Derby Bargain Hunt


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Derby

Antiques challenge. Kate Bliss and David Harper join Tim Wonnacott at the Jaguar Antiques Fair at Derby University, and Tim visits Hatfield House in Hertfordshire.


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Transcript


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Today's fair is at Derby University. Our teams will get six of the best.

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No, not whacks. Antiques.

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BELL RINGS

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Huh! Saved by the bell. Thank goodness for that. Time for a break and a spot of bargain hunting.

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We're in the world of academia.

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For one team, there'll be first-class honours. For the other, I couldn't possibly say.

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'Coming up at the Jaguar antiques fair,

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'while the reds put pressure on...'

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We've only got five minutes left.

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'..it's too much for the blues.'

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David, help.

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'But who comes out on top at the auction?

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'All that and more to come. First, let's meet the teams.'

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We've got two teams of friends - Sarah and Yvonne for the reds,

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-Christina and Rosemary for the blues. Hi, girls.

-Hello.

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-Sarah, how do you know each other?

-We work together.

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-Where do you work?

-We work in retail.

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-Who's the boss?

-I'm the boss.

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Do you think you're going to be the winning team?

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Definitely. We work as a team.

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And do you watch the programme a bit?

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-All the time.

-What experience have you got in buying and selling?

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I go to car boots, and buy and sell stuff there.

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-Have you had any success at your car boots?

-Yes.

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I've bought an Art Deco vase, which I bought for a low amount and sold for a nice profit.

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That's very coy you're being there.

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Yvonne, is Sarah a tough boss, would you say?

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No, she's not really like my boss. She's more a colleague.

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And how long have you worked in this retail oulet?

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12 years. I've worked with Sarah for seven.

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-That's long enough to know her!

-Yes.

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-Do you like working in the shop?

-I do.

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It's in the village where I was born and brought up, so I know everybody who comes in the shop.

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-They know you.

-Yeah.

-So you're providing a social function.

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Yeah, I suppose it is, really.

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-Do you collect anything, Yvonne?

-Horror books and crime.

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James Patterson, Stephen King, James Herbert.

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That's going to do you some good on Bargain Hunt?

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Yeah, cos I collect so, yeah...

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-So anything might happen!

-Yes.

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What fun. Very, very good luck.

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-Now, how long have you known each other, Christina?

-12 years.

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We met at the school gates with our first-borns.

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-What do you do for a living?

-I'm a nurse.

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I'm taking a year out after having an operation.

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-Looking after my mum, having a break from nursing.

-You have children?

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-Three children - 16, 14 and six.

-And what do you collect?

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Bureaux, settles, cabinets. Large pieces of furniture.

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Hope you've not got your eye on any of that today!

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-Lugging it around can be a problem.

-Rosemary wouldn't let me.

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-Reckon you'll make a good team?

-Yeah, we're quite opposites but we complement each other.

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Rosemary, are you likely to agree with Christina?

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Our tastes are different so when we hit on something we both like that's an indication it's a good thing.

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My job is to rein in her excessive enthusiasm and large furniture items.

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We're pleased you're here to do that very thing.

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What do you do as a job of work?

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I offer support to end users of software.

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-How long have you been doing that?

-35 years.

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Has there been software that's required support for that long?

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None of it works fully. People need help getting the best out of it.

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-And it's kept you out of mischief for 35 years.

-More or less.

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-Perhaps your skills will come in handy today.

-Let's hope so, yes.

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I've got a retentive memory so all those antiques programmes hopefully will come back to me.

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-Bargain Hunt, I hope.

-Of course.

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Well, you'll know that this is the money moment.

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-Here is the £300 a head.

-Gosh! It's hot.

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It will be. It's been in my pocket. Hot to trot.

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You know the rules. Your experts await. Off you go.

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Let's hope there isn't any misbehaviour. Our experts will have to mete out the discipline!

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'The rules are simple. Each team has £300 to spend in an hour.

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'They have to find three items that will make them profit at auction.

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'Teaching each team wrong from right

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'will be Kate Bliss

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'and David Harper.

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'Pay attention at the back there!'

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You can spend as much or as little as you like.

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There's loads to look at today.

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I love that.

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We have a colour theme going on.

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Not sure it's going to make us a fortune.

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-Can we have a look at this vase? Is it an urn for ashes?

-It's a vase.

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-Japanese or Chinese cloisonne.

-Japanese. >

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-Thank you.

-It's metal. Feel the weight.

-It's very heavy.

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-I would have thought that would be late 19th...?

-Probably about the 1920s.

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-What have you got on that?

-65's the very best.

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-Can we just think about that?

-Yeah. Course you can.

-Thank you.

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'It's early days and both teams are shying away from making a purchase.'

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-AA badges. You see quite a lot of those, actually.

-You do. Yeah.

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It's got a happy, jolly kind of feel to it.

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DEALER: It's a little "quacker"!

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'With jokes like that will the blues be put off their stride?'

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-I can't believe how difficult it is.

-I know. You're under pressure.

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-Which way are we going?

-Some bling!

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'A bit of bling. At least the girls know what they want.'

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Can we have a look at the box, please?

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It's like crystal underneath.

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It is. Nice cut glass.

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This is probably part of a bigger toiletry set

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or a set on a lady's dressing table.

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You would have had a pin tray for jewellery or earrings.

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A little box like this for perhaps hair pins? It's hallmarked.

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You've got an English silver top

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and a lovely cut-glass base.

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-Quite like that.

-I like that.

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-Is that your sort of thing?

-Yeah.

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You could put it on a modern dressing table or a sideboard.

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It's quite nice.

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Another toiletry jar. I love the shape of that.

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The sides are curved.

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Not only is the silver in good condition but this is blank.

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Very often, these were engraved with monograms.

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If we bought the two...

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-What do you think? What could you do on the two?

-I could do 40.

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As an auctioneer,

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I would estimate these at between 30 to 40,

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with a chance that they'd make a bit more.

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I think that's fair, madam, isn't it?

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Could you not do 38 for us?

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Honestly, I can't.

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I've shaved as much as I can off at 40. Sorry.

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-Do you think that's fair, Kate?

-I think it's worth a shout.

-Yeah.

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-And you both like them.

-Yes.

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I love the way that this is curved. It makes it a little more unusual.

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-Which might just help.

-OK, then.

-OK?

-Yeah.

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We'll take the two.

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Lovely.

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'15 minutes gone and the first purchase made by the reds.

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'Have the blues found their bling?'

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-It looks like something you'd put in the loo.

-What?

-In the toilet.

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-What would you do with it in the toilet?

-Put it on the window sill.

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-Why the toilet?

-It's a toilety colour.

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-What makes a toilety colour?

-Green.

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-That's the stuff you put down the toilet.

-Yes.

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'Perhaps it's more bog than bling. Never mind. Let's keep looking.'

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Let's see what the price is. 78.

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-Ooh, no! That's too expensive!

-You're thinking what I'm thinking.

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It's a fair price because it's unusual.

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But put it into the auction,

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we might struggle.

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We can always come back to it.

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'The reds being cool, calm and collected. The blues begin to panic.

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-David, help!

-We've got some potentials already.

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'Hang on, something that looks like Clarice Cliff has caught their eye.

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'Is it the real thing?'

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-Clarice Cliff. It might be a bit...

-They're absolutely gorgeous.

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-They're too expensive for us.

-No, they're not.

-Well, go on.

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Let's see.

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Morning. What's your best price on those?

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On the cream one, the very best price would be...

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I'd do it at 129 but I wouldn't come lower than that, I'm afraid.

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It's not signed?

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< No. You're welcome to have a look.

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It's got the original stopper, the pattern number.

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< The Wilkinson factory, so it's all there bar one thing.

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It doesn't have that typical Clarice Cliff vibrancy and modern look.

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-What's the absolute death on it?

-129.

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I can't go any less than that. We can offer you 100 cash.

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< Sorry, no.

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110 cash. < No. Sorry.

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I'd love to say yes, but I can't.

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I've got to earn a living.

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Oh, we just do it for love(!)

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Would you be making a profit at 120?

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< 120? A small one, yes.

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Would you go for that?

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< If you smile nicely, yes.

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On three. One, two, three!

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-Beautiful!

-We'd like to take that, please.

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-120?

-Thank you.

-I'll wrap that up for you.

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Our teams better get a move on. We're nearly halfway through.

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'Now, time for a quick lesson, which I shall call The Bonus Buy.'

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MUSIC: Theme to Grange Hill

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Snodgrass, pay attention!

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Here are the bonus buy rules.

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Two teams are each given £300.

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They spend (a+b+c)

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Leftover lolly given to expert.

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Piece of skirt, must be Kate Bliss. She joins the bald eagle.

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That's David Harper.

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They take the money to the auction, equals D.

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Oi! What are you doing chucking bits of paper around?

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The green line is the probability of profit for the bonus buy.

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If you lot understand that, you'll be allowed to go home early.

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'No more nonsense. On with the shopping.

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'Yvonne's been distracted by something from her youth.'

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-I used to work at Moira Potteries.

-Did you?

-I did. Yeah.

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-I used to make those.

-You're a potter?

-I was when I was 16.

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-Did you know this?

-No.

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-I was only 16.

-You've shocked us all.

-I'm sorry.

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Hidden secrets!

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-Do you like this to buy for the programme?

-No.

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-You don't think it's going to make money.

-No. it's not that.

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People don't know Moira Potteries.

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In an auction, it might only fetch £10.

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We're going to leave it, I'm afraid.

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'With 20 minutes to go, the blues seem to have given up on bling

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'and happened on something more interesting.'

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Do you know what it is?

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-A fruit bowl?

-Yeah.

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Or simply a small charger. Any idea where it's from?

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-It looks Oriental.

-Ro, what do you think?

-I would say Japanese.

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You are very good. It is Japanese.

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-It's Imari.

-Right.

-You've heard of Imari?

-Yes.

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Hand-painted and very decorative.

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-Collected, too.

-I was just going to ask.

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It's quite a nice scalloped tray.

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-It's really nice.

-Shall we say 25?

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-Or do you think he'd not go lower?

-We can try.

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-I'd be prepared to go to 28.

-Top price.

-Yes.

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-Shall we try 20?

-Yeah.

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Hi. Can you risk it and take 20?

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I couldn't. I'll risk it and take 25.

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-25, yeah?

-Yes, please.

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-25, yeah.

-Thank you very much.

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You two make good decisions, and quick decisions. I like it.

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'Good going, blues. Now the reds are behind. Has Kate gone a bit potty?'

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"I'm the mobile toy-toise. I lead you follow."

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'They'll need to be quicker than a tortoise to finish their shop.'

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What we've got here

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is a lovely bit of Derby porcelain.

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This is all hand-painted.

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Your Derby mark in an iron red colour.

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It's an early 19th-century piece, I would say.

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1800, 1820ish. You've got moulded flowers.

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A little bit of gilt to set it off.

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-Are they transfers?

-No. This is hand painted.

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How much do you think it'd sell for?

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It's tricky. At auction, could be anything from £20 to 40ish.

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It is Derby. If it's going to sell anywhere well it's here.

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-What's your best on that, madam?

-I can do it for 40.

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-Your rock bottom? We've got to sell it at auction.

-The best I can do.

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-I'll do another two, 38.

-38?

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-Do you like it, girls?

-I like it.

-I do.

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Why do you like it?

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I think it's simple. It's not over-the-top.

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I hate anything over-the-top.

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I just think it's really nice. I'd like that on my dresser.

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It would go with any room. It's quite nice.

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It'd go in a modern house as well. It's natural.

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-At 38, we've got a chance.

-Yes.

-Yeah.

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Everybody's happy. We'd better do the deal.

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'Kerching! Well done, reds. The blues haven't moved at all.

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'They're still looking at plates.'

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-We have just bought a plate.

-True.

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-Look at this.

-That's lovely.

-See how shiny it is.

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-It's really heavy.

-Can we take the other one back?

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-Shall we go and ask David?

-Yeah.

-He's bound to know.

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Oh, blimey. Gosh. That's quality.

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Under the light, you can see this gleaming, reflecting...

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-It looks like gold.

-It is gold.

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-Hello, Tim.

-Hello.

-Talking of gold...!

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-That's fun?

-Isn't that quality?

-Why are you bonkers about plates?

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-You girls and plates.

-We weren't. We set out looking for silver.

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-They're just bonkers, Tim.

-It's the colours.

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-We're going for the colours.

-They're glorious.

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The back is beautifully decorated.

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A-ha. Now, then.

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-I know that mark is the Fukagawa family mark.

-Right.

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-Gosh.

-If it's Japanese...

-Precise dates.

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I think Fukagawa is the moment that I should leave on.

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-Yes.

-Good luck.

-Goodbye.

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-That's the name of the factory.

-Do you think we'll make a profit?

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Yes, I do. I really do.

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-It's looks like it's in very good condition.

-It feels tactile.

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I want to... You do want to touch it.

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You do want to touch it.

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I think you've got good eyes there. It is quality.

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-It screams quality.

-It's 125.

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-Do you think it's a good price?

-I do.

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-Shall I knock it down a bit?

-Yes. Try a little bit.

-It's worth trying.

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-Shall we do that?

-Shall we see him?

-Yes.

-A three-pronged attack.

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Hello. Can I help you?

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We've had a good look at your plate.

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-We'd like to make you an offer.

-They're very good at making offers.

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Look into the eyes.

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Am I going to be hypnotised into making them a good offer?

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-You just wait.

-I've got 125 on it

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The very best is 100.

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-Can we make it 80?

-No. Sorry. It has to be 100.

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90? I can't do that.

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Try looking into MY eyes.

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I am. It's still not working.

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95.

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95. OK, 95.

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-We'll do 95.

-Thank you very much.

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'That David's always being mistaken for Paul McKenna.

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'Still, seems to do the trick.

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'The blues have their three items.'

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Let's go round the corner.

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'With a few minutes left, the reds need to make a decision.'

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That's Derby.

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-How much is that?

-I can do that for 75. >

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-What do you think?

-Don't like it.

-It's too...

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You said you like relatively plain things.

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-Is that a bit elaborate?

-Yeah. It's got too much going on.

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-Do you like that?

-I quite like that.

-That's in super condition.

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You've got this centre bouquet and floral panels.

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Then the beautiful gilt decoration.

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-It's a stunning dessert dish.

-How much will it fetch at auction?

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I would say, if the right Derby collector is there, that could fetch

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between £50 and £80.

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But I'd prefer not to pay 75!

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-What can you do for us, sir?

-70 quid?

-70 quid!

-I'm sorry.

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-What did you want to pay? >

-£50

0:20:110:20:14

I can't, honestly.

0:20:140:20:17

We've only got five minutes left! At least you've got 50 quid!

0:20:170:20:22

55, then.

0:20:220:20:24

Give me 60 quid.

0:20:240:20:26

What do you think? The gentleman's doing us a good deal.

0:20:260:20:30

For £60, I think it's worth a go.

0:20:300:20:34

-BOTH: Yeah.

-Thank you, sir. We'll take it.

0:20:340:20:39

'Tick, tick, tick, tock! The time is up.

0:20:390:20:42

'Let's remind ourselves what the teams bought.

0:20:420:20:46

'First lot, those two toiletry jars.

0:20:460:20:50

'Then, two lots of Derby. This floral decorated plate.

0:20:500:20:56

'And the dessert dish.'

0:20:560:20:59

-That was a rush against time!

-Yes.

0:21:010:21:04

Which is your favourite piece?

0:21:040:21:07

-Yvonne?

-The glass jars with the silver lid.

0:21:070:21:11

There's two together and I like those ones.

0:21:110:21:15

-What about you, Sarah?

-The same. I definitely like those.

0:21:150:21:18

-Which piece will bring the biggest profit, Yvonne?

-They will.

-Yes.

0:21:180:21:23

You agree with that. You spent £138. I'd like £162, please.

0:21:230:21:29

-Here we go.

-There we are.

-£162 of leftover lolly.

0:21:300:21:34

-For Kate to find a magical bonus buy.

-In my hot little hands.

0:21:340:21:39

-How difficult is that going to be?

-Quite tricky.

0:21:390:21:43

The girls haven't blown a huge amount on one piece.

0:21:430:21:47

-They work at a shop.

-I know.

-You have to be very careful.

0:21:470:21:51

-Now I've got it in my hot little hand.

-You'll blow the lot!

0:21:510:21:56

Let's remind ourselves what the blues bought.

0:21:560:21:59

Their hearts were set on this sugar shaker but is it Clarice Cliff?

0:21:590:22:05

The blues gave up on the bling and, like the reds, went for plates,

0:22:050:22:10

'the first one the Japanese Imari

0:22:100:22:13

'and the second the Fukagawa.

0:22:130:22:17

'There's a name not to be messed with!'

0:22:170:22:20

-You didn't buy what you thought you were going to buy.

-BOTH: No.

0:22:200:22:25

-But you had good fun?

-We did.

0:22:250:22:27

-Very much so.

-Which is your favourite piece?

0:22:270:22:31

The sugar shaker. Say that slowly.

0:22:310:22:34

The sugar shaker is your favourite. What about you, Rosemary?

0:22:340:22:39

The larger Japanese plate.

0:22:390:22:41

I was kicking myself. We'd already bought a plate.

0:22:410:22:45

So that's your favourite.

0:22:450:22:47

Which piece is going to bring the biggest profit?

0:22:470:22:51

-Sugar shaker.

-Your sugar shaker? And which do you think?

0:22:510:22:55

Fukagawa, the larger Japanese plate. Yes.

0:22:550:22:58

You spent £240, which we're really pleased with.

0:22:580:23:02

We'd like £60 of leftover lolly, which goes straight to David Harper.

0:23:020:23:08

-What an experience!

-What are you going to do with that?

0:23:080:23:12

-I'm going to try and satisfy their bling desire.

-Ah!

0:23:120:23:17

-I'm going to get them blinged up.

-That's a hint there, I think.

0:23:170:23:22

-Bling coming your way. Bling that makes a profit.

-I'll try my best.

0:23:220:23:28

For me, I'm heading off to a lovely pad in Hertfordshire.

0:23:280:23:32

I'm just over 20 miles from London at Hatfield House in Hertfordshire,

0:23:410:23:47

which has been passed down through 13 generations,

0:23:470:23:51

and is still owned and lived in by the family today.

0:23:510:23:55

Old Henry VIII took it over in the 16th century

0:23:550:23:59

when he confiscated land from the church.

0:23:590:24:02

Hatfield was a home for his children and it was the childhood home of Elizabeth I.

0:24:020:24:09

It ended up with Robert Cecil, son of the Queen's advisor.

0:24:090:24:13

It's been occupied since 2003 by Lord and Lady Salisbury.

0:24:130:24:18

Over the years, the house has received many important guests,

0:24:190:24:24

including no less a personage than King James I.

0:24:240:24:29

Twice - in 1611 and 1616.

0:24:290:24:32

This room is named after him.

0:24:320:24:35

Indeed, he is here in person, in a way.

0:24:350:24:41

Above the fireplace.

0:24:410:24:44

This fireplace was exquisitely crafted by Maximilian Colt at that period

0:24:440:24:50

to commemorate the King's visits.

0:24:500:24:53

It looks as if he's in bronze in that niche

0:24:530:24:57

above the mantelpiece.

0:24:570:24:59

Actually, he's carved out of stone and coloured to simulate bronze.

0:24:590:25:04

Look at the craftsmanship that's been lavished on the marble.

0:25:040:25:10

The different colours,

0:25:100:25:11

the exquisitely carved details.

0:25:110:25:14

Those outset black columns with Corinthian capitals

0:25:140:25:19

and lovely carved shields in the plinths.

0:25:190:25:24

They've treated the fireplace as an exquisite work of art.

0:25:240:25:29

We're just a couple of years shy from the fireplace's 400th birthday.

0:25:290:25:36

How very strange to come to the other side of the room

0:25:380:25:42

and discover this piece, which is just shy of its second birthday.

0:25:420:25:47

Commissioned by the present Lord Salisbury in 2005,

0:25:470:25:50

and carved by cabinet maker Rupert Brown.

0:25:500:25:54

This desk is basically Georgian in form,

0:25:540:25:58

with knee holes and green leather top.

0:25:580:26:01

A traditional knee hole writing table.

0:26:010:26:04

In detail, look at these corners.

0:26:040:26:07

They're not traditional Georgian corners.

0:26:070:26:11

They're trees.

0:26:110:26:13

Here we've got an organic tree

0:26:130:26:16

growing out of the plinth and forming the corner of the desk.

0:26:160:26:20

Look down the sides and front,

0:26:200:26:23

and you've got a series of trees

0:26:230:26:26

that are either carved out of the corners or inlaid between.

0:26:260:26:33

Extraordinary!

0:26:330:26:34

Don't let anyone say that quality and craftsmanship aren't available in Britain in the 21st century.

0:26:340:26:41

The big question is, are our teams going to make a century

0:26:410:26:46

or anything like it, at the auction?

0:26:460:26:48

We've popped across the city to Bamfords auctioneers

0:27:070:27:12

and man of the moment, James Lewis.

0:27:120:27:14

-Welcome.

-Lovely to be here.

0:27:140:27:17

These teams have had a ceramic fest.

0:27:170:27:21

-They have.

-They've gone strongly on the china front.

0:27:210:27:25

Yvonne and Sarah's first up are two bits of cut glass with solid silver.

0:27:250:27:30

-Popular dressing table sets.

-They're lovely, nice quality.

0:27:300:27:34

The silver hasn't been over-polished. I like those.

0:27:340:27:39

-They'll do well.

-How much for the two pieces?

-£40 to £60.

0:27:390:27:43

-£40 paid. A good start.

-Should be a profit.

0:27:430:27:47

-What about this Derby plate?

-Hm.

0:27:470:27:50

That's not great, really.

0:27:500:27:53

Derby in the early 19th century

0:27:530:27:55

concentrated on their thickness so they didn't have wastage.

0:27:550:27:59

They were making it like slabs of clay.

0:27:590:28:02

That isn't the best Derby porcelain.

0:28:020:28:05

-It's going to struggle.

-The enamelling's sparse.

0:28:050:28:08

-And not very well done.

-It's not.

0:28:080:28:11

I could enamel like that if I had ten minutes' practice. Not great.

0:28:110:28:16

So, it's a cheap piece of Derby, although it's chunky. How much?

0:28:160:28:22

-£25 to £35, something like that.

-They paid £38.

0:28:220:28:26

-They'll be lucky to get a profit.

-They will.

0:28:260:28:29

Their third piece is a bit of Derby, but infinitely better.

0:28:290:28:33

Much better. Same sort of period, but a much better quality.

0:28:330:28:37

Lovely quality flowers.

0:28:370:28:39

That lovely royal blue with gilt.

0:28:390:28:42

1820, 1825. I think that'll do well.

0:28:420:28:46

-How well?

-£40 to £60.

-They paid £60.

-They've got a chance.

0:28:460:28:50

I would think quite a good chance.

0:28:500:28:53

I would hope it would get to 60 and maybe a bit more.

0:28:530:28:57

-Hope so.

-The way you push on, it jolly well will.

0:28:570:29:01

How you get on will determine whether they need the bonus buy so let's have a look at it.

0:29:010:29:07

-Sarah, what's happened to Yvonne?

-Yvonne's husband has a hospital appointment.

0:29:070:29:13

He's not well so I'm here on my own.

0:29:130:29:15

Ah, so she's gone off to tend to her husband leaving all the fun to you.

0:29:150:29:21

-Yes.

-OK, you gave Kate £162. We want to see what she spent it on.

0:29:210:29:28

-I would guess it's rectangular and flat.

-And big!

0:29:280:29:32

Thank you. Here we go!

0:29:320:29:35

-Cor! Look at that!

-That is nice.

0:29:350:29:38

-Do you like that?

-Yes!

0:29:380:29:41

Well, this is a continental circular plaque

0:29:410:29:45

mounted in this velvet and gilt frame.

0:29:450:29:49

It's of a courtier, I would say. Probably 19th century.

0:29:490:29:52

But his dress is earlier. There is a little bit of wear.

0:29:520:29:57

-It might have got a bit damp.

-Can I help you, Kate?

-There we go.

0:29:570:30:02

I can show you.

0:30:020:30:04

You can see where the glaze is going and it's worn a little.

0:30:040:30:08

But the actual look is quite decorative and appealing.

0:30:080:30:12

How much did you spend on this?

0:30:120:30:15

Well, I spent £100.

0:30:150:30:18

I had a good go at spending all that you left me.

0:30:180:30:22

-Do you think it will make a profit?

-Nothing is guaranteed, is it?

0:30:220:30:26

I would say it has a fair chance.

0:30:260:30:29

-Do you think Yvonne would like it?

-I think she would.

0:30:290:30:32

-She's a girl for a big plaque?

-Definitely.

0:30:320:30:36

For the audience at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks.

0:30:360:30:41

Here we go, James. What do you make of that?

0:30:410:30:44

Well, it's decorative, isn't it?

0:30:440:30:48

If it was hand-painted, Vienna or a 19th-century piece of top quality,

0:30:480:30:54

-you'd be looking at £5,000, £10,000.

-What are we looking at? £1,000?

0:30:540:30:59

-50 quid.

-Ha ha ha!

0:30:590:31:01

-That's marvellous, isn't it? What is it, £50 to £100?

-About that.

0:31:010:31:06

-£100 was paid by Kate Bliss.

-Ooh.

-In the fond hope

0:31:060:31:10

-that it's going to be translated into a bonus buy.

-Hm.

0:31:100:31:15

That's it for the reds. Now for the blues.

0:31:150:31:19

First, the Wilkinson's caster,

0:31:190:31:21

-which is trying to be special.

-It's trying to be Clarice Cliff.

0:31:210:31:26

-I just don't think it is.

-Do you see that as a £120 pot?

0:31:260:31:31

A Clarice Cliff crocus pattern one would make £120, £150.

0:31:310:31:35

-That won't make 120.

-What do you think it will make?

0:31:350:31:39

-£40 to £60.

-Oh, lordy. I think we'd better move on smartly.

0:31:390:31:44

-Into Japan, now.

-Yeah.

0:31:440:31:47

We've got a terminally boring Imari plate here.

0:31:470:31:51

Ballast in the tea clippers.

0:31:510:31:54

Anyway, unfortunately it never sank and you've got to deal with it now.

0:31:540:32:01

-It might just sink in the auction!

-It wasn't expensive. £25.

0:32:010:32:05

-Oh, well.

-It does just sum up

0:32:050:32:07

the sort of average low-grade stuff that you can't expect

0:32:070:32:12

-to turn into a big profit.

-No.

0:32:120:32:14

They might, if they're lucky, break even.

0:32:140:32:18

-That's your estimate?

-£10 to £20. Might get 25.

0:32:180:32:21

OK, fine. Better quality and seriously much jollier.

0:32:210:32:25

-Yes.

-This Fuku fellow's plate.

-Yeah.

0:32:250:32:30

Fukagawa, a great make.

0:32:300:32:32

It's absolutely super. Lovely quality. Nice size. Good condition.

0:32:320:32:38

-Gilding's not worn. It's got everything.

-He likes it. How much?

0:32:380:32:43

-£80 to £120?

-Fine. £95 paid.

0:32:430:32:46

-That's good.

-That's quite snug.

-Yes, it is.

0:32:460:32:49

Depending on how the conical caster gets on, the die will be cast for this team

0:32:490:32:56

and they may need their bonus buy so let's have a look at it.

0:32:560:33:00

Christina and Rosemary, this is the reveal moment.

0:33:000:33:03

You spent £240, which is magnificent, and gave David £60. What did he buy?

0:33:030:33:09

Are you ready?

0:33:090:33:11

-Oh.

-It's a lipstick.

0:33:110:33:13

It's a lipstick!

0:33:150:33:16

-You lying...

-It isn't really!

0:33:160:33:19

-It would be a very posh lipstick.

-It certainly would.

-It's very light.

0:33:190:33:25

It's a sealing wax holder.

0:33:250:33:28

Imagine writing a letter, you need to seal it.

0:33:280:33:31

You hold that over a candle,

0:33:310:33:35

drip the wax onto the paper, stamp it and seal it.

0:33:350:33:39

How much was it?

0:33:390:33:40

I had £60. How much do you think?

0:33:400:33:43

If it's real silver, I would say £50. I'd pay £50 for it.

0:33:430:33:48

I would. I paid 60.

0:33:480:33:50

-OK.

-So, every last penny on it.

0:33:500:33:52

-What do you think, Rosemary?

-It's very light.

0:33:520:33:56

I'm not impressed by the amount of silver.

0:33:560:33:59

Because of the lightness. I was expecting it to be heavier.

0:33:590:34:03

-You're all about quantity.

-Not "all"! It's a consideration.

0:34:030:34:07

You've got a 50-50 split here.

0:34:080:34:11

-Yes.

-It's going to be interesting when you have to choose.

0:34:110:34:15

But for the audience at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about...it.

0:34:150:34:22

-There you go, James. An unusual little object.

-I've never seen one.

0:34:220:34:27

It's difficult to put an estimate on it without having seen one before.

0:34:270:34:33

-Looks as if it's out of a travelling set, doesn't it?

-Hm.

0:34:330:34:38

Nail buffers and writing equipment, pen holder.

0:34:380:34:42

The hallmark is there.

0:34:420:34:45

It's got a V-shaped clip to hold the wax in place.

0:34:450:34:49

-I think it's absolutely right.

-How much for a collector, though?

0:34:490:34:53

All of this type of thing

0:34:530:34:55

tend to make around the same estimate, £30 to £50.

0:34:550:34:59

-£60 was paid. David's quite hopeful for £60.

-It's interesting, but...

0:34:590:35:04

-He might just get there but it's not going to be a huge profit.

-No.

0:35:040:35:09

-Are you taking the sale?

-I am.

-We're in safe hands.

0:35:090:35:13

Now, Sarah. Yvonne sadly not here. You all on your own.

0:35:220:35:26

-Are you feeling nervy?

-No, I'm feeling excited.

0:35:260:35:30

Not many people have to stand here alone and take this on board.

0:35:300:35:35

-She's very good.

-She is very good, yeah.

0:35:350:35:38

First up, though, is the cut glass pots.

0:35:380:35:42

Lot 600 is the silver-mounted circular jar and cover. 32 for two.

0:35:420:35:47

At £30, and two do I see? 32, 35, 38.

0:35:470:35:52

And 40. And two beats it. 42 for you...?

0:35:520:35:55

You're in profit.

0:35:550:35:57

..42 in the doorway. 45 now? £42 in the doorway.

0:35:570:36:00

45 do I see? For both of them.

0:36:000:36:03

At £42. Any advance at 42...?

0:36:030:36:07

A profit's a profit. Well done, Kate. Plus £2.

0:36:080:36:11

-Superb! So, your joint plate.

-Yes!

0:36:110:36:16

Lot 601.

0:36:160:36:18

The Derby porcelain dish.

0:36:180:36:21

I can start the bidding at £25.

0:36:210:36:23

28 do I see? Good early piece of Derby. 28 now?

0:36:230:36:28

Absentee bid will take it at 25. 28 now?

0:36:280:36:31

28. And 30. And two?

0:36:310:36:34

32. 35. 38?

0:36:340:36:36

No. 35 with me. At 38 now?

0:36:360:36:39

At 35, it's against you. £35...

0:36:390:36:43

Bad luck. Minus three. Which means you're minus one!

0:36:440:36:49

Which is ridiculous!

0:36:490:36:51

Stand by for Yvonne's dish.

0:36:510:36:54

Lot 602. The Derby porcelain

0:36:540:36:57

shell-shaped dish - a lovely piece of early 19th-century porcelain.

0:36:570:37:02

One, two, three, four, five bids on it.

0:37:020:37:04

£60 starts it. At 60, and five now?

0:37:040:37:08

Five do I see? Five.

0:37:080:37:10

70. Five?

0:37:100:37:13

It's against you again at £70.

0:37:130:37:16

Nod once more. At 70 it's with me. It's against you.

0:37:160:37:20

Five anywhere? It's with me at 70.

0:37:200:37:23

It's plus £10. That's OK. Overall you are plus £9.

0:37:230:37:28

-Which is brilliant.

-Yes.

0:37:280:37:30

What are we going to do about the plaque?

0:37:300:37:34

I think I'm going to leave it. I'm going to stick.

0:37:340:37:38

-Did you talk to Yvonne about what your strategy was?

-Yes. I did.

0:37:380:37:42

-What are you going to do?

-I'm going to leave the bonus buy. Yes.

0:37:420:37:47

-No bonus buy.

-Bank the money.

-Yes.

-Bank the money.

-Yes.

0:37:470:37:51

-It could be a winning score and it's lovely to be in profit.

-Yeah.

0:37:510:37:56

But we're going to sell it anyway, so stand by, Kate.

0:37:560:38:00

I can start the bidding at 55. 60 now?

0:38:000:38:04

60 anywhere? At 55 and 60.

0:38:040:38:07

65. 70? At 65. 70 do I see?

0:38:070:38:10

It's with me at 65. It's against you at 65.

0:38:100:38:14

70 anywhere? Absentee bid at 65...

0:38:140:38:18

-£65.

-You are a very wise girl.

0:38:190:38:22

You certainly are. You and Yvonne are no fools.

0:38:220:38:26

That could be a winning score.

0:38:260:38:28

-Plus £9 overall. Don't tell the blues.

-No. Won't tell them.

0:38:280:38:33

Christina and Rosemary, have you been talking to the remaining red?

0:38:390:38:44

-No.

-Good. Because we don't want you to know her result.

0:38:440:38:50

First is the sugar caster. Lots of excitement in this crowded room.

0:38:500:38:55

48 starts it. 50 now?

0:38:550:38:58

At 48. 50 do I see?

0:38:580:39:00

At £48. 50.

0:39:000:39:03

-Five...?

-Come on!

-..at £55.

0:39:030:39:06

Go on. One more! 60? At 55 it's with me.

0:39:060:39:10

60 by the door. 65...

0:39:100:39:12

-Come on!

-..70 takes it. Don't lose it for £5!

0:39:120:39:15

70? Yes?

0:39:150:39:17

Free coffee in the coffee shop! 70?

0:39:180:39:21

Free panini as well! 70?

0:39:210:39:24

-Go on! Well done, James!

-No, at £65 it's with me.

0:39:240:39:28

It's against you by the door. You'll cry all the way home.

0:39:280:39:32

All done at 65? Anybody else?

0:39:320:39:35

-Ooh!

-Rosemary, that's minus £55.

-Ssh. Quiet! Quiet!

0:39:350:39:40

-That's not good, Rosemary.

-No, it's not good.

0:39:400:39:44

Now, the Imari plate.

0:39:440:39:46

The little Japanese plate.

0:39:460:39:49

One bid on it so I'll start it at £10. 12 do I see?

0:39:490:39:54

At £10. 12 now? At £10. Do I see 12?

0:39:540:39:57

12 waving. 15. 18, sir?

0:39:570:39:59

18, 20 and two beats it? At £20 with me.

0:39:590:40:02

-Oh, no. Come on!

-..The absentee bid.

0:40:020:40:05

At 20. Do I see 22?

0:40:050:40:07

Christina, that's minus £5 for you, darling.

0:40:080:40:11

-Minus 60 overall.

-Here's the big one.

0:40:110:40:15

The Japanese Fukagawa plate or charger. 95 starts it.

0:40:150:40:20

£95. 100 do I see? 100 standing, sir.

0:40:200:40:24

And five. 110 for you? 110 in the room. 120 now?

0:40:240:40:27

110 standing. 120 do I see?

0:40:270:40:30

At 110. 120 anywhere?

0:40:300:40:34

At 110, any advance...?

0:40:340:40:36

110! All I can say is Fukagawa!

0:40:370:40:41

That's a very good thing. A profit of £15.

0:40:430:40:46

David, you are brilliant.

0:40:460:40:49

Overall, I'm afraid you are minus £45.

0:40:490:40:53

-What are you going to do about the wax holder?

-Oh, I think so.

0:40:530:40:58

We're going with the bonus buy. Here it comes.

0:40:580:41:01

Lot 631 is the Edwardian, silver-handled wax holder.

0:41:010:41:06

One bid at 30. One higher. 32 starts it.

0:41:060:41:08

35 now? At 32. 35 do I see? At £32.

0:41:080:41:13

35. 38 with me and 40. It's against you.

0:41:130:41:18

At £38. 40 do I see? At 38....

0:41:180:41:21

-Oh, no!

-Come on!

-..Do I see 40 anywhere?

0:41:210:41:24

40!

0:41:250:41:28

42. 45? One more. 45. 48 now?

0:41:280:41:32

-At 45 in the room. 48 do I see...?

-Go on, James.

0:41:320:41:37

£45. 48? Anybody else? At 45...

0:41:370:41:41

You're minus 15. You're minus 60.

0:41:430:41:46

-Never mind.

-Minus £60 overall.

0:41:460:41:49

-I thought it was going to take off.

-He did well there, I must say.

0:41:490:41:54

Right, so minus £60. Don't tell the red anything.

0:41:540:41:59

-No, we won't. The singular red.

-The singular red.

0:41:590:42:02

Well done. You're great sports.

0:42:020:42:05

What fun we've had today.

0:42:100:42:12

Some monster losses, though. Have you been chatting?

0:42:120:42:15

-EVERYONE: No.

-You've not?

-No.

0:42:150:42:18

-Have you been on to Yvonne?

-No.

-You're saving it.

-Saving it.

0:42:180:42:22

Until you know whether you're ahead.

0:42:220:42:25

The team that is behind by some considerable margin are the blues.

0:42:250:42:30

ALL GROAN

0:42:300:42:32

Yes, Rosemary, £55 down the plughole

0:42:320:42:37

with the Clarice Cliff shape was not a good result - a result that you didn't recover from.

0:42:370:42:43

Overall, minus £60. But you've been a great team.

0:42:430:42:47

It's not the winning, it's the taking part.

0:42:470:42:51

Sadly, Yvonne is not with us to enjoy this moment of victory.

0:42:510:42:55

I'm going to hand you money, which is something else. £9.

0:42:550:43:00

That's £4.50 each. Less any commission you decide to pay Kate.

0:43:000:43:05

£9 overall profit is well-earned.

0:43:050:43:09

Join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes?

0:43:090:43:12

YES!

0:43:120:43:13

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:260:43:28

Kate Bliss and David Harper are the experts joining Tim Wonnacott at the Jaguar Antiques Fair at Derby University. With only one hour to find three items to sell for a profit at auction both teams need to have their wits about them to win. Tim visits Hatfield House in Hertfordshire which has been in the same family for thirteen generations.