Iolo, y Condor a'r Puma


Iolo, y Condor a'r Puma

Y berthynas glos rhwng y condor, y guanaco a'r puma ym Mharc Cenedlaethol y Torres del Paine yn ne Chile. The triangle of dependency between the puma, the guanaco and the condor.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Iolo, y Condor a'r Puma. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

-888

0:00:000:00:00

-888

-

-888

0:00:000:00:02

-888

0:00:070:00:10

-I've come to the Andes

-in Central Chile.

0:00:130:00:17

-The capital Santiago

-is a few miles behind me.

0:00:180:00:21

-I'm looking for a unique bird.

0:00:220:00:24

-The Andes Condor is

-the world's largest bird of prey.

0:00:250:00:29

-The condor is the national symbol

-of four South American countries...

0:00:430:00:47

-..including Chile.

0:00:470:00:49

-Today, the condor is rare everywhere

-except in Chile and Argentina.

0:00:490:00:54

-There are no condors in Venezuela.

0:00:570:00:59

-There are only about 100 left

-in Colombia and in Ecuador.

0:01:000:01:04

-There are no figures available

-for Peru and Bolivia.

0:01:070:01:11

-In Chile, not far from Santiago...

0:01:110:01:14

-..there's a project to nurture

-and set the birds free in the wild.

0:01:140:01:18

-This will ensure

-the future of this superb bird.

0:01:180:01:21

-The project also aims to release

-other predators to the wild.

0:01:220:01:27

-This unique project

-is led by Eduardo Pavez.

0:01:280:01:32

-Yes, it's a Chilean eagle.

0:01:350:01:37

-This is a male eagle,

-which is smaller than the female.

0:01:390:01:44

-How many are here?

0:01:450:01:47

-How many are here?

-

-There are 50 in this centre.

0:01:470:01:47

-There are 50 in this centre.

0:01:470:01:49

-Can we go in?

0:01:510:01:53

-Can we go in?

-

-Follow me.

0:01:530:01:53

-Follow me.

0:01:530:01:54

-In most countries,

-the eagle is the biggest bird.

0:02:070:02:11

-But that's not the case in Chile.

0:02:120:02:14

-I'd like you to see the biggest

-bird of prey in the world...

0:02:140:02:19

-..The Andes Condor.

0:02:200:02:22

-We're going to see the condors now!

0:02:230:02:25

-Good grief!

0:02:290:02:31

-How much does it weigh?

0:02:370:02:39

-How much does it weigh?

-

-Twelve kilos.

0:02:390:02:39

-Twelve kilos.

0:02:390:02:41

-It weighs an incredible 12 kilos.

0:02:420:02:44

-This male was a tourist attraction

-outside a Santiago restaurant...

0:02:450:02:50

-..until Eduardo provided

-a sanctuary for it.

0:02:510:02:54

-He wants to play,

-but he's too dangerous for that!

0:02:550:02:59

-He's exceptionally strong.

0:03:000:03:03

-I admire the fact Eduardo

-started from scratch.

0:03:070:03:10

-As a young lad,

-he looked after injured predators.

0:03:110:03:14

-There wasn't enough room

-in his house.

0:03:150:03:18

-The sole aim of this centre

-is to care for these birds.

0:03:190:03:23

-Today, he's the world's

-leading authority on condors.

0:03:230:03:29

-People phone from all over

-the world to ask his advice.

0:03:300:03:35

-He's doing fantastic work here.

0:03:360:03:39

-Condors are the main reason

-for the centre's existence.

0:03:400:03:45

-People donate money

-for research into the condor.

0:03:450:03:51

-His first love

-is returning birds to the wild.

0:03:510:03:57

-This one will never go back.

0:03:580:04:00

-That's terribly sad.

0:04:010:04:03

-Why the black covers?

0:04:050:04:07

-There is a breeding pair inside.

0:04:090:04:13

-They want to be left in peace...

0:04:130:04:16

-..to give the egg

-an opportunity to hatch.

0:04:170:04:23

-Is this a condor egg?

0:04:240:04:26

-It was recently laid here.

0:04:270:04:30

-A week ago, we realised

-the chick had died after 50 days.

0:04:300:04:38

-It's enormous.

0:04:470:04:49

-A condor egg.

0:04:520:04:53

-Can we go inside?

0:04:560:04:57

-Can we go inside?

-

-Yes.

0:04:570:04:58

-Yes.

0:04:580:04:58

-It was impossible a week ago because

-the hatching period hadn't ended.

0:04:590:05:06

-The male condor on the right

-is bigger than the female.

0:05:110:05:15

-It has a comb, throat

-and different coloured eyes.

0:05:160:05:19

-The female has red eyes,

-and is slightly smaller.

0:05:290:05:33

-They can't release these birds

-because they're kept for breeding.

0:05:470:05:51

-If they're successful,

-the chicks will be released.

0:05:510:05:55

-The daring and ambitious process

-will take a couple of years.

0:05:570:06:01

-To Eduardo, the most important

-aspect of the process...

0:06:010:06:05

-..is studying the condors

-in the wild as often as possible...

0:06:050:06:09

-..especially close

-to their elusive nests.

0:06:090:06:14

-This is where the soon-to-be

-released birds are kept.

0:06:160:06:20

-Of the five, one is an adult female,

-and there are four chicks.

0:06:210:06:25

-They'll be released back to the wild

-not far from Santiago.

0:06:260:06:30

-They never go inside except

-to chase after the birds.

0:06:310:06:35

-They frighten the birds

-to make them scared of humans.

0:06:360:06:41

-In the wild,

-man shoots condors.

0:06:410:06:44

-That's the only time

-their keepers go inside.

0:06:450:06:50

-That's why a black blanket

-covers the side.

0:06:500:06:54

-To date, Eduardo's centre

-has been remarkably successful.

0:06:590:07:03

-Two years ago, they released birds

-that were bred in captivity...

0:07:030:07:07

-..for the first time.

0:07:080:07:09

-The eight birds

-were fitted with a satellite tag...

0:07:100:07:14

-..so they could be traced.

0:07:140:07:16

-The satellite sent a signal back

-to a central computer.

0:07:170:07:22

-They've discovered

-that six are still alive.

0:07:230:07:26

-That's a success story.

0:07:270:07:29

-One was shot, another was poisoned.

0:07:300:07:34

-This is where the journey begins.

0:07:340:07:38

-An injured bird will be

-brought to the hospital.

0:07:390:07:44

-We're on our way to meet specialist

-doctors who first treat them.

0:07:460:07:52

-This veterinary surgery is part

-of Chile National Zoo in Santiago.

0:07:540:07:58

-This young bird

-came here a week ago.

0:08:110:08:14

-They feared

-he'd lose his swollen eye.

0:08:150:08:20

-The bird has received

-a daily treatment of ointment.

0:08:210:08:26

-He's recovered very quickly.

0:08:270:08:29

-They think he can return

-to the wild in a month.

0:08:290:08:33

-The bird has come all the way

-from South Chile.

0:08:340:08:38

-The Zoo hospital and the centre's

-reputation...

0:08:380:08:42

-..have spread throughout

-the country.

0:08:430:08:47

-People bring

-the birds all the way here.

0:08:470:08:51

-When he's recovered,

-he'll go back to where he was found.

0:08:510:08:55

-That's the area he knows best.

0:08:560:08:58

-His brownish colour

-proves he's young.

0:09:000:09:04

-When he's about 7-8,

-he'll be black and white.

0:09:040:09:07

-They're placing

-a special chip inside his throat.

0:09:160:09:20

-It's only tiny - like this one.

0:09:210:09:23

-It's like a chip

-you'd put in a dog.

0:09:230:09:26

-If he ever returns here,

-they'll know who he is.

0:09:270:09:31

-The chip number will show up.

0:09:320:09:35

-They can identify the bird -

-which is excellent.

0:09:360:09:40

-These blokes know

-what they're doing.

0:09:400:09:43

-Look how big his feet are.

0:09:430:09:46

-They're like the feet

-of a large hen.

0:09:460:09:49

-They don't grab anything -

-they're just used for walking.

0:09:490:09:53

-They're perfectly adapted

-for walking on rocks.

0:09:530:09:56

-They're white because

-they put dirt on them.

0:09:570:10:00

-Sometimes, they need to lose heat.

0:10:000:10:03

-This doesn't happen

-when the climate is cold.

0:10:030:10:07

-The best way to achieve this

-is by whitening the feet...

0:10:080:10:12

-..or leaving them black.

0:10:120:10:14

-They control their body heat

-through the feet.

0:10:150:10:20

-It's amazing. It's impossible

-to put a ring on these birds.

0:10:210:10:25

-Back home, rings are placed

-on crows and eagles.

0:10:250:10:29

-This is impossible with condors -

-they lose heat through the feet.

0:10:300:10:35

-There's a continuous conflict

-between condors and people.

0:10:390:10:43

-Lead shots have been found in every

-condor that arrives at the surgery.

0:10:430:10:47

-That's amazing.

0:10:480:10:49

-South Chile is a rare location

-in South America...

0:11:250:11:29

-..for finding

-a thriving population of condors.

0:11:300:11:32

-We've travelled 1,000 miles

-south of Santiago...

0:11:330:11:36

-..over the borders, mountains

-and glaciers of Patagonia.

0:11:360:11:40

-This is Torres del Paine

-National Park.

0:11:420:11:45

-The granite towers found here are

-amongst the planet's most beautiful.

0:11:450:11:50

-This is the habitat

-of the condor, puma and guanaco.

0:11:500:11:54

-That's why Eduardo and I

-have come so far.

0:11:550:11:58

-We want to learn more

-about the condor.

0:11:590:12:02

-If we're lucky -

-we might catch sight of the puma.

0:12:020:12:06

-888

0:12:180:12:20

-The plains at the foot of the towers

-are full of wildlife.

0:12:260:12:30

-The buffed-necked ibis.

0:12:310:12:33

-The cinnamon teal.

0:12:340:12:36

-The yellowbill coot.

0:12:370:12:39

-And the black-necked swan.

0:12:400:12:42

-Zorro is the Spanish name for a fox.

0:12:450:12:47

-This is a caracara.

0:12:480:12:50

-In addition to studying condors...

0:12:580:13:00

-..we would study the relationship

-between condor, guanaco and puma.

0:13:010:13:07

-We weren't going to get

-much sleep over the next fortnight.

0:13:100:13:14

-Guanacos are one of the most

-important animals in the park.

0:13:260:13:29

-They form a natural,

-triangular food chain.

0:13:300:13:34

-The puma is in one corner

-whilst the guanaco is in another.

0:13:340:13:39

-The puma feeds on the guanaco.

0:13:390:13:42

-The condor is also a part

-of the triangle.

0:13:420:13:46

-The condor feeds off the skeleton

-that the puma leaves behind.

0:13:460:13:50

-The food chain was found the length

-and breadth of Chile long ago.

0:13:500:13:55

-But outside the park,

-the guanaco numbers have dwindled.

0:13:550:13:59

-Sheep, cows and horses

-have been introduced.

0:13:590:14:03

-The old, natural order

-has disappeared.

0:14:030:14:07

-This is the only place in the Andes

-where the old, natural order...

0:14:080:14:13

-..the triangle of dependency,

-still exists.

0:14:130:14:16

-As I walk around,

-I see two different groups.

0:14:170:14:22

-There are groups of young males.

0:14:230:14:26

-There are also family groups,

-like this one here.

0:14:270:14:30

-We can see about 40 females,

-and only one male.

0:14:300:14:36

-In spring, the males

-become very territorial.

0:14:370:14:41

-They sit high up,

-surveying the scene.

0:14:410:14:45

-They're prepared to fight with

-any male guanaco that comes near.

0:14:460:14:51

-The ultimate prize is that

-he can mate with the females.

0:14:510:14:56

-This is an exceedingly rare animal.

0:14:590:15:01

-The 8-legged guanaco.

0:15:020:15:04

-The guanaco is undoubtedly the most

-prominent animal in the park.

0:15:110:15:16

-The animal - and its excrement -

-are everywhere.

0:15:160:15:20

-This is a guanaco toilet.

0:15:200:15:25

-It's a territorial mound.

0:15:250:15:29

-The group use this location

-as their toilet.

0:15:290:15:33

-This defines the boundaries

-of their territory.

0:15:340:15:37

-It warns the other animals

-to stay away.

0:15:370:15:41

-It's very effective -

-because trust me - it stinks!

0:15:410:15:45

-We've come higher up the valley.

0:16:180:16:20

-A puma carried a young guanaco here.

0:16:210:16:26

-Look at the hole in his skull.

0:16:270:16:30

-The puma's large meat teeth

-went for the kill here.

0:16:320:16:38

-With the next bite,

-he shattered the head.

0:16:380:16:43

-That's how powerful he is.

0:16:440:16:47

-He kills by jumping

-on an animal's back.

0:16:470:16:52

-Usually, he grabs

-the backbone or the back.

0:16:530:16:58

-He hopes to break the backbone.

0:16:590:17:03

-The animal falls and dies.

0:17:030:17:07

-It's easier for the puma to handle.

0:17:070:17:10

-In the park, he feeds off guanacos.

0:17:110:17:15

-But outside the park,

-he feeds off sheep, lambs and foals.

0:17:150:17:20

-He isn't fond of hunting calves.

0:17:210:17:24

-Calves have thick, muscular necks.

0:17:250:17:29

-The puma can't get a hold of him,

-and kill him.

0:17:290:17:33

-But he's fond of lambs, and foals.

0:17:340:17:38

-That can cause serious problems.

0:17:390:17:42

-Outside the park,

-he's hunted all the time.

0:17:420:17:45

-Gauchos hunt him with dogs.

0:17:460:17:48

-The puma defends himself

-by climbing a tree.

0:17:490:17:53

-But there, he's an easy target.

0:17:540:17:56

-But thank goodness, in the park,

-they're totally safe.

0:17:570:18:01

-There are clues everywhere -

-but where's the puma?

0:18:030:18:06

-There's a cluster of trees here.

-Eduardo has found a puma's bed.

0:18:210:18:27

-Perhaps he's been chewing

-a bone or two.

0:18:280:18:32

-He could still be here somewhere.

0:18:320:18:36

-We're not sure, so we're

-keeping quiet. Let's have a look.

0:18:360:18:40

-It's obviously an old bed.

0:18:450:18:48

-The bones could be up to a year old.

0:18:490:18:51

-But he's used this spot regularly.

0:18:520:18:54

-There's very little growth here.

-Pity they're not more fresh.

0:18:550:19:00

-Maybe we'll find something else

-in the trees.

0:19:000:19:04

-We're out during the day...

0:19:050:19:08

-..because we've been advised

-that the best way to find a puma...

0:19:090:19:15

-..is to come across

-a freshly killed guanaco.

0:19:170:19:21

-They'll feed off it for 4-5 days.

0:19:210:19:25

-If we can find one, and sit tight

-first thing in the morning...

0:19:250:19:30

-..and last thing at night, maybe

-we'll catch a glimpse of one.

0:19:310:19:35

-We'll walk around, and look.

0:19:350:19:37

-But such a find gives one hope

-that they are around.

0:19:380:19:43

-You have to be on your guard -

-this could be dangerous.

0:19:550:19:59

-Although pumas

-don't normally attack humans...

0:20:000:20:03

-..a fisherman was killed

-and eaten here three years ago.

0:20:030:20:09

-Because we're cornering them,

-we could be attacked.

0:20:090:20:13

-They almost never attack - but

-there's always that possibility...

0:20:140:20:17

-..especially if young ones are here.

-That's why we're being careful.

0:20:170:20:21

-They're unlike other big cats.

-Eduardo has seen something.

0:20:210:20:26

-The lion and tiger will attack -

-these won't.

0:20:260:20:31

-I'm following Eduardo's footsteps.

0:20:310:20:34

-If I entered from the other side,

-a puma might feel cornered.

0:20:440:20:51

-That's when they're dangerous.

-I'll follow Eduardo.

0:20:520:20:56

-A young guanaco's foot.

0:21:140:21:17

-It was just tiny.

0:21:180:21:20

-He was obviously small enough

-for the puma to carry back.

0:21:200:21:25

-Usually, the adults are too big.

-They have to be left where they are.

0:21:260:21:30

-They'll feed for 3-4 days, and leave

-him to the condors and caracaras.

0:21:300:21:36

-This one was small enough

-to bring back here.

0:21:370:21:41

-It was an important place for him.

0:21:410:21:43

-Eduardo has just told me

-to be very careful.

0:21:530:21:56

-There's a powerful

-scent of pumas in the area.

0:21:570:22:01

-I'm not sure whether there's

-a live puma within 10 yards of us.

0:22:010:22:07

-I doubt it -

-unless he has young ones.

0:22:070:22:10

-I'll have to be incredibly careful -

-and concentrate.

0:22:110:22:14

-We'd better leave

-and not go any further.

0:22:190:22:22

-No puma - just Eduardo!

-Thanks, Eduardo!

0:22:410:22:44

-He frightened me!

0:22:480:22:50

-This is a black-chinned siskin's

-nest.

0:22:540:22:59

-This bird comes to gardens

-for monkey nuts.

0:22:590:23:04

-He lives solely in South America.

0:23:040:23:08

-The pretty nest with its three eggs

-is perched on the branch.

0:23:090:23:13

-I've liked searching for nests

-since I was a little boy.

0:23:180:23:23

-We're seeing miracles of nature

-all around us. It's brilliant.

0:23:230:23:28

-Eduardo reckons the puma muck

-is very fresh.

0:23:320:23:38

-I like this bloke.

0:23:390:23:41

-He's a world authority on condors

-as well as the puma.

0:23:420:23:46

-He knows about the wildlife

-in the park.

0:23:460:23:50

-But most importantly,

-he speaks Spanish slowly.

0:23:500:23:54

-Even I can understand him -

-thank goodness.

0:23:540:23:57

-This is an indication

-of the puma's power and danger.

0:24:010:24:06

-This wasn't a small guanaco.

0:24:070:24:10

-He carried it here,

-and opened him up.

0:24:100:24:14

-He's ripped the guanaco to shreds,

-tearing off his head.

0:24:150:24:19

-He's made a mess of it.

0:24:190:24:22

-The head is broken in half.

0:24:250:24:28

-It's amazing. Good heavens!

0:24:290:24:32

-After days of searching in vain,

-Eduardo caught sight of four pumas.

0:24:390:24:45

-SPANISH CONVERSATION

0:25:240:25:27

-He's running away.

0:25:410:25:44

-The other isn't far.

-Stay on that one.

0:25:450:25:51

-At last! We've found pumas.

0:25:560:25:59

-We ran at least a mile, up and down.

0:25:590:26:03

-My laces are undone. I have thorns

-in my socks. I'm sweating buckets.

0:26:030:26:07

-But d'you know what? I don't care.

0:26:070:26:09

-This is the main reason

-for us to come to Torres del Paine.

0:26:090:26:13

-We wanted to see the puma

-as well as the condor.

0:26:140:26:17

-Eduardo spotted four pumas

-from afar.

0:26:170:26:19

-Unfortunately, by the time we rushed

-down here - they moved further away.

0:26:200:26:24

-We've seen two -

-there are another two somewhere.

0:26:240:26:28

-It must be a mother

-and three fairly old cubs.

0:26:280:26:31

-It was certainly worth the run.

0:26:320:26:34

-We're still looking.

-They're hiding in undergrowth.

0:26:360:26:39

-We'll continue to look for them.

0:26:400:26:42

-Excellent!

0:26:490:26:51

-It's 4.00am.

-We've been up since 3.30am-4.00am.

0:27:030:27:07

-We've been out every night 'til

-after 10.00pm.

0:27:070:27:10

-I hope now we can have a lie-in.

-Doubt it, though!

0:27:100:27:14

-Thank you, Al!

0:27:140:27:16

-I'm going to look for another job.

0:27:170:27:20

-888

0:27:220:27:24

-I've left the park.

-This is Puerto Natales.

0:27:280:27:32

-The condors have all left the park.

-There's more food for them here.

0:27:320:27:36

-Over the next few days, not only

-will I be looking at the condors...

0:27:370:27:41

-..I'll be researching them.

0:27:410:27:43

-In order to achieve this,

-I'll be climbing very steep cliffs.

0:27:430:27:46

-I'm no mountaineer -

-but I know a man who is!

0:27:470:27:50

-Caradoc Jones is Tregaron's

-most famous climber.

0:27:510:27:54

-We meet on terra firma this time!

0:27:550:27:57

-You know this area very well.

0:27:580:28:00

-I think it's one of the most

-amazing corners of the world.

0:28:000:28:05

-It's steeped in history.

0:28:050:28:08

-The people are interesting, too.

0:28:080:28:11

-I've always enjoyed

-climbing in South America.

0:28:110:28:16

-I started coming here in the '80s.

0:28:170:28:20

-I had the opportunity

-to come and work with you.

0:28:210:28:25

-I'll be going on a mountaineering

-expedition afterwards, too.

0:28:250:28:28

-I'm sure you'll manage the

-dangerous task I've set up for you.

0:28:290:28:33

-I'd like to start by showing you

-something rather special.

0:28:330:28:37

-I took Caradoc 100kms south

-of Puerto Natales.

0:29:000:29:04

-Estancia Olga Theresa

-is gaucho land.

0:29:050:29:08

-This is Patagonia's busiest colony

-of condors, especially in spring.

0:29:090:29:13

-There you go! I said

-I'd show you a sight and a half!

0:29:220:29:26

-There are about 12 flying around.

0:29:280:29:30

-And another 40 on the rock itself.

0:29:310:29:33

-This is the condors' habitat.

0:29:400:29:43

-The Spanish name is 'butrera'.

0:29:440:29:48

-'Butre' is a word for vulture.

0:29:490:29:52

-'Butrera' means, 'Vulture's Lair.'

0:29:530:29:55

-If they roost here,

-where are their nests?

0:29:570:30:01

-A condor's territory

-can be up to 100km square.

0:30:020:30:07

-That's the same size as Snowdon.

0:30:070:30:10

-Their nests are within

-the territory.

0:30:100:30:15

-They defend up to 1km

-around the nest.

0:30:150:30:18

-Otherwise,

-they're very sociable birds.

0:30:180:30:20

-They have to travel many miles

-in search of food.

0:30:210:30:25

-If a condor is 80km from his nest

-at 8.00pm...

0:30:250:30:29

-..he knows he won't make it home.

0:30:300:30:33

-But he knows where other condors

-come to roost.

0:30:330:30:37

-They're very wise.

0:30:380:30:41

-What is their lifespan?

0:30:420:30:44

-Some live over half a century.

0:30:440:30:49

-But they're not mature 'til

-they're seven years old.

0:30:490:30:55

-The egg remains in the nest

-for two months.

0:30:550:31:00

-The chick stays in the nest

-for another six months.

0:31:010:31:04

-The chick stays with the adult

-for another 18 months.

0:31:040:31:08

-They only produce one egg

-once every two years.

0:31:080:31:13

-They must live for a long time

-to produce enough chicks.

0:31:140:31:18

-This is a fantastic spot.

0:31:200:31:22

-They seem very inquisitive birds.

0:31:230:31:26

-When I was climbing in Peru,

-they'd come to us on the cliff face.

0:31:270:31:31

-They'd venture much closer

-than other large birds.

0:31:320:31:36

-Some fly above you

-and turn their heads like chickens.

0:31:370:31:43

-It's as if they're saying,

-"What are you doing here?"

0:31:440:31:47

-Caradoc looks like a spider

-hanging from his web!

0:32:360:32:39

-Eduardo was keen to have a closer

-look at the condor's roosting spot.

0:32:400:32:44

-We chose another roosting place that

-wasn't as busy as Olga Theresa's.

0:32:460:32:49

-But we only had a couple of hours

-of daytime...

0:32:500:32:53

-..to ensure

-we didn't disturb the birds.

0:32:530:32:57

-Caradoc! The cave looks so much

-bigger now you're above it.

0:32:570:33:02

-It looks very small from here.

-But it looks huge now.

0:33:030:33:06

-OK, yes, Iolo.

0:33:080:33:10

-I'm suspended in space.

-I've no hope of landing on a ledge.

0:33:110:33:15

-I can see it all in great detail.

0:33:160:33:18

-Caradoc, can you give us

-an idea of the cave's size?

0:33:180:33:23

-The cave is about 3 metres deep.

0:33:240:33:29

-That deep!

-How big is the whole area?

0:33:310:33:35

-35 metres, more or less.

0:33:370:33:42

-It's 3 metres high.

0:33:530:33:56

-Are the bird droppings all over

-the cave, or only at the entrance?

0:33:570:34:05

-No, the droppings

-are all over the floor.

0:34:060:34:12

-Is the cave mouth

-sheltered from the wind?

0:34:170:34:22

-The cave mouth appears very open.

0:34:250:34:30

-Are there remains of pellets there?

0:34:360:34:40

-There are some pellets here,

-but I can't see anything else...

0:34:420:34:49

-..only white guano.

0:34:520:34:55

-How many condors

-would usually stay here?

0:34:580:35:02

-Perhaps there would be up to

-7 birds here at the same time.

0:35:070:35:13

-The male, female and chicks have

-their place in the roosting area.

0:35:180:35:23

-It isn't by accident.

0:35:240:35:26

-The best place is reserved

-for the oldest male.

0:35:270:35:31

-The rest move around

-according to their status.

0:35:310:35:37

-Is this of interest to you?

0:35:450:35:47

-Oh, yes. This is information

-I was previously unaware of.

0:35:490:35:53

-It's so much better than observing

-them flying in the mountains.

0:35:530:35:57

-You can learn a lot through

-studying their roosting place.

0:35:580:36:04

-There are no droppings in the nest?

0:36:070:36:09

-No - there's much more muck

-in the roosting place.

0:36:100:36:15

-It's easily spotted from afar.

0:36:150:36:18

-You don't see droppings

-around the nest?

0:36:200:36:22

-Very little.

0:36:220:36:24

-And now it's time for a small beer!

0:36:250:36:29

-Whilst Eduardo had the hard task

-of finding a condor's nest...

0:36:370:36:41

-..Caradoc and I visited Estancia

-El Solitario on shearing day.

0:36:410:36:46

-We asked the owner, Jose Hernandez,

-and his brother Victor...

0:36:470:36:50

-..if condors and pumas

-were a problem for them.

0:36:510:36:54

-Condors aren't a problem. Only

-dead animals attract the condor.

0:36:540:37:01

-The puma's a huge problem through

-the year - especially in winter.

0:37:020:37:08

-We can lose over 100 sheep.

0:37:110:37:15

-Every year?

0:37:170:37:18

-Every year?

-

-Yes, every year.

0:37:180:37:18

-Yes, every year.

0:37:180:37:20

-There are approximately

-2,000 sheep here...

0:37:200:37:24

-..and so you're talking about

-a loss of 5% because of the puma!

0:37:250:37:30

-The puma was big -

-I'd say he was three years old.

0:37:300:37:35

-He attacked my favourite dog.

0:37:360:37:39

-He grabbed his head

-and was going for the kill.

0:37:400:37:45

-I fought back and stabbed him

-with a knife. He ran away.

0:37:480:37:54

-Eduardo's worth his weight in gold.

0:38:020:38:04

-He's found a condor's nest for us.

0:38:050:38:07

-You'd never know unless

-you saw the bird flying in.

0:38:100:38:15

-They're very loving -

-she's come to him.

0:38:210:38:24

-It's as if they're greeting

-one another.

0:38:240:38:28

-The beak is slowly going through

-the other's feathers.

0:38:280:38:31

-It's a way of ensuring this pairing.

0:38:320:38:35

-The pair stay close to one another.

0:38:350:38:38

-Once they mate,

-they stay together for life.

0:38:380:38:42

-That can be a long time -

-half a century sometimes.

0:38:430:38:46

-They're so loving.

0:38:470:38:49

-Eduardo's incredibly happy.

0:39:140:39:16

-It's almost unbelievable.

0:39:170:39:19

-We can see a little

-brownish-grey chick in the nest.

0:39:190:39:24

-It's on the right of the cave.

-I can't see him clearly.

0:39:240:39:29

-How old d'you think he is?

0:39:300:39:32

-About three weeks, I'd say.

0:39:340:39:37

-We daren't go any closer,

-in case we frighten the parents.

0:39:410:39:46

-It's cold. Such a young chick loses

-heat without his parents' presence.

0:39:460:39:52

-This is an important revelation

-for Eduardo.

0:39:560:39:58

-It's hard to find a condor's nest

-in the wild.

0:39:590:40:02

-Hardly anyone has achieved to get

-images like this before...

0:40:020:40:05

-..recording the behaviour

-of the parents by the nest.

0:40:060:40:09

-Eduardo intends returning in

-3 months when the chick is bigger.

0:40:090:40:13

-He can watch, and glean more

-information about breeding chicks...

0:40:130:40:16

-..back at the Santiago centre.

0:40:170:40:19

-It reminds me of The Falklands.

0:40:270:40:30

-We returned to the Torres del Paine

-National Park.

0:40:310:40:35

-With three pairs of eyes, could we

-catch sight of the puma again?

0:40:350:40:39

-It was a chance

-I didn't want to miss.

0:40:400:40:43

-888

0:40:520:40:54

-# I met a girl, a girl, a girl,

0:41:230:41:26

-# I met a girl on the telephone.

0:41:270:41:29

-# Her lovely voice I hear, I hear. #

0:41:340:41:37

-Our time in the Paine

-was drawing to a close.

0:41:390:41:42

-Before tracking

-the puma one last time...

0:41:420:41:45

-..there was one final thing

-I had to do.

0:41:450:41:48

-The Patagonia Glacier pours into

-lakes on the park's western side.

0:41:480:41:53

-It's the world's largest glacier -

-outside of the Poles.

0:41:540:41:57

-It's 500kms long.

-As Caradoc guided me...

0:41:570:42:02

-..it was awful to witness the effect

-of global warming in South Chile.

0:42:030:42:08

-This is a satellite picture

-of the area.

0:42:110:42:15

-We're on the grey glacier,

-in this small corner here.

0:42:150:42:20

-This stretches all the way

-to the north.

0:42:200:42:24

-I thought this was big here.

0:42:250:42:27

-But looking at the map,

-it's just a tiny section.

0:42:280:42:31

-This rock splits the glacier.

0:42:320:42:36

-It stretches beyond

-the furthest part there.

0:42:370:42:41

-It's retreated

-almost a mile since 1997.

0:42:420:42:49

-Driving around at home,

-you don't think of this.

0:42:500:42:53

-When you see it for yourself

-- it's alarming.

0:42:540:42:57

-The speed of the change

-frightens me.

0:42:580:43:01

-I expected a gradual change

-over hundreds of years.

0:43:020:43:05

-I can see it during my lifetime.

0:43:060:43:08

-It's happening so quickly.

-That's what's shocking everyone.

0:43:080:43:12

-When did this rock

-last see the light of day?

0:43:170:43:21

-To see the cat, we had to keep the

-same hours as the cat. Tiring work!

0:43:330:43:38

-We're still looking. If something,

-it's colder today than yesterday.

0:43:410:43:45

-It's so quiet!

-The guanacos are quiet.

0:43:450:43:48

-The birds and animals are all quiet.

0:43:490:43:52

-If there are pumas around,

-they'd warn each other.

0:43:520:43:57

-But there's nothing - just silence.

0:43:570:44:01

-This fox is lucky

-he came across a chilengo.

0:44:070:44:10

-The young guanaco

-was struck by a car.

0:44:100:44:14

-After days of searching,

-we were lucky, too.

0:44:200:44:24

-This is the guanaco Eduardo

-saw this morning.

0:44:250:44:29

-It was killed by a puma.

0:44:300:44:32

-You can see the marks left

-on his mouth and head.

0:44:330:44:38

-It was a big one, too.

0:44:380:44:41

-It was hard for a puma

-to bring it down.

0:44:420:44:45

-It isn't fresh. The eyes have gone,

-the tongue has dried.

0:44:450:44:49

-I'd say it was about three days old.

0:44:500:44:53

-It doesn't stink yet -

-it's still quite fresh.

0:44:540:44:57

-He's fed along the side.

0:44:580:45:00

-He's mainly fed around the backside.

0:45:010:45:04

-This is where the large muscles

-are found.

0:45:040:45:07

-He's taken big chunks from there.

0:45:080:45:10

-The grass that's scattered around

-is interesting.

0:45:110:45:16

-You can see the remains here.

0:45:170:45:19

-The puma chucks grass

-on the carcass.

0:45:200:45:23

-It's an attempt to conceal it

-from other pumas or condors.

0:45:240:45:28

-But it's easily seen!

0:45:280:45:31

-It wasn't very effective.

-Why do they bother doing it?

0:45:320:45:36

-It's our best chance

-of filming the cat close-up.

0:45:360:45:43

-How does it look

-from the other side?

0:45:570:46:00

-We've finished our hideaway.

0:46:010:46:03

-There's enough room

-for the camera woman and me.

0:46:040:46:08

-We'll be here all night,

-hoping to see a puma.

0:46:080:46:12

-I'll keep my fingers crossed.

0:46:120:46:14

-In torchlight -

-we finally found a puma.

0:46:330:46:37

-The male puma was about 4 years old.

0:46:370:46:40

-He approached the dead guanaco -

-ignoring it completely initially.

0:46:400:46:44

-He then came even closer.

0:46:450:46:48

-He lay down right in front

-of our hideaway.

0:46:480:46:52

-It's strange he didn't

-associate torchlight with humans.

0:47:070:47:12

-He isn't afraid of light.

0:47:130:47:15

-But if he'd heard a sound,

-or seen movement...

0:47:150:47:19

-..he'd have bolted like lightning.

0:47:200:47:23

-This was a huge privilege.

0:47:310:47:33

-Being within 30 yards of a wild puma

-in its natural habitat...

0:47:340:47:38

-..and staring in amazement

-at the big cat...

0:47:380:47:41

-..that's being hunted

-all over the Andes.

0:47:410:47:45

-The highlight of an unforgettable

-fortnight in Torres del Paine.

0:47:540:47:59

-S4C Subtitles by

-GWEAD

0:48:150:48:17
0:48:170:48:18

Y berthynas glos rhwng y condor, y guanaco a'r puma ym Mharc Cenedlaethol y Torres del Paine yn ne Chile. The triangle of dependency between the puma, the guanaco and the condor.