Episode 7 Junior Doctors: Blood, Sweat and Tears


Episode 7

Documentary series following the lives of seven newly qualified junior doctors. Osama stays late to get experience he will need to be a surgeon.


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Transcript


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Seven junior doctors...

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-Start CPR.

-Stop doing the drugs, please, and help here.

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Open your eyes for me.

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-Showtime.

-..on the front line of medicine.

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It looks busy, man.

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All the wards are bleeping me at the same time.

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..with all its blood...

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-We're removing everything.

-Second adrenaline.

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I love screwing.

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-..sweat...

-I think lots of doctors are competitive.

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..and tears.

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You're not going to die.

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The doctors of your future...

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I want to be the best junior doctor.

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..facing life...

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-Lion King moment.

-..and death.

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He's tired. I think he just wants to go.

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Have they got what it takes?

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-Cheers.

-Cheers.

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25-year-old Jin is about to start a nine-hour shift in the emergency

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department at Wolverhampton's New Cross hospital.

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I have to remark on the fabulous weather that is

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far and in between and rare in the British culture, isn't it?

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So we have to enjoy this bright weather, but unfortunately,

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I am working. I hope it's a sunny A&E,

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in the sense that everything will be smooth and chilled,

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so let's go for it.

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Jin is a second-year junior doctor.

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However, he didn't always have that ambition.

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I wanted to be an accountant, I wanted to do business.

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At one point, I even wanted to be a Hollywood actor, believe it or not.

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Obviously, I'm not good looking enough, but...

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But all those things crossed my mind, but obviously,

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you can tell that none of them was suited to me.

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I won't be able to survive without coffee.

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Why not?

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Addiction, habit.

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Compulsive behaviour.

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-There you go.

-Thank you.

-No worries.

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It looks busy, man.

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I think that expression said it all.

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On an average shift, Jin will see around ten patients.

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How can I help you today?

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One of those today is football fan Mr Fowler.

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He's come in with a suspected abscess.

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Is the abscess in the belly button, or...?

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They don't know. They just said it was an abscess that burst.

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Yeah, I can't see any abscess.

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-No.

-What's coming out of the belly button?

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Pus and blood is coming out of it.

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I'm getting pain right across my stomach.

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So, now, right now, would you say it's gone better?

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No, it smells worse.

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-How bad's the pain?

-It gets to about seven.

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Is it sharp or dull?

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-Sharp.

-No fever, no shakes?

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-Yeah, I've been getting shakes.

-If you wait here, I'll be back,

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-all right, so...

-OK, no problem.

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As a junior member of the team,

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Jin must check in with senior

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colleagues to ensure he's making the right decisions.

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The only thing that makes any difference in terms of morbidity

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and mortality in somebody who is

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septic is the speed at which they get antibiotics.

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I couldn't see any visible abscess on the outside.

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Neither can I. But that I don't find reassuring, that I find worrying.

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But wouldn't he be really unwell?

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But he's getting there.

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The consultant is concerned Mr Fowler is at risk of sepsis,

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a potentially fatal infection.

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Jin urgently needs to give

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medication and take a blood sample to rule this out.

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We'll keep you updated. We'll give

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you the antibiotic and we'll put you on a drip, sir.

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We'll see what the blood test shows.

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You might have to come into hospital.

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But, let's take it a step at a time.

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At the moment, we're treating him

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like he's going to get really unwell.

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You know, we're putting a line in,

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we're giving him fluids, IV antibiotics.

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I'm doing a whole range of bloods, we're going to call the surgeons.

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You know, we're treating him like he's going to get really unwell.

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But we will see how unwell he gets.

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Junior doctor Osama is on his way to start his shift in obs and gynae.

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# Look back and watch me smack that

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# All on the floor

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# Smack that Give me some more... #

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Junior doctors have three placements a year.

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This is Osama's last.

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So, this afternoon there's about 15 operations going on.

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I guess I want to be operating

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all the time and I guess these kinds of lists

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are perfect me to get my experience up.

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26-year-old Osama was born in Iraq and moved to Britain in 2001.

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Unfortunately, a big world event happened,

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9/11, and my name was Osama.

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I used to walk around school and everyone was chanting my name.

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I thought, "Wow, gosh, I'm so popular in school."

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I quite like my name, although it's quite unpopular name at the moment.

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It's like being called Adolf during World War II.

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Osama is over halfway into his placement on obs and gynae.

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Although still only a first year junior doctor,

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today he has the big responsibility of looking after a medical student,

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23-year-old Simon.

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It's the job I'm going to be starting, hopefully, in August,

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so it's really good to get a good

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insight and sort of following him

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and his day-to-day jobs is really useful

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to give me an insight into what

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I'm hopefully going to be doing in the summer.

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So, she's having a cystoscopy done.

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Just a camera test, looking at the bladder.

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Osama's first job is to meet patients having operations today.

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He's asked Simon to lead a

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consultation with a patient due to have a bladder procedure.

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And do you know what you're having done today?

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I've got problems with my bladder

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from radiation damage after I had a lot

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of radiation when I had cancer.

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-OK.

-So they're going to try and sort it out today.

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And do you take any regular medications at all?

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-Omeprazole.

-And nothing else to thin the blood?

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-No.

-Nothing for blood pressure?

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-No.

-Or heart disease or anything like that?

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-I've got a pacemaker.

-You've got a pacemaker.

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And do you have any things you need to take that?

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-No.

-What's the pacemaker for?

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Sometimes, my heart will stop when I was asleep, but start again.

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But not quickly enough, so if I got up...

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-I've got you, yeah.

-..I just pass out.

-OK. Perfect.

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I mean, not so perfect for you, but, yeah, I guess.

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-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

-OK, thanks.

-Bye.

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-Smashed it.

-Pretty much.

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Yeah, no, no, you actually asked all the questions.

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You did everything correct. And your patient manners were really good,

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which I really like. Like, I love admiring patient manner.

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I'm learning a few things from you, you know?

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As well as medical supervision,

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Osama is also expanding Simon's vocabulary.

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Simon, you've smashed it so far.

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-Yeah.

-So far, so good.

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-No flopping.

-So I like "smashed it."

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He was like, "nailed it," as well.

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I like how he calls everyone bro.

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Including the nurses.

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I think that, you know... Really good.

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In the emergency department,

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Jin is still ruling out

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life-threatening sepsis for Mr Fowler,

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who has a suspected abscess.

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I wish I could make the core decision myself, but I don't have...

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Unfortunately I'm too junior for that.

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I don't have the relevant experience or knowledge to do that.

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I want to be the best, though, the best.

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I want to be the best junior doctor.

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His condition hasn't deteriorated,

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so Jin now needs to consult the on-call surgeon about the next step.

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Discharge is coming out of the belly button.

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Yellow and foul-smelling discharge.

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He's not unwell in himself, is he?

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He is uncomfortable. Just sharp umbilical pain.

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Seven out of ten severity.

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If it's not a proper abscess, there is nothing we can offer,

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because it is not a surgical problem.

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Just a course of antibiotics will be more than enough.

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The patient's blood tests are back and it's good news.

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Let's see. That's fine, that's fine, that's fine, that's fine.

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He looks... OK.

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I've spoken to the surgeon and he doesn't need to be admitted.

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Hi, sir. I've spoken to the surgeon,

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and they feel that you don't need to be admitted.

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We've measured your blood, blood culture, you know,

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we've looked at your observations.

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I've had a word with the general surgeon and they feel that you don't

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-need to be in hospital.

-OK, so what is it, do they know?

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It could just be, you know, a superficial infection,

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not necessarily an internal abscess.

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If it's an internal abscess, you would be very, very unwell,

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so we're happy to discharge you.

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On the respiratory ward, Anna is starting her shift.

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I was a very squeamish child and would cry at the sight of vomit and

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sometimes vomit myself.

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I remember being on a bus once and the person in front of me

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was feeling sick and I remember I came out in these shivers.

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It has kind of been such an extreme change now to being a doctor where

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I'm sometimes vomited on.

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I don't know what's happened.

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I've kind of become desensitised to it over the years.

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With ten applicants for every place at medical school,

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she's come a long way to be a doctor.

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I feel really nervous.

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But she didn't have an easy start on her placement

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nearly two months ago.

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Oh, gosh. It's got a cover on it, so we're fine.

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I feel a bit like a spare part at the moment.

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-Ow.

-I'm not really sure what I'm meant to be doing.

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-Whoa.

-I did have a moment today

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where it felt like everyone was dying.

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In my head, I'm just panicking

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and not actually thinking about the answer.

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I don't think I've made the right decision here, and hate it.

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It's an important day for Anna.

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She's having her final assessment.

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If she doesn't pass, she'll have to repeat the whole year.

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Being a doctor is competitive and I think medicine,

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kind of the competitive personality fits medicine very well.

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I think lots of doctors are competitive.

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I'm not competitive at all.

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You know, I just like to get along with everyone and have a nice time.

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Not passing F1, I don't know.

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I think I probably would have a moment of despair

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where I would think, "Shall I just give up?"

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But, fingers crossed, I pass.

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Jin has been working long hours for several weeks in the emergency department.

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It's now seven hours into his shift and a patient has been

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brought in who's overdosed on antidepressants and painkillers.

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28 mirtazapine.

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Approximately 20 co-codamol.

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How many Naproxen? What's his GCS?

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Examining motor, verbal and eye response,

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Jin needs to rate the patient's

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level of consciousness on what's known as

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the Glasgow Coma Scale.

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Jin must be accurate with his GCS score

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so the team can monitor whether

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the patient is deteriorating.

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So next time I'll do that if I can't wake up a patient?

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Dr Qureshi has some questions about his assessment.

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How did you rate?

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So, motor, verbal and pain.

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Motor, verbal and pain?

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-Is it pain?

-Which medical school did you go to?

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No, motor, verbal, and what was the last one?

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-Sorry, I'm just really tired.

-Do you want me to leave you alone now?

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-Kind of.

-Have you had enough?

-Kind of, yeah.

-OK.

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When are you in next?

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-Tomorrow.

-OK.

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Well, on Monday... Are you here on Monday?

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-No.

-Are you in on Tuesday?

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-Yeah.

-OK, on Tuesday, I want...

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I will ask you the Glasgow Coma Scale,

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the competence and how you measure it.

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And if you don't know it by then, I'll tell your supervisor.

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OK.

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Not very happy, obviously.

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I know she's just joking,

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but she's just embarrassed me in front of everyone.

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Sometimes, you know, you can take it too far, I think.

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How would you feel?

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How would you feel if you were embarrassed like that in front of everyone?

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They're not kids. They are doctors.

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We're all adults, we're all

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professionals and it was not really a telling off, but it was

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trying to make Jin realise the importance of basic principles of

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assessment in an acutely unwell patient, and essentially that is the

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essence of his job in emergency medicine.

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And if he's not able to do that,

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then I think it's a failure on our part,

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as well, as consultants,

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that we are not giving him that proper teaching and training.

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You cannot work in an emergency department and not know what

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a Glasgow Coma Scale is and its components are.

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Just had a long day and I just, for some reason,

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my mind just switched off.

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I guess it was the pressure.

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Everyone was watching me and it's just...

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My mind went blank.

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With an hour until they're due in surgery,

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Osama and Simon are focused on fuelling up for the job.

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But, first, Osama must smuggle Simon into a secret part of the hospital.

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So, you can't tell anyone about this.

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So, this is for junior doctors.

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I guess Simon's going to be a junior doctor very soon,

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so I guess he is kind of, but don't tell anyone.

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So, you go by the name of Barry and you're a senior registrar.

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Oh, Emeka's here.

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How are you doing?

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So, bananas, potassium.

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And then obviously some vitamins. And tuna.

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This is the secret for any surgeon.

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They need a lot of protein.

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I lived off this stuff for six years in med school.

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It just reminds me of med school.

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So, hopefully, I'll be able to recapture the knowledge from med school,

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as well, when I'm in theatre.

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This is why I can eat this. You fancy playing some football?

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Let's go for it, man.

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The competitive world of junior doctors

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even extends to table football.

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How do you win this game?

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I think you have to score more goals than your opponent.

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You think so?

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I think that's a goal to me, bro.

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Is it? Oh.

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The thing is, every time I get a goal,

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you automatically get two participation points.

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-OK.

-Two more participation points.

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Two more participation points.

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I remember you telling me like today is a big day in theatre.

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Yeah. I'm taking my student, Simon, with me.

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-OK.

-He wants to be a surgeon. He's really good.

-Oh, really?

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So he's really keen to be in theatre, so I'm taking him with me.

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So I guess I want to show him what it's like.

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To be fair, it sounds like you're a pretty dope mentor.

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Oh, thank you, bro.

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-If I were Simon, I'd feel lucky to have you.

-Aw.

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Bro, I'm blushing.

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Oh, there you go, bro. I need to go.

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I smashed it.

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Jin's confidence has taken a knock this week.

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So, off shift, he's meeting up with senior colleague

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and friend, Raul, to get some advice.

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-Oh, man.

-So, how's it going?

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Yeah, I had a run-in with Dr Qureshi.

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-Oh, yeah.

-She's grilled me about the Glasgow Coma Scale.

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-Oh, yeah?

-And...

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Oh, yeah. I heard about this.

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You heard about it? A little bird told you, yeah?

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A little bird being the whole of the A&E.

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It's a little fishbowl, man.

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Whatever you do, everyone knows about it the next day, man.

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-Yeah.

-No, that's all right.

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It was the end of a nine, ten-hour shift.

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-Yeah.

-I was wrecked. My mind went blank.

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-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

-The pressure of everyone looking at me and...

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I think, with that kind of stuff, you know it.

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If I were to ask you about it now, you'd be able to tell me.

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Yeah, definitely, definitely.

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But, when you're so tired, you can barely think.

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I was quite similar.

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There would have been days where I did everything right and I'm

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like... Your level of confidence grows. And then, because of that,

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you come across more stuff and you think you can do it yourself.

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Yeah, I've had that.

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Exactly. Some are like, "Yeah, I'm on this one."

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I'm one of the most confident F2s in A&E, right?

0:16:210:16:24

-Yeah.

-And on another day, it comes crashing.

0:16:240:16:26

Exactly. And you miss something huge.

0:16:260:16:27

And you're like, "Oh, I can't believe I missed that."

0:16:270:16:30

-That's true.

-And then, all of a sudden,

0:16:300:16:31

"Yeah, it was a good thing." I know it's not the nicest thing,

0:16:310:16:34

being criticised in front of staff.

0:16:340:16:36

-I find it difficult...

-Why's that?

-I'm a bit of a perfectionist.

0:16:360:16:38

You're going to make mistakes.

0:16:380:16:40

Sometimes, I'm like, "Yeah, I can boss this."

0:16:400:16:42

But, when I'm feeling out of depth,

0:16:420:16:46

I'm not afraid to ask for help.

0:16:460:16:49

Anna's on her way to meet her supervisor, Dr Bateman,

0:16:580:17:01

for her final assessment.

0:17:010:17:04

He decides whether she's done enough

0:17:040:17:06

to become a second year junior doctor.

0:17:060:17:08

When we see young doctors just finished medical school,

0:17:080:17:12

and they come onto the wards and it's a completely different field.

0:17:120:17:15

They don't have feedback in the same

0:17:150:17:17

way that they do in medical school

0:17:170:17:19

in terms of how they're performing and, you know,

0:17:190:17:21

you do see students sink or swim.

0:17:210:17:23

Hello.

0:17:240:17:25

So just to catch up with you again

0:17:280:17:29

and this is the final validation from your foundation programme,

0:17:290:17:33

so it's really nice to see in the last two months in

0:17:330:17:36

respiratory you've had very positive feedback from your clinician,

0:17:360:17:39

Dr Carter.

0:17:390:17:41

And running through your checklist,

0:17:410:17:44

you've basically completed all the requirements.

0:17:440:17:47

You've had positive comments from your practical procedures,

0:17:470:17:51

your clinical work, and from the rest of the team in respiratory,

0:17:510:17:53

which is really helpful.

0:17:530:17:55

Any comments about... Obviously, you're two months into respiratory.

0:17:550:17:58

Any comments, anything else you'd like to raise?

0:17:580:18:00

I think I can be quite shy, sometimes.

0:18:000:18:02

I think I do need to push myself to,

0:18:020:18:04

I don't know, kind of get stuck in.

0:18:040:18:06

Yeah, I think so. And I think one of the most important things is,

0:18:060:18:09

essentially, there's a huge range of evidence,

0:18:090:18:12

we've been saying with the other trainees,

0:18:120:18:14

and you've shown good engagement with all these things,

0:18:140:18:16

so we're quite happy that you've done all the things that you were

0:18:160:18:19

-required to do.

-Oh, good.

0:18:190:18:21

It's been a pleasure. I think you've done really well.

0:18:210:18:23

I've seen a change in Anna in the

0:18:230:18:25

-sense that I think Anna is probably more confident now.

-Thank you.

0:18:250:18:29

A lot of the doctors have fed back on her compassion and her

0:18:290:18:33

professionalism. I think she's recognising herself

0:18:330:18:36

she's doing a good job and that she's good at what she's doing.

0:18:360:18:39

Being competitive doesn't

0:18:390:18:41

necessarily mean you're the best doctor for your patient.

0:18:410:18:44

What patients need is, you know,

0:18:440:18:47

a doctor who cares and a doctor that's going to work hard for them.

0:18:470:18:50

Have you already seen the patients in DCU?

0:19:210:19:23

In obs and gynae,

0:19:230:19:25

Osama and Simon are about to assist Mr Saeed on a major procedure.

0:19:250:19:29

A full hysterectomy.

0:19:290:19:31

Literally, we're inducing this lady into menopause.

0:19:360:19:39

We're removing everything.

0:19:390:19:40

We're removing the uterus, removing the ovaries,

0:19:400:19:42

removing the fallopian tubes.

0:19:420:19:44

We're removing everything.

0:19:440:19:46

So, yeah, this is the biggest operation in gynae.

0:19:460:19:48

Osama has back-to-back operations,

0:19:500:19:53

but on general surgery, Emeka is having a slow day.

0:19:530:19:57

I'm looking all right today, you know.

0:19:570:19:59

Oh, wait, who's this?

0:20:030:20:05

I don't understand how he's got enough time to do this stuff.

0:20:070:20:10

I guess, sometimes, you have days where there's not much going on.

0:20:120:20:16

So I'll probably send a reply to him at the end of the day,

0:20:160:20:19

after the big operations.

0:20:190:20:21

There are three applicants for every surgical traineeship.

0:20:210:20:23

As a junior, you're always trying to

0:20:230:20:25

compete with other juniors to try and get into theatre.

0:20:250:20:28

So, for example, the registrar will try to get into theatre.

0:20:280:20:31

The senior house officer will try to get into theatre.

0:20:310:20:33

The F1s will try to get into theatre,

0:20:330:20:34

so you're always trying to compete to try to get into theatre.

0:20:340:20:38

Mr Saeed is giving Osama more surgical responsibility,

0:20:380:20:40

which will help him stand out from his peers for a traineeship.

0:20:400:20:45

Mr Saeed is kindly going to step out of this one and let the registrar

0:20:450:20:48

do most of the operation

0:20:480:20:49

and therefore I'll be stepping up to do what the registrar's role is.

0:20:490:20:52

And then the medical student,

0:20:520:20:54

who is becoming a doctor soon, will be doing my role.

0:20:540:20:57

Getting experience like this is

0:20:570:20:59

literally like a once-in-a-lifetime kind

0:20:590:21:01

of thing, to become a surgeon,

0:21:010:21:02

so you need this kind of experience.

0:21:020:21:04

The team will remove the womb, uterus,

0:21:070:21:10

fallopian tubes and part of the cervix.

0:21:100:21:13

You'll be helping soon.

0:21:130:21:15

So this is the womb here, look.

0:21:230:21:25

This is the bladder here in front.

0:21:250:21:27

-OK.

-The cervix was here, so we push this all the way down.

0:21:270:21:31

This is the top of the vagina.

0:21:310:21:34

Oh, my word, it's such a long cervix.

0:21:350:21:38

Osama has the responsibility of suturing the wound.

0:21:400:21:43

It's was a really good experience.

0:21:460:21:48

You can just see the anatomy really well.

0:21:480:21:50

Did you see, like, the ovaries, uterus, fallopian tubes...?

0:21:500:21:54

Yeah, it all came out.

0:21:540:21:56

It was good.

0:21:560:21:57

Osama smashed it. So, all good.

0:21:570:21:59

It went well. Yeah, there were some really nice anatomy in there so

0:21:590:22:02

it's a really good learning experience, as well, for me.

0:22:020:22:05

If you want to be a good surgeon, you need to get as much theatre

0:22:050:22:08

experience as possible, so you have to sacrifice some time.

0:22:080:22:10

Simon, he's only a medical student, but he's already sacrificing, like,

0:22:100:22:14

coming in extra to do this.

0:22:140:22:16

Like, other medical students are literally at home right now.

0:22:160:22:18

All your colleagues are, like, chilling at home.

0:22:180:22:21

Yeah. Exactly, they are at home.

0:22:210:22:23

That's what you have to do to become a good surgeon.

0:22:230:22:27

Now Osama's finished his shift,

0:22:270:22:29

he can finally get to the important business of replying to Emeka's

0:22:290:22:32

earlier text.

0:22:320:22:34

He's taken about 20 selfies,

0:22:340:22:36

which is kind of the usual number for him per day.

0:22:360:22:39

But, wow.

0:22:390:22:41

Oh, this is cute, look.

0:22:410:22:43

Wish you were here.

0:22:430:22:45

I'm only just starting the selfie game, so, I don't know,

0:22:450:22:48

I don't think I'll be able to hack it, but I'll try and challenge him.

0:22:480:22:51

Emeka has smashed this.

0:22:540:22:56

I need to learn from him. I'm like his apprentice, essentially.

0:22:560:22:59

Hopefully, one day, I'll be at his level.

0:22:590:23:01

Successful day over,

0:23:110:23:14

Anna heads home to celebrate her

0:23:140:23:16

huge achievement with boyfriend Fraser.

0:23:160:23:19

Look, we've got a tiny prosecco to celebrate.

0:23:220:23:24

Yay! Tiny prosecco.

0:23:240:23:26

-Well, it is a weeknight.

-Yeah.

0:23:260:23:28

-How did the meeting go?

-He was really nice, my supervisor.

0:23:280:23:31

He said that he could see I'd got

0:23:310:23:32

-more confident and that he thought I was a good doctor.

-Wow.

0:23:320:23:35

Yeah, it was really nice.

0:23:350:23:37

And he said I was in the top third.

0:23:370:23:38

-Top third?

-Yeah. Bossed it, man.

0:23:380:23:40

Bossed it. Well done.

0:23:400:23:42

Whoo.

0:23:440:23:45

Jin is coming to the end of working a week of late shifts.

0:23:560:23:59

Do you want to know the reason why I love tuna so much?

0:24:010:24:05

It's because I'm really good on the drums and I can play a TUNE-a.

0:24:050:24:08

He's been called to assess a patient with a persistent nosebleed.

0:24:110:24:15

How can I help you today?

0:24:150:24:17

-Nosebleed.

-Nosebleed, yes.

0:24:170:24:19

Both nose, or one nostril?

0:24:190:24:21

-One nose.

-Continuous?

0:24:210:24:23

-Continuous.

-No other symptoms?

0:24:230:24:25

No.

0:24:250:24:27

With the help of ENT doctor Oommen, Jin cauterises the septum,

0:24:270:24:33

the cartilage that divides the nose.

0:24:330:24:35

Cheers, mate, thanks.

0:24:360:24:38

He did the cauterising very well.

0:24:380:24:40

Achieved the right result.

0:24:400:24:42

So we're just going to use the cream

0:24:420:24:44

and send the patient home.

0:24:440:24:47

-All right?

-Yeah, thank you.

-No worries.

0:24:470:24:49

This is exactly what they mean when you say junior doctors learn on the job.

0:24:490:24:53

Now that I've seen one, I should be able to do it by myself.

0:24:530:24:56

There's different ways of learning on the job.

0:24:560:24:58

You can be grilled by a consultant, which isn't particularly nice.

0:24:580:25:01

Handsome henchman, dealing with a patient.

0:25:010:25:04

There's learning from patients themselves.

0:25:040:25:06

Yeah, it's all sort of collaborative.

0:25:060:25:08

They come together to give you an experience, really.

0:25:080:25:11

After struggling to recall

0:25:120:25:14

the Glasgow Coma Scale on a previous shift with Dr Qureshi,

0:25:140:25:18

Jin has done some important revision.

0:25:180:25:21

Hello, Jin, how are you?

0:25:220:25:23

Hi, Doctor Qureshi.

