Episode 6 Crime and Punishment


Episode 6

A look at crime and punishment in modern Britain. Louise Minchin and Gethin Jones chart the changes in crime, criminals, police and prisons over the last 60 years.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Episode 6. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Today on Crime And Punishment,

0:00:020:00:03

a fatal stabbing in Birmingham caught on camera.

0:00:030:00:06

I just lifted the t-shirt and I could see the blood was pouring down.

0:00:060:00:10

And drugs behind bars.

0:00:100:00:13

Here at Bristol Prison, they're clamping down on an age-old problem.

0:00:130:00:17

Hello and welcome to Crime And Punishment.

0:00:340:00:38

The way police catch criminals today has changed dramatically

0:00:380:00:41

since the Queen came to the throne 60 years ago.

0:00:410:00:44

Back then, a crime with no witnesses and no forensic evidence

0:00:440:00:48

often went unsolved.

0:00:480:00:50

But that's not the case today - as we're about to see in a film

0:00:500:00:53

that tells the story of the shocking murder of 19-year-old Jay Sudra.

0:00:530:00:59

This is the actual CCTV footage that was taken just moments before

0:01:010:01:06

21-year-old Jay Sudra lost his life.

0:01:060:01:08

Jay is taking his last steps.

0:01:110:01:14

20 seconds later, he was attacked with a knife.

0:01:140:01:17

The youth in the white t-shirt is following him,

0:01:170:01:19

intent on violence.

0:01:190:01:21

Within seconds, Jay has been fatally stabbed in the chest.

0:01:210:01:24

This is Jay's story

0:01:260:01:27

and the story of how his killer was brought to justice

0:01:270:01:30

using technology that would not have been available 60 years ago.

0:01:300:01:34

At his 18th birthday celebrations with his family,

0:01:420:01:45

Jay had everything to look forward to, enjoying his music

0:01:450:01:48

and planning to study design at university.

0:01:480:01:51

Happy birthday, Jay. Cheers!

0:01:510:01:53

A perfect son. But the following year proved tragic.

0:01:550:02:00

Just three months later, his father died.

0:02:000:02:03

At 18, Jay became the bedrock of his family.

0:02:030:02:06

Jay was a lovely son.

0:02:090:02:11

A very caring brother and a very caring uncle as well.

0:02:120:02:19

He would do anything for anybody. He was good. He was a lovely kid.

0:02:200:02:26

And, as if their father's death wasn't enough to cope with,

0:02:270:02:31

soon after, his sister Sonya

0:02:310:02:33

lost her own 37-year-old husband to cancer.

0:02:330:02:36

Jay became a father figure to her two young children.

0:02:360:02:40

You don't expect your little brother to be taken away from you

0:02:400:02:44

so soon, especially the way he was taken.

0:02:440:02:47

Every day is difficult and people say it gets easier,

0:02:480:02:52

but I think it gets harder.

0:02:520:02:54

It's when you walk into this house.

0:02:570:02:59

Even if he's not in the particular room that you walk into,

0:02:590:03:04

you know he is either upstairs, he's doing something,

0:03:040:03:08

just coming into the gates, the front of the house, you know?

0:03:080:03:11

He's not there any more, and you just miss him all the time.

0:03:110:03:14

There are certain times when he just pops into your head,

0:03:140:03:18

you'll hear a song or somebody will look like him, dress like him.

0:03:180:03:22

It's just constant, just miss him constantly.

0:03:230:03:26

For Varsha, Jay's last night began as usual.

0:03:340:03:39

I was in the kitchen because he told me

0:03:390:03:41

to go cook him a few things which he liked.

0:03:410:03:44

After 20 past, I heard the bell.

0:03:440:03:48

So I said, "Oh, that's Jay, I'd better hurry up and open the door."

0:03:480:03:52

As I went there, near the door, it was him

0:03:540:03:57

and I heard as if he was in pain or something.

0:03:570:04:00

I thought, "God, why is he making that noise?"

0:04:000:04:04

But then I opened the door and he could hardly say anything to me.

0:04:060:04:10

He was just... I was shocked as well, and he just stood there.

0:04:100:04:15

I said, "What's happened to you?"

0:04:150:04:18

At this stage, Varsha had no idea how seriously hurt her son was,

0:04:190:04:23

but her screams alerted neighbours.

0:04:230:04:25

They didn't know what had happened to him.

0:04:440:04:47

Although Jay had managed to get himself home,

0:04:470:04:50

he was fatally injured.

0:04:500:04:51

I just lifted the t-shirt and I could see the blood pouring down.

0:04:510:04:55

So we said, "Jay, Jay, don't go to sleep.

0:04:590:05:04

"Just wake up, keep waking up, the ambulance people will be coming.

0:05:040:05:09

"And they'll help you."

0:05:090:05:10

But I think while he was in my arms, he actually died.

0:05:130:05:18

Jay had died from a single stab wound to the heart.

0:05:210:05:24

It was the start of a major murder investigation.

0:05:240:05:29

Detective Inspector Paul Joyce was in charge.

0:05:290:05:32

We have what we call the golden hours,

0:05:320:05:35

which is a period of time when we really need to focus very closely

0:05:350:05:40

on what is likely to take us in the right direction

0:05:400:05:43

in terms of, is it CCTV evidence?

0:05:430:05:48

Is it fast-track actions around forensics admissions?

0:05:480:05:51

Will it be house enquiries, will that lead us to potential offenders?

0:05:510:05:55

So really it has been focused in the early stages on exactly that.

0:05:550:05:59

When we initially attended the scene,

0:06:020:06:04

hundreds of metres of ground had been taped off

0:06:040:06:07

and was being guarded by police officers at the time.

0:06:070:06:10

The reason for that is to keep the scene area

0:06:100:06:13

as sterile as possible and uncontaminated.

0:06:130:06:16

So any forensics seizures are uncontaminated

0:06:160:06:19

and worth more evidentially.

