Episode 3 The Repair Shop


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Episode 3

The team takes on a precious hand mirror, a very special clock that may have had a supernatural accident, and a much-loved, but much-damaged, painting.


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Welcome to The Repair Shop,

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where cherished family heirlooms are brought back to life...

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This is the workshop of dreams.

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..home to furniture restorer Jay Blades.

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Nowadays, everybody spends a fortune on stuff that, once it's broken,

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they just bin it. But everybody has something that means too much to be

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thrown away, and that's where we come in.

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Working alongside Jay will be some of the country's leading

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craftspeople...

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Every piece has its own story.

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It's amazing to think that some of my work becomes part of that story.

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I've always played with things, I've always repaired things,

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-and I just love it.

-There is a real pleasure in bringing people's pieces

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back to life again.

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..each with their own unique set of skills.

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-Right tool for the right job.

-They will resurrect,

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-revive...

-I'm warm, man!

-..and rejuvenate...

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treasured possessions and irreplaceable pieces of family

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-history...

-Wow, she's fantastic!

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..bringing both the objects...

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-Oh!

-This is what I remember.

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-..and the memories that they hold...

-Wow!

-..back to life.

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Oh, my God!

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In The Repair Shop today,

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an antique clock that's had a mysterious accident...

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This is either an earthquake or a poltergeist.

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Right, well, it must have been a really angry one, because this looks

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-absolutely battered.

-..and a badly damaged painting tests Lucia to the

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-limit.

-This is a big job,

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and I've got a lot of work cut out with this one.

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It's quite a big tear.

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First into The Repair Shop today are Cherith and Simon Hathenthwait.

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They're here with a fragile heirloom in need of some serious

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attention from silversmith and metals expert, Brenton West.

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-Hello, how are we doing? I'm Jay.

-Fine, thanks. Cherith.

-Simon.

-I'm Brenton.

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-So, what have we got in the bag?

-This is a mirror that was given to me when I was eight

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by my nana, who gave me it, saying that her auntie

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-was a nurse, and she knew I wanted to be a nurse at eight...

-Right.

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..so I got the mirror. But then, when I was ten,

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I broke the mirror and I daren't tell her.

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-And unfortunately, when I qualified as a nurse...

-Yeah.

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..which is the whole reason I got it, my nan died,

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so she never knew it was broken, so in a way I'm glad she didn't know...

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-Yeah.

-..but now's my chance to get it repaired.

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So you kept it secret that it was broken?

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-I never told anybody that it was broken.

-So how did you feel when you broke it?

-Heartbroken.

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It's not something you can just nip out and get another one

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-from the shop, is it?

-No.

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So the painting on the back, is that anything to do with the family or is

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-that...?

-I've no idea. I did try to research the name on the...

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-And what did you learn from that?

-I couldn't even read it, to be honest.

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-Oh, right. OK.

-LAUGHTER

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-That is someone's signature on there, isn't it?

-It is, yeah.

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So, once we've repaired this, what's going to happen with the mirror?

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My daughter is a nurse,

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-so it'd be really lovely to pass it on to her as a nurse.

-OK.

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-So you've kept the nursing in the family, then.

-Yeah.

-OK.

-Yeah.

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All right. You can do it?

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-I think so.

-So, leave it with us and we'll get it sorted.

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-Is that all right?

-Wonderful. Thank you.

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Thank you for bringing it in.

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Before he can start to repair the handle,

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Brenton needs to establish what kind of metal he's dealing with.

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If this is white metal, which is a sort of cast zinc,

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if you heat it up, it just melts and...

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just disappears, so this would have to be glued.

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I'm hoping it's brass, because it'll make it a much better repair.

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If it's gold underneath, then we know it's brass.

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If it's white underneath, then we have to start to worry.

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And it certainly looks gold-coloured to me.

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I'm quite happy that is a piece of brass.

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The difficult bit is going to be

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getting the painting out and the mirror out,

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because I cannot heat this up with those in there,

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cos they'll just break.

