The Ceremony Turner Prize


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The Ceremony

A special live programme as the Turner Prize for contemporary art is awarded in a ceremony hosted by Britain's City of Culture, Hull. Jane Hill and Rebecca Jones present.


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Hello and welcome to the 2017

Turner Prize award ceremony,

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brought to you live from Hull,

the 2017 City of Culture.

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In a few minutes' time,

the biggest prize in British Art

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will be awarded.

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I'm Jane Hill, here at

the magnificent setting

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for the ceremony, Hull Minster.

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The Turner Prize is of course being

exhibited here in Hull because this

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is the City of Culture for 2017.

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And I'm Rebecca Jones.

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I'm at the Ferens Gallery in Hull,

where the four nominated artists

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are exhibiting their work.

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I'll be giving you your own private

view in just a few minutes' time.

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More from Rebecca to come. Taking us

through the next half-hour of our

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special coverage is Sarah Munro, the

director of the Baltic in Gateshead

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and Alistair Hudson, soon to be

installed as the new director of the

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Manchester Art Gallery and the

Whitworth. Welcome to both of you. A

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quick thought from each of you on

this year's short list and what it

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has that EU?

It is a very considered

short list, one where all the

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artists show an element of

handicraft and thoughtfulness and

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humanity. Personally, I would like

to see more politics and a bit more

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over talking about what is going on

in the world, which is there, but

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could be raised up a bit more.

Some

people would say that is that quite

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strongly. Sarah, your thoughts?

Again, it is a very considered short

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list. It absolutely represents what

the British art scene is about just

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now, that sense of practices coming

across different art forms,

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different skills, ideas, knowledge,

but also the way that artists are

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crossing borders. There is a real

diversity with where people were

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born and grew up. It reflects where

we are and where we are working. I

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like that quite politics that is

within a lot of the work.

Lots to

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discuss. We will talk more in a

moment. Let's hear more about the

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work of two of the four short listed

artists this year exhibiting at the

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Ferens Art Gallery not far from

here. Let's go to Rebecca Jones.

In

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my humble opinion, this year's

Turner Prize is almost as much about

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politics and the world we live in

today as it is about art, and I

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think if you look at the work of

Andrea Buttner here, you will see

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what I mean. She is interested in

poverty, so she has these eight

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giant woodcuts of wooded beggars

with outstretched, beseeching arms.

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This entire wall is covered in

high-vis jacket material and on it,

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what appear to be three large,

abstract pictures. But here, this is

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an enlarged fingerprint that has

been left smeared on a smartphone

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screen. To help makes into for this,

am joined by one of the co-curators

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of the exhibition this year, George

Vaizey. Two very different sorts of

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works. What is the link here?

Andrea

Buttner is interested in the value.

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We can see with these etchings, she

takes everyday marks from iPhone,

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scaled up and make them beautiful,

focusing our attention on things we

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wouldn't look at.

As well as wanting

us to look across at her work,

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Andrea Buttner also wants us to look

down at it, so we have this piece of

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blue silk fabric which she has laid

out on a low table. Why is that?

It

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is handmade silk made by Benedictine

nuns, and we are looking down at it

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because we are enacting the

representation of the beggar. So we

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are bowing down and there is a sense

of humility and modesty too much of

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her work.

Thank you. I have a

surprise for you now, especially for

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all of you who associate the Turner

Prize with unmade beds and pickled

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cows, because I am going to show you

some paintings. They are the work of

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Hurvin Anderson. Do not adjust your

set, because his landscapes are

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inspired by no less than

comfortable. Look at these lush,

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verdant forests. You can see the

figure of a boy in the branches.

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Hurvin Anderson is the only man on

the short list. His parents are from

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Jamaica and he draws on his

Caribbean heritage in his work as

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well as his own life growing up in

Birmingham. This picture is called

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Izzy Tokyo to be black it is set in

a barbershop -- it is called Izzy

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Tokyo to be black -- is it okayed to

be black. You can see black figures

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like Martin Luther king and Muhammad

Ali. Sacha Craddock joins me. We

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have two distinct works, the

barbershop and the landscapes. What

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is his prime concern?