0:06:190:06:22

What we also do in terms of the traditional policing tactics

0:06:220:06:24

is stuff we've always done - we look for witnesses.

0:06:240:06:27

We knock on doors and we speak to people,

0:06:270:06:29

we speak to the media and we ask them to help us.

0:06:290:06:32

But there were no obvious leads.

0:06:340:06:36

There were no eyewitnesses to this crime,

0:06:360:06:39

there wasn't anybody anywhere who had seen the incident take place.

0:06:390:06:44

And what we know now is that it was an extremely quick incident,

0:06:440:06:47

it was over within a matter of seconds.

0:06:470:06:50

So the challenges were nobody had seen or heard anything,

0:06:500:06:53

there were no known motives at that time.

0:06:530:06:55

More from Paul Joyce and his team later,

0:06:570:07:00

as they make what could be a crucial breakthrough

0:07:000:07:02

in the hunt for Jay's killer.

0:07:020:07:05

Bristol Prison, like many others,

0:07:070:07:09

is working hard to break the cycle of drug addiction and crime.

0:07:090:07:13

A high proportion of all prisoners

0:07:130:07:15

have committed drug-related offences.

0:07:150:07:18

But breaking the habit, inside or out, is never easy.

0:07:180:07:21

The percentage of offenders who turn up at Bristol Prison's gates

0:07:260:07:29

with a drug or alcohol addiction is staggering.

0:07:290:07:33

A prison like this will receive around 2,500 new prisoners a year,

0:07:330:07:39

and from that 2,500,

0:07:390:07:42

over half will need some sort of service in substance misuse.

0:07:420:07:46

We have had to up our game in terms of treatment and support

0:07:460:07:50

and how we actually tackle something that is causing such

0:07:500:07:52

a massive impact on communities.

0:07:520:07:54

They came up with IDTS,

0:07:560:07:57

the Integrated Drug Treatment Scheme, also known as Drug Services.

0:07:570:08:02

It's a new approach designed to rehabilitate prisoners off drugs,

0:08:020:08:06

which in turn reduces crime.

0:08:060:08:07

And it works. It works well.

0:08:070:08:10

Drug-related crime in Bristol is now down by up to 40%

0:08:100:08:15

and it's believed the scheme has played a massive part in the reduction.

0:08:150:08:18

We will endeavour to treat

0:08:180:08:20

and interact with everybody who comes in with a substance issue.

0:08:200:08:24

Lee was using hard drugs and prison had been a familiar place for him.

0:08:240:08:29

But this time he has been on the IDTS scheme.

0:08:290:08:31

If I can go out, get myself a job

0:08:310:08:34

where I have to get up at 6 in the morning, go to work -

0:08:340:08:38

I like building, you see - go to work all day,

0:08:380:08:41

six till four, come home and have some tea,

0:08:410:08:43

have mess around with my little boy

0:08:430:08:44

and then I'm just going to want to go to bed.

0:08:440:08:46

I won't have time to go out with...

0:08:460:08:48

I don't call them my mates, I call them associates,

0:08:480:08:51

the people I was hanging out with before.

0:08:510:08:53

I've got to cut them loose.

0:08:530:08:55

Lee arrived here just five months ago with the type of story

0:08:550:08:58

the staff are used to hearing.

0:08:580:09:01

There's my mum, my dad, four sisters, two brothers,

0:09:010:09:04

so that makes seven of us.

0:09:040:09:05

We had a good upbringing, really.

0:09:050:09:07

Up until I was 14, 15, and then I was causing so much trouble at home

0:09:080:09:13

and there were so many of us that I was put into care.

0:09:130:09:17

I got myself kicked out of school at 16 and it just led to drugs,

0:09:170:09:24

crime, police stations, prison.

0:09:240:09:26

What I know now, if I knew it then, I would lead a totally different life.

0:09:260:09:33

So, how does drug services help people like Lee

0:09:350:09:38

turn their life around?

0:09:380:09:40

They have a whole wing of the prison to themselves, C Wing.

0:09:400:09:43

As well as prison staff, there are doctors, nurses, councillors

0:09:430:09:47

and detox experts,

0:09:470:09:48

who all work to target the care efficiently under one roof.

0:09:480:09:53

After an initial assessment, they are taken up to C3's landing,

0:09:530:09:56

also called the stabilisation unit.

0:09:560:10:00

We house them on these wings here.

0:10:010:10:04

They come in overnight, they may well have been to court last night,

0:10:040:10:07

they may have been using illicit drugs on the streets

0:10:070:10:10

yesterday, so when they come here they are usually very confused,

0:10:100:10:14

mixed up, unstable, sometimes really difficult to talk to.

0:10:140:10:18

Staff remain vigilant for any signs of violence or suicide,

0:10:180:10:22

and may prescribe medication to help with the prisoner's detox.

0:10:220:10:26

-Are you feeling OK? Are you OK?

-Yeah.

0:10:260:10:30

Bit by bit over the next few days new arrivals are enticed to

0:10:300:10:35

join in with the other prisoners on rehabilitation programs.

0:10:350:10:38

We're going to try to entice them out of their cell into groups

0:10:380:10:40

where they will meet other guys and feel better for being out

0:10:400:10:43

of their cell, and engage with us in a positive way.

0:10:430:10:45

The length of time it takes a prisoner to stabilise

0:10:450:10:48

can vary a great deal.

0:10:480:10:50

You'd have thought that the harder the drug, the longer it would take,

0:10:500:10:53

but it's surprising which addiction proves the most difficult.

0:10:530:10:57

The hardest challenge my staff have is stabilising people who

0:10:570:11:00

have alcohol abuse.

0:11:000:11:01

We would expect the stabilisation of somebody on alcohol to run

0:11:010:11:04

from anywhere up to three to four weeks,

0:11:040:11:06

whereas stabilisation of most other drugs we expect an average

0:11:060:11:09

of 5 to 10 days before they progress to the rest of the unit.

0:11:090:11:11

The prisoners' detox is one thing, but to keep them from spiralling

0:11:110:11:16

back into drug use once they're released, takes a lot more work.