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Next to arrive at The Repair Shop is Joanna Edwards from Hampshire.

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-Hello, I'm Steve.

-I'm Joanna.

-Hiya.

-It's a bit heavy, I'm afraid.

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-OK, that's all right.

-She's hoping that horologist Steve Fletcher can

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repair a treasured timepiece that's had a rather puzzling mishap.

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Right.

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-Gosh, this really is falling apart, isn't it?

-Yes.

-SHE LAUGHS

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Right, this is, um,

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a very nice clock.

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-Thank you.

-Why is it in this condition now?

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I woke up one morning at six o'clock to the most horrendous crash,

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and it was going, "Bing, bing, bing, bing!"

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And I thought, "Oh, my God," I jumped out of bed, rushed down,

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and there was my clock on a tile floor...

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-Oh, gosh.

-..smashed to pieces.

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Right, OK. How did it fall down?

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Well, it was on this chest,

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and my husband came rushing down and he saw this little wiggly line going

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across the dust that the feet had made.

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-And we looked at it and thought, "There must have been an earth tremor."

-Oh!

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The other alternative...

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-is that we have a family poltergeist.

-LAUGHTER

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It must be the first poltergeist-damaged clock that I've

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-seen.

-Well...

-LAUGHTER

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I mean, this dates back to around about the, sort of,

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late 18th century.

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Made by this very important maker, Josiah Emery...

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-Yes.

-..of London.

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So it is a very nice clock.

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What's the history of this clock?

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Well, I know it belonged to my grandmother,

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because I remember it in their dining room

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when I was a small child, and then my mother inherited it,

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and for years it was in their house.

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She loved the tick of it,

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and I feel a bit the same.

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I feel the tick of a clock is the heartbeat of a house.

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-Absolutely.

-And I would like to hear it again.

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Right, OK, well, if you'd like to leave it with me,

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we'll get it all working as it should be and then we'll give you

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-your heartbeat back.

-That would be just so wonderful.

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-Thank you very much. Thank you. OK, bye-bye.

-Right. Bye-bye now.

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When I woke up that morning and heard the crash and found the clock

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on the floor, I was devastated.

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I was the custodian of this clock, and I felt I'd let the family down.

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So I shall be very happy when it ticks again.

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That should just come out now.

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There we go.

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Oh, we've got this nice verge escapement here.

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This is what gives it the characteristic tick,

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the heartbeat that Joanna was talking about.

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The dial might not be original, but the mechanism is all original.

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It is a genuine Josiah Emery.

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I'll know more once I take it apart.

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Josiah Emery was a renowned clockmaker in the 18th century.

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His visionary work was widely admired.

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He even made timepieces for King George III.

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On prestigious clocks such as this,

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it was common for preceding horologists to document their work.

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I can see on here some repair marks.

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There's May 1976.

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There's 1888.

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And November 17.

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So that's either 100 years or 200 years ago.

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So the next step is to start stripping the mechanism down.

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Many of the items that arrive through the doors of The Repair Shop

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are examples of outstanding

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craftsmanship in need of an expert eye.

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Next to arrive is a work of art that might stretch painting conservator

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Lucia's highly honed talents.

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-Hello.

-Hello. Mr Guthrie, Mrs Guthrie.

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-I'm Neil.

-I'm Lucia, hi, paintings conservator.

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-You have a painting for us today.

-I do indeed.

-Lovely.

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OK.

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-Ooh! Ooh!

-And there we have it.

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Wow, it's damaged, very damaged.

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-It is.

-A very large tear.

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What happened to this?

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-Dare you tell me?

-I do dare tell you.

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It hangs on a wall very close to where I sit.

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I have a modified chair, because I'm quite arthritic,

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and it has a latch that makes it

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recline, and the latch keeps slipping.

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The chair goes into the lampshade,

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the shade goes into the picture, and I'm sitting there, going...

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Oh, no!

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What can you tell me about the painting?

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-Well, it's...