As a painter,

his concern is to paint what

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painters have headed for a long

time, the interior or the exterior.

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We deal with a barbershop and there

are portraits of famous people.

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Here, we get less of a

representation of famous people and

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here we get the space emptied out.

So there is not necessarily

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narrative here, but more a sense of

creating a place. The snippets that

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have been left are the only kind of

story. The rest is reflective glass

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which is more abstract, a real

stillness. But if we move over to

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the landscape, here we have two, one

more tropical. In the centre of the

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painting, you do not have someone

showing off and making something

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gorgeous. In a way, it is dull. But

what you do have is involvement from

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the outside going in with this

railway track leading through a

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loser is space. -- loser in space.

Perhaps this is an amalgamation of

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many places for Anderson, places he

might know or imagine. Not somewhere

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real, but an amalgamation, something

to take us somewhere else.

Sacha

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Craddock, more from you later. So

those are the first two artists

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short listed for the Turner Prize,

Hurvin Anderson and Andrea Buttner.

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Thanks, Rebecca. Let's mull over

some of that with Sarah and

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Alistair. Sarah, I would like to

pick up on what the Turner Prize is

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doing for Hull. In your previous

role, you were instrumental in

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getting the Turner Prize to Glasgow.

What does it do for a city when you

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get this prize out of London and to

different audiences?

It means a huge

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amount. In Glasgow, we could have

worked with any of the four artists

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that were short listed, but that way

of working and collaborating with

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Tate and the brand, the visibility

enables it to have this resonance

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that goes out to huge numbers of

people who would not normally

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consider coming into a gallery or an

art institution. So it democratises

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the sense that they can go in and

have an opinion. For me, one of the

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most important thing is that

diversity of the audience. They are

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encouraged to have different

opinions. They can like things or

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disagree with things. It gives the

centrestage to thinking about

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artists and their role in society

and culture.

Alistair, the head of

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Hull 2017 described this as a

serious short list for serious

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times. So I am struck that you felt

it was not political enough. But do

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you think that this is a more

serious year?

Certainly, all the

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artists on the short list are

considering politics and social

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concerns. But they are operating

within the canon of the art world or

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a world, and there are many art

world and many ways of working. It

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is bizarre to me in some ways that

the artists who are describing the

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issues of the world are not actively

buying to make things happen and

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change things. But they are all

making an attempt in one way or

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another.

Very interesting. Alistair

and Sarah, thank you. Let's hear

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more about the other two short

listed artists. Back to Rebecca.

The

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Turner Prize may have come to Hull

this year, but that inside this

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specially constructed cinema and you

are immediately transported to Gaza.

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This film is the work of Rosalind

Nashashibi. At the age of 44, she's

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the youngest artist on the short

list this year. She was born in

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Croydon, but her father is

Palestinian. Her film gives us a

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glimpse into daily life in Gaza. So

we see people eating, singing,

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children playing the streets. And

she merges documentary material that

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she has shot with stage scenarios.

The curator George Vasey is back

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with me. Why did Rosalind Nashashibi

want to make a film set in Gaza?

She

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was invited by the Imperial War

Museum a few years ago to go to

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Gaza. She made a film that wanted to

look at the effects of the political

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situation on the people of Gaza.

Every so often, the film looks into

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animation, why?

She had to leave

early because the Israeli

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bombardment and animation allowed

her to finish the film, but also

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articulate the sense of heightened

reality that she encountered.

