Episode 1 This Farming Life


Episode 1

An insight into modern farming life. On Mull, new entrant farmers Janet and Alastair take their lambs to auction.


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Transcript


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Across some of the most beautiful and remote landscapes of the British Isles...

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There's not many views like that. It's absolutely stunning.

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Scotland's farmers work day and night...

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SHEEP BLEATS

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..producing our milk...

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Come on.

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..and our meat.

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Trying out new ideas...

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Buffalo doesn't want to do something,

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you're going to find it very difficult.

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Hey!

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..and striving to turn a profit in tough economic times.

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We're struggling, we're definitely struggling.

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A new rosette.

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Over the course of a year,

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six very different families let cameras onto their farms...

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Everything that could have gone wrong there went wrong.

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The idea of lying on a beach, bliss!

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..to share their struggles...

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We have to get her out, or she's going to die.

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..and their triumphs.

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-Thank you.

-THEY LAUGH

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It's not about the pay cheque. It's about the lifestyle.

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It's autumn.

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Nature is beginning to wind down.

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But for Scotland's farmers, the hard work never stops.

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It's one of the busiest times of the year.

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The days are getting shorter.

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We've still got 400 ewes to get off the hill.

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The cows are still to come in.

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There's just a whole lot of stuff around the farm we just need to get done.

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Appin, on the west coast of Scotland.

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A rugged landscape of heather-clad hills, stretching for miles.

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To thrive on this rough upland terrain,

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you need hardy livestock and resilient farmers.

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What a nice day. Nice colours.

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Sandra and David Coltart run a traditional hill farm.

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They keep cattle and sheep,

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that for much of the year roam freely over 3,000 acres.

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Today, they're rounding up a group of ewes.

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The mating season, or tupping time, is fast approaching.

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So, the ewes need to be brought in off the hills for a health check.

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Well, we're hoping that we're going to get our little puckle of sheep in.

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If the dogs do what they're told, that would be a bonus.

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DOG BARKS

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What are you barking at?

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-Stupid dog.

-Silly dog.

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Wait. Wait.

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September's been terrible, because we've had a lot of rain and mist,

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so when the weather does come good,

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then you've got a blitz the stuff you have to do and everyone wants to get things done.

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On a hill farm, livestock are truly free-range.

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Farmers spend many hours rounding up their sheep.

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It's known as a gather.

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With so much ground to cover,

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the task would be impossible without the help of a farmer's best friend.

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David has Chance, and I have June.

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Chance can be extremely stubborn when he wants to, but he's a very

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good dog, good stamina.

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June, she's a bit of a novice on the hill, but she's been used for trials

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and she's done quite well at trials.

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They're like our kids, these dogs, really, so, kind of silly,

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cos we don't have any kids, so...

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SHE LAUGHS

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These are the babies.

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Working sheep in a field is one thing, but out on a

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hill, the dogs must first find the sheep -

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a skill that takes years to learn.

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Some dogs will really only go out and get sheep if they can see them.

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But our dogs have to learn to put their nose to the ground and keep

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casting out until it actually comes across the sheep.

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Once you have a good hill dog, you never part with them,

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cos they get to know their job.

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You can fix your bike,

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you can replace your tractor and your car, but you cannot replace a good hill dog.

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Look! That's her command to look for sheep.

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Look!

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A SHEEP BLEATS

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Chance and June have found the sheep.

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Lie down, Chance. Now stay there.

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Now Sandra and David need to deploy some human teamwork.

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San's going down here.

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I'm going up to this part up here.

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And I'll go down on the ridge.

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San'll walk parallel with me and she'll keep an eye that I'm not going too

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far forward, because the sheep are quite prone at nipping back between us.

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Chance, come on.

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CAMERA SHUTTER CLICKS

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We've got this moor

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in the middle and mull in the background.

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It's nice to see it, when you can see it, and it is a beautiful view.

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Sandra's pushing the sheep from below.

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Just wait there!

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If they don't want to lose them,

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David will have to put down the camera and focus on his flock.

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In the south-west of Scotland,

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the Roan family has been raising and milking cows on these rolling

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coastal hills since 1898.

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The sixth generation of this dairy dynasty,

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brothers Stuart and Steven Roan run two neighbouring farms with their dad Derek.

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We all work together.

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We're all running the dairy business,

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we're running it on two separate farms.

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They're close enough to share machinery, but yet far enough

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apart for each family to have their own space,

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do their own thing and make most of their own day-to-day decisions.

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Steven and wife Tracey run their share of the family business from their

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farm, Boreland of Colvend.

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And their children, Andrew, seven and Lucy, five,

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are already showing signs of keeping up the family tradition.

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I would disappear for hours,

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and play on the farm with my sister and brother.

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It was a great upbringing. It was brilliant. Absolutely brilliant.

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Loved it. Total freedom.

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And so it's nice to know our kids have got the same.

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This is Andrew and Lucy's supposedly

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outdoor farm.

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SHE LAUGHS

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He's got some beef cows in there.

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He's got some dairy cows in this field!

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Andrew is, yeah, a born and bred farmer.

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Better not stand on his hens.

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He's got some cockerels.

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I think he gets Lucy, his sister, to come in and, like,

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be the gopher and help.

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Oh, that's it. He rents fields out to Lucy, cos she has horses.

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I can see some horses over here!

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Aye, there's some horses.

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I'm not always that happy with the horses on the farm.

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I mainly put them in fields away from the farm.

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I like cows more than sheep and horses.

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Andrew is about to put his passion into practice,

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as the whole family gears up for the South West Scotland Dairy Show.

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We'll work out what class Andrew's in.

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Tracey is the show secretary.

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She helps to organise the event.

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But it's also a chance for the family to compete and show off their best animals.

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BUZZING

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This year, Andrew will be competing with three-month-old calf Bliss.

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Dad Steven is getting her ready for the big event.

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At the moment, I've left...

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..the hair on her topline

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and also I've left the belly here on the calf.

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It's just helping to make the calf look as deep as possible.

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Steven's also sprucing up his own prize hopeful,

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three-year-old pedigree Holstein Peachy.

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She's got quite a bit of venation in her udder,

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especially up the back of her udder.

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And you're looking for her udder to be well attached,

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this centre ligament.

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You want a good strong ligament for the attachment.

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That would point to the cow going to last a long time.

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COW MOOS

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You have to be quite a strong-willed person to do farming and to

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work with your husband full-time!

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But it's good, it's good.

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It's a nice way of life.

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SHAVER BUZZES

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So, we're just shaving her udder with really fine clippers,

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to make the veins show up as much as possible.

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She's got a good frame. She's got a good, deep, open body.

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She is looking quite good there.

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You never talk so fondly about me as you do about your cows!

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It's not just about looks.

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It's how you handle your cow in the ring.

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Hold on tight.

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And with nearly 23st of boisterous heifer to handle,

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it's nowhere near as easy as it looks.

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You need a good strong arm.

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You need to...

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..put a bit of sort of weight, a bit of tension on the rope, just to...

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..keep her head up.

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Hold on tight. That's it. On you go.

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-You take her now.

-No, you're fine. On you go.

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Look, I can't do the big bump.

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Right, I'll take her when she goes to the step.

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-Can you take her?

-That's it.

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COW MOOS

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It's great from my point of view that Andrew is showing an interest.

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I mean, obviously, it's not to say that he's definitely going to farm when

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he's older, but it's certainly, at the moment, it definitely looks that way.

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It means all the work that

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my grandfather and father put in and the work that I'm putting in,

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that's all sort of carrying on.

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No, that's very important to us as a farming family.

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He's come on a lot.

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He had a wee wobble last night, but Steven gave him a pep talk,

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just about having his confidence and I think it's really helped.

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Hopefully, it'll be all right on the night, as the saying goes.

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You've got a little dirty nose.

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Back across, Sandra.

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In Argyll, some misbehaving sheep are threatening the smooth running

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of David and Sandra's gather.

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Domino effect. The ones just out of sight of us

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will start moving and the ones that see them will start moving and go forward.

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The sheep are still scattered all over the hillside.

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They're not daft.

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There's ones down here that are trying to get into the

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trees, so hopefully Chance will see them and will turn them back round.

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The dogs are doing their jobs perfectly.

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Chance, that'll do.

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And after 27 years together,

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David and Canadian-born Sandra are an efficient team.

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Just wait there a moment, Sandra.

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The couple met at a pub when Sandra was in Scotland visiting relatives.

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I remember the thing that struck me the most about David, when he gave me

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a ride back down to the croft that night,

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he had this little diary in the console of his car,

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so I jokingly said,

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"Oh, what's this? A little diary full of women?"

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And he picked it up, and he said, "No, it's all my lambing dates."

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And I was like, "Oh, that's so sweet!"

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So I was like, "Oh, I think I kind of like this guy.

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-"He's not like anybody I've ever met before."

-SHE LAUGHS

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Lie down, Chance. Lie down!

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They seem to be mostly here, hopefully.

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So, we'll just go down and take them into the yard.

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-Lie down!

-Good girl.

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Once in the fank, or handling pen,

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the job is to separate the older ewes from the younger ones.

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-You just tell me what you want me to do, that's what you always do anyway.

-Exactly.

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The older ewes will be sent off for sale.

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The remaining sheep are next year's breeding ewes, so they're given an

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extra dose of nutrients to get them in tiptop shape for tupping.

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There's your vitamins for the year.

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Have that rammed down your throat.

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It's a slow release. It sits in their stomach.

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The sheep are marked in a process called keeling.

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It helps identify at a distance which farm the sheep belong to.

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This is the messiest job on the farm.

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Putting the stock mark on.

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And if you're short of lipstick(!)

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-Yeah.

-SANDRA LAUGHS

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-Do you want us to put a wee bit of lipstick on you?

-Yeah!

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People think sheep are stupid, but they're actually really smart.

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And they know people's faces as well, yeah.

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When I'm in a field and I've got sheep that have been training a bit with my dogs,

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I'll go out and the sheep will run up and they'll look straight up into my face.

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They recognise me and they feel safe with me, cos they know I'll

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never let anything happen to them.

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I never allow my dogs to grip them or be rough with them.

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Come on, girls.

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So, yeah, they're very smart.

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The girls are keen to get back to the hills.

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Take your time. Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa!

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They're meant to take their time.

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In the Highlands, in the far north-east of Scotland...

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Beautiful tatties.

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..autumn is harvest time for crofters Robin and Penny Calvert.

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Well, we've been married 40 years just about now and so,

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we've been doing this sort of thing off and on,

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depending on what else we've been doing,

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right the way through.

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It's one of the things that's always given us a little pleasure.

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You know, getting our own food out of the ground.

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Well, we have our ups and downs.

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-We do argue.

-No, we don't!

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-Yes, we do!

-No, we don't!

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There you go!

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Robin and Penny moved here 25 years ago,

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taking on a disused croft -

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a type of smallholding unique to the Highlands and Islands of Scotland.

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Watch out!

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Through sheer hard graft,

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they've turned 110 acres of rough land

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into a fully working croft that now

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supplies them with most of their food

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and helps support a small butchery business that sells meat and pies.

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Their main source of income is from their 23 Highland cattle.

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Grab that gate, then, when they come through.

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The Highlanders thrive outside.

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A lot of folk will say with the Highlands,

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you just put them on rough ground and they'll do well.

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They don't. They survive.

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If you treat Highlanders well and look after them,

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and give them plenty of grub during the winter and things,

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they do very nicely indeed.

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Come on, in you go.

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Grab that gate, pet. You need a lot of hands in a job like this, really.

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Ideally. Whoa!

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Brandy, get back.

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Come on. Unfortunately, being single-handed crofting, with my wife,

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who's not as able as she used to be - I mean, she does what she can -

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it can be quite tricky. Come on.

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That's it, Pen, well done. Right, that's fine.

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Right, that's them.

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OK, I've got to go down and get the rest now.

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HE WHISTLES

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Today, Robin's gathering in the herd, known as a fold,

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for a routine TB test.

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HE WHISTLES

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Bovine TB, or tuberculosis, is a

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contagious and potentially deadly disease,

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though it's rare in Scotland.

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HE SHOUTS

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The TB tests are basically a public health requirement. I suppose,

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basically, it's a government insurance that we pay for.

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HE CHUCKLES

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Ho!

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Free-range Highland cattle like Robin's usually rub along well together.

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Ginger, you're a horrible thing.

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Come on, get off.

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But when put together in close quarters,

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they'll fight to establish a pecking order, bullying the weakest,

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like 15-year-old Misey.

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Hey, come on.

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Come on, Misey. Misey, Misey, come on.

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Problem over.

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They don't like her.

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And they seem to be bullying her a bit in there,

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so be as well to just keep them apart from each other at the

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moment. Right,

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I'd better go and find the vet and we'll see what's happening.

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Local vet Paul Morrison will be taking on the task of TB testing...

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-Whoa!

-..cautiously!

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Testing these things with horns, it's not the easiest!

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Pecking order going on here.

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Highlands are nice in the field, but working with them's hard work.

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You're never quite sure when one's going to poke you in the back!

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You've got to keep your wits about you all the time when you're

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handling cattle like this.

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Whoa!

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That'll do. We've got one.

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A bit wary that I'm coming in here now.

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First, they need to get them into the race, or cattle restraint.

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Go on, you can do it. You can do it. Go on.

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-Get your head through.