-Fog on the Thames, I can see it's called.

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Yeah, it's Edwin Fletcher.

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We think about 1900.

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Well, it's quite beautiful.

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1900, yeah, that sort of figures, from the technique.

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And, obviously, it's a pea-souper.

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Where did you get the painting from?

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My dad bought it. We saw it in a shop in Folkestone in about 1960.

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It would have been in my parents' house from the '60s,

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-right through until my mum had to go into an old folk's home...

-Yeah.

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..and she gave it to me then, so I've had it for, what, 20 years,

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-something like that?

-So there's a long family history there.

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-Absolutely.

-And it means a lot to you.

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-It certainly does.

-Yeah. It's quite a big tear.

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-Yeah.

-It's going to be quite difficult to repair that.

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This flaking was obviously going on before the tear.

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Do you know why that happened?

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I suspect because my dad will have put an electric heater in...

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Ah, OK.

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-..underneath where it was.

-So that causes the canvas to expand and

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contract, and this is why you get the flaking.

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In terms of progress on what we need to do,

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I will start by protecting this damaged paint,

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and then I'll treat the tear.

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If you're happy to leave it with me, I'll get on with it.

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-I certainly am. Thank you.

-Marvellous.

-Thank you, thank you.

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I've got a lot of work cut out with this one.

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It's quite a big tear.

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This is heat damage.

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There's a lot of little tiny blisters of paint.

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Most damage is done by humans.

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The best thing you can do if you've got a painting, hang it on the wall.

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Keep it away from heat, so over no radiators or fires,

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no lights anywhere near them.

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No direct sunlight.

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This is a big job.

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We'll see. We'll see if I can get it

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back into play and fixed.

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Clockmaker Steve has taken on an 18th-century clock with an

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impressive pedigree. It took a tumble,

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and as a result needs extensive

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repairs to its mechanism, casing and dial.

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This is most certainly not a solo project.

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-Are you bringing me a gift, Steve?

-I am, yes.

-Wow!

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Oh, wow! Goodness!

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First port of call is ceramic restorer Kirsten...

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I would suggest, actually, a coloured fill on that.

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-OK, that would be great.

-Yeah, I could do that.

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...while woodworker Will is going to attend to the clock's damaged case.

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-I've got a little job here for you.

-What on earth has happened there?

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Yeah, so it's either an earthquake or a poltergeist.

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Right, well, it must have been a really angry one,

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because this looks absolutely battered.

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It is in such poor condition.

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-Leave it with me.

-OK, cool.

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-Cheers, Steve.

-Cheers.

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This is a huge job.

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There are massive cracks going inside the structure there.

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Scratches to the veneer.

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Missing veneer, loose veneer.

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And that's it.

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He says! There's lots of work to be doing, though.

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Lots of work needing to be done.

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Now Steve can address the area that took the majority of the impact -

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the frame that held the clock's glass, known as the bezel.

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So, at the moment, I'm just trying

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to figure out the best way of straightening the dents in

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this bezel. I need to get a glass fitted into this bezel,

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and the glass will be circular.

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So I've got to make a perfect circle.

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Not sure how I'm going to do that at the moment.

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I'm just scoring a circle, so that will give me something to work on.

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It's a long way out.

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Metals expert Brenton is working on

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an old hand mirror with a broken handle.

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But before he can piece it back together, he needs to take it all

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-apart.

-Now I've established this is brass and I need to get this lovely

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porcelain thing out of here, because I cannot heat this up.

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It is quite loose now, so I think I'm going to give it a little go and

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see if that will pop out of there.

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There we go, look at that.

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Oh, it's even got some nice writing on there.

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It's got, in script,

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"Madame de Crequy," which is obviously a French name.

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Some extra digging reveals that the name on the porcelain is also the

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subject of the portrait.

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The Marquise de Crequy was an 18th-century aristocrat and woman of

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letters who wrote about court life from the reign of Louis XIV

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through to Napoleon.

