Night and Day Arena


Night and Day

To celebrate Arena's 40th anniversary, a new film made entirely from its own archive, evoking the one experience common to all - the 24-hour cycle from dawn to dusk to dawn again.


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Transcript


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THUNDER ROLLS

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MUSIC: Another Green World by Brian Eno

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MUSIC: Another Green World by Brian Eno

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The unmistakable Arena bottle has been reliably introducing

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a distinct brand of film-making since the 1970s.

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I've been a fan ever since I first saw it.

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This year, the programme celebrates its 40th anniversary, making it the

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longest-running arts documentary strand in the history of television.

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Throughout those 40 years, it has addressed the arts

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and culture of the world, high and low,

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from the Old Kent Road to Robben Island,

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Amy Winehouse to TS Eliot,

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the cinema of Bergman and Visconti to Elvis Presley's diet.

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The Arena archive is a treasure trove that provides a unique history

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of the last hundred years.

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It was originated by Humphrey Burton,

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then head of BBC Music and Arts, in 1975.

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Burton had one of the most distinguished profiles in television.

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He produced Ken Russell's legendary film on Elgar for Monitor,

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and was television's leading figure in the arts.

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The first episode featured no less than

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Laurence Olivier in conversation with Kenneth Tynan.

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She was immensely generous.

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All her money, she was free with as the air.

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She was marvellous in helping people.

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-At one point, she actually asked for her salary to be cut.

-Yes.

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Yeah, she was so worried about the expenditure going up.

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Of course, she lived on nothing. Sausages and sardines...

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In its first year, it was a weekly magazine programme.

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Then Leslie Megahey took over,

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and the series has had only three editors since,

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all like-minded

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and all directors in their own right.

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So, highly unusually

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for a TV strand, Arena has been run by an

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unbroken editorial sensibility pretty much through its entire history.

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Megahey has directed some of the finest films about visual artists ever made.

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In 1978, he passed the role on to Alan Yentob,

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who'd already made the classic film about David Bowie, Cracked Actor.

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As editors, both continued to direct,

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and notably Megahey's definitive portrait of Orson Welles,

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and Yentob's entertaining engagement with Mel Brooks.

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During Yentob's editorship, within a pool of highly talented directors,

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there was a small team that worked only on Arena.

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Author Nigel Williams' work, including films on George Orwell,

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Joe Orton and Jean Genet,

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became the core of Arena's literary output,

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and Nigel Finch and Anthony Wall

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made the films that gave Arena its unique signature style - My Way,

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The Chelsea Hotel,

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The Private Life Of The Ford Cortina

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and Desert Island Discs were witty, stylish

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and somewhat irreverent meditations on subjects

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that, at the time, would not have been thought to be within the remit

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of the BBC Music and Arts Department.

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Alan Yentob became head of that department in 1985.

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Nigel Finch and Anthony Wall took over

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and ran the series

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until Finch's untimely death in 1995.

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Wall has continued as sole editor ever since.

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The films I've mentioned represent only a fraction of Arena's output.

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The film you are about to see brings together the work of many producers,

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directors and their teams, but it demonstrates a commonality of purpose

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that characterises the 600 or so films in the Arena canon.

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It's been showered with honours at home and abroad,

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not least nine BAFTA awards and 25 BAFTA nominations.

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Rather than make a "best of" compilation to mark the anniversary,

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the decision was made to try and bring the past into the present

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and make a new film.

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CLOCK TICKS

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It's an evocation,

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drawn entirely from Arena films,

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of the one experience common to everything

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and everyone on the planet -

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the inexorable 24-hour cycle of night and day.

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Dawn to dusk and on to dawn again.

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And, remember, the darkest hour is just before the dawn.

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BIG BEN CHIMES

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THUNDER CLAP

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To begin at the beginning...

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It is spring, moonless night in the small town,

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starless and bible-black, the cobblestreets silent

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and the hunched, courters'-and- rabbits' wood limping invisible

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down to the sloeblack, slow, black,

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crowblack, fishingboat-bobbing sea.

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The houses are blind as moles,

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though moles see fine to-night in the snouting, velvet dingles,

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and all the people of the lulled and dumbfound town

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are sleeping now.

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CRICKETS CHIRP

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FROG BELCHES

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HARP PLAYS

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BIG BEN CHIMES

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BIRDSONG

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MUSIC: Night And Day by Frank Sinatra

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# Night and day

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# You are the one

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# Only you beneath the moon

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# And under the sun

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# Whether near to me or far

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# It's no matter, darling

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# Where you are

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# I think of you

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# Day and night... #

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I was out walking two blocks from where I lived at, actually,

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and I looked up and I saw these steps going up.

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I walked over the street and I walked up the steps

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and there was this beautiful big expanse of bridge, you know?

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Nobody up there.

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TRAIN HORN BLARES

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HE PLAYS A JAZZ RIFF

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I haven't slept very much in the past couple of years

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and I wake up very early, usually around six o'clock,

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with unaccountable feelings of optimism.

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I lie in bed smoking for half an hour, which is pretty disgusting,

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contemplating the horror of having to write a column

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and wondering just what the hell to write one about.

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Then I do it with some desperation.

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MUSIC: I Ain't Got No Home by Woody Guthrie

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# I ain't got no home I'm just a-ramblin' round

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# I work when I can get it

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# I go from town to town

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# Can't fill a form no matter where I go

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# Cos I ain't got no home in this world any more. #

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After I was on the highway to California,

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I made about three trips back to Texas and back to Oklahoma

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and back to California, again by freight train.

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And every time, I saw hundreds and hundreds and hundreds and thousands

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of families, of people living around under railroad bridges.

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# I'm stranded on that road that goes from city to city

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# A hundred thousand others are stranded same as me

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# Eight hundred thousand years Eight hundred thousand more

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# And I ain't got no home in this world any more. #

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TRAIN HORN BLARES

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# From the mountain to the prairie

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# Through the ocean white with foam

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# God bless America

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# My home sweet home

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# From the mountain to the prairie

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# Through the ocean white with foam

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# God bless America

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# My home sweet home... #

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I chose the name Poly Styrene

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because it's a lightweight disposable product.

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It sounded all right,

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cos I thought it was a send-up of being a pop star.

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It's like a little figure, not me, being Poly Styrene.

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Just plastic, disposable.

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That's what pop stars meant to me

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so, therefore, I thought I might as well send it up.

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The Surrealists never believed in looking bohemian

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because they realised that people expected bohemian artists

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to behave madly.

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And so they chose to look like everybody else

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and, when they did, therefore,

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attack the bourgeoisie through surprise,

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scandal or whatever means they chose,

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it was all the more shock to those they attacked that those who

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were attacking them looked exactly like themselves.

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Mesens, for instance, was absolutely meticulous about his appearance

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and in the bathroom, even to the point of obsession.

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For instance, he shaved no less than three times,

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using a fantastically elaborate mathematical system

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to select a Gillette razor blade

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from a huge pile he kept on the glass shelf in front of his glass.

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Where is... Where is the jam?

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The jam is up there.

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Beans, tomatoes, chips, mushrooms.

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Er...fried potatoes, two thick bread-and-butter

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and it comes up really heaped well up on the plate, like.

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44?

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LAUGHTER

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Cheers, mate.

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That morning, when I walked into the dining room, I spoke.

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I said, "Good morning." He said, "Good morning."

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I said, "What we going to have for breakfast this morning?"

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He said, "Fried peanut butter and banana sandwich."

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And I looked at him and I said, "What?"

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He said, "Fried peanut butter and banana sandwich."

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I said, "I never heard of it."

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The first time I went in, fixed the sandwich

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and put it on the tray and brought it back, that wasn't right.

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His father was sitting there and he said, "Mary, I'm going with you

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"and help you and let's see maybe both of us can get it right."

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I said, "OK."

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Then he said, "Let's toast the bread first," so we toast the bread,

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then spread the peanut butter on and sliced the bananas and put them on

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and put them into the skillet and kept turning them with the spatula,

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and turn them till they got heated all the way through.

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Then I take them, cut them, put them on the platter and take them

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back to him and he said, "That's what I want. That's right!"

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And then smiled.

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Run for that train. Run!

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FRANTIC MUSIC PLAYS

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'Radio 4.

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'Now it's five past nine and time for Desert Island Discs.

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'As usual, the castaway is introduced by Roy Plomley.'

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DESERT ISLAND DISCS THEME PLAYS

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And my 1,630th castaway is, I'm happy to say, Paul McCartney,

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composer, musician and ex-Beatle.

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How well could you endure loneliness?

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How well could I endure loneliness?

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Um, I don't really know.

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When I was a kid, I never used to mind it too much.

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Since then, I haven't actually been very lonely,

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so I haven't kind of tested it lately.

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But I never used to mind it too much.

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I used to quite like getting away on my own.

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-You mean alone, prolongedly, on a desert island?

-That's it.

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As the old joke goes, it's better than the alternative.

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-What's that?

-Being dead...

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-Well, yes.

-..if you see what I mean.

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But I wouldn't like it for too long, no.

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The whole idea doesn't appeal to me at all.

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I'm not especially gregarious.

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I can get along with my own dismal personality for a little while,

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but I would hate to endure it for any length of time.

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To know and be uncertain about when you would see anyone else

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would be a problem.

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Fortunately, football means I have a fairly busy life,

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got a lot of friends and meet a lot of people

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and actually got a strong family background as well,

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so I think to be isolated like that would be a problem,

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unless you know some little boat was going to come along

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in a few months' time and rescue you.

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-Can't set any term to it.

-That's right. That's what I'm worried about.

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Julio...go over to Warner Brothers this afternoon, get a shopping bag,

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pick up the money that's due to us from Blazing Saddles.

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We should have over 100 there waiting, and go to the supermarket.

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Delicious apples are on sale. Get a pack.

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Good morning, Mr Brooks.

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Great to see you, Phil.

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Phil, raise the gate, for Christ's sake! Will you raise it up?

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Thank you, Phil. Oh!

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Julio, get me a half a dozen bagels.

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Make it seven. Take one for yourself, OK?

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Good. I hope somebody's in there.

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I've been writing a weekly column for the Spectator

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for ten years now, write for at least two other magazines,

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and so inspiration is sometimes difficult to muster.

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But editors continue to ring with bright ideas

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and impossible deadlines and so I persevere.

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I really rather hate what I do for a living,

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but I suppose it's better than a nine-to-five job.

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I have about six spasms of job satisfaction a year only,

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but, as I say, I'd hate to have to rush to work on a train.

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I simply crawl out of my bed to get to it.

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I pour myself a drink, which seems to lubricate the typewriter

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and it certainly makes me feel less inhibited.

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When you're committed to owning up and taking the piss out of yourself

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in print, you're a sitting duck for literary snipers,

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but I don't really mind.

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DOORBELL RINGS

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ENGINE ROARS

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TYRES SQUEAL

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-Mr Blake?

-Yeah.

-I'm Lloyd Ryan.

-Hello.

-Hi, there.

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-Can I introduce you to Kendo Nagasaki?

-Kendo.

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I must just say, he won't shake hands and he won't speak to you at all,

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-so we'll have to do this without any communication whatsoever.

-OK, fine.

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-And Lawrence, Kendo's personal assistant.

-Hello, Lawrence. Hi.

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Well, the studio's at the top of the house so if you'd just follow me.

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Right.

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# This land is your land

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# This land is my land

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# From California to the New York island

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# From the red wood forest to the Gulf Stream waters

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# This land was made for you and me. #

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MUSIC: Imagine by John Lennon

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# Imagine all the people... #

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It's easy if you try.

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# ..It's easy if you try... #

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No hell below us.

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# ..No hell below us... #

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Above us only sky.

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# ..Above us only sky... #

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Imagine all the people.

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# ..Imagine the people... #

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WOMAN SINGS IN JAPANESE

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THEY SPEAK IN JAPANESE

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Good morning, class. As I mentioned yesterday, today is John's birthday.

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John wrote the famous song Imagine,

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so today I'm going to look at the story - how did John meet Yoko?

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Please open your texts on page 81.

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When I did the Half-A-Room show,

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where all the things were in halves, I became interested in objects,

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the part of it is just in your mind.

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John finished reading a catalogue and began walking around the gallery

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looking at exhibits.

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One of the exhibits was an apple, just an ordinary apple,

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except that the price was 400.

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John felt this was very funny.

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Look, I don't have to pay all that money for an apple.

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Yoko was pleased.

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As an artist,

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she was very happy that someone was responding to her work.

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I climb up a ladder and hammer a nail into the wall at the gallery.

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This nail is imaginary and will cost just five shillings.

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I'll give you an imaginary five shillings if you let me

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hammer the imaginary nail.

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There are no imaginary nails left.

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It was the beginning of a loving, creative

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and often difficult relationship.

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John suggested that, why don't I sell the other half

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in a bottle?

0:25:280:25:30

This is half a wind.

0:25:300:25:32

Um...

0:25:340:25:36

half a table.

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Half a letter.

0:25:390:25:41

Half a music.

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Many people said, "Well, how about half a cat?" and all that, you know,

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or half a human being?

0:25:500:25:54

But I did think it was necessary because a person is a half anyway.

0:25:540:25:58

At that time I hadn't met John yet, but, I mean, so my concept was there

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maybe subconsciously, that I'm just really a half a person

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without meeting John.

0:26:090:26:12

-But, you know, that bit...

-Cut.

0:26:120:26:14

She's got to me.

0:26:140:26:17

I try to get all my work done by 11.

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There are always deadlines to meet and I make mine opening time,

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whatever the editors may say.

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Not that I always wait for opening time to have a drink.

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I find this completely relaxing.

0:26:400:26:44

This is my rhythm today at this time of the day.

0:26:440:26:47

It is 11 o'clock

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and since I have an hourly...

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..rhythm, 11 o'clock is my best time,

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and the rhythm is this.

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Quite fast.

0:27:010:27:03

Now, when you are sick and tired of the whole day...

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You see how tired the rhythm is?

0:27:130:27:17

TICKING

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INDISTINCT

0:28:090:28:13

-This is Ali.

-Ali? Hi, bonjour.

0:28:160:28:19

Mick Jagger.

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-This is Abdullah.

-Abdullah? How are you?

0:28:220:28:24

Mick Jagger.

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-This is Ali.

-Ali, hello.

0:28:280:28:31

Mick Jagger.

0:28:310:28:33

-This is my brother, Mustapha.

-Hello. Your younger brother?

0:28:330:28:36

-This is my little brother.

-This is your older brother.

0:28:360:28:39

-You're not so bad with him?

-Huh?

-You're strong with him?

0:28:390:28:43

Yes, he plays music with me. We play the same time together.

0:28:430:28:46

This is Abdul. Mick Jagger.

0:28:460:28:50

-This is Abdullah.

-Abdullah.

0:28:500:28:53

-This is Mohammad.

-Mohammad.

0:28:530:28:55

This is old man.

0:28:550:28:57

He want to kiss you.

0:29:000:29:03

-And he thinks he meet you a long time.

-In Tangiers?

0:29:030:29:06

-In 1001 Nights with Brion Gysin.

-With Brion Gysin, yes.

-Yeah.

0:29:060:29:11

-This is... His name, Ali.

-Ali. Hello, Ali.

0:29:130:29:16

-Mick Jagger.

-Hi. Hi.

0:29:160:29:18

-Mohammad.

-Mohammad.

-Mick Jagger.

0:29:200:29:24

-This is Mochtar.

-Hi.

-Mick Jagger.

0:29:260:29:29

-He said he's very happy to meet you.

-Nice to meet you.

0:29:290:29:33

This is Ali.

0:29:330:29:36

-This is Absalom.

-Absalom, hi.

0:29:360:29:39

-This is Lehsun.

-Lehsun.

-Mick Jagger.

0:29:390:29:42

-This is all of them...

-This is good.

-..and they are very, very happy.

0:29:420:29:46

They waiting for you 20 years ago.

0:29:460:29:50

Waiting for you, all of them, very, very happy.

0:29:500:29:54

-Well, I'm very happy that we could all come.

-Thank you very much.

0:29:540:29:58

DRUMMING

0:30:010:30:05

It was just an idea that Mick and I had.

0:30:220:30:26

Ron, if ever we could use them, this is probably the track to do it on.

0:30:270:30:32

They pick it up amazingly quickly at first.

0:30:380:30:41

It's just this sort of cacophony of sound

0:30:410:30:43

but suddenly they're getting their patterns down.

0:30:430:30:45

It's a lot of drummers.

0:30:450:30:47

They all have to work out what they're going to play.

0:30:470:30:51

It's the pipes I want to hear next, you know?

0:30:510:30:54

Very good.

0:31:040:31:06

APPLAUSE

0:31:060:31:08

Good. Well done.

0:31:080:31:10

There's a sense of urgency about lunchtime drinking that I like.

0:31:150:31:18

In the evening, people are just plundering time.

0:31:180:31:22

Opening time and lunch are my favourite times of the day.

0:31:220:31:25

I think most people lead lives of such annihilating boredom

0:31:260:31:31

and so paralysed by the awfulness of life

0:31:310:31:33

that being in an ale house drinking

0:31:330:31:35

with a few acquaintances and talking a load of rubbish half the time

0:31:350:31:38

is a tremendous relief.

0:31:380:31:39

-Well, it's marginally less worse than not being, I suppose.

-Yeah.

0:31:390:31:42

I mean, most people actually are bored out of their minds,

0:31:420:31:45

-aren't they?

-Yeah.

0:31:450:31:47

Most of us don't comprehend any meaning of life. All this crap...

0:31:470:31:50

'Being out and about, hanging around, is my work

0:31:500:31:53

'because that's what I write about.

0:31:530:31:55

'I can only write about what I know about.

0:31:550:31:57

'Fiction is for novelists.

0:31:570:32:00

'If I arrive at the Coach and Horses at 12 and not 11,

0:32:010:32:04

'Tom Baker tells me that I'm late for work.

0:32:040:32:08

'Editors often call me at the pub,

0:32:080:32:10

'but the staff have developed a highly effective system

0:32:100:32:12

'of protecting me, and I never have to talk to anybody I don't want to.'

0:32:120:32:16

It's very important that the setting, the ambience,

0:32:180:32:23

the quality of the china, the glass,

0:32:230:32:28

the quality of the staff within that area is going to balance

0:32:280:32:32

the quality of food that you have in the back of house.

0:32:320:32:35

It's no good if you have first-class food and a second-class environment.

0:32:350:32:39

You need both those levels to be equal.

0:32:390:32:42

ACCORDION MUSIC PLAYS

0:32:480:32:52

Two pies and two lots of mash, three times, please, love.

0:33:420:33:46

And I KNEW he'd got the Nobel

0:33:480:33:51

and I just sat on the stairs there and thought, "Oh, my God!"

0:33:510:33:55

Cheers.

0:34:100:34:12

-Chin-chin.

-Chin-chin.

-Here's to the next show.

-Yeah.

0:34:140:34:18

Good luck to everyone.

0:34:180:34:20

Would you like to order now? Your guest has already arrived.

0:34:200:34:23

Yes, I see.

0:34:230:34:24

I think I'll just have 50 quid's worth all around the menu.

0:34:240:34:27

Better make it 40 quid's worth. I'll save a bit for the cab.

0:34:270:34:31

He said, "Do you know what, Mr Mancini?

0:34:310:34:33

"I'm going to name my car after your sandwich bar.

0:34:330:34:36

"I'm going to call it the Cortina."

0:34:360:34:38

Elvis helped make us famous for a moment by coming to Denver

0:34:400:34:45

on one occasion

0:34:450:34:47

and having 22 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches

0:34:470:34:49

delivered to his plane.

0:34:490:34:51

ACCORDION MUSIC PLAYS

0:34:510:34:54

INAUDIBLE

0:34:570:35:01

They're all characters who are against the system

0:35:060:35:09

and trying to exploit the system, aren't they?

0:35:090:35:14

Partly because they're hungry.

0:35:140:35:17

The great reward in these papers always is a feed.

0:35:170:35:20

HE SINGS AN ARIA

0:35:390:35:42

At lunchtime, people are relaxed,

0:35:500:35:53

with no expectations of being entertained or seduced.

0:35:530:35:56

No-one is really serious at lunch the way that they can be

0:35:560:36:00

at dinner parties, when everyone's trying to impress everyone else

0:36:000:36:03

with what they've done or what they're about to do.

0:36:030:36:06

You can be yourself during the day.

0:36:060:36:08

That was almost the last time I saw old Frank.

0:36:110:36:14

A week later, dead.

0:36:140:36:17

The slightly depressing thing about Soho, at my age, at any rate,

0:36:170:36:20

is that the faces are thinning out.

0:36:200:36:23

People will keep dying.

0:36:230:36:26

I think we sometimes look about us and wonder who's next.

0:36:260:36:29

Frank Blake was a fixture fitting for so long among

0:36:290:36:33

so many other old friends that I sometimes feel as though

0:36:330:36:36

I'm in a room that is slowly being stripped of its furniture.

0:36:360:36:39

-Very good.

-Very good.

-Bravo.

-Thank you.

0:36:450:36:49

The line that went out was -

0:36:500:36:52

"A pint? That's very nearly an armful!" -

0:36:520:36:55

which gets a nice laugh, but when the line...

0:36:550:37:00

Ray and I used to take great care in rhythms.

0:37:010:37:04

We used to spend a lot of time working out the sound of the line,

0:37:040:37:09

the rhythm of the line.

0:37:090:37:11

One "and" too many, one "but" too many, can kill a line.

0:37:110:37:14

-One syllable.

-Just like poetry.

-Indeed.

0:37:140:37:17

You've got to get the rhythm right.

0:37:170:37:19

You must get it right otherwise it doesn't work.

0:37:190:37:21

So probably that line started out,

0:37:210:37:23

"It's an armful," which, in itself, is quite an amusing concept,

0:37:230:37:27

to talk about blood being an armful or legful.

0:37:270:37:31

And the other one probably said, "Ah, that's nearly an armful,"

0:37:310:37:34

which is better because it's a little bit more precise.

0:37:340:37:36

And then the other one would have topped it up -

0:37:360:37:39

"That's VERY nearly an armful."

0:37:390:37:41

Now, "very nearly an armful" is much funnier than "that's an armful".

0:37:410:37:44

It's the same gag,

0:37:440:37:47

but it's being specific on a stupid way of assessing things.

0:37:470:37:50

Hold out your hand, please.

0:37:500:37:53

Now, this won't hurt.

0:38:000:38:01

You'll just feel a slight prick on the end of your thumb.

0:38:010:38:04

LAUGHTER

0:38:040:38:07

Well, I'll bid you good day, then. Thank you very much.

0:38:070:38:10

LAUGHTER

0:38:100:38:12

If you want any more, don't hesitate to get in touch with me.

0:38:120:38:15

Where are you going?

0:38:150:38:17

To have my tea and biscuits.

0:38:170:38:19

LAUGHTER

0:38:190:38:20

I thought you came here to give us some of your blood?

0:38:200:38:22

Well, you've just had it.

0:38:220:38:24

That's just a smear.

0:38:240:38:26

It may be just smear to you, mate,

0:38:260:38:27

but it's life and death to some poor wretch!

0:38:270:38:30

LAUGHTER

0:38:300:38:32

I've just taken a sample to test.

0:38:320:38:34

A sample? How much do you want, then?

0:38:340:38:36

Well, a pint, of course.

0:38:360:38:37

A pint?! Have you gone raving mad?

0:38:370:38:40

You must be joking.

0:38:400:38:42

A pint is a perfectly normal quantity to take.

0:38:420:38:45

You don't seriously expect me to believe that.

0:38:450:38:47

I came in here in all good faith to help my country.

0:38:470:38:49

I don't mind giving a reasonable amount, but a pint?!

0:38:490:38:52

That's very nearly an armful.

0:38:520:38:55

His name is Bob Dylan.

0:38:550:38:59

# In the dime stores and bus stations

0:39:010:39:05

# People talk over situations

0:39:050:39:09

# Read books and repeat quotations

0:39:090:39:11

# Draw conclusions on the wall

0:39:110:39:15

# Some speak of the future

0:39:190:39:23

# My love, she speaks softly

0:39:230:39:26

# She knows there's no success like failure

0:39:260:39:30

# And that failure's no success at all. #

0:39:300:39:33

Lloyds is a market.

0:39:390:39:41

It's very much like any market.

0:39:410:39:43

In other words, oranges, lemons and fish.

0:39:430:39:45

It's a series of stalls which are involved in selling insurance.

0:39:450:39:52

The people who man the stalls are called underwriters,

0:39:530:39:56

and the people who are trying to buy insurance are called brokers.

0:39:560:40:00

Basically, the broker is shopping in this market space

0:40:000:40:03

and the whole activity of Lloyds - again, like a market -

0:40:030:40:06

is under a single roof, and this is its unique quality.

0:40:060:40:10

SPANISH OVER TANNOY

0:40:520:40:54

Would you like some tea?

0:41:140:41:15

I'd love some.

0:41:150:41:17

I'll be mother.

0:41:170:41:19

Yes, milk.

0:41:190:41:21

Oh.

0:41:210:41:23

I like afternoon tea.

0:41:230:41:25

-It's a very civilised thing.

-Where is your oboe?

0:41:250:41:29

I had to sell it, I needed the money.

0:41:290:41:32

To buy a house, in fact.

0:41:320:41:34

My first house was the money from the oboe.

0:41:340:41:37

Have you still got yours?

0:41:370:41:38

-Oh, yes, of course.

-You treasure it, do you?

-Yes.

0:41:380:41:42

-You don't play it, though, do you?

-Yes, I do.

-Do you really?

0:41:420:41:45

Well, you never forget.

0:41:450:41:47

No, you never forget, but gosh, I don't think I could play one now.

0:41:470:41:51

-I'll give you one lesson...

-Would you really?

-..for nothing!

0:41:530:41:56

HE LAUGHS

0:41:560:41:58

-Do you know, I might take you up on that.

-Yes.

0:41:590:42:03

Why not?

0:42:030:42:05

# Cement mixer

0:42:190:42:22

# Put-ti, put-ti

0:42:230:42:26

# Cement mixer

0:42:260:42:28

# Put-ti, put-ti. #

0:42:300:42:32

What does everybody like? Anybody like anything?

0:42:320:42:35

# ..Cement mixer

0:42:350:42:37

# Goes put-ti, put-ti

0:42:370:42:42

# A puddle o'veet

0:42:420:42:47

# Concrete. #

0:42:470:42:52

Can I have some tea?

0:42:520:42:54

The next part isn't quite so sad.

0:42:580:43:01

# ..First you take some gravel

0:43:030:43:08

# And then you pour it in a vout

0:43:080:43:13

# To make a mess of mortar You take cement and water

0:43:140:43:21

# See the mellow roony... #

0:43:210:43:25

CLOCK TICKS

0:43:250:43:28

CLOCK CHIMES

0:43:280:43:30

Well...

0:43:460:43:48

another day, another dollar.

0:43:480:43:51

MIMICS TOMMY COOPER: Just like that.

0:43:510:43:54

Look at all these cigars. I gave up smoking cigars three years ago.

0:44:200:44:24

Look at all those boxes.

0:44:240:44:26

I can't bear to throw them away, there's not a cigar in them,

0:44:270:44:31

but I'll tell you what there is in them.

0:44:310:44:33

Ah!

0:44:390:44:41

Well, that's my fix for today.

0:44:440:44:46

Arrivederci.

0:44:480:44:49

DOOR CLOSES

0:44:510:44:53

I'm the president of the George Formby Society.

0:45:030:45:05

In fact, just retired president now, with honorary membership.

0:45:050:45:08

And we've come up to Blackpool, as we do three times a year,

0:45:080:45:12

to the Imperial hotel.

0:45:120:45:14

March, June and September, for our annual general conventions,

0:45:140:45:18

and, of course, September is always the biggest one because we have

0:45:180:45:22

members all over the world and they come from all over the world.

0:45:220:45:25

# With my little stick of Blackpool rock

0:45:270:45:30

# Along the promenade I stroll

0:45:300:45:33

# It may get sticky but I never complain

0:45:330:45:37

# I like to have a nibble at it now and again

0:45:370:45:41

# Every day, wherever I stray The kids all round me flock

0:45:410:45:46

# A fella took me photograph It cost one and three

0:45:460:45:50

# I said when that is done, is that supposed to be me?

0:45:500:45:54

# You've properly mucked it up The only thing I can see is

0:45:540:45:57

# Me little stick of Blackpool rock. #

0:45:570:46:00

The whole song is involved around Blackpool

0:46:020:46:07

and that's why, of course, the song is so comparative

0:46:070:46:11

with Blackpool itself.

0:46:110:46:13

I met him when I was seven, my sister took me

0:46:160:46:19

along to Ealing Studios to meet him making one of those films,

0:46:190:46:22

and when I was introduced to him and Beryl...

0:46:220:46:25

Well, you know, to a little kiddie of seven years old,

0:46:250:46:29

who idolised him, it was really something.

0:46:290:46:31

APPLAUSE

0:46:310:46:33

Thank you, and now I am going to sing a song,

0:46:330:46:36

and they are going to make a film of it at the same time,

0:46:360:46:39

so if you see any flashing, don't take any notice, you see.

0:46:390:46:42

All right, I'm going

0:46:420:46:43

to sing a song called My Little Stick Of Blackpool Rock.

0:46:430:46:45

This being in Blackpool, we'll have it filmed as well.

0:46:450:46:48

# Every year when summer comes round

0:47:000:47:02

# Off to the sea I go

0:47:020:47:05

# I don't care if I do spend a pound

0:47:060:47:09

# I'm rather rash, I know

0:47:090:47:13

# See me dressed like all the sports

0:47:130:47:16

# In my blazer and a pair of shorts

0:47:160:47:20

# With my little stick of Blackpool rock

0:47:200:47:23

# Along the promenade I stroll

0:47:230:47:26

# It may be sticky but I never complain

0:47:260:47:30

# It's nice to have a nibble at it now and again

0:47:300:47:34

# Every day, wherever I stray The kids all round me flock

0:47:340:47:40

# One afternoon, the band conductor up on his stand

0:47:400:47:45

# Somehow lost his baton It flew out of his hand

0:47:450:47:48

# So I jumped in his place and then conducted the band

0:47:480:47:51

# With my little stick of Blackpool rock

0:47:510:47:55

# With my little stick of Blackpool rock

0:47:550:47:58

# Along the promenade I stroll

0:47:580:48:02

# In the ballroom I went dancing each night

0:48:020:48:05

# No wonder every girl that danced with me stuck to me tight

0:48:050:48:09

# Every day, wherever I stray The kids all round me flock

0:48:090:48:16

# A fella took my photograph It cost one and three

0:48:160:48:19

# I said when it was done, is that supposed to be me?

0:48:190:48:23

# You've properly mucked it up The only thing I can see is

0:48:230:48:26

# My little stick of Blackpool rock

0:48:260:48:30

# My little stick of Blackpool rock

0:48:300:48:34

# Along the promenade I stroll

0:48:340:48:37

# In my pocket it got stuck I could tell

0:48:370:48:40

# Cos when I pulled it out I pulled my shirt off as well

0:48:400:48:44

# Every day, wherever I stray The kids all round me flock

0:48:440:48:51

# A girl while bathing clung to me My wits had to use

0:48:510:48:55

# She cried, I'm drowning and to save me, you won't refuse

0:48:550:48:58

# I said, well, if you're drowning then I don't want to lose

0:48:580:49:02

# My little stick of Blackpool rock. #

0:49:020:49:05

Well, there always seemed to be rivalry between groups

0:51:420:51:45

of alchemists and magicians, as I recall.

0:51:450:51:48

I mean, at one point, there was a 15th-century alchemical manuscript

0:51:480:51:51

that Jonson had that somehow was stolen or misplaced

0:51:510:51:55

and...I mean, there was a point where everyone was casting spells

0:51:550:51:58

-on everybody else...

-I know.

0:51:580:52:00

..and throwing the tarot before they left their room to find out...

0:52:000:52:03

Oh, it was hysterical. And the magicians denouncing one another

0:52:030:52:06

-in the lobby.

-Yes, right.

0:52:060:52:08

Cos he really didn't... He didn't give a damn. That was...

0:52:110:52:14

You must have seen him maybe 1,000 times...

0:52:140:52:16

# Night and day, you are the one... #

0:52:170:52:25

RESTAURANT HUBBUB

0:52:250:52:27

# ..Only you beneath the moon and under the sun

0:52:270:52:34

# Whether near to me, or far... #

0:52:360:52:41

'I wouldn't go that far...

0:52:410:52:44

'Possibly even psychologically...

0:52:440:52:46

'We should really reminisce about the time...'

0:52:460:52:49

# ..I think of you. #

0:52:490:52:52

-'..not married?

-Not married.

0:52:530:52:57

-'She's 16.

-He's a happy man'

0:52:570:53:00

-LAUGHTER

-'Watch it, buddy! Watch it, buddy.'

0:53:000:53:03

Cook a little rice with it or something, will you?

0:53:060:53:10

Something, you know... either rice or noodles.

0:53:100:53:13

OK, Timmy, I'll talk to you later. Bye.

0:53:150:53:18

Why do you have to know about my rice and noodles?

0:53:180:53:23

-I didn't know what you were going to say.

-Rice and noodles!

0:53:230:53:26

What if you had walked in here and I was talking...business?

0:53:260:53:31

Or personal matters, Jack, possibly.

0:53:310:53:34

You look cute today in your red shirt, huh?

0:53:340:53:38

All right, now, what have I got to do?

0:53:390:53:41

It's eight o'clock, why are we starting now?

0:53:410:53:44

-They are trying to finish it, Jack.

-Well, let's get 'em finished.

0:53:440:53:48

Let's get 'em out of here. Huh?

0:53:480:53:51

Finished with the assignment!

0:53:520:53:55

Beautiful. Excellent work.

0:53:550:53:57

Great work.

0:53:580:54:00

Can I have a look in your bathroom?

0:54:020:54:04

-Yeah, you want to go in with me while I go?

-No!

0:54:040:54:07

I do have to go. It's pretty neat, huh?

0:54:070:54:11

See?

0:54:130:54:14

-Toothbrush. I'll brush my teeth for you.

-Turn the light on.

-OK.

0:54:170:54:23

-I always brush my teeth before I report back in for work.

-Why?

0:54:230:54:29

Consideration for my co-workers.

0:54:290:54:32

It's gruelling enough without a face full of lamb cutlets.

0:54:340:54:38

Hmm.

0:54:400:54:41

-HE MUMBLES: They'll be so grateful to me now.

-What?

0:54:430:54:47

They'll be so grateful.

0:54:470:54:49

They'll say, "Look at that Jack.

0:54:490:54:51

"He's come down even though it's midnight."

0:54:510:54:56

That's not true, it's eight o'clock!

0:54:560:55:00

"And Lord knows...

0:55:000:55:02

"..what he's been doing.

0:55:040:55:06

"He's down here and he has a fresh and sparkling breath."

0:55:080:55:14

Hmm, it's rather nice.

0:56:050:56:08

You'll never guess what it is.

0:56:080:56:09

When using insects, you've got to understand what you're handling.

0:56:120:56:16

You've got to understand the fat, the mineral content of it,

0:56:160:56:19

you've got to understand that some produce we'll fry, some we'll grill,

0:56:190:56:22

some we'll dry roast.

0:56:220:56:24

Take the wings off.

0:56:260:56:28

Take them off here...

0:56:300:56:32

..and here. And the head.

0:56:340:56:37

One of the most important factors is to consult with a specialist.

0:56:390:56:43

You liaise, you add the knowledge together,

0:56:430:56:45

and between that, then you can break down the structures of what

0:56:450:56:48

you are trying to create and what you are trying to use.

0:56:480:56:50

Do not go into it blind,

0:56:500:56:52

the risk of food poisoning could be very high, it is an unknown

0:56:520:56:55

and you need to have that specialist subject well looked into.

0:56:550:56:58

That looks like...

0:57:010:57:03

Ah!

0:57:030:57:05

I'm back!

0:57:050:57:07

You've met Christine de la Rue...

0:57:070:57:09

-Lady Russell, Lady de la Rue.

-Hello.

0:57:090:57:12

-I'm over eight months. Babies!

-Are we comparing tummies?

-Yes!

0:57:120:57:16

-Fabulous.

-It's just so amazing because when you walked in...

0:57:160:57:18

-But it looks wonderful.

-On you, wonderful.

0:57:180:57:20

We are such different types, we're exact opposites.

0:57:200:57:23

You both have exquisite taste.

0:57:230:57:26

CHEERING

0:57:260:57:27

Two, three!

0:57:340:57:36

Off!

0:57:370:57:39

CROWD CHEERS

0:57:450:57:48

MUSIC: Nessun Dorma by Puccini

0:58:060:58:09

Although his physique has become less than athletic,

0:58:360:58:40

Pavarotti was a skilful teenage footballer

0:58:400:58:42

and he and his friends have been Juventus supporters since boyhood.

0:58:420:58:47

THEY SPEAK ITALIAN

0:58:470:58:49

The match has to be decided on penalties.

0:58:520:58:55

Juventus pray that their ace goalkeeper Buffon can save

0:58:550:58:58

Andriy Shevchenko's crucial kick.

0:58:580:59:01

ITALIAN COMMENTATOR ON TV

0:59:010:59:03

So we're right in the middle of the dinner now, it's pretty...

0:59:310:59:33

Tension here is pretty weird.

0:59:330:59:35

Andy Warhol is wearing a pair of headphones which he

0:59:350:59:37

brought with them and hasn't taken off since he sat down.

0:59:370:59:40

William Burroughs is looking fairly relaxed,

0:59:400:59:42

he's wearing a beautiful pearl-grey suit and Warhol is

0:59:420:59:44

telling him that he is the best dressed man in New York

0:59:440:59:47

and he admires his look more than anyone else's.

0:59:470:59:49

Burroughs, slightly bemused perhaps by this chic approach, has given

0:59:490:59:52

Warhol a copy of his new book, Cities Of The Red Night, a proof copy.

0:59:520:59:55

-What?

-Can you do drawings?

-Oh, yes, sure.

0:59:550:59:58

And has just drawn...signed in it and drawn a painting.

1:00:011:00:05

Warhol is telling Burroughs that he should be a painter.

1:00:051:00:07

WARHOL GASPS

1:00:071:00:09

My God!

1:00:091:00:10

Oh!

1:00:101:00:12

More, more. On this side, right here, here.

1:00:121:00:14

-No, no, no.

-My God.

1:00:141:00:19

-There we are.

-Thanks a lot!

1:00:191:00:21

-You're so lucky.

-How great!

1:00:211:00:23

I'll get back to you in a few minutes

1:00:231:00:25

and let you know what else is going on.

1:00:251:00:27

# Please don't have any more

1:03:081:03:12

# The more you 'ave The more you want, they say... #

1:03:121:03:17

You ought to be ashamed, I said To look so antique

1:03:171:03:20

And her only 31

1:03:201:03:22

I can't help it, she said Pulling a long face

1:03:221:03:25

It's them pills I took To bring it off, she said

1:03:251:03:28

She's had five already And nearly died of young George

1:03:281:03:31

The chemist said it would be all right

1:03:311:03:33

But I've never been the same

1:03:331:03:35

You are a proper fool, I said

1:03:351:03:37

Well, if Albert won't leave you alone, there it is, I said

1:03:371:03:40

What you get married for if you don't want children?

1:03:401:03:44

Hurry up, please, it's time

1:03:441:03:47

Hurry up, please, it's time

1:03:471:03:50

Goonight, Bill

1:03:501:03:52

Goonight, Lou

1:03:521:03:54

Goonight, May

1:03:541:03:55

Goonight

1:03:551:03:57

Ta ta

1:03:571:03:58

Goonight

1:03:581:03:59

Goonight

1:03:591:04:01

Good night, ladies

1:04:011:04:02

Good night, sweet ladies

1:04:021:04:04

Good night, good night.

1:04:041:04:07

SALIF KEITA SINGS

1:04:161:04:18

It was a cold November night in 1941.

1:05:261:05:29

I was living in digs in a Hertfordshire village.

1:05:291:05:32

My coal fire had gone out, I was already in my pyjamas.

1:05:321:05:36

What I needed was an idea strong enough for a series

1:05:371:05:40

of six programmes.

1:05:401:05:42

I was just about to get into bed and then I had the inspiration.

1:05:421:05:47

-RADIO:

-# Let's drift away

1:05:471:05:49

# On Dreamers Bay

1:05:491:05:51

# Let's sail along and sing a song together. #

1:05:511:05:56

Normally, I'd have been inclined to leave it until the morning,

1:05:561:06:00

by which time I'd probably have forgotten about it.

1:06:001:06:04

But I felt compelled to go straight to my typewriter.

1:06:041:06:07

We don't know where this island is, do we?

1:06:111:06:13

We don't know but it's not a bad island.

1:06:131:06:15

It's got everything on it that you need. You can get married.

1:06:151:06:20

-Oh, I think I could survive.

-Would you know which way to go?

1:06:201:06:23

-Do you know anything about stars or navigation?

-Yes, I do know the stars.

1:06:231:06:29

Within these four walls I am at peace.

1:07:141:07:17

Nothing can touch me.

1:07:171:07:19

Not the darkness of men's souls,

1:07:191:07:20

nor their contempt, nor their hatred, nor their judgment.

1:07:201:07:25

Once I was weak, once I was lost.

1:07:251:07:29

Now there is no question without answer.

1:07:291:07:32

There was so much I needed to ask and so much he alone could answer.

1:07:321:07:36

He to whom I submit.

1:07:361:07:38

Where I thought I was going to lose, there was so much more to gain.

1:07:381:07:42

I can't really describe where I'm at.

1:07:421:07:45

Paradise is beyond what my mind can conceive.

1:07:451:07:48

I want to be in paradise. The purpose of life is worshipping the Creator.

1:07:501:07:55

All of God's creations - the sun and the moon and the Earth

1:07:551:08:00

and the stars - also worship him.

1:08:001:08:03

This is what drives me.

1:08:041:08:07

Saves me.

1:08:071:08:08

Frees me.

1:08:081:08:10

BELLS TOLL

1:08:151:08:17

We had one shot where we would put poor John Russell

1:08:541:09:00

out on a flagpole, hanging onto his camera.

1:09:001:09:03

And it was the one shot where I fall, and it could never be

1:09:031:09:07

duplicated because the stuntman and all that got paid

1:09:071:09:11

so much for doing it.

1:09:111:09:13

And the next day at rushes we put in all the sound effects over black film

1:09:131:09:20

in order to make Russell think he'd forgotten to rack over!

1:09:201:09:24

HE LAUGHS

1:09:241:09:27

That's the sort of cruelty that was common on the sets in those days!

1:09:271:09:33

And we were all very forgiving, "It doesn't matter,

1:09:331:09:35

"we'll do it again tomorrow night." He had been so scared!

1:09:351:09:38

HE LAUGHS

1:09:381:09:40

I once said I thought you could define humanity

1:09:461:09:50

as people who prayed,

1:09:501:09:52

and I was met with rather cynical laughter.

1:09:521:09:56

And my friend said, "What about these

1:09:591:10:02

"dreadful louts and yobbos and murderers?"

1:10:021:10:06

"They don't pray." And I said, "How do you know?"

1:10:081:10:11

I said, "I'll bet there has never been

1:10:111:10:13

"a person who hasn't, perhaps in the night,

1:10:131:10:17

"had that sense of longing and incompleteness

1:10:171:10:20

"and shame at what they are." And that's prayer.

1:10:201:10:24

It's not explicit prayer, but it's real prayer.

1:10:241:10:27

I think we're made to pray because God made us for himself.

1:10:271:10:31

# ..Dreamed a dream by the old canal

1:10:401:10:46

# Kissed my girl by the factory wall

1:10:471:10:53

# Dirty old town

1:10:541:10:58

# Dirty old town

1:11:001:11:04

# Clouds are drifting across the moon

1:11:041:11:10

# Cats are prowling on their beat

1:11:121:11:19

# Spring's a girl on the street tonight

1:11:211:11:26

# Dirty old town

1:11:291:11:32

# Dirty old town

1:11:331:11:36

# Heard a siren from the docks

1:11:541:12:00

# Saw a train set the night on fire

1:12:021:12:09

# I smelled the spring on the smoky wind

1:12:101:12:18

# Dirty old town

1:12:191:12:23

# Dirty old town. #

1:12:241:12:27

APPLAUSE

1:12:301:12:34

If I'm not working and things, I don't like to go out.

1:13:021:13:06

Where do you go, first of all?

1:13:061:13:08

Should I take the car to drive around without any destination,

1:13:081:13:12

just to drive around? No.

1:13:121:13:15

But any Italian would suggest that if I am going to go round Rome to

1:13:211:13:27

do a thing like we did yesterday, you should take me to the fountain.

1:13:271:13:32

Even the Italians say it's Anita's fountain. It is my fountain!

1:13:321:13:37

Marcello, come here, hurry up.

1:14:051:14:10

'But why does the time have to change?

1:14:261:14:28

'Why do we have to change like that so drastically, too?

1:14:291:14:33

'Time goes by to everybody.'

1:14:371:14:39

This is the hour when the theatre crowds have gone,

1:14:501:14:53

the late-night restaurants have closed

1:14:531:14:56

and you become aware that you have crossed, all unwittingly,

1:14:561:14:59

some invisible frontier into a different world.

1:14:591:15:02

Without moving a single step from where you have been standing,

1:15:021:15:05

you have travelled during these few minutes into a far country -

1:15:051:15:09

the land of the night people.

1:15:091:15:12

A legendary kingdom of whose customs and laws you know nothing

1:15:121:15:15

and of whose inhabitants you have been told

1:15:151:15:18

only that they are dangerous and strange

1:15:181:15:21

and that a wise man or woman will keep well away from them.

1:15:211:15:25

You are in the kingdom of the night.

1:15:251:15:28

# Candy came from out on the Island

1:15:361:15:40

# In the back room she was everybody's darling

1:15:401:15:45

# But she never lost her head

1:15:451:15:47

# Even when she was giving head

1:15:471:15:50

# She says, hey, babe Take a walk on the wild side

1:15:501:15:54

# Said, hey, babe Take a walk on the wild side

1:15:541:15:58

# And the coloured girls go Doo-do-do, do-do, do-do-doo-doo

1:15:581:16:03

# Doo-do-do, do-do, do-do-doo-doo

1:16:031:16:07

# Doo-do-do, do-do-do... #

1:16:071:16:09

Don't disappoint me.

1:16:091:16:11

Be beautiful. That's very good, very good.

1:16:111:16:14

Give me your heart.

1:16:141:16:16

Max's Kansas City, a restaurant near The Factory, is the gathering

1:16:161:16:19

place for New York's underground.

1:16:191:16:21

Almost every evening, Warhol's clan can be found here.

1:16:211:16:26

Kansas City functions as both an unofficial casting agency

1:16:261:16:29

and a public playground.

1:16:291:16:31

Oh, God, that place was sick, it was wonderful!

1:16:351:16:38

Yeah, so much happened back there.

1:16:401:16:42

In one night, I mean, you would just see, like, you know,

1:16:421:16:45

everybody from Patti Smith,

1:16:451:16:48

Robert Mapplethorpe... Mick Jagger would be there,

1:16:481:16:53

somebody else would be there,

1:16:531:16:55

Jane Fonda and Roger Vadim would be in the toil... No.

1:16:551:16:59

Um, they'd be somewhere else.

1:16:591:17:00

And of course in the bathroom people were just doing drugs,

1:17:001:17:04

and, of course, the music.

1:17:041:17:06

You're not paying attention!

1:17:121:17:15

# Here's Room 506

1:17:251:17:27

# It's enough to make you sick

1:17:271:17:32

# Bridget's all wrapped up in foil

1:17:331:17:36

# You wonder if she can uncoil

1:17:361:17:42

# Here they come now See them run now

1:17:441:17:51

# Here they come now

1:17:531:17:57

# Chelsea Girls. #

1:17:571:18:00

He'd had enough of public performance

1:18:041:18:08

and enough even of his own exhibitionism,

1:18:081:18:11

and in despair he said, "I've come to the melancholy conclusion

1:18:111:18:16

"that my health is totally gone.

1:18:161:18:19

"I've seen the gates of hell."

1:18:191:18:22

Between 2 and 3.30am on the morning of November 3rd,

1:18:241:18:28

1953, in this bar, Dylan Thomas consumed 18 straight whiskys.

1:18:281:18:34

That is 18 English doubles, rather than 18 English singles.

1:18:341:18:40

He died six days later of what one doctor described as this

1:18:401:18:44

"severe insult to the brain".

1:18:441:18:47

Whew.

1:18:511:18:52

Does this story sound familiar to you?

1:18:541:18:57

I myself have read it in no less an authoritative source than

1:18:571:19:01

the Rough Guide To Britain.

1:19:011:19:03

It does sound exactly the way this wild, drunken Welsh poet

1:19:031:19:07

might have died. The trouble is, it's almost certainly completely untrue.

1:19:071:19:13

There were people in the bar that night and none of them

1:19:141:19:17

remember him drinking anything like that amount.

1:19:171:19:20

The phrase "severe insult to the brain" first surfaces in this book,

1:19:221:19:27

Dylan Thomas In America by John Malcolm Brinnin,

1:19:271:19:31

the fountainhead of the Dylan Thomas myth.

1:19:311:19:35

This is the poet as pulp fiction hero.

1:19:351:19:39

APPLAUSE

1:19:511:19:54

APPLAUSE

1:22:451:22:47

-Last drink.

-Two here, two there. Same thing.

1:22:501:22:53

Yes, sir.

1:22:531:22:54

-It's funny.

-What?

1:22:541:22:56

Time, Alec.

1:22:561:22:58

Did you ever think about time?

1:22:581:23:01

It goes, Alec.

1:23:021:23:04

That's the business of time.

1:23:041:23:06

'Little Ronnie Reagan we called him.'

1:23:061:23:09

He was just a nice little contract player, you know?

1:23:091:23:13

One does sit around and say, "Anything can happen in America."

1:23:131:23:17

There's no question about it.

1:23:171:23:19

Light breaks where no sun shines

1:23:231:23:28

Where no sea runs The waters of the heart

1:23:281:23:31

Push in their tides

1:23:311:23:34

And broken ghosts with glow-worms in their heads

1:23:341:23:39

The things of light

1:23:391:23:42

File through the flesh where no flesh decks the bones.

1:23:421:23:48

APPLAUSE

1:23:481:23:51

# There's a coal train

1:23:531:23:55

# There's a coal train

1:23:591:24:00

# That comes from Angola and Mozambique

1:24:001:24:04

# There's a coal train that comes from Namibia, from Caprivi

1:24:041:24:08

# From Zimbabwe and Zambia

1:24:081:24:11

# There's a coal train the comes from Malawi, from Swaziland

1:24:121:24:16

# From Lesotho and Botswana

1:24:161:24:18

# The whole hinterland of southern Africa

1:24:181:24:22

# And it carries with it young men

1:24:221:24:24

# And old men who are conscripted to come and work under contract

1:24:241:24:28

# In the gold, the coal, the mineral and diamond mines of Johannesburg

1:24:281:24:36

# And surrounding metropoli

1:24:361:24:40

# Deep, deep, deep down in the belly of the Earth

1:24:401:24:43

# When they are drilling and digging for that evasive mighty stone

1:24:431:24:50

# Or when they dish that mish mesh mush food out of cold iron shovels

1:24:521:24:57

# Into the iron plates

1:24:571:24:59

# Or when they sit miserably in their filthy, flea-ridden barracks

1:25:021:25:07

# And they think about the lands and their herds

1:25:071:25:10

# That were taken away from them

1:25:101:25:13

# They think about their lovers Their mothers, their brothers

1:25:131:25:16

# Their fathers

1:25:161:25:18

# Their sisters Their children and their friends

1:25:191:25:23

# Who are daily forcibly removed away from their lands

1:25:231:25:29

# Some of them they never may see again

1:25:291:25:32

# And when they hear that choo-choo train steaming away over the horizon

1:25:341:25:38

# They always curse the coal train

1:25:381:25:42

# The coal train that brought them to Johannesburg. #

1:25:421:25:46

TRAIN WHISTLE BLOWS

1:25:461:25:50

GASPING AND SHOUTING

1:26:251:26:27

Would you endure prolonged loneliness?

1:26:311:26:34

What would you be most glad to have got away from?

1:26:341:26:38

THUNDER CRASHES

1:26:381:26:41

Would you try to escape?

1:26:411:26:43

Do you know which way to go?

1:26:461:26:49

As a child, I suffered from the most horrific nightmares.

1:26:571:27:00

I used to strike out in my sleep at anyone within distance.

1:27:001:27:03

And one recurring dream came night after night, and that was my hands

1:27:031:27:09

seemed to grow larger and larger, like giant balloons.

1:27:091:27:13

I couldn't stand it.

1:27:131:27:15

It seems to me I am trying to tell you a dream, making a vain attempt,

1:27:511:27:56

because no relation of a dream can convey the dream sensation.

1:27:561:28:02

That commingling of absurdity, surprise and bewilderment,

1:28:021:28:06

and a tremor of struggling revolt.

1:28:061:28:09

That notion of being captured by the incredible,

1:28:111:28:14

which is of the very essence of dreams.

1:28:141:28:17

To begin at the beginning...

1:28:531:28:56

It is spring, moonless night in the small town,

1:28:571:29:01

starless and bible-black, the cobblestreets silent

1:29:011:29:06

and the hunched, courters'-and- rabbits' wood limping invisible

1:29:061:29:11

down to the sloeblack, slow, black, crowblack,

1:29:111:29:16

fishingboat-bobbing sea.

1:29:161:29:19

The houses are blind as moles,

1:29:211:29:23

though moles see fine to-night in the snouting, velvet dingles,

1:29:231:29:29

and all the people of the lulled and dumbfound town

1:29:291:29:34

are sleeping now.

1:29:341:29:36

In 2015, Arena celebrates its 40th anniversary, which makes it the longest-running arts documentary strand in the world. To mark the occasion, it presents Night and Day, a new film made entirely from Arena's own unique archive. For four decades, Arena has addressed the arts and culture of the world, high and low - from TS Eliot to Amy Winehouse. The Arena archive is a treasure trove that provides a history of the last hundred years.

Featuring the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Jack Nicholson and a host of other stars, Night and Day evokes the one experience common to everything on the planet - the 24-hour cycle from dawn to dusk to dawn again. Bringing the past into the present - 24 hours in 90 minutes in 40 years of Arena.


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