0:11:160:11:20

A little later,

0:11:200:11:21

we'll see the next stage in the battle to fight drug addiction.

0:11:210:11:25

Keeping drugs out of prison and off the streets is a huge challenge.

0:11:280:11:32

One of the best detectors of illicit drugs is a dog's nose.

0:11:320:11:36

Sniffer dogs, introduced in the 1970s, have been a huge success.

0:11:360:11:41

So who breeds and trains them?

0:11:410:11:42

Dogs destined for a life in the police used to be donated

0:11:420:11:47

by the public, or were provided by rescue centres

0:11:470:11:49

like Battersea Dogs' Home.

0:11:490:11:51

Now, some police forces like the West Midlands are breeding

0:11:510:11:54

their own specialist dogs.

0:11:540:11:56

We couldn't rely on the temperament of any of the dogs

0:12:020:12:04

when we were getting donation dogs.

0:12:040:12:06

We wanted certain characteristics that we breed for now.

0:12:060:12:09

And you've got some dogs out here, tell me who you've got.

0:12:090:12:12

You've got Jet, he is 30 months old,

0:12:120:12:15

German Shepherd from Czechoslovakian bloodlines.

0:12:150:12:18

We've got Russell, the rottweiler.

0:12:180:12:20

-He's yours.

-He is living with me currently at the moment.

0:12:200:12:23

May is an 11-month-old, a German Shepherd,

0:12:230:12:26

and on the end is Pippa, who is six and a half months.

0:12:260:12:29

And these are quite a way through their training,

0:12:290:12:32

because you start pretty much as soon as they're born.

0:12:320:12:34

Straight away we look at socialisation with the dogs,

0:12:340:12:36

getting them confident with people, with different environments

0:12:360:12:40

and surroundings, and starting basic play work with little rags

0:12:400:12:43

and balls on a rope, just getting the dogs to respond to you.

0:12:430:12:46

-Clever puppy!

-OK, so it starts right at the beginning.

0:12:460:12:50

Do you want to show me how it's done?

0:12:500:12:52

Yes, I'll show you a toy first and then we'll work on the sleeves.

0:12:520:12:56

Initially, we were getting Jet to bark for this pillow.

0:12:560:12:59

Once he's barking and settling, and not interfering with me,

0:12:590:13:02

we reward him with a bite on the pillow.

0:13:020:13:04

If you're standing still, a police dog's not allowed to bite you.

0:13:040:13:07

And for people at home, they are barking because they can see

0:13:070:13:10

all the equipment, and that's what they are trained for.

0:13:100:13:12

They're barking at us as people working, and the equipment as well.

0:13:120:13:16

-This is a big game, it's lots of fun.

-Go on, then, you play the game.

0:13:160:13:21

Speak, speak, speak, speak, speak, speak. Hold.

0:13:220:13:25

All we do, we want a firm bite on there.

0:13:280:13:31

No movement, just patting him, letting him win it.

0:13:310:13:34

He's working that, bit of tension, then we let him win it and run round.

0:13:340:13:39

Brilliant, he's had the pillow, been rewarded for it.

0:13:410:13:45

The next one, this is what would happen in real life.

0:13:450:13:48

Initially, with a young dog, we do it off the arm.

0:13:490:13:52

Because he's already on the sleeve,

0:13:520:13:54

I'll get him settled from barking again, and when I move,

0:13:540:13:58

he will bark, and as soon as I move, he'll attach himself to the sleeve.

0:13:580:14:04

So we'll get him settled again.

0:14:040:14:07

Speak, speak, speak, speak, speak, speak, speak. Hey!

0:14:100:14:13

And again, he's holding really steady.

0:14:160:14:19

Would that go through somebody's sleeve if you didn't have that on?

0:14:190:14:22

Yes, definitely.

0:14:220:14:23

Unfortunately. We don't want the dogs to create any damage,

0:14:250:14:28

we just want to detain a person.

0:14:280:14:30

-But damage presumably does happen.

-It does happen occasionally.

0:14:300:14:33

And they are trained to go for arms, not other parts.

0:14:330:14:36

They will go for other parts later on, but it's what's on offer.

0:14:360:14:39

Sometimes people kick out at the dogs,

0:14:390:14:41

so we get our dogs used to leg movement around them -

0:14:410:14:44

hand movement, if somebody was going to strike the dog,

0:14:440:14:47

they would fix on the arm.

0:14:470:14:49

That is amazing. There he goes. Well done, Jet.

0:14:490:14:53

Obviously, they can be quite terrifying. They're scaring me.

0:14:530:14:56

They are all police dogs and they have got a job to do,

0:14:560:15:00

but we breed... The main thing is social ability in our dogs.

0:15:000:15:03

The majority of them are very sociable.

0:15:030:15:05

OK, I know they want to go and play and work with you,

0:15:050:15:08

so I'm going to leave you and I'm going to walk to a safe distance!

0:15:080:15:11

-And Russell, goodbye. He's your favourite, isn't he?

-He is at the moment. Thank you.

0:15:110:15:15

19-year-old Jay Sudra was murdered just yards from home.

0:15:170:15:22

As we've seen, a CCTV camera recorded the horrific crime,

0:15:220:15:25

but the image of the perpetrator was too blurred to make a positive ID.

0:15:250:15:29

But thanks to 21st-century technology,

0:15:290:15:31

Paul Joyce and his team are beginning to close in on the killer.

0:15:310:15:36

As lead detective on the Jay Sudra murder,

0:15:390:15:41

Paul Joyce's first job was to piece together his last walk home.

0:15:410:15:46

He'd been to work on that evening.

0:15:460:15:48

In fact, it was his first late shift he'd ever done.

0:15:480:15:52

It was a nice summer's evening,

0:15:520:15:54

he was dressed in a casual shirt uniform for the shop where he worked.

0:15:540:15:58

He was using public transport at the time.

0:15:580:16:00

This is the station where he got off the train after his night at work.

0:16:020:16:06

He only had a journey of about 15 minutes to walk in this direction.

0:16:060:16:10

Somewhere in those 15 minutes, his attacker struck,

0:16:100:16:13

but they have no clues as to why.

0:16:130:16:16

Traditional forensics, which would have been all they had

0:16:160:16:19

60 years ago, revealed virtually nothing.

0:16:190:16:21

There were forensics submissions like nails scrapings,

0:16:230:16:26

like the deceased's clothing, and following the search

0:16:260:16:29

we actually recovered a knife we believe to be the murder weapon

0:16:290:16:33

from a drain. Again, they were all forensically tested

0:16:330:16:36

and not found to be of any use to the investigation.

0:16:360:16:40

Potentially, the loss of blood from the deceased may have

0:16:420:16:45

contaminated other key evidence like DNA, like fingerprints.

0:16:450:16:48

We will never know if that is the case.

0:16:480:16:51

But the investigators did have one stroke of luck,

0:16:510:16:54

and it was to prove crucial.

0:16:540:16:56

It was really clear to me that early on in this investigation

0:16:590:17:02

it would be based around CCTV evidence.

0:17:020:17:05

We were extremely fortunate in the very early stages to find

0:17:050:17:09

some CCTV that showed us part of the incident,

0:17:090:17:12

showed us the victim being followed by his attacker, and this was

0:17:120:17:16

from both commercial CCTV and some CCTV from a residential premises.

0:17:160:17:21

Jay was 150 metres away from home listening to music,

0:17:230:17:27

oblivious to the man behind him.

0:17:270:17:28

The footage shows the man speed up, he covers his face and moves in.

0:17:280:17:33

The initial CCTV that showed us

0:17:340:17:36

the attacker wasn't enough to facially identify the perpetrator.

0:17:360:17:41

However, what it did show was the attacker was male,

0:17:410:17:44

it also showed us what he was wearing,

0:17:440:17:47

and, in this instance, he had a distinctive T-shirt on

0:17:470:17:50

which showed different colouring on the sleeve and shoulder.

0:17:500:17:54

Clearly, that for us was quite significant.

0:17:540:17:57

The police set about widening their search.

0:18:000:18:02

The next decision was to devise a strategy around recovering

0:18:020:18:06

further CCTV in the whole area of Erdington, and specifically

0:18:060:18:10

around potential escape routes.

0:18:100:18:12

That's exactly what we did.

0:18:120:18:14

We looked at a certain radius

0:18:140:18:16

and recovered all CCTV within that radius.

0:18:160:18:19

In fact, we recovered in excess of 45 separate CCTV sites

0:18:190:18:24

in the days leading from that.

0:18:240:18:26

They were looking for more images of the man they had seen following Jay,

0:18:260:18:30

and they had to establish a timeline for his movements.

0:18:300:18:34

During the course of the investigation,

0:18:340:18:36

we recovered thousands of hours of CCTV.

0:18:360:18:39

We have to make some very strict decisions around what we're

0:18:390:18:43

going to view, how long for and exactly what

0:18:430:18:45

we are trying to identify from that viewing.

0:18:450:18:48

Eventually, they were able to trace this man's movements

0:18:480:18:51

on the fatal night.

0:18:510:18:52

He was picked up on camera at a fast-food restaurant with friends.

0:18:520:18:56

The next click I move on to will show the same group of people

0:18:560:19:00

leaving the fast-food restaurant, and here they are just here.

0:19:000:19:04

There is our offender there,

0:19:040:19:06

again drawing the attention to the dark sleeves.

0:19:060:19:09

I'm moving on now to the point where our offender

0:19:100:19:14

has walked down the high street. This is him now with an associate,

0:19:140:19:17

and he is about to stand at this bus stop and wait for the bus

0:19:170:19:20

to arrive, which is the 11A bus which takes him towards home.

0:19:200:19:23

What this next clip shows is our man getting onto the bus,

0:19:250:19:29

and you see him quite distinctively, you can recognise him facially,

0:19:290:19:33

and he takes a seat at the back of the bus.

0:19:330:19:35

This next clip is extremely important.

0:19:350:19:38

What this shows us is our offender is sat here,

0:19:380:19:42

he is having some dialogue with another male on the bus,

0:19:420:19:46

and it's very relevant now that you can see the dark under the arms,

0:19:460:19:50

the distinctive logo here,

0:19:500:19:51

and the pattern of walking is extremely unique, really.

0:19:510:19:55

They also enlisted the help of an image analyst

0:19:550:19:58

to match up the clearer pictures with the blurred pictures

0:19:580:20:01

of the man they had seen accosting Jay.

0:20:010:20:04

The sole purpose of the exercise is to conduct a comparison which

0:20:040:20:08

allows me to provide a level of support for the fact that

0:20:080:20:14

person on the bus, who is accepted to be the suspect,

0:20:140:20:18

is indeed the person that actually attacked the victim.

0:20:180:20:22

Clive focused on the t-shirt the attacker was wearing.

0:20:220:20:26

Colour is always difficult when we're looking at CCTV footage,

0:20:260:20:29

purely because of the way an individual's eyes

0:20:290:20:32

can interpret colour differently,

0:20:320:20:35

and that TV systems can be setup to display different colours.

0:20:350:20:38

So we frequently revert to grey scales

0:20:380:20:41

and talk about tone rather than colour.

0:20:410:20:43

Man A, the offender,

0:20:450:20:47

was clearly wearing a t-shirt with short sleeves.

0:20:470:20:51

The yellow arrow depicts the dark sleeves and the red arrow

0:20:510:20:57

depicts an area of darker tone in the centre of the chest.

0:20:570:21:01

When we compare that with Man B, our suspect, you can clearly see

0:21:010:21:06

there is a similarity in the form of the shirt as well as

0:21:060:21:11

the dark tone of the sleeves and the feature of the logo on the chest.