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Now that the Marquise is safely out of harm's way,

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Brenton can reattach the broken handle.

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I've got to get this lined up, so that when I solder this,

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this is at the right angle, it's not moved that way or that way.

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So what I'm going to do, I've put my

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solder paste on the joint.

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I'm just going to heat it up till the solder paste melts.

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It's important to heat it evenly so that you don't heat one bit up more

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than the rest of it and make it

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twist or go out of shape.

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Fingers crossed, that's done.

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Right, I've soldered this back on here now. It's nice and strong.

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And this bit here is brass.

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This bit was gold-leafed, so I'm now going to apply some size

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to this and then some gold leaf to it.

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Size is a type of adhesive used to attach gold leaf to a surface.

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Once the liquid is applied, it has to be left until it becomes tacky.

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I've got a sheet of gold leaf there. I'm going to put this

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mirror down on the gold leaf and pick it up,

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like...that.

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Then I'm going to turn it over...

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and then, with a brush,

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I'm going to very gently work this into the mirror.

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So we're just really gently dabbing it on, and it will stick to the

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size, where the size is, and wherever there isn't any size,

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the gold leaf just falls away.

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Across the workshop, Lucia is having to delve deep into her conservator's

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box of tricks to tackle the heat-damaged and badly ripped

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pea-souper painting.

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I'm securing the paint along the edges of the very long tear that we

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saw. I'm using isinglass.

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It looks like plastic. It's actually fish glue.

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It's very compatible with the

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adhesive that's been used to prepare the canvas originally.

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I'm using a heated spatula at quite a low temperature.

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The idea is, the warmness of the glue starts to soften with that

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lifting paint. And hopefully,

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the lifting paint will flatten and reattach itself to the canvas.

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The adhesive also softens the threads that have been stretched,

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so I'll be able to push those back through to the back of the tear.

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This is a piece of nylon gossamer,

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so the patch goes over the tear.

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It's a very light patch, but actually very strong.

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For the next stage of the painting's revival,

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Lucia turns to another of her own talents.

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She must now paint her own repairs to blend in seamlessly with the

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original artist's work.

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I'm just doing the first stage of retouching,

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and what I'm doing is knocking out the white filler

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that I've put in. So I'm putting in, basically, a base coat,

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and I'm actually using watercolour.

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The artist's palette is actually a fairly narrow palette of colours.

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So the colour mix for this palette will be earth colours.

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There's a lot of yellow ochre in here, a lot of lead white.

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This bluey-greeny colour down here

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will be Prussian blue and yellow ochre.

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There's actually no green in here.

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So what I'm actually doing with the base coat is very basic,

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mixing up a yellow ochre with a

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little bit of titanium white just to make it a shade lighter.

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You really are working with the painter,

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and working out how they've worked.

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It's really fantastic to be able to do that.

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Steve is using a three-pronged attack to get a beloved but badly

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damaged clock back in business.

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I'm very happy with the way that has worked out, actually.

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That would be good for a good number of years,

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until the next poltergeist comes along.

0:18:280:18:30

This is an almighty task,

0:18:310:18:33

and with the 200-year-old mechanism completely dismantled,

0:18:330:18:36

there's no turning back now.

0:18:360:18:39

This clock's come up really well.

0:18:390:18:40

I've put it in the clock-cleaning fluid and taken it out,

0:18:400:18:43

and then I've scrubbed up every individual piece.

0:18:430:18:46

I do like to see a clock like this looking bright and shiny,

0:18:480:18:52

the way that it would have been when it was brand-new.

0:18:520:18:55

I've popped a new main spring into the barrel...

0:18:580:19:01

and I've got a new line to pop on as well.

0:19:020:19:06

The new line is a steel cord which transfers power from the main spring

0:19:080:19:12

to the clock's wheels.

0:19:120:19:15

So I've now got Joanna's clock

0:19:150:19:16

ticking and...

0:19:180:19:21

striking beautifully.

0:19:210:19:23

After hours of painstaking fine brushwork,

0:19:270:19:30

a repaired and revived painting of a Thames pea-souper is beginning to

0:19:300:19:35

emerge from the fog.

0:19:350:19:37

So, how are you getting on with Neil's painting?

0:19:370:19:39

-Hi, Jay.

-You all right?

-Yeah, good. It's a long process.

0:19:390:19:42

It's a very bad tear.

0:19:420:19:44

-But you've fixed that. Look at that!

-I've actually just patched it.

0:19:440:19:47

-You've put a patch on the back.

-Yeah, you can see it, it's sealed on to that tear to hold it together.

0:19:470:19:51

And then this bit, what's going on here then? There's quite a lot of damage, though, isn't there?

0:19:510:19:55

A lot of damage. Somebody has had a go at retouching.

0:19:550:19:58

And, in actual fact, this white here, it's a bit difficult to see in

0:19:580:20:01

this light, but this white here is

0:20:010:20:03

actually the sun coming through this murkiness,

0:20:030:20:07

-this smog of the pea-souper.

-Right.

-And that was actually covered up.

0:20:070:20:11

-Ah!

-So it's a lot more, sort of, there's a lot more going on in that area.

0:20:110:20:15

-I get it. That's quite cool, man. You've got a fair bit to do, haven't you?

-Yeah, quite a bit to do.

0:20:150:20:19

So you're going to get rid of all of this, blend it all in, like you do?

0:20:190:20:22

This is a daylight light.

0:20:220:20:24

You can see it casts a light across the surface of the painting.

0:20:240:20:27

So that's why this is all really pronounced,

0:20:270:20:29

-because this light is picking it up.

-OK.

-So you're seeing it in a very...

0:20:290:20:34

So when you take that away, I won't see all of that?

0:20:340:20:36

-Well, you'll probably see some of it!

-LAUGHTER

0:20:360:20:39

-Right, well I'm going to leave you.

-I'm not a wizardess.

-All right.

0:20:390:20:42

At the metalwork bench, Brenton is returning the ceramic portrait to

0:20:440:20:48

the delicate brass hand mirror.

0:20:480:20:50

So that's Madame de Crequy sealed back into her frame.

0:20:520:20:58

I'm really happy. This has come out really well,

0:20:580:21:00

and it's back to its original self again.

0:21:000:21:03

The mirror had been hidden away, unused for decades.

0:21:040:21:08

Restored to its former glory,

0:21:080:21:10

it's now ready to be reunited with its owner, Cherith, and her husband,

0:21:100:21:14

-Simon.

-Hi.

-Hi. All right? So, remind me what you brought me.

0:21:140:21:19

I brought you a porcelain mirror with a handle that I broke when I

0:21:190:21:23

-was ten.

-Well, we've had a little go at it,

0:21:230:21:26

and we're pretty pleased with what's happened. I hope you are as well.

0:21:260:21:30

-Oh, my Lord!

-SHE LAUGHS

0:21:300:21:32

Oh, wow!

0:21:350:21:37

Gosh, it looks so different!

0:21:380:21:40

I'm frightened of picking it up now, with the handle.

0:21:410:21:43

It's like bringing back memories of when I was ten.

0:21:430:21:46

It's absolutely beautiful.

0:21:480:21:50

You forget what it looks like whole,

0:21:510:21:54

because I've looked at it for so many years in pieces.

0:21:540:21:57

So, what would your grandmother think now?

0:21:570:21:59

-Aww! I looked after it really well!

-LAUGHTER

0:21:590:22:04

It's gorgeous. You've done such a wonderful job.

0:22:040:22:07

-Thank you.

-I'm glad she never knew that it was broken.

0:22:070:22:10

-She knows now.

-She does know now, yeah.

-LAUGHTER

0:22:100:22:13

-I think she'll be pleased, though, that we got it fixed.

-She knows it's fixed.

0:22:130:22:17

-We like to put smiles on people's faces.

-Well, you certainly did that.