Thank

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you for your time. This is one of

two film is being exhibited by

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Rosalind Nashashibi. The other is

set in Guatemala and explores the

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relationship between a mother and

daughter who live in a big house

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with a large, overgrown garden. And

they are both artists, and receive

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the daughter dragging the large

canvases through the foliage. I

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suppose both films taken together

give us an insight into two very

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different parts of the world. Let me

show you the work of the oldest

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artist on the short list, Lubaina

Hamid. She was born in Zanzibar, but

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now lives and works in Preston. Her

chief preoccupation as an artist is

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black identity and the

representation of the people in art.

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Look at this dinner service, which

she has painted over to tell the

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story of the abolition of slavery.

Here, the centrepiece of her

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exhibition is this large, theatrical

stage set, peopled by these large

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caricatures. You can see Margaret

Thatcher flirting with Ronald

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Reagan. And the whole scene is being

survey by this imposing black

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figure. The curator Sacha Craddock

is back with me. Lubaina Hamid is a

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very political artist. Talk us

through what she is trying to say

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and do here?

She is a truly

political artist. Here, she is

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making a two-dimensional painting by

Hogarth, Marriage a la Mode, which

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is a send-up of 18th-century court

life, into a three-dimensional

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stage. This was made in 1986, and as

you said, we have all these

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different characters. We have a

concentration of courtly folly of

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people of influence at any one time.

So we have all these different

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things. It is painted in a

perfunctory way. It is not as though

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Lubaina Hamid wants to say this is

valuable art, it is more that she

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wants to say something quickly. The

most important thing is the fact

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that people are changing place

within the painting. So instead of

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going from the black people being

servants, at the front we have this

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amazing young woman who looks as if

she has changed circumstances. She

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is reading philosophy and finding

out about her origin. She is

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representing what Lubaina Hamid

wanted to do, which is to represent

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young black women artists like

herself at the time.

So there you

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have it, and Lubaina Hamid. Before

that, Rosalind Nashashibi. You have

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now seen the work of all four

artists short listed for the prize.

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The question is, who will win?

And

that question will be answered in

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the next few minutes. We are

building up to the exciting part of

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the evening. The award will be

announced by Goldie. Let's hear

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first from Maria Balshaw, the

director of Tate.

Ladies and

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gentlemen, I am Maria Balshaw,

director of Tate. In a moment, I

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will be introducing our special

guest, Goldie MBE, to reduce the

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winner of this year's Turner Prize

-- to introduce the winner. A star

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musician and a huge advocate of

British creativity, Goldie is also a

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visual artist in his own right and a

massive champion of the role that

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artists play in the world. At Tate,

our mission is to promote public

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understanding and enjoyment of

British modern and contemporary art.

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We want as many people as possible

all around the UK to have

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opportunities to see and engage with

the greatest art of today. That's

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why every other year, the Turner

Prize is staged in a different city

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outside of London. Tonight, we are

in the gorgeous Hull Minster,

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celebrating the Turner Prize, which

has been hosted by Hull as their

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year as UK City of Culture. Huge

congratulations and thanks are due

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to the team at Hull 2017, the Ferens

Art Gallery and Hull City council

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for staging the exhibition, which

has engaged and inspired people of

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all ages across the city and those

visiting the capital of culture.

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There have been 90,000 visitors, we

have heard, already to the

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exhibition. We at Tate are hugely

proud of being part of making art

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part of the daily life of this fine

city and through this, shifting

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perceptions about Hull now and for

the future. To everyone watching at

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home, you have only until the 7th of

January to see the exhibition here

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at the Ferens Art Gallery. So come

if you haven't already. I would like

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to offer my sincere congratulations

to our four nominated artists,

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Hurvin Anderson, Andrea Buttner,

Lubaina Hamid and Rosalind

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Nashashibi. I would also like to

thank our chair of our jury, Alex

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Farquharson, director at Tate

Britain, and his jury colleagues.

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This year, we opened the prize up to

artists of all ages, recognising

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that artistic breakthrough and the

most exciting work made in any year

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can happen at any point in an

artistic career. The Turner Prize

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celebrates the best of British

contemporary art in all its

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diversity and variety. This year's

show is no exception, with painting,

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video, sculpture, ceramic,

installation and print all

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featuring. I think everyone that has

and will visit will find something

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that they love, something that

challenges them and something which

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makes them see the world in a

different way. As Hull said when we

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opened the Turner Prize here,

whatever you think, you are right.