0:21:110:21:15

The CCTV footage had more secrets to reveal. Bit by bit,

0:21:160:21:20

Clive pieced together all the evidence that linked

0:21:200:21:24

the man on the bus with the man who attacked Jay.

0:21:240:21:27

We'll return to discover how

0:21:270:21:29

the attacker's distinctive way of walking

0:21:290:21:31

provided another vital clue in the investigation.

0:21:310:21:34

It's horrific enough to be the victim of a crime, but to have to

0:21:350:21:39

then go and point out your attacker only adds to the stress and upset.

0:21:390:21:44

Once, the only option was an identity parade like this one.

0:21:440:21:48

-Number six.

-Number six is the one, did you hear that?

0:21:480:21:51

But now, there's a high tech alternative.

0:21:510:21:54

Hi, Frank. Nice to see you. Now, if I was a suspect coming in here,

0:21:540:21:59

what's the procedure? What would you be doing with me?

0:21:590:22:02

First thing, sort the paperwork out. Make sure it all agrees.

0:22:020:22:05

Next, offer you an alternative top.

0:22:050:22:09

-Why?

-It's compulsory,

0:22:090:22:11

because you may have something on which was used in the crime scene.

0:22:110:22:14

So I've got to offer you something that isn't.

0:22:140:22:16

You have a little wardrobe in here! There are glasses in here too.

0:22:160:22:22

So would I be able to put these on?

0:22:220:22:24

Only if you were normally wearing them.

0:22:240:22:27

So, just to make that clear, if I wasn't wearing

0:22:270:22:29

a pair of glasses, I couldn't put a pair of glasses on for the picture.

0:22:290:22:33

-I wouldn't suggest that.

-What if I had a tattoo?

0:22:330:22:35

We would try and do it here,

0:22:350:22:38

but probably it would be done with technical bits at the house.

0:22:380:22:41

OK so I might be taken up.

0:22:410:22:43

So, have I got anything distinctive on me or would I just be OK?

0:22:430:22:46

-No, you're fine.

-What do I do then?

-Just take a seat over there.

0:22:460:22:51

Usually the holiday snaps, but slightly different!

0:22:510:22:55

Just slightly different.

0:22:550:22:56

AUTOMATED VOICE: Please press the button,

0:22:560:22:59

then prepare to hear the instructions.

0:22:590:23:01

-Look to the right now. Look to the front now.

-OK.

0:23:010:23:08

So that's the end of the procedure for me,

0:23:080:23:10

there is my picture, what happens to it now?

0:23:100:23:12

That goes straight to the house.

0:23:120:23:14

I'm here with Paul - Paul, what's your role?

0:23:150:23:18

My role is to compile identification parades for West Midlands Police.

0:23:180:23:22

-Which is exactly what you've done for me today.

-It is.

0:23:220:23:26

How have you gone about that?

0:23:260:23:28

We've received your image, I then put your details into a search criteria,

0:23:280:23:33

where I put your age, your hair colour, your build.

0:23:330:23:37

That then brings back matches which are similar.

0:23:370:23:39

-What sort of search is it?

-It's a national database that we use here.

0:23:390:23:45

-It's brought back 667 matches.

-667 people look like me in Britain?

0:23:450:23:50

-They do.

-Who are they? Who are these people?

0:23:500:23:52

These are all volunteers and they are on the national database.

0:23:520:23:56

So there would be a line-up of nine for a witness.

0:23:560:23:59

-This is very different to the old system, isn't it?

-It is, yes.

0:23:590:24:02

The old system was a lot like live identification parades

0:24:020:24:06

where the witness would go and see a lineup

0:24:060:24:09

and there would be confrontation, maybe, with the suspect.

0:24:090:24:12

Here, the witness is going to a private room, seeing each

0:24:120:24:15

individual video and they can view the video as many times as they want.

0:24:150:24:19

-So there's a lot less pressure on the witness.

-Definitely, yes.

0:24:190:24:23

And they're far more relaxed to be able to focus on the nine.

0:24:230:24:26

And they're not faced with the person who may have committed the crime.

0:24:260:24:30

So how quickly can you put this together?

0:24:300:24:32

We can only turn a parade around within one hour from first receiving the image.

0:24:320:24:36

-Have you got my video there?

-I have. Shall we have a look?

0:24:360:24:39

So, a witness would see this and then eight other videos.

0:24:390:24:42

That's correct.

0:24:420:24:44

Thanks, Paul.

0:24:440:24:46

We're going to meet three men, all police officers from the same family

0:24:500:24:54

with a joint experience that spans nearly 100 years.

0:24:540:24:57

There's Arthur, who joined the Metropolitan Police in 1913,

0:24:570:25:01

his grandson, Bill, who joined Staffordshire Police in 1963, and

0:25:010:25:06

great-grandson James, who currently serves with West Midlands Police.

0:25:060:25:10

This film starts with the words of PC Arthur Holland in 1913.

0:25:100:25:14

"Well, I must tell you I am now a policeman, and what a fine chap, too!

0:25:160:25:21

"Fancy me in uniform!

0:25:210:25:23

"I'll get my mug sketched the first opportunity I get,

0:25:230:25:26

"and then you'll see for yourself."

0:25:260:25:28

A mug sketch, is that a photo? A photograph?

0:25:280:25:31

You've got that old photograph of him, haven't you?

0:25:310:25:34

That could well be the photograph he's referring to in his letters.

0:25:340:25:39

That's right.

0:25:390:25:41

It was 1913 when PC Arthur Holland

0:25:410:25:43

had his mug sketched for the family to see.

0:25:430:25:46

Nearly one century on, his grandson, a former policeman,

0:25:460:25:49

and great-grandson, a serving policeman,

0:25:490:25:52

are reliving his experience.

0:25:520:25:54

Back then, unmarried police officers lived in lodgings.

0:25:540:25:57

"I am now in lodgings, and I tell you they are lodgings, too!

0:25:570:26:01

"I'm with four of my pals from Peel house as well as three more,

0:26:010:26:06

"so there's a happy family."