-Getting four-feet-wide horns through a

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20-inch restraint requires a bit of skill.

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No, it's going to be a rope job.

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Let's see if we can get one antler through. I think the rest will come.

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Come on.

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She's through, Paul.

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Oh, Paul. Grab the lock!

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She's done it. Has she closed it?

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-Yeah.

-Not quite.

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It's done. Is it?

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Whisht, whisht!

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We're going to just inject a tiny amount of tuberculin today and we

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come back in three days' time and just see if there's been a reaction to it.

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Go on, Mary. Out you go. No, not backwards, you daft cow!

0:18:340:18:37

That way.

0:18:370:18:39

Come on.

0:18:390:18:40

Poor old Misey is the last in.

0:18:420:18:43

Come on, Misey. You can do it. I know you've had a tough morning, but

0:18:430:18:47

you can do it. Get up there. Come on, up you go.

0:18:470:18:50

Up you go.

0:18:500:18:51

There's a girl. Come on.

0:18:510:18:53

There's a girl.

0:18:530:18:55

There you go. Perfection!

0:18:550:18:59

She's actually got to the stage, she's a total pain, this cow.

0:18:590:19:02

You bring everybody else up from the wood,

0:19:020:19:04

you've got to spend half an hour going looking for her.

0:19:040:19:07

Why have you still got her? Sentimental?

0:19:070:19:10

I'm not going to answer that!

0:19:100:19:11

HE LAUGHS

0:19:110:19:13

She's one of the first ones we had and she doesn't owe me a penny

0:19:130:19:16

and she's been a good old cow, you know.

0:19:160:19:18

What do we do with her? You know, she's here till she's finished.

0:19:180:19:21

Come on, out you go.

0:19:240:19:26

Good girl.

0:19:260:19:28

Go on, you geriatric ruin!

0:19:280:19:29

Have you time for a coffee?

0:19:310:19:34

No, probably not, no. Thanks anyway.

0:19:340:19:35

Okey doke. Right, we'll leave you to it. If you want to wash

0:19:350:19:38

your boots, there's a bin just by the kitchen window.

0:19:380:19:40

Okey dokey. Thanks, Paul.

0:19:400:19:42

All right, cheers.

0:19:420:19:43

Thanks a lot. Right, we'll just have a tidy up here.

0:19:430:19:46

The TB results should come back in three days.

0:19:460:19:49

Move back, move back.

0:19:490:19:51

Now if the result, for whatever

0:19:530:19:55

reason, proves positive, in other words,

0:19:550:19:58

we've got

0:19:580:19:59

a problem within the fold, that

0:19:590:20:01

triggers all sorts of horrible things

0:20:010:20:04

that we don't want to discuss at this point.

0:20:040:20:07

I'm not expecting it, but if by chance we did have a problem within

0:20:070:20:11

the fold, that would put us into complete shutdown.

0:20:110:20:13

On the Isle of Mull in the Inner Hebrides,

0:20:390:20:43

new-entrant farmers Janet and Alastair Taylor are trying to stay

0:20:430:20:47

on top of the endless list of autumn tasks.

0:20:470:20:49

So in the autumn, it can be quite a busy time for us.

0:20:520:20:55

We've got lambs to go to sale,

0:20:550:20:58

so there's a lot to do and it's quite a high-pressure time to get

0:20:580:21:01

ready for the year ahead.

0:21:010:21:03

Janet and Alastair rent a 700-acre farm on the south of the island,

0:21:030:21:07

where they rear sheep and a handful of cattle.

0:21:070:21:10

The couple were hired hands before taking on their own farm five years

0:21:110:21:15

ago. They started with nothing - no farm, no animals and no cash.

0:21:150:21:22

We went to the bank for all of our money, but we managed to agree

0:21:230:21:27

great deals with local farmers and

0:21:270:21:29

friends for buying stock, so that really saved us.

0:21:290:21:34

It was, it was really hard and it nearly broke Janet and I,

0:21:340:21:38

not as a couple, but just broke our spirits and our passion for farming.

0:21:380:21:42

SHE CALLS OUT

0:21:420:21:45

So many tears, so much heartache, so much trouble, but we got there,

0:21:450:21:51

we got there.

0:21:510:21:54

Today, they're bringing in the lambs to get them ready to sell.

0:21:540:21:57

Helping them are four of their nine dogs.

0:21:590:22:02

Sit down!

0:22:020:22:04

We used to have a running joke that every time someone suggested we had

0:22:040:22:07

kids, we got another dog!

0:22:070:22:09

Lie down.

0:22:100:22:12

But now that's getting out of hand, so we'd better stop buying dogs!

0:22:120:22:16

And just like kids, not all the dogs are well-behaved.

0:22:160:22:19

SHE SHOUTS

0:22:190:22:21

SHE WHISTLES

0:22:210:22:23

Come here!

0:22:230:22:25

Come here!

0:22:250:22:26

You!

0:22:270:22:29

Janet and Alastair depend on paid contract work and subsidies to make

0:22:300:22:35

ends meet.

0:22:350:22:36

But the annual lamb sale is the only time they can make money from their

0:22:360:22:40

livestock. So it's time for a makeover.

0:22:400:22:43

We'll put them into the U-bend.

0:22:460:22:48

We'll see if there's any dirty tails.

0:22:480:22:50

They run the lambs through a curved handling pen, also known as a race.

0:22:500:22:55

Sheep are easier to manage and move when they can't see ahead of them.

0:22:550:22:58

These ones are actually all all right,

0:23:000:23:02

cos their tails are completely dried up,

0:23:020:23:05

so it's all dry shit that's on it.

0:23:050:23:07

I'm just going to tidy it up a wee bit so it doesn't look quite so bad.

0:23:070:23:10

A tail trim needs a steady hand.

0:23:110:23:14

Yeah.

0:23:140:23:15

This one that should be worried about it -

0:23:170:23:19

I don't want it slipping - cut it.

0:23:190:23:21

Shaping her, making her look pretty!

0:23:230:23:25

You're disappearing. You stop jumping.

0:23:310:23:34

I don't know if you can make this arse look pretty!

0:23:340:23:36

Eating too many curries, boy!

0:23:410:23:43

Eugh!

0:23:430:23:45

Right, done.

0:23:460:23:48

Now will be the job of sorting them out into their different lots.

0:23:500:23:53

These six-month-old lambs, known as store lambs,

0:23:550:23:59

will be sold on to other farmers to be fattened up for meat.

0:23:590:24:02

When they go to auction, they'll be sold in batches,

0:24:020:24:06

ideally of equal size.

0:24:060:24:08

The idea is that you're putting in the best lambs all in together and

0:24:100:24:14

the slightly poorer lambs all in together.

0:24:140:24:17

Nice, big lambs, we want the buyers to see the nice, big lambs,

0:24:170:24:21

not be drawn to the little lambs that don't quite fit in the group.

0:24:210:24:25

This pen down here, looking at it, is almost the small pen.

0:24:250:24:28

For every lamb that doesn't make the grade,

0:24:280:24:30

there's another who's upwardly mobile.

0:24:300:24:34

Come, boy. Come on, you're getting promoted.

0:24:340:24:36

Janet and Alastair's hopes for profit ride on one group.

0:24:380:24:42

This is our top-drawer.

0:24:420:24:44

This is the one that hopefully makes the most amount of money per head,

0:24:440:24:47

so it's very important to us. This is the only point that this

0:24:470:24:51

farm actually produces any money from for us, is when we sell the lambs.

0:24:510:24:55

It's...really frightening...

0:24:560:24:59

actually, because a bad sale is

0:24:590:25:02

really bad. It affects everything.

0:25:020:25:05

It affects everything for the next year.

0:25:050:25:07

Over six months of hard work has gone into getting their lambs to

0:25:070:25:11

this point. But they still have to get their sheep off the island.

0:25:110:25:15

Now the couple have to hope the weather and the markets are on their side.

0:25:170:25:21

Back down in Dumfries and Galloway,

0:25:280:25:31

dairy farmers the Roans are also hoping their hard work will pay off.

0:25:310:25:35

I think I'm being over-adventurous trying to fit this in the car.

0:25:350:25:39

It's the South West Scotland Dairy Show and team Roan is mobilising.

0:25:390:25:44

Yeah, it's quite nerve-racking and certainly competitive.

0:25:440:25:49

It's always a sort of step into the unknown,

0:25:500:25:52

when you take an animal to a show.

0:25:520:25:54

The dairy show is held every autumn in Castle Douglas.

0:26:000:26:04

It's a local event

0:26:040:26:06

where farmers come together to show off their best cows.

0:26:060:26:08

Three-year-old Peachey and young calf Bliss are getting their final

0:26:100:26:14

touches before they take to the stage.

0:26:140:26:18

It's something I very much enjoy, getting your stock ready for a show.

0:26:180:26:23

It's not just about producing milk.

0:26:230:26:25

We're trying to breed a herd of cows that we're really proud of.

0:26:250:26:29

It's a bit of a shop window, if you like.

0:26:290:26:31

To show other farmers the type of stock that you're breeding.

0:26:310:26:34

The cattle aren't the only ones to scrub up well.

0:26:360:26:39

Grandad Derek is here to make sure dairy show traditions are kept up in

0:26:400:26:45

-style.

-Holstein cattle,

0:26:450:26:47

the handlers dress up in white, the way Brook is here.

0:26:470:26:51

And the way Steven's got below his boiler suit now and Andrew's got his

0:26:510:26:55

whites on. White is not the most practical colour,

0:26:550:26:58

but it looks really smart. Let's see what that's like.

0:26:580:27:03

-That about right?

-Perfect!

0:27:030:27:05

Perfect.

0:27:050:27:07

It's something that's always nice to see at the shows, is the youngsters

0:27:070:27:12

taking calves. I took some calves to shows when I was young as well,

0:27:120:27:16

something I always remember and something that probably started off

0:27:160:27:20

my interest in that side of things.

0:27:200:27:22

You're always a bit apprehensive till you see how things are going,

0:27:240:27:29

but it's obviously... You're quite proud to see them doing it.

0:27:290:27:31

It's time for Andrew to go into the ring.

0:27:330:27:35

-ANNOUNCER:

-This is the junior calf class, heifer calf - to be born in 2016.

0:27:360:27:41

So we have two classes, the junior, and the senior.

0:27:450:27:48

The judge is looking for form,

0:27:480:27:50

cleanliness and grooming in the calf

0:27:500:27:53

and good showmanship from the handler.

0:27:530:27:55

But the young calf is playing up.

0:27:580:27:59

ANDREW SOBS

0:28:070:28:08

It's OK, it's OK. We'll get it again. Are you OK? We'll get it.

0:28:080:28:11

You OK? Good boy. Come on, you're doing really well.

0:28:110:28:13

Come on. You come with me. Come with me.

0:28:130:28:15

My heart kind of went, there!

0:28:150:28:17

-Did you bump your elbow. I could hear it in the middle of the ring.

-You're OK.

0:28:180:28:22

Good boy.

0:28:220:28:24

It'll be good now. You keep a tight hold.

0:28:240:28:26

-Good boy.

-Yeah,

0:28:260:28:28

-but it'll just run away again.

-It won't. You just remember.

0:28:280:28:31

It's going to run away again.

0:28:310:28:32

No, it won't. If you're confident, remember, confidence.

0:28:320:28:36

A pep talk from Dad and Andrew's back in the game.

0:28:360:28:40

The boy's doing well.

0:28:420:28:43

I don't think he looks very happy, though.

0:28:460:28:48

He got a wee fright, but you know, he's got to learn.

0:28:480:28:51

So, yeah, OK. I think I'm OK.

0:28:510:28:53

The calf's just playing up a wee bit.

0:28:580:29:01

He'll get there, though, hopefully.

0:29:010:29:04

I just told him to make sure the calf knows that he's the boss.

0:29:040:29:08

The judge has made his final decision.

0:29:100:29:13

Andrew takes third place.

0:29:220:29:24

Well done, Andrew.

0:29:250:29:27

-I'll help you. Come on.

-You go with Daddy.

-Come with me.

0:29:350:29:38

Considering he got quite a nasty knock,

0:29:430:29:46

I think he's done remarkably well and it was a big class, so do you know...

0:29:460:29:49

No, I'm pretty proud of him.

0:29:490:29:51

You did so well.

0:29:510:29:54

Did you get a wee bump?

0:29:540:29:56

You're so brave.

0:29:560:29:59

What did we get? What's that?

0:29:590:30:01

You've got £20. And what are we going to spend that on?

0:30:010:30:05

-Tractors!

-Tractors!

0:30:060:30:08

And to top it all, Steven seals team Roan's success with first

0:30:090:30:14

-place for Peachey.

-First place just shows a tremendous ring presence and

0:30:140:30:18

cleanness throughout and cleaner through her neck, cleaner right down

0:30:180:30:21

through her brisket. Showing great youthfulness in her udder.

0:30:210:30:24

The udder shaving paid off.

0:30:240:30:26

That makes it a bit more worthwhile when you're sort of standing higher

0:30:280:30:32

up the class. No, it's really good.

0:30:320:30:34

I'm just fair chuffed.

0:30:340:30:36

Autumn is a time when farmers take advantage of the last good weather,

0:30:420:30:46

to prepare for winter.

0:30:460:30:47

And in Argyll, hill farmer David has a rather fragrant task to undertake.

0:30:490:30:54

The cattle will soon need to come in,

0:30:580:31:01

but while they're out enjoying the last of the warm weather,

0:31:010:31:04

David can access the empty sheds...

0:31:040:31:07

and what lies beneath.

0:31:070:31:09

Slurry.

0:31:110:31:12

Each pen has a set number of cows and all the dung that is produced

0:31:120:31:17

from them falls in below the slats into a ten-foot tank below.

0:31:170:31:20

And that agitator just mixes it up into a kind of soup-like substance

0:31:230:31:27

that is easy to put out in the fields.

0:31:270:31:30

The slurry from last year has settled at the bottom of the tank

0:31:300:31:34

and needs to be mixed up before being spread on the fields,

0:31:340:31:37

which sounds harmless, but is far from it.

0:31:370:31:40

When the agitation is going on, it produces hydrogen sulphide,

0:31:420:31:45

which is a very dangerous gas,

0:31:450:31:47

especially when we first start mixing it at the start of the season,

0:31:470:31:50

when it's been settled for a while, so I have a gas detector,

0:31:500:31:53

which I wear and that protects me from getting overcome with the gas.

0:31:530:31:58

Very fragrant!

0:32:010:32:03

I'm not allowed into the house without actually stripping all the

0:32:030:32:06

stuff down - because I stink!

0:32:060:32:08

Once the slurry has been mixed,

0:32:110:32:13

it becomes a natural fertiliser to put on fields.

0:32:130:32:17

A job that needs good weather...

0:32:180:32:19

..and a thumping soundtrack!

0:32:210:32:22

MUSIC PLAYS: Highway To Hell by AC/DC

0:32:240:32:26

The slurry is like a kind of high-powered nutrition that just

0:32:410:32:44

kind of gives the grass a shot in the arm,

0:32:440:32:46

just to give it a last wee boost before the frost starts.

0:32:460:32:50

It's nice and dry.

0:32:520:32:54

The ground conditions are good and hopefully,

0:32:540:32:57

40 or 50 loads may well go out over the next few days.

0:32:570:33:00

Just having fun, enjoying the radio, bombing along!

0:33:020:33:05

While David gets spreading...

0:33:080:33:10

Hey, buddy.

0:33:120:33:14

..sheepdog trainer Sandra is trying out five-month-old puppy, Snip.

0:33:140:33:17

We'll shut that over.

0:33:170:33:19

DOGS BARK LOUDLY

0:33:190:33:20

I think they're a bit jealous.

0:33:200:33:22

Snip is her youngest collie, but Sandra has high hopes he'll have a

0:33:230:33:27

stellar career as a sheepdog.

0:33:270:33:29

His great-great-grandfather Snip was one of my first dogs and one of the

0:33:300:33:34

best dogs I've ever had, so I decided I would like to have another one like that,

0:33:340:33:38

so I'm hoping that he's going to live up to his name.

0:33:380:33:42

Well, so far, he seems to be

0:33:420:33:43

doing OK.

0:33:430:33:46

Some pups will really make a mess,

0:33:470:33:48

they'll run through the sheep and take a hold with their teeth and

0:33:480:33:51

pull chunks of wool out and scatter the sheep all over the field.

0:33:510:33:54

They think it's great fun.

0:33:540:33:55

Good boy!

0:33:570:33:58

Good boy!

0:33:590:34:01

See, I can't put any commands on him, because he doesn't know anything.

0:34:010:34:04

His instincts are just

0:34:040:34:06

keep the sheep to the handler...

0:34:060:34:08

...basically. Good boy.

0:34:090:34:13

That's how his grandfather, his great-grandfather started out as well.

0:34:130:34:16

It can take up to four years for a sheepdog to reach its prime.

0:34:160:34:20

Get to the end of this rope. Come here!

0:34:200:34:23

I've been training sheepdogs for about 25 years now.

0:34:240:34:28

Lots of things can go wrong when you take them out to sheep for the first

0:34:280:34:31

time, they won't listen to you at all.

0:34:310:34:34

It's a job that needs patience, commitment and a sense of humour.

0:34:340:34:38

There we go.

0:34:380:34:39

That was fun. Oh!

0:34:390:34:41

Yep! That was my fault.

0:34:430:34:45

Slippery rope. Come here, come here.

0:34:480:34:50

Come here.

0:34:500:34:52

Oh, no! That's awful!

0:34:540:34:56

This is where the fun starts!

0:34:570:34:59

Catch him!

0:35:010:35:03

Stand on his rope. I've got you!

0:35:030:35:06

Right. Good boy.

0:35:060:35:08

The rope was slippery. Slipped right out of my hand.

0:35:080:35:12

He's wanting to go again.

0:35:120:35:13

He's basically showing that

0:35:140:35:16

he wants to go around and keep them together,

0:35:160:35:19

which is good and he's balancing them to me,

0:35:190:35:22

which is also good.

0:35:220:35:24

Oh, he's a good lad!

0:35:240:35:27

He's so cute.

0:35:290:35:32

If he's anything like his great-great-grandfather, well,

0:35:320:35:35

he was a good trial dog and I did quite well with him, so...

0:35:350:35:38

Here's hoping that he's going to follow in his paw prints, basically.

0:35:390:35:43

His paw steps!

0:35:430:35:44

Over. Over.

0:35:500:35:52

Over. Good girl.

0:35:520:35:54

Right, I want one.

0:35:540:35:55

150 miles away in the far north,

0:35:570:36:00

Highland crofter Robin is having better luck with his trusty sidekick Meg.

0:36:000:36:05

Right, on you go. On you go.

0:36:050:36:07

On you go. Good girl.

0:36:070:36:09

Hold it there, hold it there. Right,

0:36:090:36:11

that's immobilised now and then we'll turn her over.

0:36:110:36:15

Have a look at her feet.

0:36:180:36:20

There's no two ways about it.

0:36:230:36:24

Half the reason I've got these on here this year is just to keep the dog happy,

0:36:240:36:28

because without her sheep, she wouldn't have an awful lot to do, you know,

0:36:280:36:31

apart from the cattle.

0:36:310:36:33

Leave it.

0:36:340:36:35

It's been three days since Robin's cattle had their TB test.

0:36:390:36:42

The results have come in.

0:36:420:36:44

Well, it's Friday afternoon.

0:36:450:36:47

We've had the vet out again this morning.

0:36:470:36:49

We had a, fortunately, a clear TB test.

0:36:510:36:55

No problems there. So we're all quite happy with that.

0:36:550:36:57

Now both he and Penny can concentrate on gearing up for the winter ahead.

0:36:590:37:04

Absolutely fabulous day.

0:37:040:37:06

First real hard frost we've had.

0:37:060:37:08

Getting all that Scotch mist coming up Loch Fleet there.

0:37:100:37:13

Over the years, Robin's worked hard to clear and improve his 110 acres.

0:37:170:37:21

But he's also kept around 40 acres as woodland, which makes the croft

0:37:220:37:27

more self-sufficient.

0:37:270:37:29

Right, this is just making use of fallen birch timber and this was a

0:37:290:37:33

big tree that came down a few weeks ago.

0:37:330:37:36

And this will be used for putting on the Rayburn at home.

0:37:360:37:39

This stuff has kept us going for...

0:37:390:37:41

..24, 25 years now in bits and pieces,

0:37:420:37:46

various Rayburns, keeping them going and...

0:37:460:37:48

it's an excellent fuel.

0:37:480:37:50

And it's there for the use.

0:37:510:37:53

It's part of the croft economy, as far as we're concerned.

0:37:530:37:55

It's saving us having to buy the stuff in.

0:37:550:37:57

I mean, that's what? Half an hour's cutting there.

0:37:570:38:00

That'll keep us going for about four days, which gives us

0:38:000:38:03

all our heating,

0:38:030:38:06

all our hot water and the majority of the cooking.

0:38:060:38:11

It's called crofting.

0:38:240:38:26

You either take on crofting the whole hog or you just don't do it.

0:38:260:38:30

We've created everything that we've got here.

0:38:330:38:36

Started with it just being a patch of nettles

0:38:380:38:41

and rushes.

0:38:410:38:43

There weren't any fences. All the fences were due to be replaced,

0:38:430:38:46

so Robin has actually put in every single fence.

0:38:460:38:49

He's built the gates

0:38:500:38:53

and he's built the gates to fit the contours of the hill.

0:38:530:38:56

He's done that with all the gates.

0:38:560:38:58

They all fit exactly, so he's quite a precision artist.

0:38:580:39:02

We moved into the house in

0:39:090:39:12

1992 and we came over here just before Christmas.

0:39:120:39:17

And it was snowing,

0:39:170:39:19

then we got into the house

0:39:190:39:22

to find that the water was frozen.

0:39:220:39:25

There was no electric, there was no telephone and so,

0:39:250:39:28

we cooked stews on the peat fire and sat on the sofa and it was just

0:39:280:39:34

delightful. We had plenty of candles and we didn't care a bit!

0:39:340:39:39

And it was like that for three days.

0:39:390:39:40

25 years of hard work have gone into turning disused land into the

0:39:420:39:46

productive croft they have today.

0:39:460:39:48

Right, tea break.

0:39:490:39:51

But six years ago, Penny began to struggle with the workload.

0:39:530:39:57

We're getting there. I actually gave up my teaching back in 2011.

0:39:580:40:04

My work was getting slower and slower and I had to just call a halt.

0:40:040:40:09

I hadn't worked out, I hadn't even thought about Parkinson's then and

0:40:090:40:12

it was another three years before it was diagnosed.

0:40:120:40:15

But I was getting really tired then, so I just had to stop.

0:40:160:40:21

I think if you've got something wrong with you,

0:40:230:40:26

you've just got to grin and bear it, work out what your limits are.

0:40:260:40:29

And just get on with it.

0:40:300:40:32

I've still got my motivation and motability.

0:40:350:40:38

I sleep a lot.

0:40:410:40:43

I have to take a 40-minute kip after lunch,

0:40:430:40:47

but I can usually recharge and it's a funny thing that if you feel like

0:40:470:40:52

putting your feet up,

0:40:520:40:55

the best way around that is to go for a walk or unload some timber,

0:40:550:40:59

because it's the circulation which is slowing your body down,

0:40:590:41:03

so you keep the circulation going, and you feel a lot better.

0:41:030:41:07

While Parkinson's is incurable,

0:41:090:41:11

for now, staying active is key for Penny, which is just as well,

0:41:110:41:16

as work on a croft never stops.

0:41:160:41:19

I've got the hens to feed and turn out their water.

0:41:190:41:22

And the doorstep cleaned, because it's got pen muck on it.

0:41:240:41:27

Never leave a rake upside down.

0:41:300:41:32

I know, to the detriment of my face!

0:41:330:41:35

Over on the Isle of Mull,

0:41:460:41:48

it's a big day for new farmers Janet and Alastair,

0:41:480:41:51

who are on their way to sell their lambs.

0:41:510:41:53

Luckily, the weather is on their side and the ferry is on time.

0:41:550:41:59

On board, 59 sale lambs, three dogs and two nervous farmers.

0:42:010:42:07

At least we're lucky, Janet,

0:42:070:42:09

cos there's no point stressing about whether or not we're going to get

0:42:090:42:11

good prices, cos by now, it's too late. We're going today and that's it.

0:42:110:42:15

Because we live on the island here,

0:42:170:42:20

and it costs so much in time and money to go off the island,

0:42:200:42:24

when we go to the sale,

0:42:240:42:26

there's no choice other than sell the lambs.

0:42:260:42:28

AUCTIONEER SHOUTS BIDS

0:42:360:42:38

They reach Dalmally auction in good time,

0:42:400:42:42

giving Alastair the chance to suss out any potential competition.

0:42:420:42:46

When you look around, ours look less bedraggled.

0:42:500:42:52

I'm really happy with the way they're looking.

0:42:540:42:57

Having had them in overnight and the last day,

0:42:580:43:01

they're looking very fluffy and very dry,

0:43:010:43:03

so it makes them look fuller and they stuffed themselves with silage

0:43:030:43:06

last night, so they're still looking reasonably full this morning.

0:43:060:43:09

A buzz at the ringside is what every seller hopes for.

0:43:130:43:17

The lamb prices have been in a slump for the last two years and today,

0:43:170:43:21

trade is slow.

0:43:210:43:22

Once they factor in the costs of raising the lambs and getting them

0:43:240:43:27

to market, they'll need an average

0:43:270:43:30

of £35 per sheep to make even a small profit.

0:43:300:43:33

19.50 for them three in the rings.

0:43:360:43:39

-How much?

-£19.50.

-£19.50.

0:43:390:43:41

Trade's not great.

0:43:470:43:48

In the south-west,

0:43:580:43:59

the rosettes and show whites are packed away and it's back to

0:43:590:44:03

business for dairy farmers the Roan family.

0:44:030:44:08

Come on!

0:44:110:44:13

Come on.

0:44:130:44:15

Their dairy cows need milking and today it's Tracey's turn to

0:44:150:44:18

round them up.

0:44:180:44:20

Go on, girls. In you go. Come on.

0:44:240:44:26

I always remember when Steven trained me -

0:44:280:44:31

he said, "If you remember anything,

0:44:310:44:32

"always remember to put your milk pipe across into the tank."

0:44:320:44:36

This is what basically carries the milk through

0:44:370:44:40

into here. If I didn't put this over, the milk

0:44:400:44:44

would just run out into the ground, and that would be it gone

0:44:440:44:47

and yeah, that would be disastrous.

0:44:470:44:50

Major, major...

0:44:500:44:52

What could he do, sack me?!

0:44:520:44:54

I might get a break if he did!

0:44:570:44:58

Get a wee holiday!

0:44:580:45:00

Right, let's rock and roll!

0:45:010:45:03

Everything is run on a vacuum.

0:45:110:45:12

It's like a Hoover. It needs suction.

0:45:120:45:15

So think like a breast pump, basically!

0:45:150:45:17

It takes on average three and a half hours to milk the entire herd

0:45:170:45:22

twice a day, every day.

0:45:220:45:24

Cows are just like us women, we're just kind of built the same.

0:45:240:45:27

We all come in different shapes and sizes and we produce milk.

0:45:270:45:30

Pedigree Holsteins can produce up to 8,500 litres of milk a year.

0:45:310:45:37

That's 41 pints a day per cow.

0:45:370:45:40

It's these girls that keep our bread and butter,

0:45:400:45:43

keep our roof over our heads, so, like, if we didn't have these girls,

0:45:430:45:47

we wouldn't have what we have.

0:45:470:45:49

Steven is checking the afternoon's takings.

0:45:540:45:56

Tonight, there was 2,165 kilos.

0:45:580:46:02

That was off of 167 cows.

0:46:040:46:07

So it's probably fairly average.

0:46:070:46:09

Once the cows are shut in during the day, they'll produce more milk.

0:46:090:46:13

It's intensive work,

0:46:150:46:17

especially when the most the family will make is 2p per litre.

0:46:170:46:21

Milk prices have hit farmers hard.

0:46:210:46:24

Half of British dairy farmers have gone out of business in the past

0:46:240:46:27

15 years.

0:46:270:46:29

The milk price is a huge thing for us.

0:46:290:46:31

It is a worry.

0:46:310:46:34

It does annoy me when you see the price of a two-litre jug and you think,

0:46:340:46:37

"That's just giving it away."

0:46:370:46:40

You need to be resilient to be a dairy farmer these days, and I suppose you

0:46:400:46:44

need to be, in a way, you need to be quite brave.

0:46:440:46:47

Going forward, I think, it's basically probably going to be boom or bust.

0:46:490:46:52

Are we ready to go?

0:47:030:47:05

-We are.

-Aye, the second pen first, if that's all right.

0:47:050:47:08

Further north, at Dalmally auction,

0:47:080:47:10

a decent profit is also on the minds of new farmers Janet and Alastair.

0:47:100:47:14

It's their only chance this year to bring in cash for their farm and

0:47:150:47:19

their sale lambs are next in the ring.

0:47:190:47:22

-Janet.

-Yes?

-Ticket.

-Thank you.

0:47:220:47:25

Trade is down today, so Alastair deploys a cunning strategy.

0:47:270:47:31

I've sent Janet into the ring, cos she's smaller,

0:47:310:47:33

so she makes the lambs look bigger.

0:47:330:47:36

-Thank you.

-That's OK.

0:47:360:47:38

To make any money today, they'll need an average of £35 per lamb.

0:47:390:47:44

Thank you.

0:47:440:47:46

It's one of the sad states of farming that, you know, one sale can

0:47:520:47:56

just make or break you with regards to making money for it.

0:47:560:47:59

We're just having to hope for the best.

0:48:030:48:05

Their first batch go for just £30 each.

0:48:130:48:17

It's not a good start.

0:48:170:48:19

The second batch manage £32 each, slightly better,

0:48:310:48:35

but everything now rests on their top-draw lambs.

0:48:350:48:38

41. At £41. At £41.

0:48:380:48:43

41, 41. 41. At 42.

0:48:430:48:47

At 43, at 44,

0:48:470:48:49

at 44. Six, seven, eight.

0:48:490:48:53

48. 50. It's 50. £48.50.

0:48:530:48:59

48.50...

0:49:020:49:05

They go for £48.50 each, a good price...

0:49:070:49:11

giving them a total profit of just under £2,000.

0:49:110:49:15

I'm quite a pessimist and I like to think if I average £35,

0:49:150:49:19

then I'm doing all right but our average there was 38,

0:49:190:49:23

so that's not too bad.

0:49:230:49:26

We're not going to go home and open the champagne, but...

0:49:260:49:29

We can definitely afford the new trailer.

0:49:290:49:32

-We can get the new trailer, yeah.

-The bale trailer. Some feeding.

0:49:320:49:35

-A bit of Tesco's shopping.

-Yeah, next one's to get some shopping.

0:49:350:49:38

What's important to us is having a good, happy life and not be rich.

0:49:430:49:48

In the far north,

0:50:040:50:06

Highland crofter Robin's also busy trying to boost his finances.

0:50:060:50:09

We did get dirty today.

0:50:120:50:14

To bring in extra money, they sell croft-reared meat and home-made pies.

0:50:140:50:19

Crofts, per se, were never, ever meant to be a living.

0:50:210:50:25

They were never meant to be a livelihood.

0:50:250:50:27

You go back into the history of crofting...

0:50:270:50:29

But everybody that has a croft has a different source of income one way

0:50:290:50:34

or another.

0:50:340:50:36

This is beautiful meat.

0:50:360:50:37

Like Janet and Alastair,

0:50:390:50:41

Robin used to sell lambs at auction but struggled to make a profit.

0:50:410:50:45

If we put it through the ring, as a live animal,

0:50:470:50:51

you're probably looking at

0:50:510:50:53

anywhere between £40 and £60 at today's prices,

0:50:530:50:56

depending on just how the markets are going.

0:50:560:50:59

Doing this is where we add a tremendous amount of value into them.

0:50:590:51:02

It's about added value. You know,

0:51:020:51:04

it's getting the maximum return out of the animals that we possibly can.

0:51:040:51:08

The croft makes approximately three times more per lamb by selling their

0:51:080:51:12

animals as butchered meat.

0:51:120:51:14

To do that, Robin built his own cutting room and taught himself butchery.

0:51:140:51:19

Doing what we're doing, producing completely birth-to-plate,

0:51:190:51:23

is very good for the produce.

0:51:230:51:26

But everything we produce on here has got two purposes.

0:51:280:51:31

It's either towards self-sufficiency -

0:51:310:51:33

and I hate that expression,

0:51:330:51:35

cos it really does scream sort of Good Life,

0:51:350:51:39

woolly-back stuff which we are absolutely not into.

0:51:390:51:41

There's too much work in here for that.

0:51:410:51:44

But we do really believe very,

0:51:440:51:47

very strongly in making the croft wash its face as far as it can.

