Ingrid Bergman Talking Pictures


Ingrid Bergman

A retrospective look at television appearances made over the years by Hollywood icon Ingrid Bergman, capturing the milestones and highlights of her life and career.


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Transcript


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One of the greatest stars from the golden age of movies,

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Ingrid Bergman, came from Sweden to America in the 1930s.

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Her talent

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and natural beauty won the hearts of cinema-goers the world over.

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For a period in the 1940s, she was Hollywood's biggest box office draw.

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She starred in the enduring classic Casablanca

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and was awarded a Best Actress Oscar for her role in Gaslight.

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Then, in the 1950s, came scandal.

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An affair and a child with the Italian director

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Roberto Rossellini while she was still married to her first husband.

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Bergman was condemned by America's outraged moral guardians,

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in politics and the press.

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She left the US for several years,

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but when she finally returned to Hollywood, it was in triumph.

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Her film Anastasia earned her a second Oscar.

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Our first interview is from an appearance on Parkinson in 1973.

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And the discussion begins with an open

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confession from the infatuated host.

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I must now confess a hitherto unpublished fact about myself

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and it concerns my next guest.

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It is that I've been in love with her for years.

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She never knew because when we first met more than 20 years ago,

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I was in the one and nines at the local fleapit

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and she was up there on the screen, looking like an angel.

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And this was the precise moment that the both of us met.

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Play it, Sam.

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Play As Time Goes By.

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I can't remember it, Miss Ilsa.

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I'm a little rusty on it.

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I'll hum it for you.

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# Da-da da-da da-dum

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# Da-da da-di da-dum... #

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HE PLAYS

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Sing it, Sam.

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# You must remember this

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# A kiss is just a kiss

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# A sigh is just a sigh

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# The fundamental things apply

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# As time goes by

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# And when two lovers woo

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# They still say I love you

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# On that you can rely

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# No matter what the future brings

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# As time goes by. #

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Sam, I thought I told you never to play...

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I could watch that scene for ever.

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Ladies and gentlemen, my special guest tonight, Ingrid Bergman.

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APPLAUSE

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I've waited a long time and I must say it's worth it.

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Well, it's very nice of you indeed.

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I really do approve of my taste. Did you know when...?

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LAUGHTER

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Did you know when you were making that film, Casablanca,

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that it would one day become the cult movie that it is now?

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No, I certainly did not at all.

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It was a great confusion during the shooting of the picture

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and I'm quite surprised, but I must say I saw the picture here at the

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Film Institute about two years ago for the first time on the screen,

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not on television, and I really thought it was a very good movie.

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-It is a good movie.

-Yes. Surprise!

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There aren't many films, are there,

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that you can look back at and think, "That's a good, good movie."

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It was good also because all the parts

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were played by such good actors.

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The smallest part was really a top class actor.

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-Yes.

-So that helped a lot.

-Yes.

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Is it true it was made in, as you say, confusion?

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-Nobody had a real idea.

-No, we didn't.

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The script, it was written as we went along and to tell you the truth,

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no-one knew how to end it, so we went along until the bitter end

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and it was very bitter because they said, I should shoot it both ways.

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Either I should go with the husband in the plane,

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played by Paul Henreid, or stay on the ground with Humphrey Bogart.

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LAUGHTER And it was very difficult to act out these love scenes because

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I really didn't know which one of the two men I was in love with.

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LAUGHTER But it doesn't show!

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No, it doesn't. You went off with the right fella in the end.

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-What about Bogart? He's grown into a cult figure too, hasn't he?

-Yes.

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-Oh, very much so.

-What is the appeal?

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-Were you able to assess it when you were working with him?

-No.

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Of course, he was an excellent actor and he always played himself.

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He didn't make any character...make-up or change

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anything. As a matter of fact, I think

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he wore the same raincoat and the same hat in every movie.

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LAUGHTER

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He must have been terrible to be close to!

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LAUGHTER Well...

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He had that marvellous voice that you can hear right now this minute.

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It was such an interesting and rough voice

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and of course he was also considered a tough man,

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but I think that inside he was quite a loveable person.

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You say you think so, didn't you get to know him at all?

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No, I really didn't.

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I think he was upset as everybody else about not having a script

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and not knowing exactly where we were going

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and he used to stay very much by himself.

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And... Well, in another interview...