0:26:060:26:08

Even when Bill joined the force in 1963,

0:26:080:26:11

young recruits lived in lodgings.

0:26:110:26:13

Whereabouts were your lodgings, Dad?

0:26:130:26:16

Well, my first lodgings were in a multi-storey block of flats.

0:26:160:26:21

I can remember one day when I was on nights my bedroom door opened,

0:26:210:26:25

and my landlady brought in a load of ladies from the house

0:26:250:26:29

to look at the policeman in bed!

0:26:290:26:32

Bill and James began their police careers

0:26:350:26:37

not in London like Arthur but in an old mining town near Birmingham.

0:26:370:26:42

Today, they are pounding the same streets again.

0:26:420:26:44

Years ago, I can remember walking along here with my truncheon

0:26:440:26:51

strap hanging down, and the superintendent was driving past

0:26:510:26:56

and stopped and said it looked too aggressive

0:26:560:26:59

to have your truncheon strap hanging down, you shouldn't do it.

0:26:590:27:04

-Right.

-So what they'd make of it now when you have

0:27:040:27:08

stab vests and all the equipment you carry!

0:27:080:27:10

Bill started in the force in the early '60s.

0:27:100:27:13

Nearly 50 years on, it's a world away from the policing Jim does now.

0:27:130:27:17

I think there's certain parts of the job which are quite

0:27:190:27:23

similar in respect to upholding the law, arresting people,

0:27:230:27:27

doing general police duties.

0:27:270:27:30

But I think that in modern times there are certain aspects

0:27:320:27:35

which he'd have great difficulty coming to terms with, really.

0:27:350:27:39

ASBOs, for a start - unheard-of in the '60s.

0:27:390:27:42

Now, Anti-Social Behaviour Orders

0:27:420:27:45

are an everyday part of modern language and life.

0:27:450:27:48

We are en route to a lady who has reported some antisocial behaviour

0:27:500:27:55

inside a block of flats.

0:27:550:27:56

It got so bad that we secured two antisocial behaviour

0:27:580:28:04

injunctions taking out against the resident of the block of flats

0:28:040:28:07

and his former partner.

0:28:070:28:11

Both of them create an absolute misery for the other residents

0:28:110:28:16

who live in the block of flats. Hello, it's Jim. You all right?

0:28:160:28:21

Ultimately, we want him out the block of flats, don't we?

0:28:210:28:26

That will be that.

0:28:260:28:28

If he's not a resident here, that's the problem solved, isn't it?

0:28:280:28:31

In his day, Bill did some things that would never happen now.

0:28:310:28:34

When my dad was in service, he was chasing an armed criminal

0:28:340:28:38

up the motorway with a hostage and a bundle of cash and a firearm.

0:28:380:28:42

He was unarmed with his colleague on the traffic department.

0:28:420:28:47

In this modern day and age, that certainly wouldn't happen.

0:28:470:28:51

And for Arthur, cars weren't for chasing, they were for dodging.

0:28:510:28:55

"There's a lot to see in the streets, plenty of life and traffic -

0:28:550:29:00

"too much at times, especially when you want to cross the road."

0:29:000:29:04

Little did Arthur know that in the early '70s,

0:29:050:29:07

his grandson would work on the traffic division

0:29:070:29:11

and drive the first car over the world famous Spaghetti Junction.

0:29:110:29:14

REPORTER: 'You can see why they call it Spaghetti Junction.

0:29:200:29:23

'The engineers point out that, unlike a plate of spaghetti,

0:29:230:29:27

'it stands up and is highly planned.'

0:29:270:29:29

I declare this motorway open!

0:29:290:29:32

'We were the first vehicle over the junction.

0:29:340:29:38

'But there was a lot of national interest on it,

0:29:390:29:42

'so to be first over that was quite an experience.'

0:29:420:29:46

If they know where they're going, if they drive according

0:29:460:29:50

to motorway standards, that is they know what they are doing,

0:29:500:29:52

and they are able to read the signs, they will have no problem at all.

0:29:520:29:56

I have vivid memories of what he used to say,

0:29:560:29:59

and being a traffic officer for my dad was a large part of his career.

0:29:590:30:04

If ever there were anything that was on the top section

0:30:050:30:09

that was an accident, I didn't like that.

0:30:090:30:13

Bill was also there when the police started to formalise the way

0:30:130:30:16

they dealt with public order offenses.

0:30:160:30:18

West Midlands police introduced special training

0:30:180:30:22

for some of its officers.

0:30:220:30:24

Bill took part and was sent to help Merseyside police

0:30:250:30:28

deal with the riots in 1981.

0:30:280:30:31

I can see a lot of parallels

0:30:350:30:37

with when my dad first joined and when I joined.

0:30:370:30:40

Perish the thought, going into a riot situation

0:30:410:30:44

with a flimsy plastic visor over your normal police helmet

0:30:440:30:48

just seems absurd.

0:30:480:30:49

Now we obviously have crash helmets, flameproof suits, body armour,

0:30:490:30:54

stab proof vests.

0:30:540:30:56

For PC Arthur in 1913,

0:30:560:30:59

dealing with civil disorder was an altogether more civilised affair.

0:30:590:31:03

"I was listening to a suffragette last night at top of Regency Street.

0:31:050:31:09

"Talk about tongue! There was plenty of that.

0:31:090:31:12

"She didn't half give it votes for women."

0:31:120:31:14

After the Great War,

0:31:170:31:18

waves of industrial unrest rippled through Europe.

0:31:180:31:21

Many workers were in dispute, including the police.

0:31:210:31:25

Their pay matched that of an unskilled labourer,

0:31:250:31:27

so when they downed truncheons, Arthur joined them.

0:31:270:31:30

It led to the end of his career.

0:31:300:31:33

Those who went on strike, including my grandfather,

0:31:330:31:36

were required to resign their posts.

0:31:360:31:39

Arthur was dismissed on 1 August 1919,

0:31:400:31:43

after five years as a policeman.

0:31:430:31:45

As it was then, as it is now, it is against the law for police officers

0:31:450:31:50

to strike and he paid the price with his career.

0:31:500:31:54

Arthur's career in the police force ended prematurely,

0:31:570:32:01

but his inspiration lives on through his family.

0:32:010:32:03

When a murder happens, it is often front-page news.

0:32:080:32:11

Then, it begins to be forgotten.

0:32:110:32:13

But away from the headlines, the police work goes on.

0:32:130:32:16

The team working on the Jay Sudra killing is closing in.

0:32:160:32:19

First, they have to link the youth seen on the bus CCTV

0:32:190:32:22

to the one following Jay on his last journey home.

0:32:220:32:27

In the hunt for Jay Sudra's killer,

0:32:290:32:31

Clive's painstaking work on the CCTV images eventually link

0:32:310:32:35

this very clear image

0:32:350:32:36

to the man caught on camera following and attacking Jay.

0:32:360:32:41

And not only did they have a picture of his face,

0:32:440:32:46

this man also had a very distinctive walk.

0:32:460:32:49

Just like the man following Jay.

0:32:490:32:51

One of the things we saw

0:32:530:32:55

when viewing the imagery was that the suspect actually moved

0:32:550:32:59

with a foot pattern that seemed to be quite pointed out.

0:32:590:33:04

Using the yellow arrows to demonstrate

0:33:040:33:06

general direction of movement

0:33:060:33:08

and the red arrow the broadness of the movement of the foot

0:33:080:33:12

out splaying as he walked,

0:33:120:33:14

it was clearly evident on the imagery of Man B as he was walking

0:33:140:33:18

that he demonstrated the same general mannerism.

0:33:180:33:21

And in this case, we were able to view Man A over

0:33:210:33:24

a period of CCTV footage where it became evident that he tended

0:33:240:33:29

to walk with his toes splayed out quite widely.

0:33:290:33:32

Over a series of frames, we were able to assess his general

0:33:320:33:36

direction of movement and the angle in this case of his left foot,

0:33:360:33:41

and the angle tended to be consistent throughout that period of footage.

0:33:410:33:45

It was a Charlie Chaplin-style walk.

0:33:450:33:47

Paul had this very clear image to show,

0:33:470:33:50

but as yet he did not have a name in the frame.

0:33:500:33:52

He decided to release it to the press and put out an appeal.

0:33:520:33:56

At that stage, we didn't have any suspects,

0:33:560:33:59

and the reason for the appeal

0:33:590:34:01

was to enlist the help of the community where it took place.

0:34:010:34:04

Watching the footage of Jay's final moments

0:34:040:34:06

was very difficult for the family.

0:34:060:34:08

It wasn't nice because we knew that was Jay's last steps,

0:34:080:34:12

his last breaths.

0:34:120:34:14

It was hard, it was really difficult to watch.

0:34:140:34:17

Before I saw it, I could just picture him walking home,

0:34:170:34:21

his head down, minding his own business,

0:34:210:34:24

listening to his music, thinking to himself,

0:34:240:34:27

"Oh, I'll go home, play guitar and spend time with my mum."

0:34:270:34:31

That's the person Jay was.

0:34:310:34:33

The press appeal gave the police the breakthrough they needed.

0:34:330:34:37

As a direct result, a 15-year-old handed himself over to the police.

0:34:370:34:42

His name was Lamah Prince.

0:34:420:34:44

He admitted to being the man on the bus,

0:34:440:34:46

but refused to say anything else to the detectives.

0:34:460:34:50

There was still more work for them to do, and most of that work was

0:34:500:34:53

gathering evidence made available through modern technology.

0:34:530:34:57

It was also clear to me as the officer in charge of the case

0:35:000:35:04

that everything we did in every decision we made

0:35:040:35:07

needed to really be in support of that CCTV evidence.

0:35:070:35:10

What we did in order to achieve that was looked for opportunities

0:35:100:35:13

with telephones, analysis and computers, to really try to

0:35:130:35:18

support any dialogue that took place after the actual incident

0:35:180:35:21

between the offender and his associates or family members.

0:35:210:35:25

Cell site technology which tracks mobile phone signals helped

0:35:250:35:30

to place him in the right area, and, on top of that,

0:35:300:35:34

analysis of the 15-year-old's computer confirmed that,

0:35:340:35:37

in the days following the killing,

0:35:370:35:38

he had been researching all the news put out about it.

0:35:380:35:41

With all the evidence gathered,

0:35:410:35:43

Lamah Prince appeared in court to face a murder charge.

0:35:430:35:46

That was a real tough two weeks at the court every day,

0:35:490:35:53

really draining, listening to everything.

0:35:530:35:57

At the end of every day, we would ask the police

0:35:570:35:59

and the officers, how do you think it's going to go?

0:35:590:36:02

They'd say, we don't know.

0:36:020:36:04

But at the end of those two weeks,

0:36:040:36:05

Prince was sentenced to life to serve a minimum of 14 years,

0:36:050:36:10

well over the statutory minimum at his age.

0:36:100:36:13

A great result for the police in a case that could never have

0:36:130:36:16

been solved 60 years ago.

0:36:160:36:18

In my opinion,

0:36:180:36:19

and owing to the great significance

0:36:190:36:21

placed on the CCTV during this investigation,

0:36:210:36:24

I don't believe we would have had a successful

0:36:240:36:26

outcome had we not had the help and support

0:36:260:36:30

and the technical advice from the imagery analyst.

0:36:300:36:34

This case was extremely emotive for all concerned,

0:36:360:36:39

and I know it really touched the hearts of lots of people

0:36:390:36:42

involved in the investigation, right through to our press team,

0:36:420:36:48

and some really experienced police officers were also very touched

0:36:480:36:51

by Jay, by the warmth offered to us from his family.

0:36:510:36:55

When he was sentenced, when a jury stood up and said they found him

0:36:590:37:04

guilty of murder, that was just the best possible result

0:37:040:37:09

we could have got, because we were scared

0:37:090:37:11

he was going to get manslaughter.

0:37:110:37:13

For him to get murder, justice has been done.

0:37:130:37:18

Amazing police work and a really brave family.

0:37:260:37:30

In Bristol, as we've heard,

0:37:330:37:35

they have a successful drugs rehabilitation programme.

0:37:350:37:38

Once prisoners are stabilised, it's time to move them on,

0:37:380:37:42

but at all times, they are carefully monitored.

0:37:420:37:45

OK, one sample kit.

0:37:450:37:46

What I would like you to do now if you can is give me a urine sample,

0:37:460:37:50

please, as much as you can, but a minimum of below that line there.

0:37:500:37:54

Thank you very much.

0:37:540:37:56

Benji takes part in voluntary drug tests,

0:37:560:38:00

but also undergoes mandatory tests like this one, something

0:38:000:38:03

all prisoners must do at Bristol in full view of the officers.

0:38:030:38:07

And he's happy to do it because it proves he's stayed off the drugs

0:38:070:38:10

and is something he's proud of.

0:38:100:38:12

You know the results will come back to me,

0:38:120:38:14

you'll get a sheet on the Tuesday night

0:38:140:38:16

-and a certificate on Wednesday morning. Thank you.

-Cheers, mate.

0:38:160:38:21

Benji has been through the IDTS, or drug services unit, on C Wing.

0:38:210:38:27

Its methods are designed not just to get prisoners off drugs

0:38:270:38:29

while they are inside, but to get them to stay off them

0:38:290:38:33

-when they are living back in the community.

-Are you lot OK?

-Yes.

0:38:330:38:37

Come on, lads, lock the doors. Let's go.

0:38:390:38:41

After new prisoners have finished this stint detoxing

0:38:410:38:44

in the stabilisation unit, they moved to C1's landing, AKA Recovery.

0:38:440:38:49

Down here, they get involved in drug

0:38:490:38:51

and alcohol group work for an hour in the mornings,

0:38:510:38:55

they can do the sports and games courses, go outside on the Astroturf.

0:38:550:39:00

A bit of circuit training, just build up momentum.

0:39:040:39:07

They're down here for about 28 days, we have to keep people moving on

0:39:070:39:10

because there's always people coming in.

0:39:100:39:12

The purpose of recovery is for prisoners to regain their weight,

0:39:120:39:17

get healthier and to begin to look to the future without drugs.

0:39:170:39:20

When you are a drug user, you tend to be quite insulated, so the people

0:39:200:39:25

you mix with are all drug users, so it becomes a small, insular circle.

0:39:250:39:29

By using sport, we break that circle,

0:39:290:39:31

so when they go outside they mix with people who use the gym, and

0:39:310:39:34

they have another circle of friends apart from the drug-using friends.

0:39:340:39:38

And this approach is proved to work.

0:39:380:39:41

Since we set up this project, there has not been a single member

0:39:410:39:45

of people engaged in this who have tested positive for drugs in prison.

0:39:450:39:49

So it is a massive, massive thing that has happened.

0:39:490:39:53

Once prisoners have completed their 28 days of assessment on C1,

0:39:540:39:57

they move to B Wing.

0:39:570:39:59

This is B Wing. When prisoners have finished detox

0:39:590:40:02

and gone through the 28-day psychosocial module,

0:40:020:40:05

a lot of them come here.

0:40:050:40:07

It's known as the voluntary drug testing unit,

0:40:070:40:10

because when they're on here, they sign up to a contract where

0:40:100:40:13

they agree to be voluntary drug tested at any time.

0:40:130:40:16

Staying off drugs on B Wing brings benefits.

0:40:160:40:19

Prisoners are given single cells and not having to share is a big bonus.

0:40:190:40:23

Also, they work every day either in a job or in a class.

0:40:230:40:28

We have to start thinking about how we get people

0:40:280:40:31

back into the lifestyle that you and I would live,

0:40:310:40:33

and that is getting up in the morning, going to work, doing

0:40:330:40:37

a day's work, coming back at night and maybe then going to the gym.

0:40:370:40:40

It's important we get them back into mainstream education

0:40:400:40:44

within the establishment, or mainstream employment.

0:40:440:40:47

Throughout their time in prison,

0:40:470:40:49

close ties are made with probation staff and drug workers

0:40:490:40:51

from many different agencies in the community, so on release

0:40:510:40:55

there will be continued support from familiar faces.

0:40:550:40:58

There are a lot of things here that, if you want it, that is,

0:40:580:41:02

you can achieve.

0:41:020:41:06

The way I'm feeling, this is the final step in my journey.

0:41:060:41:09

When I get out this time, I'm on nine-month's licence,

0:41:090:41:13

probation in here have started working on me now,

0:41:130:41:16

I am hoping to work when I am out. That's what I want.

0:41:160:41:18

The Bristol Prison team has won awards for its work.

0:41:180:41:22

They have helped reduce crime in the city by a considerable amount,

0:41:220:41:25

and violence in the prison itself has also dropped off steeply

0:41:250:41:28

since they started the scheme.

0:41:280:41:30

Ultimately, we never lose touch with reducing reoffending,

0:41:300:41:33

we never lose touch with the fact that this will benefit

0:41:330:41:36

our local community in the city of Bristol by sending people back

0:41:360:41:39

out with that sense of value and a fresh set of addictions, if you like.

0:41:390:41:45

If that is just scoring a goal in football,

0:41:450:41:47

then it's a better addiction than crack cocaine.

0:41:470:41:50

That's all from us on Crime And Punishment for now,

0:41:540:41:56

we'll see you next time.

0:41:560:41:58

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:42:080:42:12

A look at crime and punishment in modern Britain. Louise Minchin is at Birmingham City Centre Police HQ and Gethin Jones is behind the bars of Bristol Prison. In this diamond jubilee year, they chart the changes in crime, criminals, police and prisons over the last 60 years. They revisit dramatic landmark cases and present hard-hitting real life stories from the city streets and prison life today.


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS