The 10th Anniversary It's My Shout: Short Films from Wales


The 10th Anniversary

To celebrate the tenth anniversary of It's My Shout, we look back see how it developed from a one-off community project to an award-winning film and television training scheme.


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Transcript


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It's My Shout is a unique film training scheme in Wales.

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It supports upcoming actors, writers, directors and crew

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in the production of short films for television.

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The scheme has been running for ten years, and more than 9,000 trainees

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have now taken part in the production of over 60 short films.

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Today, hundreds of former trainees are working in the industry,

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both in front of and behind the camera.

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This is the story of It's My Shout.

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In 2003, Roger Burnell was Director of Theatre for Bridgend Council.

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He launched a project for local young people to express themselves

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through making a short film.

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I'm going down Black Stream.

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Anyone want to come with me?

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I did feel that film might be a way to engage with these young people.

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The people who were working with me at that time felt that they'd

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probably want to deal with issues.

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It could be, it was,

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um, loneliness or drugs,

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but they wanted to tell a story

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and they wanted to create a story they wanted to create characters.

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They wanted to create a sense of excitement and drama.

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The result was a film called Down about a boy's quest

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to solve the mystery behind his friend's disappearance.

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Emma Housley was one of Down's leading cast members.

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It's been nearly two weeks.

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She's now performing on London's West End.

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I played the part of Sian who was a friend of the two people,

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the girl that was murdered

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and the young boy that was trying to find out what happened.

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But there was one line that continues to stick with me.

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It's basically I'm walking with the lead character, the young boy,

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and the line is, "It's just not right, is it?"

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But back then, with my accent being a lot stronger, it came out...

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STRONG WELSH ACCENT: "It's just not right, is it?"

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So, will you come with me, then?

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No way, sorry, Alex.

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It's just not right, is it?

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The general feel of the whole project,

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I just remember it being really exciting and really fun,

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and everyone couldn't wait to do it

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and couldn't wait to get to the next stage of the project.

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Since Down, I obviously carried on at school to my A Levels,

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but then after that, I studied at the Arts Educational School in London

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and then got into the Wizard Of Oz which is the job I'm doing now

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and I'm first cover Dorothy, but when I'm not playing Dorothy,

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I'm a Munchkin and I'm in Emerald City and, you know, doing everything,

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back stage singing and everything like that. It's really great!

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Liam Riddick also took part in Down.

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He's currently rehearsing for a national tour with

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the Richard Alston Dance Company.

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I'd never been on a film set, on that kind of environment before,

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and even though I remember it being quite, not low key, but quite small,

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but I was fascinated to see all the cameras and the locations

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and everything taken from the piece of paper and put into real life.

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That's the best memory I think I take away.

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Like, forget the film and everything, to be a part of the making of it

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and the creation was the best bit for me.

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Yeah, I think that's probably why it worked.

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They wanted to just tell their story as a story.

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You shouldn't go to new talent and young talent and tell them

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how to do something.

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That should come from them.

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The following year, the project grew to make three more short films

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with young people throughout Bridgend.

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It's midnight, the witching hour.

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They've drunk their love potions,

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and now it's time to cast their spells on their victims.

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Amy Morgan first became involved in 2004

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and is now working on London's West End.

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Let me get this right, you're looking for a husband?

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Yes, that's correct.

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So why have you come here?

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I was never one of those people that said,

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"Ooh, I've always wanted to be an actress."

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I actually wanted to be an air hostess and then I found out that

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I was too short to ever be an air hostess and so gave up on that one.

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I remember Roger Burnell who runs the Bridgend Youth Theatre as well

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asking a couple of us if we wanted to audition for these short films?

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"Yeah, OK, fine, great, sounds brilliant."

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I remember that first one that I did was Bettws Pastie,

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which was very interesting, and it was like a teenage party

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and I remember it was the first set that I'd ever been on,

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and it was incredible.

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You just didn't want to touch anything,

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but everything was disgusting, cos it was a party.

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The props lady had done cigarettes stubbed out in beer cans,

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and you were like, "Oh, God, this is brilliant but disgusting."

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And, yeah, I remember being given one line.

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That was a lot of pressure at the time. Didn't want to get it wrong.

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Probably did get it wrong a couple of times.

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-Is it true what Lindsay said?

-What true?

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About you and that maths teacher. Slag!

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I think I did three films with It's My Shout.

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Maybe one or two more,

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because I always had little bits here and there,

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or Roger would call up and say,

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"Can you do this cos someone can't do it?" or whatever,

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so I think it was three.

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And one of those I did

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when I was still training at the Royal Welsh College in Cardiff.

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Since leaving drama school I've done some BBC Wales productions.

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I did a thing called Baker Boys, that was on. I did two series of that.

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Rob, you're alive.

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Was the last time I looked, yeah.

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We've all been so worried, about Valley Bara and you obviously.

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-Obviously. Is he in?

-Er, not yet.

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There were 419 calls while you were away.

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I took messages.

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Coffee?

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And I've done a lot of theatre actually.

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The last couple of plays I've done has been in London which is nice.

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It's My Shout was absolutely invaluable to me in terms of

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the discipline on set and etiquette on set and things like that.

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I seemed to have much more of a head start.

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Me and the couple of people in my year group at Welsh College,

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when we were doing our TV project, we knew so much more

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than we thought we knew, and that people were telling us things

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that we already knew and we didn't even realise we had that knowledge.

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It was already in us from what we'd done with It's My Shout.

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You know, we all had big ambitions for the film scheme.

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I know Rog always had big ambitions for it.

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He really saw it going as far as it possibly could which was brilliant.

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The scheme became known as It's My Shout

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giving a voice and opportunity for young people to develop talents,

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whether in front of or behind the camera.

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Griff Rowland directed

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It's My Shout's first Welsh language film in 2004.

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Today he's a director on Coronation Street.

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Well I'd been doing a lot of documentary work at BBC Wales

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for a good few years.

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I had trained in drama in theory and practice

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at Central School of Speech and Drama

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and, to be honest, I wanted to go back to direct drama for television.

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And so it was quite a bit of a jump,

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because people like to just pigeonhole you as just one thing.

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A documentary maker or a drama director or comedy,

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and I just had to make that jump.

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My short film that I'd done for Roger, and It's My Shout

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led me to my first professional gig, if you like, as a drama director

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working on Cowbois ac Injans for S4C.

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At the moment, I'm now directing Coronation Street.

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This is my 51st episode and then once I've finished this block,

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I'm going to do the Christmas Day episode, so I'm thrilled.

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I wouldn't be doing what I'm doing now if it wasn't for having done

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that short film, so I know it's absolutely instrumental in that

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jump I wanted in my career and the change of direction.

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Year on year, the scheme expanded into more communities

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across South and West Wales.

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Sony has been It's My Shout's biggest supporter throughout.

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The growth of It's My Shout is very impressive growth,

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starting from something that was a local theme with local people,

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and now we're starting to put people on a much wider scale,

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growing it to the size of covering all of Wales reaching out to far more

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communities than just Bridgend, so it's an absolutely tremendous scheme

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that's grown probably much more than I envisaged from the very beginning.

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It's My Shout's main broadcast sponsor is now BBC Wales who offer

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industry guidance and a broadcast platform for all the films.

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For many people, television production, filmmaking can feel

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outside, beyond their grasp,

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and I think It's My Shout gives people the confidence to make

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the connections to stand that little bit taller in those conversations

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and with a conviction that they have something valuable to say or do.

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It's really important in television that the range of perspectives,

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the range of voices,

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that take part in production come from the widest possible field.

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You know, the BBC is owned by the licence fee payer.

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It's owned by every community across Wales, and it's important that

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every community across Wales believes it has the right to be able

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to think about participating in television production

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and know those avenues are open to everybody and not just the few.

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Since 2006, the scheme has produced six films each summer

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in partnership with schools, colleges

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and local authorities across Wales.

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In 2011, it reached Bangor, in North Wales, where it filmed ABC Dad.

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I could help you learn if you want.

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At the time it was something that was more to do with down in Bridgend,

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and I was lucky enough to be living locally.

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I live in Cardiff, but I come from Bangor,

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and now that It's My Shout has gone to North Wales, I'm so pleased

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to see North Wales films,

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because, you know, it's part of Wales, you know.

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I think last year's...so nice to see one location was the corner shop

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next to my school that I went to, and it's great, because actually

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the opportunity it gives people from all over Wales is really important,

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because the voices of Wales come from each corner.

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I think it's vital that we continue to look for the talent

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and continue to develop the talent

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that might otherwise be lying dormant.

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He thought I should be tough.

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Fight!

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Justin Davies had never acted before playing the lead role

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in the 2010 film, Be A Man.

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Well, the first time I heard about It's My Shout

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is when they came to my school about two years ago now.

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My drama teacher picked people who were doing well or OK in the subject

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to go to a talk with Roger, and he told us all about It's My Shout,

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and then Roger was doing like a workshop with us then.

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He was giving us scenarios.

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I think it was the synopsis to one of the short films,

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and we had to act it out how we would.

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-The bus is well late.

-It always is. Is she looking?

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We got asked to then go to an audition down in Bridgend,

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and this was like, this was me and my mam's version of like,

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"Oh, we're going to Hollywood!"

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But really it was only like 40 miles down the M4,

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but I can remember telling my friends that I went for an audition

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down Bridgend for a short film on BBC Wales

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and I was waiting for the call for quite some time.

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Then I didn't hear nothing for quite a while, but funnily enough,

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when I was out with my friends one day, I got a call off my mam,

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who found out off Roger that I'd got one of the leading parts.

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Go on, then! Stop him, then! Go on, get into him!

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-Kick him.

-Aye, break his legs!

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Smash him.

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That's it, yes, go on!

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Yes! Yes!

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GOAL!

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CHAMPIONS!

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It was the first time we'd ever been on a television set

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and it felt really weird,

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cos it was in surroundings that we'd never been in before,

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never seen the people before.

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It was just quite a weird experience, because...

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There was probably about 30 people crammed into a two-bedroom house

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in the middle of Ebbw Vale, and you're thinking,

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"Gosh, what are all these people here for?"

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Everybody had a role to play,

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whether it was in front of the camera or behind the camera.

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It was really intense and amazing.

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A couple of weeks after Be A Man came out, it was just nothing.

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It was just like, "Oh, I've done that now, let's get on with life."

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But then, I went into school one day and I got told

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to go and see my drama teacher, and she said she had a phone call that

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I've got an audition for Ruth Jones Sky One new programme, Stella.

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Ben, I have made you, like a...

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Yeah, go on.

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I have made you a wheat...

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..type of thing.

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-She haven't done it.

-A wheat sheaf?

-Yes.

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-The dress rehearsal's at four.

-I know. I'll bring it up the school.

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-When?

-This afternoon.

-When?

-At three o'clock.

-When?

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Even though two years does sound like a long time,

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so much has happened it just feels like yesterday it all started.

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And now we're currently in the middle of filming series two.

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It's just mad how my life changed in such a short period of time.

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The It's My Shout project gave him the opportunity to develop

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and perhaps identify a career path

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that he wouldn't have thought of before.

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I think the whole thing about the It's My Shout project is

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it has created opportunities for young people across the board.

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We're sat here, in the middle of Six Bells in Blaenau Gwent,

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and Blaenau Gwent has been continuously slated in the press

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for being a deprived, depressed, run-down area.

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But as you can see, it's not deprived,

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it's not depressed, it's not run-down.

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And the fact that It's My Shout has provided opportunities

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for the young people of the area

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to take part and to identify what their goals and dreams are

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and, ultimately, to succeed,

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I think is a testament to the project and what it's all about.

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King Danny needed to rescue the old king from his dungeon.

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The beast!

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Thomas Herbert got his first lead role in King Of The Castle in 2011.

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Before doing It's My Shout,

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I thought it was just people living out their lives,

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and they just happened to be on a TV screen.

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But then when I did It's My Shout, I was thinking,

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you don't just live out your life.

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There's a script and stuff, and you have to learn it.

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Why aren't you eating any?

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I'm just not hungry.

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I'll save some chips, just in case you want them later.

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Since It's My Shout, I got a part in a short film,

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and I've done an advert,

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which I had to have fake teeth for.

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And then I did a Pets At Home advert.

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Then I did Casualty.

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Hey, Thomas! How you doing?

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It was really fun working down in the BBC studio,

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because I had my own dressing room,

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and it was really cool.

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Because there was a green room,

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and you got to watch TV there whenever you liked.

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Ryan Andrews and Keri Collins were trainee directors

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and have recently finished work on their debut feature films.

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When I directed Be A Man for It's My Shout,

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that was the first time I'd worked under a BBC exec producer, directly,

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and the first time I'd had to fit in

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with the editorial guidelines of the BBC.

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The process is different to making independent film.

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That was the first time

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I'd ever had to do that, which was an invaluable experience.

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Before I'd worked on It's My Shout,

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the products I'd been working on were music videos

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or adverts or promotional work

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or shorts I'd put together myself and worked with my own crew.

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So it was great to go into more of a professional environment

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where you're given a script to direct which isn't yours

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and you know nothing about,

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but you're chosen because of your directing style.

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I was given a short called Family Picnic,

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which was a really sweet short

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about two kids that didn't have very loving parents.

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And it was set pretty much in reality.

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A normal kind of realist environment.

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And what I thought I could give to that script

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was set it in a different world.

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So I set it in a steampunk world.

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It's OK. I got it.

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SHE CHUCKLES

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The short-film format is really, really tough.

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It's a hard thing to do. It's an art in itself.

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It's completely different from making feature films.

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You have so much less time.

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Generally, you have less money.

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It's a really tough thing to do.

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But short films offer such an important part

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of any filmmaker's career,

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because it's the only thing you can do to move on to feature films.

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Because no-one will give you a six-figure sum to make a feature film

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if you've never directed anything.

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So as a first step for a director, it's brilliant,

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because you're not only being supported,

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but you get an end product that is a certain level, which everyone needs.

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You have to start building your portfolio of projects

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that exist within a reality of the industry.

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And I think It's My Shout is a great one to do that.

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And you work with the BBC, which is a really high level.

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So on your CV, to have something that's been on the BBC

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for your first port of call, is amazing.

0:19:080:19:12

Most of my peers have also applied for It's My Shout

0:19:120:19:15

or been through It's My Shout,

0:19:150:19:17

so it's kind of a rite of passage for a lot Welsh filmmakers.

0:19:170:19:22

I directed another short film called Fun Day,

0:19:220:19:24

which was selected for Raindance Film Festival.

0:19:240:19:29

And I'm now on the set of my first feature film, Convenience.

0:19:290:19:32

So, yeah, it's just taking further steps forward, really.

0:19:320:19:37

After I left the It's My Shout scheme

0:19:370:19:40

and I was lucky enough to win best director, it was really helpful,

0:19:400:19:43

because it all of a sudden put me in front of the Film Agency.

0:19:430:19:46

When the Film Agency had another scheme,

0:19:460:19:48

they asked me if I would like to put in a pitch.

0:19:480:19:51

And that led on to me doing another short,

0:19:510:19:54

and that short went down quite well.

0:19:540:19:56

What are you doing? What's happened?

0:19:570:20:00

That started building me a portfolio to show investors for my feature.

0:20:020:20:05

-Let me go.

-No!

0:20:050:20:09

Elfie Hopkins, my latest feature,

0:20:090:20:11

is going to cinemas next week, which is great.

0:20:110:20:14

And that's really my first, like, it's my first foot in the door.

0:20:140:20:19

Like It's My Shout was my first foot in the door to short films,

0:20:190:20:22

Elfie's my first foot in the door to features.

0:20:220:20:24

But every director needs a strong crew of talented people

0:20:240:20:28

in every department.

0:20:280:20:29

From camera and sound to makeup, costume and set design.

0:20:290:20:32

Helen O'Leary was a trainee

0:20:320:20:34

in the set design and props department back in 2008.

0:20:340:20:38

I hadn't considered TV or film before.

0:20:380:20:40

I'd set my sights on doing stuff in theatre.

0:20:400:20:43

So it was quite a good experience for me

0:20:430:20:46

and an eye-opener, really, doing It's My Shout.

0:20:460:20:48

The production designer, who was our mentor for the art department,

0:20:480:20:52

gave us one script as a little project each to be in charge of.

0:20:520:20:57

So you'd have to do the breakdown for that script,

0:20:570:21:00

then do the prop sourcing and then, on the day,

0:21:000:21:03

be in charge as our, you know, standby art director.

0:21:030:21:06

The Bulb, or Egin, which was my little baby,

0:21:060:21:10

it was about a boy in school who was getting bullied,

0:21:100:21:13

but as part of a science project,

0:21:130:21:15

they were each given a plant to look after.

0:21:150:21:17

The plant was like the hero prop in this,

0:21:230:21:26

so we had loads of these,

0:21:260:21:28

we bought loads and loads of repeats,

0:21:280:21:30

piled them up in the van, got them down there,

0:21:300:21:32

opened the van door, and they were like...

0:21:320:21:35

So someone's board had landed on top of these plants and flattened them.

0:21:350:21:39

So we had to do some quick repair jobs on them

0:21:390:21:41

and we brought them back to life.

0:21:410:21:43

Not magically but with a little bit of wire.

0:21:430:21:45

It was quite hairy for me, that experience,

0:21:450:21:48

because a few things did go wrong but...got it sorted.

0:21:480:21:51

And, yeah, I think that particular shoot

0:21:510:21:54

was the one where I thought,

0:21:540:21:57

"Yeah, I really want to do this. I like this, it's a good feeling."

0:21:570:22:00

So since It's My Shout, I've worked on Upstairs Downstairs

0:22:000:22:04

and Doctor Who in trainee capacity,

0:22:040:22:07

but since then, did standby props on Pobol last summer,

0:22:070:22:11

and now they've asked me back this time around to be art director,

0:22:110:22:15

which is what I'm doing now.

0:22:150:22:16

There might be cables down there,

0:22:160:22:18

so we'll have to be sure we can't see anything down there.

0:22:180:22:21

Specifically for me, It's My Shout

0:22:210:22:23

just gave me a little bit of insight into the industry

0:22:230:22:26

and put me in a position where I could meet other people

0:22:260:22:29

who were already doing it.

0:22:290:22:31

And then, subsequently, for me,

0:22:310:22:33

it did open up more opportunities further down the line.

0:22:330:22:37

Chris Jacobi was a camera trainee in 2011.

0:22:370:22:41

I'm a bit worried about the reflection because I can't see.

0:22:410:22:44

Um...well, I was at uni doing film production,

0:22:440:22:47

so I'd concentrated on cinematography throughout the three years,

0:22:470:22:50

so I knew that's what I wanted to go into.

0:22:500:22:52

Uni doesn't prepare you for what you need to learn when you're on set,

0:22:520:22:55

so all of that comes from experiences in the professional world.

0:22:550:23:00

I think, last year, the opening of Sweet Sixteen,

0:23:000:23:02

there was a very complicated shot,

0:23:020:23:04

where the main character is writing what she wants for her 16th birthday.

0:23:040:23:08

And we were on top of a roof, like, it was dark,

0:23:080:23:10

we had it lit, we had this really complicated shot

0:23:100:23:12

that started over her shoulder onto her hand, pull up, pull away.

0:23:120:23:16

And I was the one that had to do that shot.

0:23:160:23:19

And, I mean, it took about three takes to get it right,

0:23:190:23:22

and I think we got it. And that was a really good experience,

0:23:220:23:25

cos that was the first film we did,

0:23:250:23:28

and it was kind of like me controlling the shot

0:23:280:23:30

and getting it right,

0:23:300:23:31

and the satisfaction of a very complicated shot that paid off,

0:23:310:23:34

and it was used in the film.

0:23:340:23:36

From the outset, I've firmly been of the opinion

0:23:360:23:41

that the product needs to be as good as you can possibly make it.

0:23:410:23:46

Um...it's not enough just to give people an experience.

0:23:460:23:52

They need to have an experience that results in something

0:23:520:23:55

that they can take pride in.

0:23:550:23:58

And we can all take huge pride in what we've delivered over the years.

0:23:580:24:03

This year, It's My Shout won its third BAFTA Cymru award.

0:24:030:24:08

So, what's the birthday girl want to do today, then?

0:24:080:24:10

And the winner is...Sweet Sixteen!

0:24:100:24:14

APPLAUSE

0:24:140:24:15

I'd like to thank Roger and Kylie from It's My Shout Productions.

0:24:180:24:22

CHEERING

0:24:220:24:23

That's the short scheme that made all this possible.

0:24:230:24:26

And this summer, another six short films have been made.

0:24:260:24:30

Chris Jacobi has returned as cinematographer for three of them.

0:24:300:24:34

My role this year is director of photography,

0:24:340:24:37

so I'm in charge of, um...lighting,

0:24:370:24:40

camera angles, camera work

0:24:400:24:42

and obviously training or aiding the trainees I have on each shoot.

0:24:420:24:48

It's my first proper job as a DOP and it's getting broadcast national,

0:24:480:24:52

so it's nice to have that pressure to know you've got to up your game.

0:24:520:24:56

And all of this year's films were premiered at a special event.

0:24:560:25:00

Each year since the scheme began, a premiere and awards ceremony

0:25:040:25:08

has recognised the trainees' hard work and talent.

0:25:080:25:11

But never before has it been held in the iconic setting

0:25:160:25:19

of Cardiff Bay's Wales Millennium Centre

0:25:190:25:21

to an audience of 1,500 trainees and supporters.

0:25:210:25:25

Ten years ago, I remember the first awards event.

0:25:270:25:30

It was in a day, actually, in the Odeon cinema in Bridgend.

0:25:300:25:33

It went through the Grand Pavilion in Porthcawl,

0:25:330:25:36

and tonight, here in the Wales Millennium Centre.

0:25:360:25:39

And it's great to see so many young people from around Wales taking part.

0:25:390:25:42

To be in the Millennium Centre, such...

0:25:420:25:45

well, an iconic building,

0:25:450:25:47

where so many amazing artists have performed,

0:25:470:25:51

says that...well, not only has it got an amazing presence,

0:25:510:25:56

but it also has a great potential for the future.

0:25:560:26:00

For me, it was a rollercoaster of emotion.

0:26:000:26:02

There was humour, there was such talent

0:26:020:26:05

in every bit of the production.

0:26:050:26:07

It was great that I was awarding sound engineer.

0:26:070:26:11

And the winner is...Joseph Barker.

0:26:110:26:14

APPLAUSE

0:26:140:26:16

All the best. I don't know what to say. I'm speechless.

0:26:160:26:19

-Thanks very much.

-APPLAUSE

0:26:190:26:21

For me, these young people, every part of the team,

0:26:210:26:25

has got to be recognised.

0:26:250:26:27

I also, as a minister, feel that this is a really important scheme

0:26:270:26:31

and development I want to support.

0:26:310:26:34

It's brilliant. Two years ago, this is what got me into Stella.

0:26:340:26:38

It gave me the best opportunity in life.

0:26:380:26:40

Fantastic. Yeah. It's great.

0:26:400:26:43

There's verification that it's a scheme

0:26:430:26:45

that finds and nurtures new talent.

0:26:450:26:50

I wish it was going when I was started out.

0:26:500:26:54

The future is bright, but I promise you, the future is yours.

0:26:540:26:58

So be strong and go and chase it and well done, everybody, tonight.

0:26:580:27:01

I'm presenting Best Supporting Actor. What are you presenting?

0:27:010:27:05

-Best Actor.

-Well, that tells you something doesn't it, eh?

0:27:050:27:08

That tells you something.

0:27:080:27:09

I think the talent's always been there,

0:27:090:27:11

but it's the opportunity for the talent to show itself.

0:27:110:27:14

It's all very well having talented people,

0:27:140:27:16

but if they never have the chance to actually show how talented they are,

0:27:160:27:19

then, of course, they're lost.

0:27:190:27:22

But it's because of It's My Shout

0:27:220:27:24

that that talent has the chance to flourish.

0:27:240:27:27

Tonight, a special achievement award

0:27:270:27:29

recognises that talent in Aneurin Barnard.

0:27:290:27:32

Since leaving It's My Shout, he has won a Laurence Olivier Award

0:27:320:27:35

for his role in the West End production of Spring Awakening

0:27:350:27:38

and has starred in Hollywood films,

0:27:380:27:40

including Mariah Mundi And The Midas Box.

0:27:400:27:42

For BBC Four, he played photographer David Bailey

0:27:420:27:45

-in We'll Take Manhattan.

-That's it!

0:27:450:27:48

Done.

0:27:520:27:53

This is a bit mental.

0:27:530:27:55

I feel a bit young to be taking one of these awards.

0:27:550:27:58

I feel like I need another 50 years

0:27:580:28:01

before I can stand here and hold it, but I will treasure it.

0:28:010:28:04

It's, um...it's overwhelming.

0:28:040:28:08

Knowing where this come from, from Roger.

0:28:080:28:11

Mr B, as the pupils know him.

0:28:110:28:14

Without him, I wouldn't be doing what I'm doing,

0:28:140:28:17

and a lot of other people wouldn't be doing it either.

0:28:170:28:21

And this night here, wouldn't be here for definite.

0:28:210:28:24

So a personal thank you, Roger.

0:28:240:28:26

APPLAUSE

0:28:260:28:29

And a special award for Roger

0:28:290:28:31

recognises how much he has done to develop a scheme

0:28:310:28:34

that continues to enrich the lives and careers

0:28:340:28:37

of young people across Wales.

0:28:370:28:39

APPLAUSE

0:28:390:28:41

I hope that everybody here joins with me

0:28:440:28:47

in celebrating what all these people have done.

0:28:470:28:50

Thanks to everybody who's come.

0:28:500:28:52

This is obviously one of the nights of my life,

0:28:520:28:55

and I hope that you've shared in something

0:28:550:28:58

which is hopefully going to be important to all these young people.

0:28:580:29:03

I think, you know, and hope, I think it will grow,

0:29:220:29:25

but I hope that it will just devour the UK.

0:29:250:29:29

Let's get everyone involved.

0:29:290:29:31

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:29:470:29:50

To celebrate the tenth anniversary of It's My Shout, we look back over the years to see how it has developed from a one-off community project in 2003 to becoming an award-winning film and television training scheme, that now works with communities right across Wales.

We catch up with trainees who have taken part across the years - from some of the very first young actors who are now starring in Hollywood and the West End, to the directors who have just launched their first feature films - and hear about their experiences of taking part in the scheme and how it has helped them to develop successful careers within the creative industries.


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