0:22:170:22:20

-Good.

-Thank you ever so much.

-No problem at all.

0:22:200:22:22

OK, there you go. Thank you.

0:22:220:22:24

Absolutely thrilled with the mirror.

0:22:270:22:29

Quite nostalgic.

0:22:290:22:30

It's been in that box, broken, for 40 years...

0:22:300:22:33

well, more than 40 years.

0:22:330:22:35

It's also nice, as well, knowing that it's repaired and that it'll go

0:22:350:22:38

to the next nurse in our family.

0:22:380:22:42

Lucia's giving a final once-over to her restoration of the damaged

0:22:490:22:53

painting, but before it can be

0:22:530:22:55

returned, there's still one piece missing.

0:22:550:22:58

-Right, frame's all done.

-Great, let's have a look.

0:22:580:23:01

And I've lined it as well.

0:23:010:23:03

Oh, fantastic, brilliant!

0:23:030:23:05

-How's that?

-Yeah, that's saved me a job. That's great.

0:23:050:23:08

Let's see if it fits.

0:23:080:23:10

-Look at that.

-Yeah, yeah.

-You see how tight a fit it is now?

0:23:100:23:13

-Ah!

-Hardly any space.

0:23:130:23:15

With the painting now back snug in its frame,

0:23:160:23:19

it's ready to take pride of place in the home of its owners,

0:23:190:23:22

Neil and Viv.

0:23:220:23:24

-Hello.

-Hello, hi.

-Lucia, you've got some visitors here.

0:23:250:23:28

-Hi, Viv, lovely to see you again.

-Hello.

-Welcome back.

0:23:280:23:32

-Nice to see you again.

-Hello, Neil, nice to see you. OK, are you ready?

0:23:320:23:36

Oh, my goodness! O-o-oh! Oh!

0:23:360:23:39

-Stunning!

-My goodness!

0:23:400:23:43

-Beautiful.

-I am absolutely stunned at how that has repaired.

0:23:430:23:47

-I just can't see it. I mean...

-I think...

0:23:470:23:49

I was expecting to see some sort of a dent there or something.

0:23:490:23:52

Well, in actual fact,

0:23:520:23:53

when I'd done the moisture treatment and pulled all the threads of the

0:23:530:23:56

canvas together, they all kind of went back together again, really...

0:23:560:23:59

-Well, it's had a surface clean.

-I like the rowing boat now.

0:23:590:24:03

-It's just so much clearer.

-It is so much clearer,

0:24:030:24:06

and the oar and the little waves that come in there.

0:24:060:24:09

So where's it going to sit in the house when it goes back?

0:24:090:24:11

We're arguing about that, because if I put it back in the same place,

0:24:110:24:14

-there's a possibility that it might get the same rip again.

-Oh, no!

-No!

-LAUGHTER

0:24:140:24:17

-So, who won the argument then? Where's it going?

-I did!

0:24:170:24:20

-Oh, you... Say no more! So where is it going, then?

-LAUGHTER

0:24:200:24:23

It's going back in its original spot.

0:24:230:24:25

The painting is on the wall and there should be no problem

0:24:250:24:28

-whatsoever.

-Right, OK.

-OK. Well, it's a great painting.

0:24:280:24:31

-Hope you enjoy it for years to come.

-Oh, yeah.

-Yeah.

-I've missed it.

0:24:310:24:34

-I can't say "thank you" enough.

-Yeah, I've really missed it.

0:24:340:24:37

-You've done a wonderful job.

-Well, thank you. Well, I'll wrap

0:24:370:24:40

-this up for you, and then you can take it away.

-Yeah.

0:24:400:24:43

Lucia's done a brilliant job, you know, really has.

0:24:450:24:48

I'm really thrilled, I really am.

0:24:500:24:53

It's better than I hoped it would be,

0:24:530:24:55

and I can't wait to get it home.

0:24:550:24:57

The Repair Shop squad has joined

0:25:060:25:08

forces to rescue a notable timepiece.

