Taming the Wild Grand Tours of Scotland's Lochs


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Taming the Wild

Paul Murton takes a tour of Scotland's lochs. In this edition, he swims across Loch Ba high on Rannoch Moor and struggles against the elements while trainspotting.


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The lochan-studded expanse of Rannoch Moor -

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an icon of the untamed.

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A true wilderness, and once a place of thieves and wild men.

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For generations the West Highlands were considered to be

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a dangerous place, a country to be tamed.

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First the military came, and then the engineers,

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and they built roads and railways and harnessed the power of nature.

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Lochs are Scotland's gift to the world,

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and are the product of an element that we have

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in spectacular abundance - water.

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It's been estimated that there are more than 31,000 lochs in Scotland.

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They come in all shapes and sizes,

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from long fjord-like sea lochs,

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great freshwater lochs of the Central Highlands,

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to the innumerable lochans that stud the open moors.

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In this series,

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I'm on a loch-hopping journey across Scotland,

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discovering how they've shaped the character of the people

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who live close to their shores.

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For this grand tour, I'm taking a walk on the wild side.

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My journey starts on the beautiful banks of Loch Tulla,

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crosses Rannoch Moor, and then by Loch Rannoch and Loch Tummel

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I will go.

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It reaches journey's end on a fairy mountain.

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Loch Tulla lies on the southern edge of the great Rannoch Moor.

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This wild country was first settled thousands of years ago.

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To see the evidence of habitation for myself,

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I'm being ferried out to a tiny island called Eilean Stalcair,

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where some of the first people to lead settled lives

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in this part of Scotland made their home.

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It's known as a crannog -

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that's an artificial island that was built

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to keep the occupants safe from wild animals,

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and from their human enemies' raiding and plundering.

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Back in the Iron Age, over 2,000 years ago,

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the crannog would have been a defensive home

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to an extended family, living in a thatched timber house,

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sitting on wooden stilts above the water.

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Crannogs were once very common.

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At least 600 have been identified by archaeologists in Scotland's lochs.

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The earliest belonged to the Stone Age.

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Others were used for hundreds of years.

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This crannog was occupied up until the 14th century by Clan MacGregor,

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who once dominated this whole area.

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And when they lost it to the Campbells,

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their bard wrote a lament recalling their happy days

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on the shores of Loch Tulla,

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and I can see why they were sad to leave it.

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It's amazing to think that during the last ice age

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the whole of Rannoch Moor was covered by a great ice cap.

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As the glaciers melted,

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they created the loch-studded landscape

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we are familiar with today.

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Most of the moor lies over 400 metres above sea level.

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In winter, its many lochans are covered in ice,

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which makes the prospect of taking a dunk in one of them, even in summer,

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less than appealing.

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I meet Calum Maclean on the banks of Loch Ba.

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He's a devotee of wild swimming, a rather grand name

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for something that people have been doing for years.

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Calum blogs about his watery adventures,

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which take him to some extreme locations,

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including an icebound lochan high in the frozen Cairngorm Mountains.

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Today, he invites me to take a plunge in water

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that is thankfully ice-free.

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Do you ever actually kind of measure temperatures, scientifically?

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Oh, I never measure the temperature with an actual thermometer.

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I think that's far too scientific for me.

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I think I usually stick my toe in,

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and depending on how much it hurts and how much I scream,

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that's how cold the water is that day.

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So are we going to be screaming, do you think?

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I think when we get in, it's going to hurt.

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That's usually what happens. It never gets any easier.

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-Heart stopping?

-Possibly, yeah.

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Is there a kind of gradation of wildness that you're looking for?

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I mean, how does this compare, Loch Ba?

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Where we are here, it's quite calm, you know,

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we're not too far from the road.

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But, yeah, I've been to some of the more extreme places, you might say.

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The Gulf of Corryvreckan between Jura and Scarba,

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that was a particularly fun one, where the current sweeps through.

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It's one of the biggest whirlpools, I think, around.

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Luckily, there was a slack tide, so we were OK.

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Were you not scared?

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I wasn't scared, no. I was excited more than scared.

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So it's adrenaline rather than just pure fear?

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That's right, yeah.

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I'm ready for this. Are you ready for anything?

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-Uh-huh.

-Right.

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-How does it feel so far?

-It's fine - I'm wearing a wet suit.

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VOICEOVER: The plan today is for Calum to swim the length of Loch Ba.

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I'm going to try my best to keep up with him,

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at least as far as the nearby island of Eilean Molach.

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Perhaps I should have brought my rubber ring,

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but at least my wet suit means I shouldn't die of hypothermia.

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Well, it's really quite cold out here, I have to say, Calum.

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Thank you so much for bringing me out for this wonderful experience.

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But the views are amazing.

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-They are.

-It's like a kind of trout's-eye view.

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It is. But, yeah, it's a fantastic way

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to see this beautiful landscape around us.

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And we are in the middle of Rannoch Moor.

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Who would have thought it?

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Exactly. Lots of people come here for walking, hiking.

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How many people come here to swim?

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Very few. I wonder why!

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But my problem is that I've only ever really swam

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a maximum of about ten lengths before,

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and what we're proposing to do must be a good bit more than that -

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about ten times more than that.

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So I'm not sure I'll be able to make it all the way.

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I think you might be right.

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I reckon it's about half a kilometre or so.

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Oh!

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Well, I'm getting a bit tired now.

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Oh, look - I can stand up!

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-Oh.

-Oh, ho, ho!

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There's no need to panic at all.

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I can literally walk to this island if I need to.

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That's right, yeah. You invited me here for a swim,

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but it's a bit more of a walk, I think.

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We could just walk the whole way.

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Why don't we stroll over this way, if you don't mind?

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VOICEOVER: Unfortunately, our reception committee on shore

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is a swarm of vicious midges.

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Just wade the last few feet to the shore.

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Well, Calum, I'm afraid I don't think I'm going to be able

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to make it. I'm just a bit too peched.

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So, if you don't mind, I think I'll just wait for a boat.

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So good luck, my friend.

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OK, well, I'll leave you with the midges, then, Paul.

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Happy wild swimming!

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There he goes. Good luck, Calum.

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But these midges really are horrendous.

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It's time to move on.

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Fleeing the swarms of miniature bloodsucking beasties,

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I leave Loch Ba and follow the old road west across the moor.

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It was built by the great 18th-century engineer Thomas Telford,

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and follows the route of an older military road,

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built to suppress the lawless and rebellious clans

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who'd made this wild stretch of country their home.

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Nearing the high point on Telford's road,

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I'm looking for a little-known monument to a remarkable man.

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Much of the western half of Rannoch Moor

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has been owned for many years by the Fleming family.

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Now the most famous member of the family has to be Ian Fleming,

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the author and creator of James Bond, 007.

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But what a lot of people don't know

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is that Ian had an older brother

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who at one time was much the more famous of the two.

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Long before Ian Fleming had put creative pen to paper,

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Peter Fleming was already a successful travel writer

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and novelist.

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During the war he worked for British intelligence,

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and drew on his experience to write a spy thriller.

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The Sixth Column was described by critics

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as the blueprint for his younger brother's Bond story, Casino Royale.

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Despite the similarities,

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Peter encouraged Ian's literary endeavours,

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and even suggested the name Miss Moneypenny.

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He loved the outdoors,

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and was an enthusiastic sportsman with a passion for shooting.

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But it was out here on the wilds of Rannoch Moor

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that he suddenly and unexpectedly died of a heart attack.

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And this cairn marks the exact spot where he fell -

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a memorial to a remarkable life and an unsung literary hero.

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Journeying into the heart of Rannoch Moor,

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I encounter its biggest loch by far, Loch Laidon.

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A faint path follows the shoreline,

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and after a 14-mile hike I come across an unexpected sight -

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a railway station, apparently in the middle of nowhere.

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Rannoch station is one of the remotest in the country.

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Despite this, trains from London stop here.

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Hi, Paul.

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VOICEOVER: To find out about the line that crosses Rannoch Moor,

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I'm meeting up with railway historian

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and photographer Norman McNab.

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Norman, why build a railway line

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through such a desolate expanse of moorland?

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Well, there was a need to open up the West Highlands.

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There was a particular desire to get a connection

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from Glasgow to Fort William,

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and then onward from Fort William to the West Coast Sea,

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to tap into the lucrative herring industry.

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And you've got to remember that road across Rannoch Moor to the west

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by Coire Ba was a very, very...

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It was nothing much more than a rough track

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as it was in the days of the stagecoach.

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So getting to Fort William was very hard.

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Over the course of eight years,

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5,000 navvies toiled in horrendous conditions

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to build the railway across the moor,

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where deep peat banks forced the engineers

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to float the line on rafts of brushwood and ash.

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The first passenger services eventually began in 1894.

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What's interesting to me,

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to celebrate the opening of the line,

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this wonderful book here, Mountain, Moor And Loch,

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was produced when this line was opened,

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presumably to encourage a wealthier sort of visitor.

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Yes. Absolutely.

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And it's a beautifully illustrated book as well.

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And the poetry of it all was bound to have enthused people.

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"From the window of the railway carriage,

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"it is the reverse of wearisome."

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As true today as it was when it was written.

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And of course, you can tell the character of a person, man or woman,

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by their attitude to crossing Rannoch Moor.

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They're either stimulated and excited by it, and wondrously so,

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or they find it a boring place.

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-How do you find it?

-Well, I find it a very stimulating place.

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VOICEOVER: Norman wants to get a shot of the London sleeper train

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crossing the famous Rannoch viaduct.

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So we set off over the heather to get into position.

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It's a great view of the viaduct.

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Yep. This is absolutely ideal, Paul.

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All we want is the light.

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Now, what are you looking for when you come to choose a location

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to take a photograph?

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Well, I'm looking for a composition

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which sets the train within the landscape.

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So the train is just part of it.

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It's primarily to give the impression

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of the scenery and the location.

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Particularly to bring over this aspect of the wild openness.

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It's something unique to the West Highland Line

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as it crosses over Rannoch Moor.

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It is real drama with the lighting and the clear visibility.

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It can be quite fantastic.

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HORN BLARES

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OK, after all the waiting, here comes the train.

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-OK.

-Check the lens cap's off, power's on.

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This is very exciting.

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-This is the moment, Paul.

-This is what we've been waiting for.

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One, two, are you getting this?

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That's brilliant.

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Yeah.

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-Do you wave at trains, Norman?

-Yes, you do.

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They're waving back.

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Yes, I'm not sure about that gesture, Norman.

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Having got our shot of the train,

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suitably invested with the drama of a desolate location,

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I leave Norman and explore the loch-studded moor,

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where I am fascinated to see ancient tree roots

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protruding from the dark peat.

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All across the moor, you come across roots like this

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sticking out of the peat.

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These are the remains of a once-great forest

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that covered this desolate expanse thousands of years ago.

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Many of the roots are pine trees,

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early victims of climate change.

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Just after the last ice age,

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the climate is thought to have been warmer and drier than now,

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encouraging the spread of forest cover.

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But then things changed.

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It got wetter and cooler, and moss thrived,

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which developed into layers of peat.

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This eventually suffocated the forests

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but preserved the remains of the trees

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which once grew here thousands of years ago.

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My old railway guide, Mountain, Moor And Loch,

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mentions the curious sight of so many old tree roots

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in an otherwise treeless moor,

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and goes on to explain that local folk

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used to use this peat pine as candles.

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They would dry it out, break it into little splinters,

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and then light the splinters

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which made excellent candles to spin wool by.

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Not that the local folk had much choice

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in the matter of their illumination,

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because candles were far too expensive.

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Reaching the road, I pick up a push bike and pedal west,

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following the River Gaur as it makes its way down to Loch Rannoch,

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which, in the days of the Jacobites, was an unruly place indeed.

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This was a wild country without roads,

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presided over by a warrior chief.

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Alexander Struan Robinson is the only man known

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to have taken part in all three Jacobite risings.

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But Struan Robertson had gentler beginnings.

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He was actually a divinity student at St Andrews University,

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where he joined the first Jacobite rebellion in 1689.

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In 1715, he was captured at the Battle of Sheriffmuir,

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but then escaped to France.

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And then, in 1745, at the age of 75,

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the old warrior marched off to join Bonnie Prince Charlie,

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whose defeat at Culloden cost him dear.

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The estates of Struan Robertson were forfeited

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and he lived out the rest of his days in a cottage

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close to the great black wood of Rannoch.

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Today, the black wood is one of the largest areas

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of ancient Caledonian pine forest left in the country.

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The Scots pine is the dominant tree species here.

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In Latin, it's known as Pinus sylvestris,

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but you have to be very careful how you pronounce it

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if you want to avoid offence.

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And I'm being as careful as I can.

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Pee-nus or pie-nus sylvestris

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as it's known, has recently been voted as Scotland's national tree.

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And here in the black wood of Rannoch

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are many fine old specimens,

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including this one,

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which must have been a mere sapling when Struan Robertson lived here.

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Amazing to think of all that history it has seen.

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Struan Robertson wouldn't recognise my next destination.

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Nestling beneath the peak of Schiehallion is Kinloch Rannoch.

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It's a quiet, respectable sort of place,

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but when the old clan chief was alive,

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this area was at the heart of a rebellious community.

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When the Jacobites were finally defeated,

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it became a refuge for desperate, hungry men on the run.

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Because the people were starving,

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the returning warriors had to resort to theft

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to keep their families alive.

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And soon, Rannoch acquired a reputation

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of cattle rustling and lawlessness.

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A captain of the army of occupation wrote,

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"The people of this country

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"are the greatest thieves in Scotland

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"and were all in the late rebellion."

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But within a few years, the village of Kinloch Rannoch was established.

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Schools and churches were built

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in an attempt to civilise the wild clansfolk,

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and it seems to have worked.

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There's not a rebellious Jacobite to be seen.

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Leaving Kinloch Rannoch, I take the old military road,

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following the southern shores of Loch Tummel.

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After its warlike history, it now seems the epitome of peace.

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And what could be more peaceful than sailing?

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Loch Tummel has become a favourite location for lovers of watersports,

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and dinghy sailing in particular.

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Despite the gale that's blowing,

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I threw caution to the wind and joined veteran sailor Jim

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and his crew member Amanda,

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dodging other boats as squalls race across the water.

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Are we going to jibe or are we going to about?

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Oh, no, we're going to go about in this weather.

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Would you normally be coming out to the loch in this weather?

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Not normally, no.

0:18:220:18:23

This is just for a bit of fun, really.

0:18:230:18:26

Right.

0:18:260:18:27

So, if you look upwind,

0:18:270:18:29

you can see dark patches are sitting on the water.

0:18:290:18:32

Some of them have more ripples than the others,

0:18:320:18:34

and that generally is when your squalls are coming in.

0:18:340:18:37

That's when your boat will start to keel over quickly.

0:18:370:18:39

-Or it could flatten you completely?

-Yes.

-Which we don't want.

0:18:390:18:41

No.

0:18:410:18:43

When did you start sailing?

0:18:430:18:45

About 1949.

0:18:450:18:47

Good grief, really?

0:18:470:18:48

-Yep.

-It's done you well.

0:18:480:18:50

Yep.

0:18:500:18:51

No disrespect, but you really are an old sea dog.

0:18:510:18:54

Well, I'd hardly say an old sea dog,

0:18:540:18:58

but we are all wrinkly anyhow.

0:18:580:19:00

It's a lifetime, you've spent a lifetime at the tiller.

0:19:000:19:02

As we tack backwards and forwards across the loch,

0:19:070:19:10

Jim tells me that we are sailing over land that was once farmed.

0:19:100:19:14

There are even the ruins of an ancient Clan Menzies hunting lodge

0:19:140:19:17

beneath our keel.

0:19:170:19:19

Everything was drowned in the 1950s when the lock was dammed.

0:19:190:19:24

Intrigued, I leave Jim's boat and sail 11km

0:19:240:19:29

to Loch Tummel's famous Queen's View,

0:19:290:19:31

to see for myself how the landscape has been altered

0:19:310:19:34

by this man-made flood.

0:19:340:19:37

Now, this really is a grand view

0:19:370:19:42

and one worthy of royal appreciation.

0:19:420:19:45

But you can tell from this old photograph postcard

0:19:450:19:48

that was taken in the 1940s

0:19:480:19:50

just how much it's been altered by rising water levels.

0:19:500:19:53

There's a whole area of land here that's been flooded.

0:19:530:19:57

The tiny island in the background

0:19:570:19:59

is, in the photograph, nothing more than a wooded hill

0:19:590:20:03

beside the River Tummel.

0:20:030:20:05

It's all drowned now,

0:20:050:20:07

but still rather beautiful.

0:20:070:20:09

Just around the corner from Queen's View is the Clunie Dam.

0:20:120:20:16

Built in 1951, it holds back the weight of Loch Tummel

0:20:160:20:20

and water from a vast catchment area,

0:20:200:20:23

all part of a hugely ambitious hydroelectric scheme.

0:20:230:20:27

This archive film from the 1950s

0:20:300:20:33

shows the dramatic scale of the engineering works

0:20:330:20:36

that were undertaken to harness the power of water

0:20:360:20:38

and to turn it into electricity for the Highlands and beyond.

0:20:380:20:42

An army of men toiled day and night, deep underground,

0:20:440:20:49

drilling and blasting their way through solid rock

0:20:490:20:53

to divert the flow of water into a network of dams.

0:20:530:20:57

This is the Clunie Memorial Arch.

0:20:580:21:02

It actually shares the same dimensions

0:21:020:21:04

as the tunnel that was built to carry water

0:21:040:21:07

from the loch to the power station,

0:21:070:21:10

and clearly shows the scale of the tunnel,

0:21:100:21:13

which, at the time, was the largest of its type built in Britain.

0:21:130:21:18

There are names inscribed here too,

0:21:180:21:21

to remind people of the human cost of the project.

0:21:210:21:25

There are seven massive structures

0:21:270:21:30

that make up the huge hydroelectric scheme.

0:21:300:21:33

At the nearby Pitlochry Dam, I meet up with Gonna O'Donnell,

0:21:330:21:38

one of the famous Tunnel Tigers

0:21:380:21:40

who collectively dug over 400 miles of tunnels in Scotland.

0:21:400:21:45

The first job you went and got in a tunnel was a spanner man.

0:21:450:21:50

That's the man that held the drill

0:21:500:21:53

for the driller that was drilling holes.

0:21:530:21:56

You held that drill,

0:21:560:21:59

but you couldn't wear gloves, nor had any earmuffs.

0:21:590:22:02

I was stone deaf, completely stone deaf.

0:22:020:22:06

The men in the tunnels were minors.

0:22:060:22:08

Some of them were platelayers.

0:22:080:22:10

That's the men that looks after the railway line.

0:22:100:22:12

They were platelayers. Then you have the powder monkey.

0:22:120:22:15

He was looking after the explosives.

0:22:150:22:17

Then you have the loco driver.

0:22:170:22:19

He was taking in and out what we called the muck.

0:22:190:22:21

That was the gravel and stones.

0:22:210:22:23

We called that muck.

0:22:230:22:24

It must have been very dangerous work.

0:22:240:22:26

Everything is dangerous when you don't know.

0:22:260:22:29

When I went in first, everybody looked after me.

0:22:290:22:33

Anybody that came in after me, I looked after him.

0:22:330:22:36

And if I saw a stone hanging above you when you were drilling,

0:22:360:22:39

if I saw a stone, maybe a stone, maybe a tonne weight,

0:22:390:22:43

or half a tonne weight, or 500 weight,

0:22:430:22:45

I would push you out of the road and point up.

0:22:450:22:48

I mean, it was a waste of time trying to talk.

0:22:480:22:51

Nobody could hear you.

0:22:510:22:53

Gonna lived on site in a camp high on the mountainside,

0:22:540:22:58

surrounded by hundreds of other men.

0:22:580:23:00

Many had come from Ireland, others from Eastern Europe,

0:23:000:23:04

having fled the Cold War to work on the hydro scheme.

0:23:040:23:08

When you come back to Scotland and you see these amazing dams,

0:23:090:23:12

what does that make you feel?

0:23:120:23:15

It makes me feel about 18 feet tall.

0:23:150:23:18

It makes me very proud

0:23:180:23:20

that I was a wee part, a small part of it.

0:23:200:23:23

I was a small part of it. But I was there.

0:23:230:23:25

VOICEOVER: In the archive room at the Pitlochry Dam,

0:23:290:23:32

I meet up with Brian Haslam.

0:23:320:23:34

Brian was a young engineering graduate

0:23:340:23:37

when he first worked on the dams.

0:23:370:23:39

I was excited.

0:23:390:23:40

I don't know why, but I had faith in my own ability.

0:23:420:23:46

The engineering side didn't bother me.

0:23:460:23:48

I felt quite confident.

0:23:480:23:50

But I hadn't got a clue.

0:23:500:23:51

When I first went in the tunnel, I didn't know,

0:23:510:23:53

I could have been on the moon for all I knew.

0:23:530:23:55

It's a great collective effort.

0:23:550:23:57

Cos we look at some of these pictures here,

0:23:570:23:59

you can see men working together,

0:23:590:24:01

really kind of complicated, difficult tasks,

0:24:010:24:04

using huge pieces of machinery.

0:24:040:24:06

That was just making the machinery.

0:24:060:24:09

-What's happening here?

-This is the Blondin.

0:24:090:24:11

It's a sort of aerial ropeway that carried the concrete across the dam,

0:24:110:24:16

named after the guy who walked over Niagara Falls.

0:24:160:24:20

So, you were flying concrete from one side of the glen to the other?

0:24:200:24:23

Yes. We were doing just that.

0:24:230:24:25

So what have we got here? We've got this precarious business?

0:24:250:24:29

Men about to disappear into the maw of hell?

0:24:290:24:32

This is just an example of the health and safety rules at the time.

0:24:320:24:37

-Non-existent!

-Zilch.

0:24:370:24:39

What do you think is your almost abiding memory

0:24:390:24:44

of working on these tunnels?

0:24:440:24:45

Four years of happiness.

0:24:460:24:49

-Really?

-Yeah.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

0:24:490:24:52

I get quite nostalgic about this.

0:24:530:24:55

I grew up when I came to the scheme.

0:24:580:25:02

I met the big wide world.

0:25:020:25:04

I met wonderful people.

0:25:040:25:06

I was doing a wonderful job, in a wonderful place.

0:25:080:25:11

I know being inside a tunnel doesn't sound like a wonderful place.

0:25:110:25:14

But the company was good?

0:25:140:25:15

Somebody once said to me it was like a family.

0:25:150:25:18

And you were, you looked after each other.

0:25:180:25:20

That was it.

0:25:200:25:22

That stuck with me.

0:25:220:25:23

Leaving a legacy of dams and tunnels,

0:25:270:25:30

which are still generating electricity

0:25:300:25:33

from the wild waters of Lanark,

0:25:330:25:35

I headed to my final destination -

0:25:350:25:37

the shapely peak of Schiehallion.

0:25:370:25:39

This mountain was once considered sacred

0:25:410:25:44

by the early people who lived in its shadow -

0:25:440:25:47

a magical place and the haunt of fairy folk.

0:25:470:25:51

But in the 18th century,

0:25:510:25:53

Schiehallion was tamed by science

0:25:530:25:55

in a brilliant experiment to determine the mass of the Earth.

0:25:550:26:00

To do this, you first needed to work out the mass of something smaller,

0:26:000:26:04

like a mountain.

0:26:040:26:05

In 1775, the Astronomer Royal Nevil Maskelyne

0:26:060:26:10

and the mathematician Charles Hutton chose Schiehallion

0:26:100:26:14

for their experiment because of the mountain's regular, conical shape.

0:26:140:26:18

If you look at any OS map,

0:26:180:26:21

you can see quite clearly from the contour lines

0:26:210:26:24

just how uniform the mountain is.

0:26:240:26:27

They're placed at ten metres apart, these lines.

0:26:270:26:30

Now, interestingly, Charles Hutton, a mathematician,

0:26:300:26:33

actually invented contour lines to help him with his calculations,

0:26:330:26:37

to work out the volume of Schiehallion.

0:26:370:26:40

It's an amazing thought,

0:26:410:26:42

that the very first contour lines in the world

0:26:420:26:45

were drawn right here and have been used by map-makers

0:26:450:26:48

and hill walkers ever since.

0:26:480:26:50

The contour lines enabled Maskelyne to calculate the volume

0:26:530:26:57

and then the mass of Schiehallion.

0:26:570:26:59

And then, by scaling up, he was able to work out the mass of the Earth.

0:26:590:27:04

It took 17 long weeks to complete the experiment,

0:27:040:27:08

partly because the weather that summer was dreadful.

0:27:080:27:12

Despite this, the experiment was considered to be a great success

0:27:120:27:16

and came close to the modern figure for the mass of the Earth

0:27:160:27:20

of 5.9 x 10 to the power of 24 kg.

0:27:200:27:24

However, because the experiment had taken so long to complete,

0:27:240:27:28

it bankrupted the Royal Society which had funded the project.

0:27:280:27:32

But, as they say, there's no gain without a wee bit of pain!

0:27:320:27:37

Onwards and upwards!

0:27:370:27:38

Although Schiehallion had been tamed by science,

0:27:460:27:49

its reputation for wildness continued.

0:27:490:27:52

The scientists threw a party on the mountain

0:27:520:27:55

for the locals who'd helped them with the experiment.

0:27:550:27:58

It was quite a night.

0:27:580:28:00

The fiddler burned his fiddle

0:28:000:28:01

and then burned the bothy to the ground.

0:28:010:28:04

It's hard to be a rock and not to roll.

0:28:040:28:07

So, here we are - the summit of Schiehallion,

0:28:080:28:12

the fairy mountain of the ancient Caledonians.

0:28:120:28:15

And from here, you can see my route

0:28:150:28:18

all the way from the wilds of Rannoch Moor,

0:28:180:28:21

making this the perfect place for me to end my Grand Tour.

0:28:210:28:25

Join me for my next Grand Tour

0:28:290:28:32

when I travel into the secret heart of Knoydart

0:28:320:28:35

and search for Jacobite gold.

0:28:350:28:38

Paul begins his Grand Tour with a chilly swim across Loch Ba high on Rannoch Moor, struggles against the elements while trainspotting and meets some veteran Tunnel Tigers - men who tunnelled deep inside the Grampians, diverting water to hydroelectric schemes.