David Nash - Slatetown Sculptor


David Nash - Slatetown Sculptor

Documentary looking at David Nash, one of Britain's most important artists. Represented in major galleries around the world, his sculptures always contain a little bit of Wales.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to David Nash - Slatetown Sculptor. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

This ancient tree that has fallen into a river in North Wales

0:00:080:00:13

is about to find new life as works of art.

0:00:130:00:17

A real idea has spirit energy in it, and they compel me to make them,

0:00:170:00:22

and they actually bring that energy with them.

0:00:220:00:25

David Nash is a sculptor with an international reputation.

0:00:250:00:29

He has made his name, not from working in clay, bronze or stone, but in wood,

0:00:290:00:34

using cranes and chainsaws.

0:00:340:00:37

He also uses heat and fire to create artworks that are displayed

0:00:370:00:40

and cherished in many countries around the world.

0:00:400:00:44

Sequoia trees have been growing for thousands of millennia, in their forms,

0:00:470:00:55

but now I walk in a forest and I'll say, "My, that's a Nashy one, isn't it?"

0:00:550:00:59

Shapes that are features of the North Wales landscape resonate in his sculptures.

0:00:590:01:06

David Nash's base for the last 40 years has been perhaps the most

0:01:070:01:12

unlikely setting for an artist whose work graces museums, public spaces

0:01:120:01:17

and private collections worldwide -

0:01:170:01:19

the slate mining town of Blaenau Ffestiniog in North Wales.

0:01:190:01:24

Today Nash has workshops in the town's industrial units, employing

0:01:260:01:30

a number of local people to create the work for a global demand.

0:01:300:01:35

The town, its history and its weather are all woven into art

0:01:350:01:39

which is made with the elemental forces of nature, and a deep understanding of wood and trees.

0:01:390:01:46

The weather phenomena of Blaenau is one of the most essential ingredients

0:01:590:02:04

of what I love about the place, and I deeply love the geography,

0:02:040:02:08

the fact there is a community here at all.

0:02:080:02:11

It grew here because of the slate.

0:02:110:02:15

You can see we're at the end of the valley here, and the wet air coming

0:02:150:02:19

off the Irish Sea just lifts to 800 feet here, and that's where it rains.

0:02:190:02:23

We have an average 120 inches of rain, and it's a bit like

0:02:230:02:27

people talk about rain here like the Eskimos talk about snow.

0:02:270:02:31

I actually heard somebody say, "It's coming down straight today."

0:02:310:02:34

There's a particularity about the angle of the rain.

0:02:340:02:39

It's a phenomenon, and ironically, this is where all the roofing slate is coming from.

0:02:390:02:44

It has roofed many buildings all over the world.

0:02:440:02:47

I wasn't really expecting to be living here,

0:02:470:02:52

but at the end of my art school years, "Where am I going to be?"

0:02:520:02:55

I discovered I could buy somewhere here very cheap.

0:02:550:02:59

That meant no rent, no mortgage.

0:02:590:03:01

I didn't mean, really, to stay. Found a cottage here.

0:03:010:03:04

The best thing that I did was to stay, was to stay here.

0:03:040:03:08

And, I think, for a lot of sculptors, place, location of where they are,

0:03:080:03:13

is very important. It runs deep.

0:03:130:03:15

And particularly with Blaenau, which is like an enormous sculpture.

0:03:150:03:20

These beautiful diagonal lines have just

0:03:200:03:23

found themselves out of millions of loose pieces which have just been...

0:03:230:03:28

Just tumbled down, thrown away, but they've ended up with a very precise geometric form.

0:03:280:03:35

The tips look as they do from the process of their making, and that to me was my fundamental

0:03:350:03:40

clue on how to work - keep my mind on the process

0:03:400:03:44

and let the resulting object take care of itself.

0:03:440:03:47

So long as the process was clean and true and pure, I could trust that

0:03:470:03:52

and let the object be and not worry it after I'd finished the process.

0:03:520:03:57

In 1968, David Nash bought an old chapel, Capel Rhiw.

0:03:590:04:05

At a cost of £200, this would enable Nash to keep his overheads

0:04:050:04:08

to a minimum and realise an ambition to fuse life and work.

0:04:080:04:13

Where a congregation of quarrymen and their families once stood

0:04:150:04:18

singing hymns, Nash replenished

0:04:180:04:20

the space by populating it with his sculptures and a family of his own.

0:04:200:04:27

He married an artist, Claire, and together they turned this chapel into a family project.

0:04:270:04:35

If something interesting is going on somewhere, however far away

0:04:360:04:40

from London or New York or wherever, people will hear about it.

0:04:400:04:44

Now with two young boys, life and work was one and the same thing.

0:04:460:04:50

Major galleries began to be interested and made the long trek

0:04:500:04:55

to the Nash studio and home.

0:04:550:04:57

People from the art world came to see the chapel, the work that was going on there.

0:04:570:05:03

And there was always something to see, because he was seriously working.

0:05:030:05:10

People liked the fact that he had made his house

0:05:100:05:14

and he had made his kids' toys.

0:05:140:05:18

We were like a sort of team of artists when the boys were little.

0:05:180:05:24

They were involved with everything we did.

0:05:240:05:27

This picture is of William in David's arms

0:05:270:05:30

while he's sawing a piece of wood, and just that lovely thing

0:05:300:05:34

of them being able to be involved in what we were doing.

0:05:340:05:37

Lord Dafydd Elis-Thomas's father was a minister at Capel Rhiw,

0:05:460:05:50

and one day, while he was the MP for Blaenau in the 1970s,

0:05:500:05:55

he was amazed by what he saw going on inside this chapel

0:05:550:05:59

that he'd known as a boy.

0:05:590:06:01

I just walked up and looked through the windows and saw these...

0:06:010:06:05

obviously, what were works of art.

0:06:050:06:08

And I was immediately captivated by it all.

0:06:080:06:11

And I got to know David and I keep being reinvigorated

0:06:110:06:14

whenever I meet him or see his work.

0:06:140:06:17

I'd always had it drummed into me by my father that this is where

0:06:200:06:25

our roots were and, of course, this particular chapel was the great temple of the Presbyterian Church.

0:06:250:06:33

Y Trefnyddion Calfinaidda and... Well, that's, of course,

0:06:330:06:36

"Holiness, sanctity behoves your house."

0:06:360:06:41

that would be the translation. But, of course, holy in religion

0:06:410:06:45

is something spiritual.

0:06:450:06:47

Art, I think, is a close cousin of that drive towards the spiritual

0:06:470:06:55

in human life.

0:06:550:06:56

And I think it's very appropriate. Obviously, that's why he did it.

0:06:560:07:00

He kept it there because he saw a synergy

0:07:000:07:04

between what the chapel was in the past

0:07:040:07:07

and the spiritual activity that was here, and the creativity,

0:07:070:07:11

verging on the spiritual, which is in his work.

0:07:110:07:14

I love the idea that there is in this chapel now a new congregation.

0:07:150:07:22

David tells me that there are at least 400,

0:07:220:07:25

which must make it the best attended chapel for miles around.

0:07:250:07:29

Ever since David Nash settled in Blaenau Ffestiniog,

0:07:310:07:34

wood has been more than just a raw material to shape.

0:07:340:07:37

Throughout his career, it's led him to a deeper understanding

0:07:370:07:41

of the properties of trees and the natural processes at work.

0:07:410:07:46

This fallen oak tree is about to be transformed into sculpture.

0:07:460:07:52

David Nash's artistic vision enables him to identify unique forms in each tree.

0:07:520:07:59

Over his 40-year-long career, he has fashioned over 2,000 sculptures.

0:07:590:08:04

Understanding the tree and allowing the forms he makes

0:08:040:08:07

to retain the essence of their origins has been his life's work.

0:08:070:08:12

I would never take a tree that has no reason to take it down.

0:08:120:08:17

So I can only really engage with it once it's down, and then I go over it

0:08:170:08:21

like a dentist, looking at its teeth,

0:08:210:08:23

checking the rot spots and just what these forms are.

0:08:230:08:29

It's the art of making a sculpture.

0:08:320:08:34

For me, it's trying to make an object which is like more here,

0:08:340:08:38

and there are ways of doing this.

0:08:380:08:41

I never polish the surface because my eye just slides off it. The rough surface.

0:08:410:08:46

It needs to have holes and cracks in it which will draw the viewer in.

0:08:460:08:51

It's got to have an animation which is actually in the original tree.

0:08:510:08:56

You have got to allow the echo of the source

0:08:560:09:01

to resonate.

0:09:010:09:02

The work leads me.

0:09:020:09:05

I've always been aware of possibilities, they just wink at me

0:09:050:09:10

all over the place and, if I'm alert to them, I can catch them.

0:09:100:09:14

A team of local tree surgeons are brought in to extract the wood from the river.

0:09:150:09:19

This is dangerous. These are very, very heavy pieces of wood,

0:09:230:09:27

and these people are very, very skilful.

0:09:270:09:30

There are all these aspects which put, for me, value into that particular piece of wood.

0:09:320:09:38

One, that it is local to where I am.

0:09:380:09:42

I've known this patch for 15 years...more.

0:09:420:09:47

And to be able to put this amount of focus into a piece of wood,

0:09:470:09:52

that becomes a very, very special piece of wood.

0:09:520:09:54

This tree is probably 100 years old, so it's got a story, its own story.

0:10:000:10:06

Its form is because of where it is,

0:10:060:10:09

and because of where it is, it's fallen down.

0:10:090:10:12

That's all part of its narrative.

0:10:120:10:15

I make mainly abstract work but there is a strong narrative

0:10:150:10:20

to the sourcing of the material and that narrative goes into the form.

0:10:200:10:27

And I try and always source my wood from trees

0:10:270:10:31

which have become naturally available, like this.

0:10:310:10:36

It just feels ethically OK for me to source my wood

0:10:360:10:40

from this place.

0:10:400:10:42

Depending on the circumstances, the wood from the fallen tree

0:10:440:10:48

can be worked on at the location or be brought back to the workshops in Blaenau Ffestiniog.

0:10:480:10:53

David Nash works on the sculptures with chainsaws.

0:10:530:10:58

Nash has become a master of the chainsaw,

0:10:580:11:01

and uses it as adeptly as a painter would use a brush.

0:11:010:11:04

He makes large fires that he controls to achieve exactly

0:11:090:11:13

the right amount of charring to produce the deep black surface he requires.

0:11:130:11:18

These forms are then shown in major galleries such as here at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park.

0:11:230:11:29

In 2010, David Nash was the subject of a significant exhibition

0:11:310:11:36

showing over 200 sculptures

0:11:360:11:38

in a retrospective spanning his whole career.

0:11:380:11:41

Moving to this grey, wet town after art college in London,

0:11:500:11:54

it was the perfect antidote to London's competitive art scene.

0:11:540:11:59

Coming to Blaenau was like coming to somewhere where nobody was watching.

0:11:590:12:06

I was very naive and I started building a big tower here,

0:12:060:12:11

because obviously that was very evident. But in a way, I didn't...

0:12:110:12:15

I felt I was separate enough to try... To try this out.

0:12:150:12:20

Hence the first tower.

0:12:200:12:21

It was like an epic statement. Like trying to write a whole opera

0:12:210:12:25

or a huge philosophical statement, and this moving through

0:12:250:12:29

these various layers going up through the legs and the guts

0:12:290:12:34

and into the head, and then into the heavens.

0:12:340:12:38

And I built it very badly out of scrap stuff, and it blew over.

0:12:380:12:44

And there was a cable coming from a communal aerial which

0:12:440:12:47

went to all the TVs in Blaenau Ffestiniog, so that knocked that out.

0:12:470:12:52

And I heard, only recently, somebody said, "Oh, I remember that,

0:12:520:12:55

"We used to say when we got interference, 'It's the modern art!'"

0:12:550:12:59

From these humble beginnings

0:12:590:13:01

in bits of scrap wood,

0:13:010:13:04

David Nash's sculptures are now valued in the tens of thousands of pounds.

0:13:040:13:08

As Nash's reputation grew on the world stage, the sculptures developed in scale and ambition.

0:13:090:13:16

And it was a local lorry driver who was equipped to help the artist work on a larger scale.

0:13:160:13:22

I was advised that there was a chap in Blaenau

0:13:220:13:25

who had a hire crane, called Yonks, he was known...

0:13:250:13:29

There are great on nicknames in Blaenau.

0:13:290:13:31

And he came, and not only did he just present me with...

0:13:310:13:35

Deliver the wood, he was actually able to hold it up for me, you know?

0:13:350:13:40

Like a two-ton piece of wood. There's no way I...

0:13:400:13:43

I would normally have to have carved all the weight off it before I managed to pull it up myself.

0:13:430:13:49

So this was a revelation, that there was somebody here in Blaenau, and he turned out to be somebody who was...

0:13:490:13:55

Just was a brilliant natural engineer, and also very enthusiastic about what I was doing.

0:13:550:14:03

Yonks has been a very important part of this

0:14:030:14:07

and of the actual growth of the work, of what his...

0:14:070:14:11

Not only his equipment but his intelligence and his enthusiasm

0:14:110:14:15

and his creativity have actually...

0:14:150:14:17

What he's brought to the work, to what's possible.

0:14:170:14:21

Because of the size of some of the pieces and the hard work

0:14:210:14:24

in actually moving them, when you have something

0:14:240:14:27

that can actually lift them, it just opens a lot of possibilities

0:14:270:14:32

and it just makes life so easy, doesn't it?

0:14:320:14:35

But you don't just get a nice square block, do you?

0:14:350:14:39

Yeah, there are some pieces which are easy...

0:14:390:14:42

Quite easy to handle, but, you know,

0:14:420:14:45

there's a variety of shapes and, you know, you have to figure out

0:14:450:14:50

how can you physically lift it safely and without doing any damage?

0:14:500:14:56

When Yonks first helped me, it was just him with his truck and a crane.

0:14:560:15:02

Now he's got ten articulated lorries,

0:15:020:15:04

a very flourishing business and his son is now very active.

0:15:040:15:11

And he's a whizz with a crane.

0:15:110:15:15

Over the years, because of the interest in David's work,

0:15:150:15:20

I've got to know other people's work.

0:15:200:15:23

It's just give us a bit of interest into art.

0:15:230:15:25

You come to know who they're by.

0:15:250:15:29

I suppose if I hadn't been carrying David's work,

0:15:290:15:33

I wouldn't have given it a second thought.

0:15:330:15:36

But if I see a piece, I think, what would it be like to carry that

0:15:360:15:40

and how would we go about doing it?

0:15:400:15:42

You have that thought in the back of your mind all the time.

0:15:420:15:45

The cube, sphere and pyramid appear often in Nash's work,

0:15:480:15:52

seen here in Chicago.

0:15:520:15:55

And here, in the prestigious Tate Gallery in St Ives.

0:15:550:15:59

And it's the landscape of Wales that might have influenced

0:15:590:16:02

the young David Nash, whilst on family holidays

0:16:020:16:05

to his grandparents, who lived near Blaenau Ffestiniog.

0:16:050:16:10

I began to be aware that they were actually in the mountains

0:16:100:16:17

that I've grown up with.

0:16:170:16:19

There's a...from looking from Port Madog,

0:16:190:16:24

looking east, there's the Cnicht mountain.

0:16:240:16:29

That runs into the Moelwyn Mawr.

0:16:290:16:35

Then there's the Moelwyn Bach.

0:16:350:16:39

And so, obviously, I can see that there are shapes.

0:16:390:16:46

I didn't make these as a result of knowing that.

0:16:470:16:51

But I feel that as a child these forms are probably living into me.

0:16:510:16:55

With geometric forms, which are universal forms,

0:16:550:16:58

they live in us all, and they don't belong to anybody.

0:16:580:17:02

In 2009, the National Eisteddfod in Bala

0:17:060:17:09

recognised David Nash's contribution to the arts in Wales

0:17:090:17:13

with a special exhibition.

0:17:130:17:15

He is also represented in the collection

0:17:150:17:18

at Amgueddfa Cymru, National Museum Wales.

0:17:180:17:22

We have got a body of work ranging from one of his most important

0:17:220:17:26

early pieces, right through to recent drawings

0:17:260:17:29

and a wonderful sculpture multi-cut column.

0:17:290:17:32

So we've got a significant body of David's work from across his career.

0:17:320:17:36

Nash, in the National Museum of Wales, is symbolic of somebody

0:17:360:17:41

who has chosen to make his entire career based in Wales.

0:17:410:17:45

I remember early in his career, any curator such as myself

0:17:450:17:49

wanting to make a project with him, rule number one is,

0:17:490:17:53

you've got to come and see me where I am and look at my work,

0:17:530:17:56

and understand it in the context of my locality.

0:17:560:18:00

So he's demonstrated that such a career is possible in Wales.

0:18:000:18:04

By choosing to live in Blaenau, North Wales,

0:18:060:18:09

by in a sense cutting himself off - not really,

0:18:090:18:11

because actually he's very aware of what's happening in the art world.

0:18:110:18:16

But being able to have that distance,

0:18:160:18:18

and I suppose a kind of a peace. Being able to just make the stuff

0:18:180:18:24

that comes out of him and not just be unduly influenced by fashion

0:18:240:18:28

and what other people say or think or do.

0:18:280:18:32

But yes, very much his life and work being intertwined.

0:18:320:18:37

If one reflects on David's career,

0:18:400:18:42

you get a fantastic sense of both consistency and range.

0:18:420:18:47

He is rooted in Blaenau Ffestniog.

0:18:470:18:50

He has an incredible sense of continuity with some of his projects

0:18:500:18:54

in that locality.

0:18:540:18:55

But also, one's conscious of the global reach of his work,

0:18:550:19:01

and how, through his approach to the work,

0:19:010:19:04

he has engaged communities around the world

0:19:040:19:07

in a methodology that is absolutely extraordinary in my view.

0:19:070:19:12

So that as well as coming up with significant pieces, objects,

0:19:120:19:17

drawings, installations, in their own right, he's also generated

0:19:170:19:22

this sense of sharing ideology, values, experiences.

0:19:220:19:29

And I think that's, in a way, the real significance of the work.

0:19:290:19:34

Many people are involved in projects overseas.

0:19:340:19:37

Often it's construction workers who engage with the art long before

0:19:370:19:41

curators and gallery directors see the installed sculptures.

0:19:410:19:45

I think they're beautiful. I'm amazed.

0:19:450:19:48

I've never seen anything like it.

0:19:480:19:50

How did the shapes come about?

0:19:520:19:54

These ones that go up like this are for the rising sun.

0:19:560:20:00

And those ones coming down, are for the setting sun.

0:20:000:20:05

So this is like a flame, and that's like a patch or a wedge, or both, coming down.

0:20:050:20:10

Or shadows?

0:20:100:20:12

Yeah, well this is the only one that the sun will shine through.

0:20:120:20:17

So they were cut and shaped for the sunshine itself?

0:20:170:20:22

Where the sun comes up, the sun goes down, yeah.

0:20:220:20:24

I'll be darned.

0:20:240:20:27

David Nash has undertaken many international projects

0:20:270:20:31

throughout Europe, the United States and Japan.

0:20:310:20:35

These events bring people together, as they share a common goal

0:20:350:20:38

to realise major works of art.

0:20:380:20:40

Throughout the '70s and early '80s, Nash worked alone.

0:20:420:20:46

But with a global demand for him to exhibit in other countries,

0:20:460:20:50

Nash realised the benefits of bringing teams together,

0:20:500:20:54

to create the works overseas.