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Of course, I have talked a lot about Casablanca!

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Ignore all the other interviews.

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This is the first time you've talked to me.

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And they used to ask me if I knew him and I said, "No, I don't know him.

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"I kissed him, but I don't know him!"

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It must be difficult, particularly playing a romantic part

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opposite somebody that you literally don't know.

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You just see on the set.

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No, it isn't difficult, when you look like Humphrey Bogart.

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You can act like he does.

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I think he's absolutely wonderful.

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I'm so pleased when I see that he looks at me

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with such love in his eyes. It's very flattering.

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Of course, one of the great characters in that film,

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behind the scenes, was Michael Curtiz, the director.

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There are more stories about Curtiz in Hollywood than probably

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-Cecil B DeMille, I suppose.

-Yes.

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He was a very colourful person and temperamental.

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He told me a very funny story.

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When he came from Hungary, that was years before Casablanca, because he

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had done several pictures before, he arrived in America by boat

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and he saw the harbour full of flags and bands playing

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and ribbons were flying and he was so moved where he stood,

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seeing this, he said, "I didn't know that they knew me so well in America

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"and I would get a reception like this!"

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And it was much later they told him it was the 4th July.

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LAUGHTER

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-It was not for him.

-Poor devil. Can you remember your first audition?

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Yes, I started dramatic school

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and we have the Royal Theatre in Stockholm

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and that is a free school, you see,

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so everybody tries to get in there because it's the best education

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and the best teachers and also you don't pay anything.

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And you're taken care of, you're supposed to play small parts

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after three years of studying, so you already have five years ahead of you.

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I tested to get in there and we were about 75 youngsters

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and there are all the actors and the teachers

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and the head of theatre and you came out on the stage

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and you read whatever you had to read and I had just begun

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when somebody said, "That's enough, Miss.

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"Out. You can go."

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And of course, I thought that I was so awfully bad that they

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didn't have the patience to listen through my test.

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Well, I went out and I stood there

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and looked at the sea in front of the theatre,

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we have a lot of water in Stockholm, and I was wondering if I should throw

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myself in the water and get it over with right away

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because I wanted very badly to become an actress.

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However, I got a message to come back to the theatre and I was engaged.

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Later on, I asked why they had done it

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and it was very cruel of them, of the jury, to do that, and they said,

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"The minute you got in and the way you moved on the stage,

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"we realised that you had it, we didn't want to waste any more time.

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-"You were in."

-Of course, I thought I was out. Yes.

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How did you...? You then moved... Eventually, you got to Hollywood.

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I didn't have the patience to go through the five years in the school

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and being engaged by the theatre, I went directly to the movies.

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-Yes, Swedish movies, that's right.

-Yes.

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And I worked for a couple of years and then a picture called

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-Intermezzo, that you called Escape To Happiness in England.

-Yes.

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It was shown in a small art theatre in New York and David Selznick

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had a lady who was reading books and looking for talent for him.

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She went up into her office building,

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the elevator boy was of Swedish descent

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and his parents had gone to see this Swedish movie

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and said to this lady,

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her name is Katherine Brown, "My parents were very much

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"taken by a young Swedish actress and I think you are looking for talent,

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"why don't you go and see the movie?"

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She did. She sent the movie to Mr Selznick

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and he asked me to come over to America and do a repeat,

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so I owe my career in America to the elevator boy.

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That's how it happens in movies, actually! Did you...?

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I suppose they got hold of you and they started to try to process you.

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Yes. That was very difficult in the beginning

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and I don't know where I got my determination and strength from.

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I was so young and I wanted so much to try my wings in Hollywood.

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But immediately, I was considered too tall

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and they were going to do something with my face and knock out my

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teeth, put in other teeth and change my eyebrows and make them thinner.

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And change my name.

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When I heard all that, I got terribly frightened and said,

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"I want to go back. I don't want to do all that."

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It would be terrible if my first movie was a flop

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and I had to go back to Sweden because they wouldn't want me in

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Hollywood and I will come back with a changed face and a changed name.

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I wouldn't be able to pick up my career after that.

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So I refused and refused and refused and then they accepted

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my name and what I looked like.

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Are you a very stubborn person? Are you a determined person?

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Yes, I think I'm quite stubborn when it comes to my work.

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I'm willing to listen. I listen to everybody. But I select.

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You became, of course, the biggest female box office

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-star in the world at that time, didn't you?

-Oh, I don't know.

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-Did I really?

-Indeed. I've been doing my homework.

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And in fact, there was only one male star whose picture made more

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money than you and that was Bing Crosby.

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-Oh.

-You didn't know that?

-No, I didn't know that.

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-They probably owe you some money!

-LAUGHTER

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We'll talk now about the days in Hollywood when, as I say,

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you were the sort of biggest box office

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star in the world, female box office star.

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Can I take you now to the point in your career where it all

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sort of crumbled apart?

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1950, wasn't it, when you went to make Stromboli?

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It sounds as if it crumbled because I left.

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I like that, I think.

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It needs recapping on. You went to make this film with Rossellini.

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You were a married woman, you fell in love with him, you had his child.

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-It created the most extraordinary stink, didn't it?

-It certainly did.

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-Yes.

-When you look back at it now, what are your feelings?

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Well, I feel the same thing as I felt then.

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I felt it was my private life and people who judged and wrote

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and talked in the American Senate and wanted me

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to be for ever excluded from American movies

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and even putting my feet in America, that they

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didn't know what they were talking about

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because they didn't know me, they didn't know what had happened.

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And the only judge that I had was my own country.

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Now, of course, I have gone back to America and I played in Washington

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and 23 years later, another senator went up in the Senate

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and very kindly asked pardon for what the other senator had said

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and he said not only was I welcome in America but they were honoured

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to have my visits, so if you live long enough, you see, it all comes...

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Everything is fine again.

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Well, that's true about the moral stance that people took then.

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Because, I mean, today, if it happened today, who would care?

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Yes, I don't think anybody would care.

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I don't say that I approve of my behaviour,

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it's not that at all, it is just that people

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so quickly are ready to judge without knowing the background.

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And I think today, we've heard so much and seen so much,

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that people have just become more callous.

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They don't care and they really don't care

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so much about people's private lives any more.

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It was extraordinary. I was reading through the press reports

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of the time and there was one extraordinary...

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-You were described as an "apostle of degradation".

-That's right.

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"Dirty, lousy and filthy". I mean, it's quite extraordinary.

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But I mean, I'm sure that stuff like that must leave some

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kind of scar on you. Some resentment.

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If somebody called me that, I'd get very angry indeed.

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Yes, I was. But you can't be angry for years and years.

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Also, so many people tried to tell me, that there was enormous

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love for me, which is true.

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The American public has been absolutely wonderful to me.

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That their love turned to hatred because my image was the good,

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wonderful...woman who had played, but they forgot that - "played",

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the saint and a nun and all those suffering women.

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They forgot that I was a woman

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and maybe not at all what I did on the screen.

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That was not me.

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But as I say, you can't keep going on thinking about that any more.

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I forgot that long ago. I'm back in America, I've been to Hollywood

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-and I've played both in the theatre and on the screen.

-Yes.

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Can I ask you, though, when you look back now, you've in fact

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-divorced Rossellini since then and you are now married again.

-Yes.

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Bearing that in mind, it's an impossible question, but

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if you could go through it again, would you do the same thing again?

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I certainly would. Yes, because I knew what I did.

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I didn't do anything that was just haphazard or anything,

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I was very conscious of what I was doing.

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And I thought, following naturally what I have to follow,

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which is my own head, I did the right thing.

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Bergman's versatility was underlined by the fact that during her

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career, she acted in five different languages.

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In 1974, she won a third Oscar, this

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time for Best Supporting Actress in Murder On The Orient Express.

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Co-stars and directors would call her the ultimate professional.

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Here, in an interview with Ronald Eyre,

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in the BBC One programme Ingrid Bergman Remembers,

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she offers some insight into the daily working life of a movie star.

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You obviously have to keep severe hours if you're filming,

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you are brought to the studio very early and may well work very late.

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Does this suit your temperament? You like an ordered life?

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Yes, I think making a movie is a vacation.

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I always call that my vacation. It is absolutely no work at all.

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You get up early in the morning, what's the difference?

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You go to bed a little earlier in the evening.

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The hours are just put this way.

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You might not be able to go to dinner parties

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and go to a theatre or something like that,

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but it's for a very short period while the picture is being done.

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To get up in the morning is not difficult.

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Then, you are taken care of. You see?

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They bring the car, they bring you to the studio,

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they put you in a chair,

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they make you up as well as you can possibly look, they fix your hair,

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they bring you in another car and they take you to location or

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wherever we shoot, they bring you coffee.

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And all they ask of you is to get up there and say a couple of lines

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and if you don't say them well, you do it again and again until you

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do them well and if you don't do them well, you can always dub them!

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No, that is a vacation.

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Over modest, I reckon, that assessment of your work.

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-No, but it is much easier than the theatre.

-Yes, indeed.

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-You don't have to sustain it quite that long.

-No.

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You had a chance in For Whom The Bell Tolls of being in touch

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-with a major writer.

-Yes.

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When you say that you go through a work

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and underline the bits you want to say, did you do the same?

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Yes, I knew the book by heart and I had all my scenes underlined.

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Don't forget this piece of dialogue, don't forget here,

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doing this or saying this. Yes, I'm very faithful to the author.

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Did you have to put your foot down about including certain

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things you thought should be in?

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If somebody can persuade me that his idea is better,

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I give up immediately.

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But it has to make sense. It has to be something that... I think

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everything you do in this kind of work has to be worked out 50-50.

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Hitchcock used to be wonderful with me because he used to listen to all

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my arguments and you thought you had him,

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he didn't answer, just sit there and listen, listen,

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"I have got him now, he's on my side,"

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and then when you've finished he said, "I get your point.

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"Now do exactly what I told you to do and fake it!"

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And that taught me something, which is very clever,

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that you can do certain things that in real life you might not do it,

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but you do on the screen because it has to be within the frame

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and it has to be there for his camera to get that movement and then,

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you know, fake it and you do it.

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It seems to me that you're not a person who shows what one can

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call nerves usually and if you make a film like Gaslight,

0:19:070:19:10

in which you are a wife with a murderer husband

0:19:100:19:14

and he's trying to keep you in the house and he's driving you

0:19:140:19:17

quietly mad, I think you, Ingrid Bergman, would walk away.

0:19:170:19:21

No, I love it!

0:19:210:19:23

Love it!

0:19:230:19:25

But this performance did produce your first Academy Award, I believe.

0:19:250:19:29

# La, la-la, la-la, la-la-la... #

0:19:310:19:35

SHE LAUGHS

0:19:350:19:37

Oh, Gregory...

0:19:380:19:41

What's the matter?

0:19:410:19:43

Paula, I don't want to upset you.

0:19:460:19:48

If you will put things right when I'm not looking,

0:19:480:19:51

-we'll assume it did not happen.

-What? Gregory, what?

0:19:510:19:54

Oh, please don't turn your back on me. What has happened?

0:19:540:19:58

You mean you don't know?

0:19:590:20:02

No, I...

0:20:020:20:04

Look...

0:20:040:20:06

Yes.

0:20:190:20:21

The little picture has been taken down.

0:20:220:20:26

Who took it down?

0:20:280:20:30

-Why has it been taken down?

-Why indeed?

0:20:320:20:36

Why was it taken down before?

0:20:360:20:39

Will you please get it from wherever you've hidden it

0:20:390:20:42

and it put it back in its place?

0:20:420:20:44

But I haven't hidden it. I swear I haven't. Why should I?

0:20:440:20:48

Why should... Don't look at me like that.

0:20:480:20:52

How did you reconcile yourself with somebody who is obviously,

0:20:520:20:55

-psychologically, a bit of a freak that lady was, must have been?

-Yes.

0:20:550:20:59

No, but that's fun. I've played that many times. No, it's a good part.

0:20:590:21:03

Everything that's a good part is fun to do.

0:21:030:21:05

And it's just, as I say, concentration

0:21:050:21:08

and actors enjoy acting.

0:21:080:21:11

It's up to the director to tell you how to start and how to get up.

0:21:110:21:15

For instance in Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Victor Fleming hit me.

0:21:150:21:20

And he hit me and he shook me and he hit me again.

0:21:200:21:24

And I knew he was doing it... I was angry with him for doing it,

0:21:240:21:27

doing it in front of the whole crew, but at the same time,

0:21:270:21:30

deep down in me, I knew he was doing it

0:21:300:21:33

so that I would become hysterical and I was very grateful.

0:21:330:21:36

So that's one way of getting a performance. It certainly worked.

0:21:360:21:40

-I gave a very good performance!

-Did you hit him back?

0:21:400:21:42

No, I didn't. I kissed him.

0:21:420:21:44

When did you realise he was doing it for therapeutic purposes?

0:21:440:21:48

I think right away, but it was still shocking.

0:21:480:21:51

Still, it helps you to shake you up.

0:21:510:21:53

I very often ask my directors to do this!

0:21:530:21:57

Have you been hit in a film since, by a director or...?

0:21:570:22:00

No, I don't think so.

0:22:000:22:02

'There was censorship in America, wasn't there?

0:22:020:22:05

'The Hayes Office in the '40s was very hot on anybody doing anything.

0:22:050:22:08

'Did you have trouble this way? Did you ever try to swing the law?'

0:22:080:22:11

'We had trouble several times with these things.

0:22:110:22:13

'For instance, if we take Notorious, Hitchcock was very clever

0:22:150:22:20

'and invented a love scene, with a kiss,

0:22:200:22:24

'that became famous in those days.'

0:22:240:22:26

'Looking at it today, I mean, it's laughable

0:22:260:22:29

'for what we see nowadays on the screen.

0:22:290:22:32

'But a kiss couldn't last more than two seconds, I think it was.

0:22:320:22:36

'It had to break, and it couldn't be in a horizontal position,

0:22:360:22:42

'even with clothes on. It had to be sitting down or standing up.

0:22:420:22:45

'And he invented this thing that they tried to cut, but he won,

0:22:450:22:50

'because not one kiss was longer than two seconds,

0:22:500:22:52

'but there were so many of them, you see. It looked like...

0:22:520:22:55

'That became a very famous love scene.'

0:22:550:22:57

-'This is you and Cary Grant, in the film.'

-'Yes.'

0:22:570:22:59

There's one thing, obviously, which talking to you, one can't,

0:22:590:23:02

one doesn't want to put off very long, which is

0:23:020:23:05

talk about Joan of Arc, which seems to be a focal part of your life.

0:23:050:23:08

-Yes.

-A key image. When did you first get interested in her

0:23:080:23:12

and realise she was something special to you?

0:23:120:23:15

When I was a child, I must have read about her in school.

0:23:150:23:19

And then I started to collect books and read more and more.

0:23:190:23:22

And then I started to collect medals and things, you know, instead of

0:23:220:23:26

butterflies and stamps and things like that that children collect.

0:23:260:23:29

I thought it was fun to collect Joan of Arcs.

0:23:290:23:32

And, naturally, as a man wants to play Hamlet,

0:23:320:23:37

a woman wants to play Joan of Arc.

0:23:370:23:39

And it never came about in Sweden.

0:23:390:23:43

There was not a chance of doing such a picture.

0:23:430:23:45

It would have been far too expensive.

0:23:450:23:47

And I waited and waited and talked to many people,

0:23:470:23:50

and no-one was interested.

0:23:500:23:52

And one day I got a telephone call from Maxwell Anderson,

0:23:520:23:55

who called me and said,

0:23:550:23:57

"I would like to have you for a play about Joan of Arc."

0:23:570:23:59

I said, "That's it, you don't have to ask more. I'm coming!"

0:23:590:24:02

-So I did my Joan of Arc.

-This was a theatre play?

-A theatre play.

0:24:040:24:09

Of course, that became a big success, so, immediately,

0:24:090:24:12

people were after the rights to do the movie.

0:24:120:24:15

Perhaps there's no answer to this,

0:24:150:24:16

but can you put your finger on that thing in Joan of Arc,

0:24:160:24:19

which made her important to you for the whole of your life?

0:24:190:24:23

'Her courage.'

0:24:230:24:24

All I have done, I've done by the command of my Lord.

0:24:250:24:28

That's all that I have done well.

0:24:300:24:32

How do you know that your voices come from God?

0:24:320:24:36

I knew that they came from God because what they commanded me to do was only good.

0:24:360:24:40

My lords, I have answered these same questions at Poitiers.

0:24:420:24:45

My King charged the Archbishop of Rheims, another loyal and learned

0:24:450:24:49

priest, to examine me before I was allowed to lead his army.

0:24:490:24:52

Send for the records at Poitiers and you shall have all my answers!

0:24:520:24:55

The examination at Poitiers by the Archbishop of Rheims has no relevance.

0:24:550:24:59

We are your judges now, and you must answer us.

0:24:590:25:02

But you're not fitted to be my judges.

0:25:020:25:05

STARTLED DISCUSSION

0:25:050:25:07

You are my mortal enemies.

0:25:070:25:09

English.

0:25:090:25:11

And Burgundians.

0:25:110:25:13

All of you!

0:25:130:25:15

And you are not the Church!

0:25:170:25:19

You are the men of the enemy king, whose orders you obey!

0:25:190:25:23

If I am being tried by the Church,

0:25:230:25:25

why am I not in a Church prison among women?

0:25:250:25:28

I am in an English prison, guarded by English soldiers, chained to my bed.

0:25:280:25:32

If I must rise for any purpose, I must ask guards to unlock the bonds.

0:25:320:25:36

We, your judges, keep you chained because you attempted to escape.

0:25:360:25:40

Isn't that the right of all prisoners of war, to try to escape?

0:25:400:25:43

You say that you are my judges.

0:25:470:25:49

I don't know if you are, but I say this.

0:25:510:25:54

Take care not to judge me wrongly.

0:25:560:25:58

For, in truth, I am sent by God and you place yourself in great danger.

0:25:590:26:05

Take her back to her cell!

0:26:050:26:06

Do you think the film worked as well as the stage version?

0:26:060:26:09

Well, we did the absolute honest version that we could find.

0:26:090:26:15

'We had a priest from France who had written books about Joan of Arc,

0:26:150:26:19

'who was a great researcher, and he came and he was there.'

0:26:190:26:23

'He read everything and gave us advice and looked at everything.

0:26:230:26:27

'You can imagine how much I had read and how many books I had underlined.

0:26:270:26:32

'And the picture, in America, had less success than in Europe.

0:26:320:26:37

'But in Europe, Joan of Arc was considered a masterpiece.'

0:26:370:26:41

'She must have been, to look at, a fairly scruffy, ordinary girl.'

0:26:410:26:46

'She couldn't have possibly stood up to the hard life she had to lead

0:26:460:26:51

'and carry the armour and all that if she hadn't been a strong girl.'

0:26:510:26:54

-'But the Hollywood picture of her is extremely small.'

-'Yes.

0:26:540:26:57

'With colour and with all the combings of hair,

0:26:570:27:01

'I think it should have been rough.

0:27:010:27:03

'Everybody came up and smoothed it out, and it was very glossy.

0:27:030:27:07

'Even the battle scenes.

0:27:070:27:08

'They are beautiful, but not in the right sense.'

0:27:080:27:12

Did you make an attempt to fight the people patting your hair?

0:27:120:27:15

Yes. I usually waited until the director said action,

0:27:150:27:19

and then I would shake my head like this. Sometimes I forgot.

0:27:190:27:22

I had other things to think about.

0:27:220:27:25

In 1980, Bergman made a return to the Parkinson programme,

0:27:250:27:30

promoting the story of her life.

0:27:300:27:32

It was a book she always swore she'd never write.

0:27:320:27:36

APPLAUSE

0:27:380:27:41

The last time I talked to you, you said that, in fact,

0:27:410:27:44

you didn't think you would ever write your autobiography,

0:27:440:27:47

and, in fact, you've been fighting the urge to do so

0:27:470:27:50

or the temptation to do so for the past 20 years.

0:27:500:27:53

Why have you now decided to do it?

0:27:530:27:55

Well, I'll tell you first about Alan Burgess, who is out here somewhere.

0:27:550:27:59

He's my co-author, because I didn't do this book alone.

0:27:590:28:04

He wrote The Small Woman,

0:28:040:28:06

which later became The Inn Of The Sixth Happiness.

0:28:060:28:09

-That's Gladys Aylward, isn't it?

-Yes, Gladys Aylward's story.

0:28:090:28:11

And they couldn't call it The Small Woman, having me playing the part,

0:28:110:28:15

so it was changed to The Inn of the Sixth Happiness.

0:28:150:28:17

And he said then, which is 22 years ago, "Could I write your story?

0:28:170:28:22

"I would like to write about an actress." I said, "Absolutely not.

0:28:220:28:25

"Not me." And four years went by and he called up again and said,

0:28:250:28:30

"Have you changed your mind?" And I said, "No." And so we continued.

0:28:300:28:34

Now, one day I am on the phone again, and hung up after having said,

0:28:360:28:41

"No, I am not going to write any memoirs.

0:28:410:28:44

"Everybody else writes, but I'm not going to do it."

0:28:440:28:47

And my son was there, and he said to me, "But do you realise,

0:28:470:28:50

"when you're dead, people will throw themselves on your life story and

0:28:500:28:55

they'll take information from gossip, from rumours, what people are saying?

0:28:550:28:59

"And how the story is this big and it becomes bigger and bigger.

0:28:590:29:04

"And we, your children, can't defend you,

0:29:040:29:07

"because we don't know the truth."

0:29:070:29:10

That made me sit down and think very carefully, because I know that after

0:29:100:29:15

you're dead, they write an awful lot of things about you that's not true.

0:29:150:29:20

I mean, there are interviews, people say, "You have said that,"

0:29:200:29:23

you didn't say that. There are certain things that are invented.

0:29:230:29:26

Alan Burgess called me and I said, "Are you calling about the book?"

0:29:260:29:30

And he said, "No, after 20 years, I've given up.

0:29:300:29:34

And I said, "Now you can do it." LAUGHTER

0:29:340:29:36

So we started. That's three years ago.

0:29:360:29:39

Ingrid, can I finally ask you - writing as closely as you have

0:29:390:29:42

and in as detailed a fashion about your life involves looking

0:29:420:29:45

right back at yourself and thinking about every aspect of your life,

0:29:450:29:49

is there any part of your life that you'd have lived differently,

0:29:490:29:53

given the chance?

0:29:530:29:54

Yes, I'm sure if I had known then what I know now,

0:29:540:29:59

I would have been grateful. I could've changed many things.

0:29:590:30:04

But there we are. We don't know better.

0:30:040:30:07

I did what I thought was right.

0:30:070:30:10

I know that when I came back to New York after about nine,

0:30:100:30:14

ten years of absence, and I knew the press was after me

0:30:140:30:18

and I came alone to face them again,

0:30:180:30:20

I had one day in New York to receive the New York Critics Award.

0:30:200:30:25

It was the press, television, radio and then the big party at night,

0:30:250:30:30

and then off back to Paris, where I was playing.

0:30:300:30:33

I was in a play in Paris.

0:30:330:30:35

I had only one day to go to New York

0:30:350:30:38

and then back and pick up the play again.

0:30:380:30:40

I didn't ask my daughter to come to New York,

0:30:420:30:45

because I couldn't bear to see her after so many years.

0:30:450:30:49

I hadn't seen her then for about five years.

0:30:490:30:52

I couldn't stand to see her with all the photographers

0:30:520:30:56

and all the press, so I asked her not to come.

0:30:560:30:59

I think she's had a very hard time to understand why.

0:30:590:31:03

But that was the only thing you'd have changed?

0:31:030:31:06

Yes, I wish I had been a little more discreet.

0:31:060:31:09

I could have done things, maybe, a little less...

0:31:090:31:12

I mean, I'm very open, I'm very frank,

0:31:140:31:16

and sometimes that's stupid, you know?

0:31:160:31:19

It's better if you hide a little more,

0:31:190:31:22

but that's a little bit of hypocrisy, and I don't have that in me either.

0:31:220:31:27

Two years after that interview, in 1982,

0:31:270:31:30

Bergman died in London on her 67th birthday.

0:31:300:31:35

She had been fighting an eight-year battle with breast cancer,

0:31:350:31:38

but had carried on acting to the end,

0:31:380:31:40

winning an Emmy Award and a Golden Globe that year for her final role

0:31:400:31:45

in the television film, A Woman Called Golda.

0:31:450:31:48

The obituary writers said,

0:31:490:31:52

"She'll always be remembered as an icon of the cinema

0:31:520:31:55

"for her poise and beauty and for her three Oscar wins.

0:31:550:32:00

"And not least for the film she didn't win an Oscar for -

0:32:000:32:04

"Casablanca."

0:32:040:32:06

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:32:160:32:20

A retrospective look at television appearances made over the years by Hollywood icon Ingrid Bergman, capturing the milestones and highlights of her life and career. Narrated by Sylvia Syms.


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