Episode 11 Filthy Rotten Scoundrels


Episode 11

Series investigating Britain's waste dumpers. Featuring the disgusting consequences of tipping fat down the sink, and the neighbour who set fire to a caravan outside his house.


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Transcript


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A computer. A computer. It's unacceptable behaviour to do this

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sort of thing. There's no need for it. There are local tips available.

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Just take it down the tip. We're on the front line of the clear-up and

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the fight back with the dedicated teams tracking down the rogues and

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putting the 'Great' back into Britain. It may harm your defence

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if you fail to mention when questioned something which you

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later rely on in court. Today, searching for clues in a fly-tip,

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an amateur sleuth provides the damning evidence. This was actually

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in there? It was, yes. You found this in the tip? That's brilliant.

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As a tax payer I'm quite appalled. We spend a lot of money on our

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refuse collection. I don't feel we should foot the bill for these fly-

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tippers. I think it's a disgrace. And the intricate detective work

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that brought to book the man with a van who couldn't be bothered to do

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the recycling. We've got the same table, the same covering, the same

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breeze blocks and, to tie everything together, we have the

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address of the premises all this came from on this box here.

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that, and Britain's worst fly- tipper. Welcome to the dirty world

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Now, although my body is a temple, I have to confess to occasionally

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joining the congregation who worship at the alter of the Sunday

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morning fry-up. Tasty! But have you ever thought about what happens to

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all the waste oil you casually tip In London, Thames Water are

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fighting a constant battle to keep the sewers flowing against the

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growing tide of waste oil that accumulates, hardens and causes

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expensive blockages. But what they've cleared so far is just the

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tip of the fat-berg. Blockages are a great cost to Thames as a company,

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and to all water companies. But, more importantly, it's not the

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financial cost, it's the cost of the inconvenience to customers

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where people have disposed of stuff into the sewer system that they

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shouldn't dispose of in the first place. And they cost millions.

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We're talking about millions and millions of pounds a year to

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unblock. So, basically, it's our own fault and it's our own sewers

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we're blocking up, and not just with fat. All the things we

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shouldn't be flushing down the loo, from cotton wool to condoms just

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make it worse. The silly thing is, it's all completely avoidable.

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taken out and it goes to landfill. Why not short-circuit that and put

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it straight into the bin, where it would just go directly to landfill

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and not possibly cause people problems with sewer blockages and

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sewer floodings. Right, own up, do you pour your oil down the sink?

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Usually when I'm chucking away cooking oil we let it dry first and

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then chuck it in the bin. Good man. Swot, some might say. OK, next.

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I've done any cooking with chickens or meats or anything, the oil and

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the waste and the fat I generally pour it into a carton, like a

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carton of juice or something that we've finished off. And then when

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it's all solidified I just sling it in the bin. Another shining example.

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Is anyone going to own up to it? I'm frying and I use kitchen roll,

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I wipe the pan and put that in the refuse bins that go with the other

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recycling stuff, and then I wash it in the sink, but hopefully there's

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no fat left in the utensils. Oooh! Very fair, sir. If it goes down the

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sink it just goes hard down in the pipes and it just blocks everything

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up. With all the other that goes rubbish that goes down the sink as

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well, it just goes all scummy and blocks things up, which it has done

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in our street. And that's exactly the problem. We might think the

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main culprits are restaurants and cafes, but, in fact, most blockages

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are found in the small pipes around people's homes. So, waders on and

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Today, the Thames Water team have the unenviable task of going down

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into the sewers underneath London's Westminster to chip away at the

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fetid fat which has accumulated there. You're doing a tough job,

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We're going to go down and remove the fat that's on the sides of the

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sewer there. We're going to get some of that off to aid the flow,

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push it through faster. This is serious work, people. Just look at

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the conditions. It's hot down there, about 30 degrees, would you

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believe? And I think we can all guess what it smells like. These

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men are to be applauded. As you can see here, but fat is actually

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completely solid. I mean, this has all been flushed, this liquid fat

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and sanitary items. But it's actually solid and to cut through

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it, it's like clay almost. The same consistency as clay has got, really.

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A dry clay. So, it takes us a lot of effort to remove it from the

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walls. You're telling me. It's not a quick wipe with a bit of kitchen

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towel now, is it? If we leave this fat without actually cleaning it

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off, you can see how it's starting to build up, so what would happen

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is we'd end up with a complete blockage. I mean, look, this is a

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small lump, you know? It's only a small section on the top, but you

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can see there how big that is. Shame on you, fat flushers. The fat

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that we've got here has come from a variety of places. I mean, we're in

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the heart of the West End here, so there are lots of restaurants, also

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domestic premises, as well. Commercial premises aren't the only

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offenders. You can tell that from finding condoms and sanitary items.

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I don't know about you, but after watching this I'll never throw

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anything except water down my sink again. Thames Water alone deals

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with 55,000 blockages a year at a cost of an eye watering �12 million,

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and that's just for one year! You're already paying your Council

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Tax, and yet you're paying us to dispose of your rubbish as well,

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whereas this could just go straight into your bin, into landfill, which

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is where it's supposed to go. point well made, and here's Danny's

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audition to present Blue Peter. What people should be doing with

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their fat is waiting for it to cool and congeal and then you can scoop

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it out of the pan with kitchen roll, or you can even mix birdseed with

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it and make fat balls out of it for the birds during the winter.

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one you made earlier? After half an hour chipping away at Westminster's

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impressive underground fat-berg, Danny's got plenty to feed the

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birds with. Maybe it's all those dinners the MPs have been scoffing.

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As you saw, we removed quite a large lump of fat from the sewer. I

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mean, it only looked like a small bit above the surface, but when we

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broke it up underneath it weighed a good 150 kilos. So, I mean, that's

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a large bit of fat. If that had have come through on its own, it

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could have quite easily blocked the cipher and then we'd have had

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potentially a bit of a flooding issue on our hand, so we've been in

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and we've cleaned it now and safe in the knowledge that it will run

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fine for another couple of months without causing too many problems

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through the network. Well done, chaps. Now, go and have a shower,

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you've done us proud. Join us later to find out how a bus company has

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come up with a clever way of using leftover oil to steer their vessels

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A brilliant detective story now. Are you sitting comfortably? Then

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I'll begin. It looks kosher enough, doesn't it? A man chucking out his

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waste at a recycling centre in North Shields, acting like a

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responsible citizen. But that's all he was doing, acting, because

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instead of properly recycling everything in his van, half of it

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landed up being dumped at the side Filthy, stinking trash strewn

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everywhere. Disgusting. But, our rotten scoundrel wasn't going to

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get away with it that easily, not if North Tyneside Council's

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environment officers had anything to do with it. Wayne Young is in

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charge of the team that pieced together a fascinating string of

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clues to track down the man responsible, and this is how it all

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happened. What he decided to do is travel down to this site next to an

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industrial estate and dump the remainder of the waste. He was

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actually witnessed by a local security guard pulling up onto the

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site, tipping off his waste and driving away from the site. And

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that was dumped just over here. security guard reported what he had

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seen. The investigation had begun. Wayne's team arrived to pick apart

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the festering haul looking for clues. What a job. But the mucky

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work paid off. The investigators went through and found some

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addresses that linked the waste to an address in Newcastle. And bingo!

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Mistake number one from the fly- tipper. Wayne's officers drove over

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to Newcastle and knocked on the door of the address they had found.

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No one was at home, but there was another clue staring them in the

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face, a 'To Let' sign outside the house. Next stop, the letting

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agents. The letting agent explained that they had employed a person of

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JH Environmental Services to take away the waste. Environmental

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services! That's some cheek! The letting agency thought they were

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employing someone who's do the job to the letter of the law, but

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there's nothing environmental about dumping rubbish at the side of the

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road. But with a name and number, it was another lucky break for

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Wayne's team and the net was closing in on the filthy rotten

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fly-tipper. It turns out that the business was owned by 24 year old

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Jamie Harker, who charged �70 in cash to take away the rubbish. And

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this is when he made mistake number two. He went to a household waste

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recycling centre, which is meant just for local residents to use to

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dispose of their waste, and he signed a disclaimer to say he was a

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local resident and he wasn't being paid for disposal of the waste.

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mistake. In fact, massive, because every week Wayne's tireless team of

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enforcers do the rounds of recycling centers and check out all

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those disclaimers. They were already on to Harker through the

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letting agency, so when his name came up again alarm bells started

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ringing. A quick check of the CCTV soon picked out the scoundrel and

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eagle-eyed Wayne suddenly saw his whole case fall into place. As you

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can see here, this person has on the breeze blocks, a wooden table

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top and a black covering. It's a really hot day and later on you see

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he gives up. We'll see him there actually going out and leaving the

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site. Awww, didums! Was it too much like hard work having to sort out

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everything to put it into the proper skips? Having to actually

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recycle the waste you'd been paid to dispose of properly? Well,

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obviously it was. Just look at how much stuff is left in the back of

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his van. Harker thought it was quicker and easier to just fly-tip

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Look familiar? We've got the same table, the same covering, the same

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breeze blocks and, to tie everything together, we have the

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address of the premises all this came from on this box here.

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it's like watching Poirot on the Orient Express! Wayne had his man

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and Harker was bang to rights. In March 2011, he was found guilty of

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two fly-tipping offences and ordered to pay �100 costs to the

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council and handed a 12 month conditional discharge, meaning if

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he did this again in the next year But for Wayne, Harker's conviction

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meant a lot more than being found guilty of his crimes. Following the

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convictions, this story was actually featured in a local

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newspaper which outlines what this person did. There's the waste there

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he dumped. This sends out a clear message to other people who may be

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wanting to fly-tip that if you do fly-tip within this area, we'll

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investigate and we will prosecute. Hear, hear, Wayne! And good

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Keeping our streets clean is a mammoth job at the best of times,

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but there are some filthy rotten scoundrels who seem intent on

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making it even tougher, as Before you get to the railway

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embankment there are the backs of houses and people tend to go behind

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there and drop sacks of rubbish, sofas, and then set fire to them.

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Look! I mean, look! That's because people don't want to pay to put

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tyres in the dumps, so it's easy to throw them down there. That's a

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really, really wrong attitude. I don't think there's any need for it.

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I think it's just laziness, to be honest. I think they should be

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fined instantly. Fine them heavily. They won't do it again. Not only

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fine them, send them out clearing up litter. If they continue? In

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prison. Pretty clear, eh? People are fed up with rubbish louts.

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Doncaster Council spent �3.5 million last year clearing up our

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mess. Now, that's not for ordinary rubbish collection. That's for dog

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fouling, fly-tipping, dropped fag ends, discarded gum and thousands

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of black bags of rubbish that never made it to the bin. That's day to

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day work for Doncaster grime fighters. But environmental

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investigator Bob Allen was recently confronted with something

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A job they got right up his nose. In the 10 years I've been doing

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this job, this is possibly the worst one I've ever seen just

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because of the nature of what it was. When I got a call for this one,

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it was sent through to me with the photograph. When I got out there, I

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couldn't believe what I was seeing. And what he was seeing was animal

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carcasses just dumped on a remote road. It was a nice warm day. The

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smell was just starting to come out, but the first thing I saw was the

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pig's head. This is unbelievable. It was clear this wasn't your

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average dump. I'm looking at that thing smiling at me. It was

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surrounded by blood, broken eggs, empty milk cartons, pigs' feet,

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pigs' ears. It was tripe. It was the side of the carcass where the

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fat's all cut off. Past its sell-by date bacon where, because it was

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warm, the packets had swollen. Some of the meat that was in there, I

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presume it was intestines, offal and things like that, that had gone

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almost grey and putrefied. There was a hell of a mixture of smells.

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Stop, Bob! I'm feeling a bit off colour myself now. But where on

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Earth had this awful smelling offal come from? Bob had the unenviable

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job of searching this lot for clues. I was there for an hour or so

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searching through it. There were labels in there from main brand

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supermarkets, so I thought that it can't be a fly-tip case, there's a

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bit more to this one. So, I pulled a lot of the evidence out and went

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to certain shops. They told us quite openly, yeah, we have this

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guy comes round, collects our end of product meat. End of product

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meat? It's got a horrible kind of ring to it. Bob contacted the

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company who were doing the pick ups and they said one of their vehicles,

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still full of rotting carcasses, had been stolen and still hadn't

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been traced. Some unwitting van thief had got more than they

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bargained for when they made off with this load. No wonder they

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wanted rid of it. Disgraceful that they dumped it. You know, where

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they'd dumped it was right near to a water filled ditch, so a lot of

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that stuff could contaminate the water. It was across an access road

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to a water treatment plant. I just don't think that these guys could

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care less. The filthy scoundrels must have got a well deserved shock

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when they opened the back of the truck. The clean-up job was

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certainly shockingly expensive. total, it was just under nine

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tonnes of waste meat there. We didn't just clear it, we cleaned it

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off, as well. We had to jet it all down. The whole job cost us nearly

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�5,000. Five grand of public money to clean up after a van thief!

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Disgusting. And the filthy scoundrel was never caught.

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didn't get any conviction. We didn't get any evidence as to say

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who had done it. I'm quite grateful that these sort of jobs are the

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extreme and it's the only one I've had to deal with because it's a lot

:17:30.:17:34.

of money just to spend on one job. Well, for your sake, Bob, we all

:17:34.:17:37.

hope it's a one-off. This random dump of animal carcasses became the

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council's responsibility because the tip was found on public land.

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However, fellow grime fighter Rob was called in to help in a case

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where fly-tipping was costing a private company so much money they

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started to do their own surveillance. This fly-tip is on

:17:52.:17:55.

private land and it's something that the council won't clear up, so

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it brooks the business to remove it. And what he's done is he's put some

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cameras in. This camera system has cost over �1,200 to implement, so

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that's a big cost to a business that's been here for over 30 years.

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And it wasn't long before Big Brother captured some villains

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brazenly dumping a load of household waste. Somebody clearly

:18:15.:18:18.

didn't like their bedroom furniture very much. Frustratingly, the

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camera didn't pick up a registration number, but luck and

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the brass neck cheek of the same fly-tippers was on the company's

:18:24.:18:31.

side. A few days later, the vehicle actually came back to this

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particular area. They've come round the back of the property looking

:18:35.:18:40.

for an area to dump. They found a perfect area, which is out of the

:18:40.:18:43.

way. One of them actually looks around the area to check out if

:18:43.:18:53.
:18:53.:18:54.

They think there are no cameras there. They've dumped it, and then

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And there it is, a completely clear registration number. Result! And

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the pictures confirm it's the same vehicle as the first dump because

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both show an identically dented van. You've been framed, guys, and for

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what? You could be facing a hefty fine just for dumping a small, dead

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conifer. It was good news for the company, though, because they had

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enough evidence to pass to the council for investigation. Rob

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found the address where the white van was registered and immediately

:19:28.:19:33.

sets out to interview the owner. Without this CCTV evidence, or

:19:33.:19:36.

without any evidence at all, for flight tips we're unable to

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investigate it, unless we've got a witness. And so, yes, it's a really

:19:39.:19:49.
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important part. I really enjoy this He's at the house on the van's

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registration document. But there's no one in it. The next step is to

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How are you doing? Are you all right? I'm from Doncaster Council.

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Has he got a white van, do you know? A white Citroen van? No.

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You've not seen that in the back? Cheers for your help. I'm just

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going to go round the back to see whether there's anything there.

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Excuse me, sir, sorry to bother you. I'm from Doncaster Council. This

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property here, have you ever seen a white Citroen van outside here

:20:28.:20:35.

before? I've never seen it. you've not seen this van? All right,

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then. Not to worry. Thanks for your time, anyway. Cheers. It appears

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that the neighbours say they've never seen a white Citroen Replay

:20:45.:20:48.

van outside this guy's property, so it looks as if he's sold this van

:20:48.:20:52.

on. So, if we could find out where he's sold it on to, that's the next

:20:53.:20:57.

step in the investigation. whoever lives here is completely

:20:57.:21:02.

innocent. It's the new owner of the van that Rob wants to speak to now.

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Rob leaves a note at the address asking him to get in touch. A

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frustrating beginning, but Rob is still working on the case in the

:21:09.:21:19.
:21:19.:21:22.

We're off to the coast now and the picturesque Fairlight Downs in East

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Sussex, near where the Battle of Hastings was fought. But amongst

:21:27.:21:30.

these rolling downs, a modern-day battle is being waged against a

:21:30.:21:33.

dirty rotten fly-tipper who's left a huge mound of rubbish in a

:21:33.:21:40.

bridleway at the bottom of a hill. Environmental Enforcement Officer

:21:40.:21:42.

and pivotal filth fighter for Rother Council Mike Hutton has come

:21:42.:21:52.
:21:52.:21:58.

What exactly lurks in this lot? lot of builders' rubble, a lot of

:21:58.:22:07.

Even an old microwave in here. It looks like a lot of domestic

:22:07.:22:12.

rubbish, as well. Well, we've got the lot here. I think that counts

:22:12.:22:22.
:22:22.:22:23.

as a full house. Totally blocking It's such a shame finding a fly-tip

:22:23.:22:26.

in this area because it's obviously an area of outstanding natural

:22:26.:22:30.

beauty. We're right on the edge of Hastings Country Park here and

:22:30.:22:37.

adjoining National Trust property. Criminal dumping in an area of

:22:37.:22:42.

outstanding natural beauty breaks my heart. And local residents are

:22:42.:22:48.

rightly up in arms. When I first saw the fly-tipping here it made me

:22:48.:22:53.

very angry, and also very sad. I have seen at times even glowworms

:22:53.:22:56.

down there, so it's a very precious and a rather special site. It's

:22:57.:23:01.

spoiled what is a very beautiful amenity for this part of Sussex.

:23:01.:23:04.

Quite right. Maggie Sullivan was so wild she decided to do some

:23:04.:23:10.

detective work of her own and found a vital clue in the rubbish. This

:23:10.:23:16.

was actually in there. It was, yes. You found this in the tip? That's

:23:16.:23:19.

brilliant. It's a replacement note. It actually has got a name and

:23:19.:23:22.

address on it, which is all brilliant stuff. As a tax payer,

:23:22.:23:26.

I'm quite appalled. We spend a lot of money on our refuse collection.

:23:26.:23:29.

I don't feel we should foot the bill for these fly-tippers. I think

:23:29.:23:34.

it's a disgrace. That's great. Thanks ever so much. Thank you. Bye.

:23:34.:23:37.

I'm not surprised she's upset, considering Rother Council does

:23:37.:23:40.

foot the bill for this ugly crime, to the tune of the �80,000 last

:23:40.:23:46.

year. Maggie's evidence could lead Mike to the owner of the rubbish.

:23:46.:23:49.

He's determined to collar someone for this and he wants more clues.

:23:49.:23:52.

It's actually a delivery note with a name and address on here, which

:23:52.:23:58.

is quite useful, which we can add to our evidence. So, more evidence,

:23:58.:24:01.

which is a result. This was clearly someone who wasn't worried about

:24:01.:24:04.

being found out. Did they misguidedly think their rubbish was

:24:04.:24:08.

being legitimately disposed of? Right, I mean, although we've got

:24:08.:24:11.

the same name and address cropping up time and time again on here,

:24:11.:24:16.

this may not be the person who's actually done the fly-tipping. They

:24:16.:24:19.

may well have paid somebody to do this for them. Obviously, we won't

:24:19.:24:23.

know this until we ask these people in for interview. We'll obviously

:24:24.:24:27.

ask them how this stuff ended up here with their name and address in

:24:27.:24:31.

it. Mike's got great evidence to follow up on, but first the

:24:31.:24:36.

rubble's got to be removed, and that doesn't come cheap. A fly-tip

:24:36.:24:40.

of this size, I imagine is going to cost in the region of �250 to �300

:24:40.:24:48.

to get cleared. What a waste. should be cleared tomorrow,

:24:48.:24:53.

hopefully. You catch the person. Well, let's hope so. I think Mike

:24:53.:24:56.

fully intends to. Over the next few days, Mike tracked down the person

:24:56.:25:01.

who appeared on all the paperwork. So, what we went and did was we

:25:01.:25:04.

paid the guy a visit, told them we've found this evidence in this

:25:04.:25:07.

fly-tip and the guy was horrified, because he'd actually paid somebody

:25:07.:25:10.

�130 to take all this stuff away for him. 130 quid the cheating

:25:10.:25:16.

dumper just pocketed. Luckily, he remembered the name of the guy. I

:25:16.:25:19.

think he got the registration of his van and we got the details of

:25:19.:25:23.

this guy. Mike's investigation was continuing and then he heard about

:25:23.:25:31.

another similar dump. A fly-tip was reported just a few miles from the

:25:31.:25:38.

other one. The dump's now been cleared, but it was quite a sight.

:25:38.:25:44.

Right, this is the scene of the fly-tip in Rock Lane. When we came

:25:44.:25:47.

down here rubbish was strewn probably a good 100 yards all along

:25:47.:25:51.

this lane. It looks like there was a bed dumped here with a load of

:25:51.:25:54.

bed linen. There was a load of broken up furniture. It looks like

:25:54.:25:58.

a lot of clothing, general domestic stuff. That looks like an old tent

:25:58.:26:01.

or something like that. Just all the sort of stuff you'd associate

:26:01.:26:04.

with a general house clearance. I don't believe it's quite the

:26:04.:26:09.

destination the owners of the rubbish had in mind. He just opened

:26:09.:26:13.

up the back of the truck, it's a tipper truck, tipped it as he was

:26:13.:26:16.

driving. He didn't even bother to stop, just tipped it all along the

:26:16.:26:20.

side of the road and this is why it was strewn over such a long area.

:26:20.:26:24.

Unbelievable! How low can you sink? The dumper seemed to be on a

:26:24.:26:30.

mission to deface some of the prettiest countryside. It's so

:26:30.:26:33.

picturesque around here and when you see rubbish and old towels and

:26:33.:26:40.

sheets and old books and things just laying in the road, it's awful.

:26:40.:26:43.

Again, there were plenty of documents to lead Mike to the owner

:26:43.:26:52.

We had a look amongst all this sort of stuff and we found quite a lot

:26:52.:26:54.

of correspondence, names and addresses, envelopes with names and

:26:54.:27:01.

addresses on, which are all linked to one person. That owner gave him

:27:01.:27:04.

details for a man who's offered to dispose of his rubbish for a tidy

:27:04.:27:08.

fee. Another case were an unsuspecting home owner thought

:27:08.:27:18.
:27:18.:27:18.

their rubbish has been properly The reason these people dump their

:27:18.:27:23.

rubbish is they get paid cash. If they're going to take it to the

:27:23.:27:26.

amenity tip, they actually get charged to dump this stuff, so what

:27:26.:27:29.

they do is just dump it anywhere they can so it's not costing them

:27:29.:27:32.

anything. So, they can just take the cash, dump the rubbish and

:27:33.:27:35.

they've made themselves some money. Mike brought the suspect in for

:27:35.:27:38.

questioning and charged him with fly-tipping and not having a waste

:27:38.:27:45.

carrier's licence, offences which carry a maximum penalty of �20,000.

:27:45.:27:48.

However, if the owners of the rubbish hadn't been able to provide

:27:48.:27:51.

Mike with information, they would have been liable for the offence,

:27:51.:27:54.

so if you find yourself in the same situation, use your loaf and ask to

:27:55.:28:01.

see a waste carrier's licence. The last word should go to the local

:28:01.:28:05.

residents, determined to protect their beautiful part of the country.

:28:05.:28:10.

I don't know why they can't take it down the tip like we do.

:28:10.:28:13.

countryside is not a dumping ground. It should be taken care of and

:28:13.:28:17.

those that live here value it, and it's wrong. I think that they

:28:17.:28:20.

should be locked up in the stocks in our village and the local people

:28:20.:28:26.

would be able to throw rotten apples at them, basically. And I'll

:28:26.:28:31.

be first in the queue with that apple.

:28:31.:28:35.

Back now to the slippery issue of the problems we cause if we pour

:28:35.:28:38.

are old cooking fat down the sink. Now, I'm sure the images of those

:28:38.:28:41.

poor guys down the sewer chipping congealed fat off the walls made

:28:41.:28:46.

quite an impression. The lesson is, throw it in the bin or make a nice

:28:46.:28:54.

cake for the birds. But, down on the Sussex coast, a busy bus

:28:54.:28:57.

company has come up with an even more ingenious way of putting all

:28:57.:29:01.

that fat to good use. We're based in Brighton. We run 11 buses. We

:29:01.:29:04.

run on 100% recycled bio-diesel made from waste cooking oil which

:29:04.:29:12.

is all sourced from restaurants, cafes, bars, hotels etc. Brilliant!

:29:12.:29:17.

So, this Yellow Bus Company is totally green. The restaurants who

:29:17.:29:23.

supply us with their waste cooking oil are being quite generous. They

:29:23.:29:26.

could be giving their oil to other people who might give them nominal

:29:26.:29:29.

amounts of money for it, which we don't do. We give them advertising

:29:29.:29:32.

to our students on the buses. It all sounds like a well oiled

:29:32.:29:42.

And Marcus Fort is the man who goes out every day to collect the used

:29:42.:29:49.

cooking oil for the company. first job of the day is to hit a

:29:49.:29:52.

very nice Thai restaurant. They've changed their fryers and have asked

:29:52.:29:57.

for us to come round. Marcus has regular clients he visits in cafes,

:29:57.:30:07.
:30:07.:30:14.

bars and restaurants all around the You can see how nice that oil is.

:30:14.:30:20.

It's clear, it's got no water in it, it's got no bits of food in it. You

:30:20.:30:25.

could just strain that once and put it straight in your tank.

:30:25.:30:31.

everyone's oil is liquid gold, though. Some containers have quite

:30:31.:30:34.

a high content of both water, which has to be got rid of, food waste,

:30:35.:30:38.

which clogs up the machinery and can't be used for being made into

:30:38.:30:47.

bio-diesel. And what we call whites, which is fat. Say if you're cooking

:30:47.:30:51.

a lot of duck, you'll get a lot of the animal fat going into the oil,

:30:51.:30:54.

and that manifests itself as a layer of white which sits between

:30:54.:31:01.

the water at the bottom and the oil on the top. And that white fat

:31:01.:31:11.
:31:11.:31:13.

All right, so they're both full, that's 20 litres in each. That's 40

:31:13.:31:16.

litres. Sweet. Thank you so much for the coffees. Have a nice time.

:31:16.:31:19.

I'll see you probably in a week or two if the weather continues like

:31:20.:31:28.

this, yeah? Wham, bam! 40 litres smooth and by the numbers. Before

:31:28.:31:31.

people became concerned with going green, waste oil could be collected

:31:31.:31:34.

from restaurants by pig farmers who would mix it with feed and give it

:31:34.:31:37.

to their droves, but that became outlawed when the Government

:31:37.:31:40.

decided that animals couldn't be fed with other animal products. Now,

:31:40.:31:43.

because of that and the dangers of putting oil down the sink,

:31:43.:31:46.

restaurants have to give their waste oil to a licensed carrier,

:31:46.:31:52.

and this scheme makes business as well as environmental sense. It's

:31:52.:31:55.

very important to people at restaurants in Brighton that all

:31:55.:32:00.

the waste oil is recycled. It's not only recycled, but it's used to run

:32:00.:32:03.

the buses. They're picking up 60, 80, 100 litres every week, which is

:32:03.:32:07.

a lot of oil to get rid of, and for it to be re-used for something good

:32:07.:32:12.

in Brighton is fantastic. As well as collecting waste oil, this

:32:12.:32:15.

clever Brighton bunch also deliver fresh supplies for restaurants to

:32:15.:32:18.

cook with which, in turn, comes back to the company to be converted

:32:18.:32:25.

into green fuel for the yellow buses. A slick operation. Did you

:32:25.:32:29.

see what I did there? This is the empty container which I take back,

:32:29.:32:39.
:32:39.:32:41.

and then I circulate his oil and I Cheers, then. See next week. Good

:32:41.:32:46.

luck! Good! And done for the day collecting. Now we'll take it all

:32:46.:32:52.

to Mill Farm to get it transferred, and they'll make it into bio-diesel.

:32:52.:32:55.

But before Marcus can get on to converting the oil into bio-fuel,

:32:55.:33:00.

there's one more process to go through. He has to filter the used

:33:00.:33:03.

oil to get rid of any unnecessary nasties, using a traffic cone, of

:33:03.:33:12.

course! I mean, what else? It pours out like that. There's the water

:33:12.:33:15.

and food waste that I was talking about. That's all been caught in

:33:15.:33:20.

this filter, which I'll then get rid of. You get really obsessed

:33:20.:33:26.

with what's nice oil and what's not. Knowing the gang that we got this

:33:26.:33:36.

