South Bargain Hunt


South

Antiques challenge. Tim Wonnacott welcomes teams of bargain hunters to Hungerford in West Berkshire, where they are joined by experts Mark Stacey and Philip Allwood.


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Transcript


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Welcome, Bargain Hunters, to Hungerford in West Berkshire.

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Today, we're shopping in the Hungerford Arcade.

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We've given two teams - one red, one blue -

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the enviable task of shopping here for one hour.

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They get a budget of £300 to find three objects,

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antiques or collectibles, which are taken off to auction.

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The aim of the game is to sell them for more money than they paid

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as any profit they make they'll get to keep.

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Let's go and meet the teams.

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And here they are. For the reds we've got sisters Wendy and Shelley, double trouble there!

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And battling away for the blues, father and son Brian and Paul.

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Welcome to Bargain Hunt. You're sisters. Close, or are we going to have fireworks?

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-We're very close.

-Yeah, we're close.

-Very close.

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-But we debate a lot.

-We're good at debating!

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And you do a bit of chatting with one another?

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-We do.

-Quite a bit.

-Quite a bit.

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-Every day.

-Twice a day.

-On the...

-Three times a day.

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And we might meet in the evenings.

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-What will you be looking out for today?

-Maybe something silver. That sells well.

-Yes.

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And we want something that's maybe a bit modern,

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a bit Art Deco with nice lines.

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-Design led, that type of thing.

-Yes, that will go in a modern house.

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-You're young and with it.

-Yes!

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And clean and lean, and all that.

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-Shell, this isn't your first time on television?

-No, it's not.

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-Tell us about the shows you've starred in.

-The other show I've been on is Blind Date!

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Blind Date?! Did you? What's Cilla like? Is she nice?

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She was OK. A very professional lady. Yes.

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-Did you get picked?

-Yes. Went to Jamaica.

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-No!

-I did a bit of water-skiing

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and had a bit of a laugh. It was good fun.

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-You didn't marry the man that picked you?

-No, I didn't.

-Did you get "close" to him?

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-No. Just had fun, really.

-Just fun.

-Just fun.

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Very good luck to you. I think you'll be good at this lark.

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-Boys, are you scared?

-Yes!

-Definitely!

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You've seen this. They are formidable!

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-Are you well prepared for today's Bargain Hunting?

-I think so.

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-Got any collections yourself?

-I don't collect but I have a big collection of tools.

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-Where do you keep them all?

-In three sheds and a garage.

-Really?

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-It's a family joke.

-Is it?

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Every time Dad wants to do a job, he buys a new tool.

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Cos he can't find the old one!

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Do you collect anything?

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-I watched an episode of the Antiques Roadshow...

-Splendid programme.

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-BBC programme.

-Indeed.

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There was an autographed Beatles record.

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I saw it went for quite a good price

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so I thought I'd choose a band around at the moment

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and I chose the band U2.

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-What have you got in your collection? Records?

-Not just records.

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-Things ranging from inflatable cars.

-Inflatable cars?

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Inflatable lemons.

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-Right.

-And even, if I'm allowed to say, U2 condoms!

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U2 condoms?! Are they inflatable as well?

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The girls think that's terribly funny!

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I don't think U2 condom is a trade name, so we'll allow it.

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-It may be collectible one day.

-If they're still in their original packaging!

-Not been used!

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Let's keep this wholesome, shall we?

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So, apart from looking out for U2 memorabilia today, what will you be going for?

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What will we be going for? I think the old household favourites,

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possibly, if we can, Clarice Cliff or maybe some Wedgwood or Doulton.

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Do you know about Clarice Cliff?

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I've been quite fortunate. I did buy a boxed lot at one stage

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that had on top of the box some glass bowls

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and fortunately underneath the box, I'm not sure the auctioneer noticed it was there,

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was a Clarice Cliff dinner service!

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-Ah!

-So it was very fortunate and paid for my ticket to Australia.

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-So you are an expert on Clarice Cliff?

-Hopefully!

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Now, the money moment. £300 apiece.

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A wodge of cash. How lovely.

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You know the rules. Your experts await. Off you go.

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And very good luck!

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So their hour has started. Let's hope their experts are ready for them.