0:51:470:51:52

We're making a living, we're paying the bills,

0:51:520:51:55

but we're never going to get rich from it, you know.

0:51:550:51:59

Right.

0:51:590:52:00

We need a smoke and we need a cup of tea, I think.

0:52:000:52:03

Yes?

0:52:030:52:05

While the butchery helps the croft pay for itself,

0:52:050:52:07

it also allows Penny to step back from farming duties.

0:52:070:52:11

You're being a sook. You're being an absolute sook, aren't you?

0:52:120:52:16

Go on, on your chair.

0:52:160:52:18

Is that a pot-full of coffee on there, Penny?

0:52:180:52:21

-No, but it could be.

-That sounds like a good idea to me, that.

0:52:210:52:24

Are you needing a snooze, or are you dithering?

0:52:240:52:27

I just did too much this morning.

0:52:270:52:29

OK. Have you taken your pills?

0:52:290:52:32

I will do in half an hour.

0:52:320:52:33

Have you tried taking about ten at once, to see what happens?

0:52:350:52:38

Well, the problem is,

0:52:380:52:40

your body gets used to them, and then they run out of their efficacy.

0:52:400:52:44

Yeah, but you could have a lot of fun on the way past, couldn't you?

0:52:440:52:47

LAUGHTER

0:52:470:52:48

I've never met a sort of hyperactive Parkinson patient, you know!

0:52:480:52:52

Here you are.

0:52:550:52:57

Taste.

0:52:570:52:58

Not much wrong with those at all.

0:53:000:53:02

Back down in the south-west,

0:53:130:53:15

the day's milking is finally over for the Roans, but work never stops

0:53:150:53:19

on a dairy farm.

0:53:190:53:21

Steven is in the barn, preparing for some new arrivals.

0:53:210:53:25

This is what we would call the calving pen or the

0:53:280:53:32

maternity ward, if you like.

0:53:320:53:34

Ideally, you like to just get a constant sort of stream of

0:53:360:53:41

pregnancies in your cows, so that you're getting cows calving all the time.

0:53:410:53:46

As cows don't produce milk until they calve,

0:53:480:53:51

the Roans depend on this constant cycle of pregnancies.

0:53:510:53:54

Little heifer calves, they're the sort of lifeblood of the farm.

0:53:560:54:01

They're the future, future generation.

0:54:010:54:03

They'll all be milking animals in two years' time.

0:54:030:54:06

You know they're healthy enough if you see them skipping about like that.

0:54:110:54:15

I just basically love working with cows.

0:54:190:54:23

It's my hobby as well as my job.

0:54:230:54:25

There's no clocking off in farming,

0:54:340:54:36

especially when it comes to pregnant cows.

0:54:360:54:39

It's almost nine in the evening

0:54:390:54:41

and Tracey's concerned about first-time mum Daisy.

0:54:410:54:45

COW BELLOWS

0:54:490:54:51

The feet are out, so, yeah, it's imminent.

0:54:510:54:54

She wasn't really progressing, but now, there's two feet there,

0:54:560:54:59

so I'm just going to check that the head's definitely there as well,

0:54:590:55:03

just to make sure it's been presented the correct way.

0:55:030:55:05

This is her first calf. It's just a heifer.

0:55:140:55:16

So there's never as much room when they're just a first-time.

0:55:170:55:22

The head's there OK.

0:55:230:55:25

Heifers are young cows that haven't had their first calf.

0:55:260:55:29

They're much more likely to suffer complications than mature cows.

0:55:290:55:33

The skill is to know when to help.

0:55:330:55:36

Intervene too soon and it could harm the cow's ability to calve in the

0:55:360:55:40

-future.

-I would rather just leave her half an hour,

0:55:400:55:43

just... There's a fair chance, if we leave her in peace,

0:55:430:55:46

she might just calve herself.

0:55:460:55:49

Steven goes to check on the other cows while Tracey stays behind to

0:55:500:55:54

keep an eye on the labour.

0:55:540:55:55

Oh, she's laid down, look.

0:55:580:55:59

There, you can see, like, she's like laid down and she's like pressing,

0:56:010:56:06

so I think, as we have contractions, so she's starting to get there.

0:56:060:56:10

She'll just be a bit unsure, because it is her first.

0:56:100:56:14

She doesn't really know what's happening.

0:56:140:56:16

There's no antenatal classes!

0:56:160:56:17

LAUGHTER

0:56:170:56:19

No gas and air or anything.

0:56:190:56:20

COW BELLOWS

0:56:200:56:22

That's a good sign.

0:56:240:56:26

Sounds worse than it is.

0:56:320:56:33

Oh, I think that'll be the head.

0:56:360:56:39

SHE BELLOWS

0:56:400:56:42

Come on.

0:56:470:56:49

It's a red and white.

0:56:500:56:51

Come on.

0:56:530:56:55

That's a girl, oh...

0:56:550:56:58

There we go.

0:56:580:57:00

Come on.

0:57:000:57:02

Every farmer wants a healthy calf, but for dairy farmers,

0:57:060:57:10

the added hope is it's a girl that will go on to join the milking herd.

0:57:100:57:15

It's a heifer! Yes!

0:57:150:57:17

Ideal. Welcome to the world, eh!

0:57:170:57:20

Good girl.

0:57:200:57:23

Well done, lass.

0:57:230:57:25

There you go, there's your baby.

0:57:250:57:26

Phew, that was a success.

0:57:310:57:34

You just needed a wee hand, didn't you?

0:57:350:57:38

That's good.

0:57:390:57:41

Oh, it is quite a good end to a long day.

0:57:420:57:46

It's a really good end.

0:57:460:57:47

Next time...

0:58:020:58:04

GUNSHOT

0:58:040:58:05

Alastair has set his sights on honing new skills for the farm.

0:58:050:58:08

Then you can see deer in everything.

0:58:100:58:12

It's man versus very stubborn beast for buffalo farmer Stevie.

0:58:140:58:18

The more you fight them, the more they go against you.

0:58:180:58:22

And our old friends Mel and Martin introduce their new addition.

0:58:220:58:26

Oh, she'll definitely be a sheep girl!

0:58:260:58:28

Definitely.

0:58:280:58:30

BABY CRIES OUT

0:58:300:58:31

See?!

0:58:310:58:32

The hit farming documentary series returns and in this first episode of the second series, four new families are introduced .

On Mull, new entrant farmers Janet and Alastair take their lambs to auction, in Dumfries and Galloway, three generations of the Roan dairy-farming family enter a cow and a young heifer into competition at the South West Scotland Dairy Show, and in Argyll, hill farmers David and Sandra prepare for autumn by gathering in their sheep for a mineral dose and spreading slurry, while in the far north in the Highlands, crofters Robin and Penny's cattle are tested for bovine TB.