So that goes in and that's clear and it's all oil, with the odd bit

:33:36.:33:41.

of burned food in it. If there was another oil collector next to me,

:33:42.:33:44.

we'd both be commenting, "Yeah, that's the stuff, that's what we

:33:44.:33:52.

like!". And once the used oil has been filtered, the nifty process of

:33:52.:33:56.

converting it into bio-fuel can really begin. Now, pens and paper

:33:56.:34:02.

at the ready, I'm going to test you on this afterwards. All right, this

:34:02.:34:06.

is the bio-diesel processing plant. Waste cooking oil is transferred

:34:06.:34:15.

into that holding tank. That goes into a bath.

:34:15.:34:20.

FILM IS SPEEDED UP SO WORDS CAN'T BE HEARD.

:34:20.:34:23.

And that goes for an hour at a temperature of 86 degrees. Did you

:34:23.:34:26.

get that, everyone? Simple, really. This is the finished bio-diesel.

:34:26.:34:29.

It's clear, it's orange and it's got a smell quite unlike anything

:34:29.:34:33.

else I've ever smelled. Slightly chemical, but not at all like waste

:34:33.:34:37.

cooking oil. It started its life as this, which is the waste cooking

:34:37.:34:42.

oil. Everyone knows what that smells like. Quite fantastic,

:34:42.:34:46.

really. You're right, Marcus, it is pretty impressive. And it must feel

:34:46.:34:50.

good to help save the planet as your day job. The best thing about

:34:50.:34:54.

this job is the fact that I feel like I'm really working for the

:34:54.:35:00.

good guys, trying to do everything sustainably. Even just analysing

:35:00.:35:02.

whether or not something is sustainable is quite fun and a

:35:03.:35:06.

worthwhile pursuit in this day and age, I think, if you care about the

:35:06.:35:10.

future of the planet. Oh, we do, Marcus, we do. Now, if you'll

:35:10.:35:20.
:35:20.:35:25.

accept the honour, I'd like to But now to someone with an even

:35:25.:35:29.

more elevated title. This is the story of the man who became known

:35:29.:35:35.

as Britain's worst fly-tipper. And here he is in action. 36 year old

:35:35.:35:38.

Marcus Bairstow, a serial scoundrel who blighted Southampton for two

:35:38.:35:44.

years with his outrageous rubbish dumping. Dumping that cost the

:35:44.:35:52.

council a whopping �50,000 to clear up. It all started in 2008 with a

:35:52.:35:56.

flurry of reports of fly-tipping across Southampton. Council

:35:56.:35:59.

officers started mapping out the trail of waste that was being

:35:59.:36:04.

dumped across the city on a daily basis. We had our city patrol

:36:04.:36:06.

officers carrying out investigations and very quickly

:36:06.:36:09.

they concluded that this was being carried out on a commercial basis,

:36:09.:36:12.

not just ordinary residents, and that one person and one person only

:36:12.:36:22.
:36:22.:36:22.

was responsible for dumping this One personal fly-tipping every day

:36:22.:36:26.

in a different place. That's an unbelievable amount of rubbish and

:36:26.:36:32.

an unbelievably brazen operation. And you haven't even heard the half

:36:32.:36:35.

of it. Bairstow was charging innocent businesses a pretty penny

:36:35.:36:45.

for the so-called services he provided. The people Bairstow had

:36:45.:36:48.

taken the rubbish from had paid a significant amount to him for the

:36:48.:36:52.

disposal of it, not knowing that it was going to be dumped a few miles

:36:52.:36:55.

away instead of being disposed of legally. But now comes the most

:36:55.:36:58.

shocking part of this whole story. Nowhere was off limits for this

:36:58.:37:02.

shameless scoundrel to dump his rubbish. Prepare yourselves, then

:37:03.:37:12.
:37:13.:37:13.

I'm not sure 'filthy' and 'rotten' are strong enough words to describe

:37:13.:37:18.

the person who would do this. is the rubbish that first appeared

:37:18.:37:22.

over in the gravel area behind me. And it gradually spilled out into

:37:22.:37:29.

the main tarmac area, all adjacent to the graves. We were faced with a

:37:29.:37:32.

bill of nearly �2,000 for the removal of this rubbish. We also

:37:32.:37:35.

had asbestos to clear, which had to be done by another specialist

:37:35.:37:39.

company. The heartless rogue had even dumped broken asbestos sheets

:37:40.:37:45.

next to the church, a cancer causing killer. It beggars belief,

:37:45.:37:50.

doesn't it? Well, dumping your rubbish anywhere is an anti-social

:37:50.:37:53.

act, but to dump it next to a cemetery on consecrated ground is

:37:53.:37:55.

particularly insensitive and completely against the feelings of

:37:55.:38:04.

people visiting graves. I've never seen so much rubbish dumped. It's

:38:05.:38:12.

absolutely, totally disgraceful. brought tears to my eyes when I saw

:38:12.:38:16.

that fly-tipping there. I mean, Millbrook Church is a beautiful

:38:16.:38:20.

church. Cue some divine intervention in the form of a tip-

:38:20.:38:23.

off to the council from an anonymous caller who had taken the

:38:23.:38:25.

registration number of a truck they'd seen driving away from the

:38:25.:38:30.

churchyard. But the council needed indisputable evidence linking Mr

:38:30.:38:37.

Bairstow with the crime. The chase was on and they were closing in on

:38:37.:38:43.

their man. OK, this is an unadopted footpath, and this is another site

:38:43.:38:49.

of Mr Bairstow's handiwork. My staff are responsible for gathering

:38:49.:38:54.

evidence to prepare for court cases. They will sift through mountains of

:38:54.:39:01.

rubbish in order to find any relevant information. And in this

:39:01.:39:04.

case, Mr Bairstow had not been very careful with the rubbish that he'd

:39:04.:39:07.

left and he did leave us fairly substantial clues as to where it

:39:07.:39:12.

had come from. In the pile of smashed up debris, they found

:39:12.:39:16.

flyers from a small business in the Shirley area of Southampton. Then

:39:16.:39:19.

council investigators got the breakthrough they needed to crack

:39:19.:39:23.

this case. When they checked CCTV footage from a street camera nearby,

:39:23.:39:26.

they found they had a perfect shot of Bairstow's truck parked outside

:39:26.:39:33.

the same business that the flyers came from. And witnesses saw him

:39:33.:39:40.

loading up. He was seen to be removing items such as cardboard

:39:40.:39:44.

boxes, the business flyers, some metal tubing. And when officers

:39:44.:39:47.

compared those items captured on camera with the fly-tip dumped in

:39:47.:39:53.

the alleyway, bingo! They had the missing part of the jigsaw.

:39:53.:39:56.

identified that this was some of the rubbish that was taken away

:39:56.:40:02.

from the small business in Shirley. Gotcha! Now, that's what I call

:40:02.:40:07.

solid evidence. End of story? Not a bit of it. In yet another shocking

:40:07.:40:09.

twist, investigators discovered that fly-tipping was only half of

:40:09.:40:19.
:40:19.:40:21.

Bairstow's lucrative scheme. thing that we found quite

:40:21.:40:24.

despicable was that Mr Bairstow would not only dump his loads of

:40:24.:40:27.

rubbish in an area, he would later go back, find the landowner and

:40:27.:40:31.

then offer his services to get that rubbish cleared again. So, in

:40:31.:40:34.

effect, he was getting a double whammy and we found that quite

:40:34.:40:42.

appalling behaviour. Too right, Ken. The bare-faced cheek of it. Ken's

:40:42.:40:45.

officers were constantly scouting the city for more evidence of

:40:45.:40:49.

Bairstow's crimes, building a solid case against him. And, luckily for

:40:49.:40:53.

them, our man was about to make a mistake that would seal his future

:40:53.:41:00.

and, put it this way, it's not looking rosy. OK, we're now in the

:41:00.:41:04.

middle of an industrial estate in Norgrove in Southampton. He

:41:04.:41:07.

actually dumped the load along this grey car park on the right hand

:41:07.:41:12.

side. This site can actually be seen very clearly, both from the

:41:12.:41:16.

road here on my left, and also there are various CCTV cameras in

:41:16.:41:20.

close proximity. So, Mr Bairstow had no qualms or anything dumping

:41:20.:41:27.

the rubbish here in full view of all the local businesses. Careless,

:41:27.:41:30.

but at least he gave the case for the prosecution a nice clear

:41:30.:41:38.

picture. Thanks, Marcus! These people, they go to people's places,

:41:38.:41:43.

they say, yeah, yeah, I've got the licence to take a rubbish. They pay

:41:44.:41:49.

him �100, �150 to take their rubbish and he just dumps it. I

:41:49.:41:52.

really hope these people are brought to court and they go to

:41:52.:41:56.

prison over this. Well, consider you wish granted. Because of the

:41:56.:42:01.

work of Ken and his colleagues. Mr Bairstow was found guilty of six

:42:01.:42:04.

counts of fly-tipping, three breaches of duty of care and one of

:42:04.:42:11.

failing to provide information. Bairstow got a two and a half year

:42:11.:42:14.

sentence, I think, but that was reduced to two years in the end.

:42:14.:42:18.

But he also got a five year ASBO which means he can't carry any

:42:18.:42:21.

waste in a van anywhere in the country. Result! Britain's worst

:42:21.:42:26.

fly-tipper behind bars. Sadly, there are plenty more where he came

:42:26.:42:29.

from. But, luckily, there's a nationwide team of people working

:42:29.:42:34.

A look at the disgusting consequences of people tipping fat down the sink - we're in the sewers with the team charged with clearing it up; the neighbour from hell who smashed up then set fire to an entire caravan outside his house; and the investigation that put Britain's worst fly-tipper behind bars.


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