0:20:540:20:56

Evan Shively's woodyard ethically sources its timber

0:20:560:21:00

from this part of California,

0:21:000:21:02

making it the ideal place for Nash to find his raw material

0:21:020:21:05

and work with wood that is not native to Britain,

0:21:050:21:09

such as eucalyptus and the great redwood trees also known as Sequoia.

0:21:090:21:15

I had the pleasure of meeting David for the first time

0:21:150:21:17

maybe three or four years ago.

0:21:170:21:20

I didn't realise we'd been building his candy store this whole time.

0:21:200:21:24

But he did as soon as he drove in.

0:21:240:21:28

It is fascinating in working with him, of course,

0:21:360:21:40

that the conversation goes both ways.

0:21:400:21:42

Sequoias have grown for thousands of millennia in their forms.

0:21:420:21:48

But now I walk in a forest and I'll say,

0:21:480:21:51

"My, that's a Nashy one, isn't it?"

0:21:510:21:53

He lives it, breathes it.

0:21:540:21:58

Every moment of the day or night, it is always percolating.

0:21:580:22:03

This Nash sculpture, the Oculus Block,

0:22:030:22:06

was formed out of a huge root and trunk of four eucalpytus trees

0:22:060:22:10

that fused together as they grew.

0:22:100:22:13

For me, it doesn't really need to symbolise anything.

0:22:130:22:16

The thing is what it is. It could be nothing else in the world.

0:22:160:22:20

I love that idea that David has brought together

0:22:200:22:23

all of these different agencies.

0:22:230:22:26

And then to develop the equipment necessary to cut the edges from it.

0:22:260:22:32

Which were chainsaws, double-ended chainsaws, a motor at each end.

0:22:320:22:37

And I think there was something like 20 feet of chain on those saws.

0:22:370:22:41

With two guys holding the saws, so that they were on lifts,

0:22:410:22:45

and as they came down the piece they shaved off these edges

0:22:450:22:48

and sliced off those pieces of wood in one go.

0:22:480:22:52

So you get this incredible surface.

0:22:520:22:55

The chainsaw is just to make a straight cut, yes,

0:22:550:22:58

but also to be able to make one simple gesture

0:22:580:23:01

so you can see the marks of the tool

0:23:010:23:05

going uninterrupted across the face, and to emphasise the simplicity

0:23:050:23:12

of the very minimal nature of his interventions into it.

0:23:120:23:17

Almost how little it took,

0:23:170:23:19

with the right insight, to make it into a sculpture.

0:23:190:23:22

Other artists have occasionally asked us

0:23:470:23:50

to consider literally the passage of time in their work.

0:23:500:23:54

But I don't think there are many artists who have embedded

0:23:540:23:58

those kinds of ideas in the material reality of their work.

0:23:580:24:02

The centrality of it to David's work is pretty unique.

0:24:020:24:09

David Nash has always recognised that time is an integral element

0:24:090:24:14

to the way he works in wood.

0:24:140:24:16

A lump of wood cut from the base of a fallen oak

0:24:160:24:20

allowed Nash to explore decay and reintegration,

0:24:200:24:23

as the lump was pushed into a nearby stream

0:24:230:24:26

and followed as it was washed down the mountain by successive storms.

0:24:260:24:31

It became known as the Wooden Boulder.

0:24:310:24:35

Eventually it made its way into the Dwyryd Estuary and became mobile.

0:24:350:24:41

The Wooden Boulder is, geometrically, essentially a sphereish thing.

0:24:410:24:46

If it was a cube or a triangular shape, it would be a manufacture.

0:24:460:24:50

But it looks enough like a boulder to be naturally there.

0:24:500:24:55

It sort of is in disguise.

0:24:550:24:57

That's the other thing about my outdoor pieces.

0:24:570:25:00

It's this low visibility.

0:25:000:25:02

I'm not very interested in making big red things outside,

0:25:020:25:06

that shout at you.

0:25:060:25:08

These earlier works, particularly, Wooden Boulder and Ash Dome,

0:25:080:25:11

are very discreet and have low visibility,

0:25:110:25:14

like the wooden boulder, people would walk past it

0:25:140:25:17

and think it was a boulder. That's fine.

0:25:170:25:19

The wooden boulder would travel four miles out

0:25:210:25:24

and four miles back with the tides in the estuary.

0:25:240:25:28

The artist would photograph and film it where it settled,

0:25:280:25:32

until one day, the wooden boulder could not be found.

0:25:320:25:35

After much searching, it was finally declared lost in 2003

0:25:370:25:40

and presumed to have gone out into the Irish Sea

0:25:400:25:43

and even beyond to the Atlantic Ocean...

0:25:430:25:46

..a journey that took 25 years.

0:25:470:25:50

To explore the concept of living and growing sculpture,

0:25:520:25:55

a circle of ash trees were planted in 1976.

0:25:550:25:59

All the time, he's learning what each of these woods does

0:25:590:26:02

and they all work in different ways

0:26:020:26:05

and so he understands how ash reacts in certain conditions,

0:26:050:26:09

how beech reacts and how those woods are used in particular ways.

0:26:090:26:15

Through these living works, Nash has a deeper understanding

0:26:150:26:18

of his materials, incorporating the elements more fully

0:26:180:26:22

into his understanding and relationship with wood and trees.

0:26:220:26:26

It is only now, after 30 years of careful nurturing,

0:26:280:26:32

that the Ash Dome is being realised.

0:26:320:26:35

If I was to prune this branch off, if I prune it here,

0:26:360:26:40

it can't grow over the wound.

0:26:400:26:41

If I cut it back here where these rings are,

0:26:410:26:44

that bark has got the capacity to actually heal over the wound.

0:26:440:26:49

If I cut it here, this will rot

0:26:490:26:51

and then you get a rot spot going back into the tree.

0:26:510:26:54

Obviously not good.

0:26:540:26:56

Here, we've got a very successful healing

0:27:000:27:03

so that was quite a big branch I cut off

0:27:030:27:05

and that has actually grown over and completely healed.

0:27:050:27:08

So that took about 10 years to completely grow over

0:27:100:27:14

and seal itself up, very satisfactorily.

0:27:140:27:17

It's just this gathering of practical, hands-on knowledge.

0:27:240:27:28

It just comes part of the great compost of information

0:27:280:27:35

and feelings and everything that makes up a maturing human being.

0:27:350:27:39

So like a tree, there is an 18 year-old inside here,

0:27:390:27:43

there is a six year-old, which still has an essence coming through

0:27:430:27:46

into how I am now but, hopefully,

0:27:460:27:51

one is learning and becoming a little wiser from all this deeper knowledge,

0:27:510:27:57

out of which one is created.

0:27:570:28:00

At the workshop, massive lumps of wood continue to arrive

0:28:020:28:06

to be transformed into major works of art before they leave

0:28:060:28:10

Blaenau Ffestiniog to go on a journey where they will be seen

0:28:100:28:15

and appreciated in galleries and public spaces all around the world.

0:28:150:28:19

The next generation is already responding

0:28:220:28:26

to the work of the sculptor from the slate town,

0:28:260:28:29

who has brought Blaenau Ffestiniog

0:28:290:28:31

to the attention of the world through his art.

0:28:310:28:34

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:28:530:28:56

E-mail [email protected]

0:28:560:28:59

David Nash is one of Britain's most important living artists and he has a global reputation. In his sculptures, represented in collections at major galleries and public spaces around the world, there is always a little bit of Wales.

This film reveals how Blaenau Ffestiniog is fundamental to the artist's ideas and has been a major part of his success. Working with wood, David Nash has developed a deep understanding of his materials. Natural forces and the nature of the tree itself are integral to his art. Cut with a chainsaw and allowed to crack, warp and bend or planted on a hillside to grow into a form as 'living sculpture' the landscape of North Wales is the foundation to the work.


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS