Joan Fontaine Talking Pictures


Joan Fontaine

A look at the life of Joan Fontaine, one of Britain's best-loved actresses, using rarely seen archive footage of her BBC appearances to tell the story of her Oscar-winning career.


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One of cinema's biggest female stars

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of the 1940s,

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Joan Fontaine,

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was an actress whose

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on-screen image differed greatly

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from the reality of her life.

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Directors sought her out for her ability to convey restraint

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and vulnerability. But away from the camera, she was no pushover.

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She fought for, and won, some of the period's most coveted roles

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and engaged in one of Hollywood's most notorious feuds with

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her elder sister and fellow actress,

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Olivia de Havilland.

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And it was Fontaine,

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not James Stewart, Grace Kelly, or Cary Grant,

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who gave the only Oscar-winning performance in a Hitchcock film.

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She spoke about all these things with the interviewer Derek Hart,

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on the programme Talking Film.

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-Miss Fontaine, you were born de Havilland.

-True.

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In Tokyo, of British...

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Worse than that, de Beauvoir de Havilland, while you're at it.

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De Beauvoir de Havilland, you were born in Tokyo of British parents.

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Yes.

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Did you feel at an early age that you were going to be an actress?

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Was this a certain plan for you?

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Well, that's rather interesting.

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My mother had been with the Royal Academy

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and I suppose we can call it a disappointed actress.

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In her words, her family wouldn't let her go on stage

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because it wasn't done.

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This was the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art.

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Yes, and music too. She did the whole lot.

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So, erm, she HATED our attempts

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to be as American as the locals

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and so she sat us down and made us do Shakespeare and everything else

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at very tender ages

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and we kind of took to it.

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I went round reciting poetry.

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It must have been ghastly at nine and ten.

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And then Olivia and I did little Shakespearian skits,

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Portia and Nerissa, all those things for the ladies' clubs and whatnot.

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So, then I went back to school in Japan and I found a diary,

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and I think especially if you're an actress,

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it's a very ridiculous thing to keep a diary.

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Probably very dangerous, but I had kept one for a brief moment,

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in which I had speculated about my future as to what I was going to be.

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And it was a toss-up between

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a librarian, a house painter and an actress,

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so I'm rather glad I chose this one.

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When you decided to become an actress in San Francisco,

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did you then immediately move to Los Angeles to Hollywood?

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Actually, that was in Japan, when I went back to school.

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By the time I returned to California, I found my sister -

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though she'd won a scholarship and she was an extraordinary student

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to a very fine college in California -

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had been selected to understudy

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in Max Reinhardt's Midsummer Night's Dream, which she did.

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And, like those extraordinary fables that nobody believes,

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but are usually filmed, at the opening night, the leading lady

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became ill and Olivia had the part, stole the reviews.

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The great cliche occasion of all time.

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So, by that time, I had got myself engaged to be married -

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one of my many times I've done that.

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I'm still prone to that sort of thing. Nasty habit, can't break it.

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So, I went to see my mother and sister,

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who were in Hollywood, to say goodbye,

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and an agent saw me at a party

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and said, "Wouldn't you like to be an actress?"

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Well, it seems so simple and so easy,

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I mean, I did it. I said, "Certainly."

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Well, having said I would, then how do you become one?

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And having decided to be one, you can't let go.

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The first movie that you made was which?

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It was one with Joan Crawford,

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and not under any name I can even remember now.

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Called No More Ladies, I believe.

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And I was 18, maybe. Maybe not that.

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And I was supposed to play a sophisticated rival of about 40,

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but that's Hollywood. I must have been hideous in it.

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How many movies did you make before you starred in Rebecca?

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Well, I was what we call the Queen of the B's.

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After B movies.

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We made B movies, and I'm glad. That is the best technique, really.

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The study of what you're doing,

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where you're going, where your marks are, get all that over with,

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and I played all the leads and that couldn't have been better.

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I must've made about five a year or so.

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How did you then make the leap into Rebecca?

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I'd actually almost given up films,

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the whole idea of it, and was going to be married.

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And I was sitting next to David Selznick at a party and mentioned

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I'd read the book

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and he said he'd bought it that day and would I care to test?

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I tested along with everybody else you can ever imagine

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and I was on my honeymoon. Of course, had I not married,

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this would not have happened.

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Let this be a lesson to you, not about marriage, but to everybody.

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Go far away and what you want will happen. Stay there and it won't.

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This was a movie with Laurence Olivier, wasn't it?

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Right, yes, and George Sanders.

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And Alfred Hitchcock directed.

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What a slap in the eye

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I must've been to them then.

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I suppose that's why you married me.

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Cos you knew I was dull

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and gauche and inexperienced

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and there could never be any gossip about me.

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Gossip? What do you mean?

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I...I don't know, I just said it for something to say!

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Don't look at me like that. Maxim, what's the matter? What have I said?

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-It wasn't a very attractive thing to say, was it?

-No.

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It was rude and hateful.

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I wonder if I did a very selfish thing in marrying you.

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How do you mean?

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I'm not much of a companion to you, am I?

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You don't get much fun, do you?

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You ought to have married a boy, someone of your own age.

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Maxim, why do you say this? Of course we're companions!

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Are we?

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I don't know.

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I'm very difficult to live with.

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No, you're not difficult, you're easy. Very easy.

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Our marriage is a success, isn't it? A great success?

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We're happy, aren't we? Terribly happy.

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If you don't think we are happy,

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it would be much better if you didn't pretend.

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Can you say what it was like to work with Hitchcock for the first time?

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He was darling, a bit formidable,

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enormously bawdy sense of humour

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and he had a habit -

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whether it was conscious or not, I don't know -

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but of rather keeping all his actors at loggerheads,

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so HE would be the one in the middle, rather puckish.

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Good for me, because it made me suffer quite a lot

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and feel quite miserable all the time

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and it probably came out on the screen that way.

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This scene from Rebecca

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is with Judith Anderson.

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..live in her house, walk in her steps,

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take the things that were hers,

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but she's too strong for you.

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You can't fight her! No-one ever got the better of her, never, never!

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She was beaten in the end, but it wasn't a man. It wasn't a woman.

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It was the sea.

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Oh, stop it, stop it, oh, stop it!

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You're overwrought, madam. I've opened a window for you.

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A little air will do you good. SHE SOBS

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Why don't you go?

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Why don't you leave Manderley?

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He doesn't need you.

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He's got his memories.

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He doesn't love you, he wants to be alone again, with her.

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You've nothing to stay for.

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You've nothing to live for, really, have you?

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Look down there. It's easy, isn't it?

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Why don't you? Why don't you?

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Go on.

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Go on.

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Don't be afraid.

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He had absolutely no nonsense about mood or meaning or any of that.

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He was telling a story,

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expected you to tell it with him in absolutely common terms.

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No theories like the Actor's Studio or any of that. Made it terribly clear.

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And I remember finally I had to cry one day, quite a lot,

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and I said, "Hitch, I just can't cry any more."

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He said, "Well, kid, what are we going to do?" I said, "Slap me in the face."

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He said, "Fine."

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Off he went, slapped me in the face

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and went back and the tears came down.

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Partly pain, but a great deal of gratitude for his understanding.

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It was wonderful of him!

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You said he made you suffer a lot during the making of that thing

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and that it was probably good for you. In what way do you mean?

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Oh, well, I think that if you are playing an insignificant little girl

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that has a terrible inferiority complex,

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that it's better not to praise her too much and tell her

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she's marvellous or you'll undo what you want.

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He was a little difficult.

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I remember Larry Olivier telling a rather off-colour joke,

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as a matter of fact, the first time I'd ever heard a certain

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four-letter word ever spoken, and he'd said, "Oh, I wouldn't speak like

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"that in front of Joan. After all, she is a bride."

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And Larry said, "Oh, who did you marry?"

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And I shyly said, "Well, Brian Aherne." And he said, "Oh,

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"couldn't you have done better than that?"

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So, I think that's part of the treatment I was getting.

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It certainly helped the acting.

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It helped the acting to the extent that you were nominated for an

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-Academy Award...

-And lost it.

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And the picture won it. Hitchcock I don't think got it.

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I may be wrong, but I don't think he got it for that.

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Then, of course, I did Suspicion, did get it for that.

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Also directed by Hitch and I don't think the picture got it,

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but there you are, that happens.

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Have you ever been kissed in a car before?

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1941, Suspicion, with Cary Grant.

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..joke with me.

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I'm no good at joking,

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I don't know how to flirt.

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I'm not joking, I'm serious!

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-Have you ever been kissed in a car?

-Never.

-Hmm.

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-Would you like to be?

-Yes.

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Well, well, you're the first woman I've ever met

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who said yes when she meant yes.

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What do the others say?

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-Heck if I know. Anything but yes.

-But they kiss you.

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Usually.

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Have there...?

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Have there what?

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Have there been many?

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I'm afraid so, quite a few.

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One night when I couldn't fall asleep, I started to count them.

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You know, the way you count sheep jumping over a fence?

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I think I passed out on number 73.

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Are you always frank with them like this?

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No, no. Not particularly.

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Why are you frank with me? Because I'm different?

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No, no, it isn't that.

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I'm honest because with you, I think it's the best way to get results.

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I hope I'm not saying the wrong thing,

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but I love you.

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Well, get undressed, old girl, what are you waiting for?

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Johnnie, I'm in a state tonight, I don't know why. I'd like to be alone.

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Would you mind sleeping in your dressing room?

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Of course I'd mind.

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Please, Johnnie. I haven't been sleeping very well lately.

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I understand. You used to sleep badly when I wasn't here,

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and now you... All right, if that's the way you feel about it.

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Good night.

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DRAMATIC MUSIC

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You won an Academy Award as the best actress of the year

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for your part in Suspicion.

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Can you describe what the whole of the ballyhoo

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of the Academy Awards was like?

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Well, this was frightening to me, because Olivia was up for it also.

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-Your sister.

-And I never expected to get it, had I not got it for Rebecca,

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I thought, it's silly to think of it for Suspicion,

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because they weren't comparable to me.

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And I was making a picture called The Constant Nymph.

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Olivia called me that day, as did the head of the Screen Actors Guild,

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Jean Hersholt, and she said, "You are coming out." "No, I can't.

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"I've got to get up at five in the morning. I'm going to be on the set

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"until six-thirty tonight.

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"I couldn't begin, I have no clothes to wear or anything."

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So, Olivia - and we were supposed to be enemies at this time,

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which is so ridiculous - brought a seamstress over

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and several lovely gowns that she had purchased for me.

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Tried them on on the set, and did all that.

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It was so sweet and wonderful of her.

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But the legend of you and your sister constantly feuding has...

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-Isn't it fun?

-..has no foundation.

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Oh, it has lots of foundation, but no fact. How's that? Do you like that?

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Olivia and I were brought up very, very strictly by our mother

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and we were all living in Hollywood together.

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I was, at that time, having to ask if I could go out in the evening,

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having to report in. Olivia the same, and we never had time.

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We were all working. We didn't have time

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to go to nightclubs or have beaux, really.

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And if they did, they had to come to call and have tea with Mother

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and all that sort of thing. So, there was no scandal. Nothing!

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As a matter of fact, I skipped a whole youth

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that never happened to me at all.

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Going out to dine, being gay, all that sort of thing.

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We didn't do that. So, there was nothing they could write about.

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Olivia was under contract to Warner Brothers, I to RKO,

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and I would simply imagine that the heads of the publicity department

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kind of got together and said,

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"What are we going to do about these spinster ladies?" And this evolved.

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At least it was a feud which got the names of the pictures in

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and the studios and all that.

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How much of the great Hollywood spectacular days did you catch?

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I was very fortunate, because by the time I was there,

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Mary Pickford had retired in splendour to Pickfair,

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which was the example of gracious living, shall we say.

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So everybody wanted to live more or less like that.

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Then with the war coming, nobody could travel.

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And it's a terrible thing to say,

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but there was nothing to spend one's money on.

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Really nothing at all!

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So everybody got bigger and better houses

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and more and more silver pheasants running down the dining room tables,

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that kind of thing, and entertaining.

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Everybody had to outdo the others.

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Naturally, everybody had their swimming pool

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and that was usually covered with a dance floor.

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Huge tent erected, living trees of lilacs and roses brought in,

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paving the way from the house to the tent.

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And several orchestras, perhaps.

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And, naturally, champagne and everything.

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But this was almost a nightly occurrence.

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It was really finally rather boring.

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You know, "Ho-hum, here we are at another one.

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"Well, there's not as many roses tonight."

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And one party, which wasn't too long ago, that Jack Benny gave,

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and I hadn't been to Hollywood for a long time,

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so I was asked to that. It was about five years ago.

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It was for, I believe, Heifetz or somebody like that.

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And Mary had got glorious peonies, I don't know what,

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from San Francisco down, the usual tent and everything.

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And I was thunderstruck.

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Here were all the men in one end of the room talking about business.

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All the most beautiful women in the world, beautifully gowned,

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talking about their children or their servant problems.

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We went into this lavish place to dine. Nobody danced.

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And everybody had to leave, of course, by 11 o'clock,

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because they were all working the next morning.

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And I had forgotten that this was the way one lived.

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Very disappointing for the hostess.

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Terribly nice of her to go to so much trouble,

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but rather extraordinary to see.

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And I shall never forget, as I got in the car,

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Gary Cooper came down the...

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..brick path from the house, knocked on the window and said,

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"Have fun, kids."

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And I didn't know it, but he was dying of cancer

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and he died within three months.

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And that one thing makes him stand out more than anything else he ever

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did in his life, because I think he wished that maybe

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he could be rushing off and doing something else too.

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Did you ever feel that you were the victim of the Hollywood

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publicity machinery?

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In the beginning, it was frightful, and I think it is

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frightful for anybody to have their marriage constantly attacked.

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I remember one woman saying in the press

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that Brian and I were divorcing,

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and I called her, which I shouldn't have done, I learnt about it then.

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And she said, "Well, we haven't seen you around lately."

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I said, "Well, of course not! I'm working!

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"I'm home at seven every night, up at five and so is he."

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And she said, "Well, if you're still together

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"in six months, I'll retract it."

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But that leaves it...

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It's multiplied. Your friends ring you or write to you

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or say, "Isn't it dreadful?"

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Before you know it, you ARE divorced and it's a terrible thing,

0:18:340:18:40

and I think just the negative thought, it plants the seed

0:18:400:18:43

and your friends seem to get used to it. When you're not.

0:18:430:18:47

And it's a horrid thing, horrid.

0:18:470:18:49

Did that kind of thing happen a lot in Hollywood?

0:18:490:18:51

Yeah, I think it happens all the time.

0:18:510:18:53

So this meant that really any Hollywood marriage had to

0:18:530:18:55

fight like hell to survive?

0:18:550:18:57

With your own family, your own friends, with your own studio, yes.

0:18:570:19:02

Without any grounds, perhaps. At all.

0:19:020:19:05

And then if you did go home before your husband did, at a party

0:19:050:19:09

because you had to get up early,

0:19:090:19:11

"What husband was left in the lurch by his movie star wife?"

0:19:110:19:15

would be in the press the next day. So you don't really stand a chance.

0:19:150:19:19

Fontaine was very familiar with the dark side of Hollywood

0:19:200:19:24

and so the topic came up again in a programme called

0:19:240:19:27

Hollywood Greats with Barry Norman in 1979.

0:19:270:19:30

As far as the stars were concerned,

0:19:320:19:34

the real bosses were the Mayers, the Jack Warners,

0:19:340:19:36

the Sam Goldwyns, and the Combs,

0:19:360:19:38

and these people ran their studios like medieval baronies or like

0:19:380:19:43

dictatorships, though not always benevolent.

0:19:430:19:45

These were the men that the stars had to placate

0:19:450:19:47

and whose rules they had to follow if they wished to thrive.

0:19:470:19:51

The fact that the moguls were in turn subject to the whims

0:19:510:19:54

and the dictates of the New York office

0:19:540:19:56

and the stockholders didn't matter.

0:19:560:19:58

In Hollywood itself, the moguls were the law.

0:19:580:20:00

On one occasion, for example,

0:20:000:20:02

Miss Fontaine was persuaded to go on a trip with other starlets to

0:20:020:20:05

have some publicity pictures taken, or so they were led to believe.

0:20:050:20:09

Rather amusing story, I think,

0:20:090:20:11

because I was told we had to go out to Arrowhead Springs, where

0:20:110:20:15

there's a big hotel, and there was going to be a distributers' meeting.

0:20:150:20:18

And a distributers' meeting really is an excuse for everybody to come

0:20:180:20:21

to Hollywood and leave their wives at home. It looks like business.

0:20:210:20:24

So, I went with my mother and they all were horrified.

0:20:240:20:28

And they said, "Get rid of the old lady."

0:20:280:20:31

And my mother, of course, overheard this

0:20:310:20:33

and she said, "Joan is coming to bed when I am

0:20:330:20:37

"and that will be all." And I went with my mother

0:20:370:20:41

and the next morning, Mother got on the phone - she was not

0:20:410:20:43

a Hollywood mother, a theatrical mother at all, she didn't push us -

0:20:430:20:47

but she said, "My daughter's up here to take pictures.

0:20:470:20:50

"Where's the cameraman?"

0:20:500:20:52

And nobody appeared, they were all hung-over, of course.

0:20:520:20:55

Mother kept on the phone persistently, and finally, some...