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It now gives me great pleasure to

introduce Goldie to announce,

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finally, the winner of the Turner

Prize 2017.

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APPLAUSE.

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Good evening, ladies and gentlemen,

boys and girls. I'm really pleased

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to be here in Hull, because I was

here 20 years ago, partying and

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raving in dirty underground clubs.

And it's crazy to see how this city

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has developed. And especially in a

year where you guys have been given

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this cultural city award and great

things have been happening here ever

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since. For someone like myself who

is always surrounding myself in art,

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I have always had mentors who are

artists that gave me guidance. I was

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really chuffed when I was asked to

come here and be at the ceremony and

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to announce this year's winner of

that Turner Prize. I have been at

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the Ferens Art Gallery all

afternoon, looking at each of the

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artists' work thoroughly. It is one

of those things when you are looking

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at an artist's work, I get inspired.

And I think all of you who have been

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there and people who will be

visiting will be just as inspired.

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It's a strong line-up. The work is

very diverse. I think you are all

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winners, in my eyes. Art and artists

can offer a mirror of society. It

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can show us how fragile we are and

how strong we are also. And there is

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no right or wrong, it's about the

art. It is subjective and all of

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that. With all the confrontation we

are having in the world right now

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and the pressure of society, it's

good that this country is digging

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deep and the artists are going

further to reflect on their social

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views and political concerns in a

way which is really upfront. We need

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more art to do that, to challenge

perceptions. I have my own

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favourites, we all do. And you are

about to find out who is this year's

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Turner Prize winner. So... The

winner of this year's Turner Prize

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is Lubaina Hamid!

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Good evening. Thank you, panel.

First of all, that the people who

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have stopped me in the streets of

Preston and Hull to wish me luck,

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thank you, it worked. Thank you to

the teams at the harbour in

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Blackpool and Belmont and Longbridge

for taking such care. Thanks of

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course to the university of central

Lancashire for giving me enough rope

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to develop the making history is

visible project. I know dozens of

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strong, clever artists and curators,

mostly women, and have talked to one

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or other of them everyday. I them

dearly. Thank you to Matt Burchill

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for being amazing artists and clever

assistance and the kindest men I

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have ever known. Thank you to the

Hollybush gardens gallery for giving

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me both time and space. To the art

and cultural historians who cared

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enough to write essays about my work

for decades, thank you. You gave me

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sustenance in the wilderness years.

Thank you to Susan for never

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allowing me to give up or throw away

my work and to Patricia for helping

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us both. Thanks to my mother, for

letting me do what I wanted as a

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teenager as long as I came home by

10pm. I quickly learned to squeeze

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as much as possible in by 9.55.

Thank you to Richard bliss for

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helping me carry on. Finally, thank

you to artist and photographer

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Ingrid pollard for being a dear,

sweet friend, even though I love to

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show off and dance into the early

hours. Thank you.

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Lubaina Hamid, congratulations,

winner of the Turner Prize 2017. You

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are live on BBC News. What does this

mean?

It's amazing. It's a complete

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shock to me. I didn't predict it.

You sounded very composed. I'm not

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sure I believe you are shocked.

I am

shocked.

I am very struck that you

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thanked, as you put it, those who

supported you in what you called

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wilderness years. I was talking to

someone involved in the prize

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earlier today who said he felt it

was time to recognise people who had

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been overlooked for a long time. Is

that how this feels to you?

Well, I

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was overlooked by critics and press,

but I was never overlooked by art

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historians or curators or other

artists. So it's like being in the

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public eye, yes but people have

helped me develop my work and I was

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never overlooked.

You tell stories

and you talk about needing to tell

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stories that aren't told enough or

not ever told. That is a key theme

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of your work. I am struck by that

because it seems that you have been

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exploring that seem very fruitfully

for decades. Is this the art

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establishment only just catching up

with you?

Some of the art

0:24:050:24:10

establishment are catching up, yes.

The time is sometimes right for

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something. Do you know what I mean?

Yeah. And going forward, does this

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affect your work? You are a

Professor of contemporary art as

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well. Does it affect what you say to

your students?

They might take more

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notice of me, I guess, when I walk

in a room! It is like when people

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win the lottery, they say it won't

make any difference. It will not

0:24:400:24:44

make a difference to the kind of

work I make, but it will make a

0:24:440:24:48

difference to the people who have

supported me all these years. It

0:24:480:24:53

sounds like a cliche, but I have won

it for them.

Lubaina Hamid,

0:24:530:25:00

congratulations. Turner Prize winner

of 2017. I will let you get back to

0:25:000:25:05

your friends and family. Enjoy your

celebrations. So that is Lubaina

0:25:050:25:11

Hamid, the winner of the Turner

Prize 2017. Ceremony row and

0:25:110:25:16

Alistair Hudson were talking to me

earlier. -- Sarah Munro and Alistair

0:25:160:25:20

Hudson. It seems invidious to ask

whether that was the right choice,

0:25:200:25:26

but I have to.

We are delighted. We

are doing a show, and we are

0:25:260:25:35

absolutely thrilled.

This is an

artist whose work, let's be honest,

0:25:350:25:45

a group of 1980s black artists in

Britain, their story was not told

0:25:450:25:48

and it was not possible in that era.

Now in this year, with shows around

0:25:480:25:57

Britain where it is now current,

this question around the 80s and

0:25:570:26:03

where we have got to its hugely

current.

But I am struck by that in

0:26:030:26:08

the sense that there will be people

watching this who say, isn't the

0:26:080:26:12

Turner Prize meant to be about work

in the previous year? Is this now

0:26:120:26:18

about looking further back?

It is

about this year now. Lubaina has

0:26:180:26:25

shown her work across Britain in the

'80s black art show in

0:26:250:26:30

Middlesbrough. She has had a solo

show. Only this year as she had

0:26:300:26:35

gallery representation. This is a

black artist in Britain who has been

0:26:350:26:38

working for over 30 years who has

only just had gallery

0:26:380:26:42

representation. It is a significant

moment and one in which a lot of

0:26:420:26:46

balances have been redressed. So

this is about this year now, not 30

0:26:460:26:50

years ago.

Does that then influenced

artists working in Britain today,

0:26:500:26:57

and what does it do for the viewing

public, those of us who want to see

0:26:570:27:01

this work?

Artists make work over a

long time and a small number of

0:27:010:27:06

those rights and get that moment.

This is about institutions taking

0:27:060:27:10

responsibility and being much more

aware of those who are in and out,

0:27:100:27:16

about exclusion and inclusion. She

is also making great work now. All

0:27:160:27:24

will be exciting for Lubaina now is

to be, in a way, Floyd, and moving

0:27:240:27:32

onto the next -- she is freed. I'm

excited to see where this goes for

0:27:320:27:36

her now.

A very exciting year.

Alistair and Sarah, lovely that you

0:27:360:27:43

could be with us for our special

coverage of the Turner Prize 2017.

0:27:430:27:50

You can see the work of Lubaina

Hamid and all the short listed

0:27:500:27:53

artists, of course, at the Ferens

Art Gallery here in Hull. It is

0:27:530:27:59

available to see until the 7th of

January. We leave you on our special

0:27:590:28:04

coverage with the work of this

year's winner, Lubaina Hamid.

0:28:040:28:08

A special live programme as the prestigious Turner Prize for contemporary art is awarded in a ceremony hosted by Britain's City of Culture, Hull. Jane Hill and Rebecca Jones present from Hull Minster and the Ferens Art Gallery.