0:27:510:27:56

horse boarding, we are on the final

leg through the Outer Hebrides. I

0:27:560:28:00

can see the Lighthouse! Just a few

metres left to go. And after 186

0:28:000:28:06

miles, I reach journey's end. Hello,

boys. We've made it. I've absolutely

0:28:060:28:17

loved exploring the islands here,

from down south to hear at Lewis.

0:28:170:28:24

Every single pocket and every corner

you go around is completely

0:28:240:28:27

different. There is so much to see

and experience. You could literally

0:28:270:28:32

spend months here and still has more

to see.

0:28:320:28:36

It's been amazing.

I hope she got home all right! Don't

0:28:360:28:43

you?

0:28:430:28:44

From one Emma to Storm Emma -

weatherman Ben Rich,

0:28:440:28:47

what are we expecting overnight?

0:28:470:28:49

How are things looking for the next

12 hours or so?

In some parts of the

0:28:490:28:53

country things do not look great at

all because where we have that Met

0:28:530:28:57

Office red warning in the south-west

of England, we will see huge amounts

0:28:570:29:01

of snow, blizzard conditions, very

strong winds also affecting the

0:29:010:29:05

south-east of Wales. You can see the

worst of the weather there, some

0:29:050:29:10

snow also spreading into parts of

the Midlands overnight. It will move

0:29:100:29:12

into some parts of Northern Ireland,

and all the while the snow showers

0:29:120:29:17

continue across northern and eastern

parts of Scotland and North East

0:29:170:29:20

England on what will be another cold

and frosty nights. Into tomorrow,

0:29:200:29:25

more snow across the south-west

corner, perhaps other southern areas

0:29:250:29:29

as well, and those snow showers

continuing in the north-east. So

0:29:290:29:33

some pretty nasty weather still to

come for you two over the next 24

0:29:330:29:37

hours or so. After that, it does

very, very slowly improved.

We will

0:29:370:29:43

waive goodbye to that! We want to

finish with a nice snowman, here he

0:29:430:29:47

is. Nick Franks from Scotland.

0:29:470:29:49

Thanks to Ben, Edmund,

Mary, David and Simon.

0:29:490:29:51

Civilisations starts

tonight at 9pm on BBC Two.

0:29:510:29:57

The show will be back tomorrow, good

night.

0:29:570:30:00

Matt Baker and Angellica Bell are joined on the sofa by Mary Beard, David Olusoga and Simon Schama to talk about new BBC series Civilisations.