0:25:230:25:25

I'm very well, thank you.

0:25:250:25:27

-Are you OK?

-Yes.

-What did we learn, then?

0:25:270:25:29

So, in terms of...

0:25:290:25:31

It's E4, M6 and V5.

0:25:310:25:32

-OK.

-E4 would be opening eyes simultaneously,

0:25:320:25:35

or opening eyes to voice or opening eyes to pain or not opening eyes at all.

0:25:350:25:38

-OK.

-Motor would be obeys commands or localises the pain,

0:25:380:25:42

or withdraws from the pain,

0:25:420:25:44

flexes to the pain, extends to the pain, or doesn't respond at all.

0:25:440:25:47

-OK.

-And voice would be fully alert, or disorientated or confused,

0:25:470:25:51

or uttering inappropriate words,

0:25:510:25:53

or uttering complete incomprehensive sounds.

0:25:530:25:56

So why do you think it is so important?

0:25:560:25:59

So, it's important to assess GCS because you need to see the level of

0:25:590:26:03

impairment consciously,

0:26:030:26:05

which would guide future management neurologically.

0:26:050:26:07

I hope you didn't feel I was very harsh?

0:26:070:26:10

At the time I did, but... I sort of knew I had to do it,

0:26:100:26:12

but I didn't know it inside out, bang, bang, bang.

0:26:120:26:14

But now I do, so it's definitely

0:26:140:26:16

been beneficial to me in the long-term.

0:26:160:26:18

-Right.

-I feel like a real doctor.

-You feel like a real doctor?

0:26:180:26:21

No, I'm not saying that I didn't before, but, like...

0:26:210:26:24

Oh, God. You know what I'm saying.

0:26:240:26:26

I didn't mean it in that way.

0:26:260:26:29

Retrospectively, it has actually improved me as a doctor.

0:26:290:26:32

Because you've had this viral pleurisy for three weeks,

0:26:320:26:35

it's going to put a lot of strain on your muscle.

0:26:350:26:38

Particularly the muscle lining of

0:26:380:26:40

your rib cage and the lungs because it's

0:26:400:26:42

getting irritated by all the cough.

0:26:420:26:44

Before, I was OK, but it's

0:26:440:26:46

definitely developed me in that regard.

0:26:460:26:49

And it has been a painful learning experience, but one, no doubt,

0:26:490:26:52

that's made me a better doctor.

0:26:520:26:54

It's nearing the end of Jin's shift

0:26:540:26:57

when Dr Qureshi comes to say goodbye.

0:26:570:27:00

She's leaving the department.

0:27:010:27:03

See you, Dr Qureshi.

0:27:030:27:05

In the short time we've known each other.

0:27:070:27:09

The short time we have known each other.

0:27:090:27:11

Yes. It's been a pleasure.

0:27:110:27:12

Yeah, if I end up going to Preston, is it?

0:27:120:27:14

I have friends in Preston, so...

0:27:140:27:16

-You come and see me, yeah.

-They might be working there, actually.

0:27:160:27:19

You might bump into them.

0:27:190:27:20

What are you going to tell them, not to see this doctor?

0:27:200:27:23

-Stay away from her?

-I'll warn them about you.

0:27:230:27:25

I will give them a heads up on the WhatsApp.

0:27:250:27:27

Best of luck. I'm sure you'll be fine.

0:27:270:27:29

-Yeah, thank you, thank you.

-All right.

0:27:290:27:31

-Genuinely, thank you.

-Best of luck with everything.

0:27:310:27:33

-Thank you very much.

-OK.

0:27:330:27:35

I quite like having a student with me.

0:27:400:27:43

It's kind of a sense of power.

0:27:430:27:45

What mistakes have you made?

0:27:450:27:47

As soon as I got news of it, I was like, "Oh, man,

0:27:470:27:50

"I need to go, like, counsel you."

0:27:500:27:52

I feel a bit naked.

0:27:520:27:53

I love screwing.

0:27:550:27:57

Here's to the future.

0:27:570:27:58

-Cheers.

-Cheers.

0:27:580:28:00

Getting ahead in the competitive world of medicine takes its toll on the junior doctors. Jin struggles with criticism from a senior colleague, and Osama stays late to get experience he will need to be a surgeon. Anna finds out whether she has passed the year.


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