0:20:550:20:58

..bemused cameraman came up and with a jaundiced eye,

0:21:030:21:07

looked through the camera, took some photographs of me,

0:21:070:21:09

and they sent me packing home.

0:21:090:21:11

I was called into the publicity office the next day

0:21:110:21:15

and was accused of being high-hat and snobbish and all this

0:21:150:21:20

sort of thing because I hadn't been one of the gang, and I was fired.

0:21:200:21:26

The only trouble with Hollywood is you know you're running out of it.

0:21:260:21:31

You're going right straight through it and out the other end.

0:21:310:21:34

It's not a cul-de-sac, because they don't want you that long anyway.

0:21:340:21:39

Eventually, Fontaine would pour all

0:21:400:21:43

her experiences into a tell-all autobiography.

0:21:430:21:46

She called it No Bed Of Roses.

0:21:460:21:49

One of her ex-husbands would call it No Shred Of Truth.

0:21:490:21:54

Its publication in 1978 led to this appearance on the Tonight programme

0:21:540:21:59

with the interviewer Valerie Singleton.

0:21:590:22:01

Joan Fontaine, you're a successful Hollywood movie star,

0:22:030:22:06

you've had success, glamour, parties, travel,

0:22:060:22:09

an exciting life, and yet you've called your book No Bed Of Roses.

0:22:090:22:13

Why?

0:22:130:22:14

I think in No Bed Of Roses it explains a childhood

0:22:140:22:20

which was no more severe than some childhoods

0:22:200:22:24

but where there were no relatives except a mother,

0:22:240:22:28

where my mother was, in a sense, deserted by my father

0:22:280:22:33

and we ran away from home, my sister and I. She really ran away

0:22:330:22:38

and I was away, so I just stayed away.

0:22:380:22:40

And then four marriages, that's not easy.

0:22:400:22:45

And the ups and downs of career.

0:22:450:22:48

That's not easy. And, um...

0:22:480:22:51

-Not as glamorous as it appears, to people?

-It certainly isn't.

0:22:510:22:53

However, I'm out the other side of it, I'm a very happy woman.

0:22:530:22:58

I feel very fortunate, I've accomplished a lot,

0:22:580:23:00

I've done it all by myself and I'm rather proud of that

0:23:000:23:03

and I'm proud of being an author.

0:23:030:23:06

You... I have to raise this, and I'm sure it's been raised many times,

0:23:060:23:09

but you have this feud with your sister, Olivia de Havilland.

0:23:090:23:12

Did this come about because you were rivals, she was a year older

0:23:120:23:15

than you, and her success came more quickly than yours did?

0:23:150:23:17

-Did you find being...?

-I try to explain in the book

0:23:170:23:20

that it really happened, I think,

0:23:200:23:22

at my birth, because my mother said that Olivia, since we were born in

0:23:220:23:27

Tokyo, there were a lot of servants and all that sort of thing,

0:23:270:23:31

and she was rather the cock of the walk, and then the little intruder comes in.

0:23:310:23:36

As an intruder, I was a very sickly baby.

0:23:360:23:40

I had eczema all over my body for two years and I was in cotton wool.

0:23:400:23:44

So, I must have got a great deal of attention

0:23:440:23:47

and she must've been told, don't disturb the sleeping child, or

0:23:470:23:50

you can't go and see her, because she's sleeping, whatever it is.

0:23:500:23:54

And that... So, I was not a little doll to play with.

0:23:540:23:59

I was somebody who was upsetting her realm, as it were. And...

0:23:590:24:01

-People usually grow out of that when they grow older.

-Yes, they do.

0:24:010:24:04

-And she has not been able to.

-She? Not you? Or both of you?

-I have...

0:24:040:24:09

I'm proud of an older sister. I have no resentment of any kind.

0:24:090:24:13

You, actually, funnily enough, won an Oscar before she did, for your performance in Suspicion.

0:24:130:24:17

Was that a bone of contention as well or not?

0:24:170:24:20

No, she wouldn't raise that.

0:24:200:24:21

I mean, it's a fair fight, if it is a fight at all.

0:24:210:24:25

I feel a little guilty about it, but I feel a little guilty that

0:24:250:24:31

Brian Aherne, to whom I was married, had never even been nominated.

0:24:310:24:34

He was there, so that was rather awkward, only within me,

0:24:340:24:40

but they, I hope, were happy for me.

0:24:400:24:42

Was it a role you were proud of?

0:24:420:24:44

Do you think it was one of your better roles?

0:24:440:24:46

Oh, yes. There's no doubt.

0:24:460:24:47

I was directed by Hitchcock, and how lucky can one be?

0:24:470:24:50

But not one performance has really given you complete satisfaction.

0:24:500:24:53

There must be one or two, surely, that have given you some.

0:24:530:24:56

I don't think any artist, be it an opera singer, pianist,

0:24:560:25:01

a writer, anybody, is completely satisfied with their performance.

0:25:010:25:05

-And they shouldn't be, either.

-Which is one of your favourites?

0:25:050:25:08

Oh, I have so many. I was lucky to have the classics, really.

0:25:080:25:13

In order, Rebecca, Suspicion, Constant Nymph, Jane Eyre,

0:25:130:25:17

This Above All, Letter From An Unknown Woman, Ivanhoe.

0:25:170:25:22

I mean, I've been very lucky and I've had marvellous leading men.

0:25:220:25:27

You said just now you've been married four times

0:25:270:25:30

and, again, coming out of your book,

0:25:300:25:32

you seem very much to need the sort of permanence

0:25:320:25:34

and security in a marriage that you seemed not to get in your childhood.

0:25:340:25:38

And yet four marriages.

0:25:380:25:39

-Do you think Hollywood's to blame for the whirlwind, kind of superficial...

-No.

0:25:390:25:42

I think being the child of divorced parents makes one have

0:25:420:25:48

a different attitude about marriage.

0:25:480:25:51

I had never any real intention of it being for ever and ever

0:25:510:25:54

and ever and ever.

0:25:540:25:56

Because, as I write in No Bed Of Roses,

0:25:560:25:59

the night before my first marriage, there was a telephone call

0:25:590:26:03

at midnight saying, "Please may I get out of this marriage?"

0:26:030:26:06

And that's not a very good start.

0:26:060:26:08

Each of your marriages seems to have something that goes

0:26:080:26:11

wrong near the beginning of it that almost casts doubt.

0:26:110:26:13

-Yes, absolutely.

-Extraordinary.

0:26:130:26:15

I think that marriage should be terribly truthful

0:26:150:26:18

and nobody should go into marriage with any secrets of any kind.

0:26:180:26:23

And there were secrets in all my marriages that I discovered about

0:26:230:26:27

my husband shortly after marriage, which was a terrible blow.

0:26:270:26:31

-And I don't think quite fair.

-What are you doing now?

0:26:310:26:34

You're not in Hollywood any more, are you?

0:26:340:26:36

Oh, I've lived in New York for years.

0:26:360:26:39

I have a rather lovely apartment, all kinds of friends,

0:26:390:26:43

which one does in a large city.

0:26:430:26:45

In Hollywood, you had only friends that were in motion pictures, really.

0:26:450:26:49

But to have the UN, and many other things, is very exciting.

0:26:490:26:53

I find this time in my life, this age that I'm at, is a marvellous age.

0:26:530:26:58

Most women are terrified about getting older. Ah! It is lovely.

0:26:580:27:03

Especially if you have your own financial independence,

0:27:030:27:06

that's very important. And I do.

0:27:060:27:09

And I rely pretty much on myself for everything

0:27:090:27:13

and it's lovely to be able to choose the kind of life that I want to live

0:27:130:27:17

and then go ahead and live it.

0:27:170:27:18

So briefly, despite being called No Bed Of Roses,

0:27:180:27:21

there aren't too many regrets?

0:27:210:27:23

There are no regrets, because that's living.

0:27:230:27:25

I can't regret having lived and learned.

0:27:250:27:27

For Joan, living and learning never meant just acting.

0:27:280:27:33

Outside of Hollywood, she was a licensed pilot,

0:27:330:27:36

flew in an international balloon race, trained as

0:27:360:27:39

a Cordon Bleu cook and was a shrewd player of the stock market.

0:27:390:27:45

When she died, in 2013 aged 96, at home in California,

0:27:450:27:51

many referred to a quote that captured both her

0:27:510:27:54

love of performance and the most famous of her relationships.

0:27:540:27:57

She'd been asked how she'd like to die.

0:27:580:28:02

And she'd answered, "Aged 108,

0:28:020:28:05

"flying around the stage in Peter Pan

0:28:050:28:09

"as a result of my sister cutting the wires."

0:28:090:28:12

A look at the life of Joan Fontaine, one of Britain's best-loved actresses, using rarely seen archive footage of her appearances on the BBC to tell the story of her Oscar-winning career.


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