0:25:080:25:11

The beloved clock is nearing the end of its long road to recovery.

0:25:110:25:15

-Hey! Oh! Doesn't that look good?

-It's very good, isn't it?

0:25:170:25:20

-Are you pleased with it?

-I'm really pleased with it.

0:25:200:25:22

So your task now is to get that in there,

0:25:220:25:25

and then another happy customer.

0:25:250:25:27

-Hopefully.

-Hopefully.

-LAUGHTER

0:25:270:25:30

Just one final push to get this

0:25:320:25:34

distinguished piece ready for collection.

0:25:340:25:37

I'm now going to fit the bezel on,

0:25:400:25:43

and hopefully it'll be...

0:25:430:25:46

-all OK now. If I can find the right hole.

-HE CHUCKLES

0:25:460:25:49

Someone was just looking down on me right then.

0:25:540:25:57

Thank you!

0:25:570:25:59

Good. OK, let's pop it into the case.

0:26:030:26:06

There we are.

0:26:140:26:16

The Repair Shop's work is complete,

0:26:180:26:20

and not a moment too soon.

0:26:200:26:22

Joanna is back, ready for the familiar tick of her dear old clock.

0:26:230:26:28

-Hi, Joanna.

-Hello.

0:26:290:26:31

-Nice to see you again.

-It's lovely to see you.

0:26:310:26:33

-I'm really looking forward to seeing that.

-Right, OK, I won't keep you in suspense any longer.

0:26:330:26:38

-Please don't.

-Right, there we go.

0:26:380:26:41

Wow!

0:26:410:26:42

That's amazing!

0:26:460:26:47

That's incredible! Look at that.

0:26:520:26:55

Oh, my friend.

0:26:560:26:58

Thank you so, so much.

0:27:000:27:03

You're very, very welcome.

0:27:030:27:05

It's been a real pleasure to do.

0:27:050:27:07

CLOCK TICKS

0:27:070:27:09

Sounds wonderful. That's, that's the sound I want.

0:27:110:27:15

Thank you very much.

0:27:150:27:16

It is just a lovely-sounding tick.

0:27:160:27:18

-I think so.

-And Will's done an awful lot to this case.

0:27:180:27:22

-Somebody's done an awful lot to it!

-LAUGHTER

0:27:220:27:24

Will, can you come over?

0:27:240:27:27

It is amazing.

0:27:270:27:30

-Pleased?

-Delighted.

0:27:300:27:32

More than delighted!

0:27:320:27:35

I almost want Steve to take it all apart again on the inside so you can

0:27:350:27:38

see the amazing job that he's done. It looks beautiful inside.

0:27:380:27:41

-Can I have a look?

-Yes. Let me just swivel it round for you.

0:27:410:27:45

Oh, gosh, wow!

0:27:480:27:50

Goodness me. That's fantastic.

0:27:500:27:53

Thank you so much. Thank you both very much.

0:27:530:27:55

-OK...

-Thank you very much.

0:27:550:27:57

I don't think it's ever looked so good. Certainly not in my lifetime.

0:28:000:28:03

It's an old friend being given a really, really good face-lift.

0:28:030:28:07

I feel my house has got its heartbeat back now.

0:28:100:28:13

Join us in The Repair Shop next time,

0:28:180:28:20

as the team tackles more extraordinary items that have seen

0:28:200:28:23

better days,

0:28:230:28:25

and gives them a new lease of life.

0:28:250:28:27

-That's fantastic!

-LAUGHTER

0:28:270:28:29

Silversmith Brenton West tackles a broken hand mirror containing the portrait of a mysterious French lady. Painting conservator Lucia Scalisi repairs, cleans and brings some much-needed light to a murky painting of fog on the River Thames. And resident horologist Steve Fletcher joins forces with ceramics expert Kirsten Ramsay and wood specialist Will Kirk to work on a prestigious eighteenth-century timepiece that has suffered a supernatural accident.