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Yes, both teams have expert knowledge on hand to help them pick up their bargains.

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With the reds, it's number one, Mark Stacey.

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And for the blues, unmistakably, Philip Allwood.

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OK, teams. Three bargains with £300.

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Let battle commence!

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£300!

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Anything you like in there?

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I'm still looking.

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That's Beswick and that's Shelley.

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-Get a bit bored with those.

-But it's my name!

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But it is 295. We're probably just out on that.

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-See the Elizabeth II pepper pot?

-Where?

-With the crown on it.

-At the back?

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-At the back?

-Oh, yes!

-That's quite stylish, isn't it?

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-Silver jubilee.

-How much is it?

-£150 the pair.

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A pair? Oh, cos it's got the little salt with it.

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-Yes.

-The silver salt.

-Why don't we look at that?

-Shall we?

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Salt and pepper pots, or cruet set, if you fancy.

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How does this kind of stuff sell?

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It's becoming more collectible. We'd need to get the price down.

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I don't know if this dealer negotiates but we'd need the price down.

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-They'd be a speculative buy.

-OK.

-Because of the jubilee connection.

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I think they're quite stylish. Do you know what I mean?

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If there wasn't that on there you'd happily use that.

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I like the way the holes are there.

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Don't people go for kind of royalty kind of...

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They can do. It's not as collectible as it once was

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because we're not as royalist as we once were, if you know what I mean.

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-Shall we see what we can get for these?

-Shall we?

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-We'll find out the best on those.

-We'll run out of time.

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We need to go round the corner.

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The reds haven't bought the cruet set. They've put it on the back burner.

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But it could be theirs for £100.

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Over to the blues, now. What's tempting them?

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What about the plaques?

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No. Right, what have we got there?

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145.

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OK. Shall we have a look at them?

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We want to look at the Copeland plaques, if possible.

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There we go. They're pretty smart, aren't they? Look at those.

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Copeland & Garrett. 1830, '40, that sort of period.

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They are going to be made out of, by the looks of it, porcelain.

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Are they a collectors' piece?

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They certainly will be. These are reasonably early bits of Copeland.

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Bacchanalian figures, there.

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Looks like Bacchus sitting in a basket. He's had a good night!

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-And that one...

-Good end to an evening!

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-That's rude!

-They're a load of Bacchanalian figures.

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They're obviously moving a donkey somewhere!

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Yes, slightly risque.

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Building on Greek and Roman myths, traditional stories.

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-Um...

-Risky usually sells, doesn't it?

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-It can do.

-What do you reckon it'd sell for?

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Probably if they were in my sale room I'd estimate them at around 100 to £150.

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Might possibly get a little more than that but it's...

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-So if we can get them down to closer to 100 than...

-The 145.

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100 is what we're looking at.

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I think you might well have a chance there.

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-OK, we'll try for the 100.

-Let's have a look.

-Let's go.

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Chaps, time for some negotiating with the manager.

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They're looking between 90 and 100. Can you do anything for me?

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You're certainly in that ball game.

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-I did a bit better than what you wanted.

-95. Most definitely.

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-We'll have a go at that.

-That's put a smile on my face!

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Strike one to the blues. The reds have some catching up to do.

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What about something like these?

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Like carpet bowls.

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Those kind of things.

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I quite like that. Do you quite like that?

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Those are fun, aren't they?

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-I think they're fun, too.

-I like them.

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We need to get them out and see. They're in their original box

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with the rules of engagement.

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Have a proper look.

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They're pretty smart.

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Candlesticks.

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Yeah. By Linley. Lord Linley.

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Good quality. Great maker. Good name.

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-But I just think...

-Around 150.

-We can come back to that, maybe.

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-Yeah.

-Come back to it.

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Actually it's... This is the original box.

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-Can I pick one out?

-Of course you can.

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-Have the bowls.

-I think they're great.

-I love them.

-They're good fun.

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What we've got here is a 1930s set of carpet bowls.

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What I like about them is the box is original.

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You can see that. They're beautifully fitted inside.

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You have the rules of the game there.

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All the details here are rather interesting.

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They're "perfectly balanced miniatures."

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So you roll the jack down the carpet

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and use the colours to try and play a normal game of bowls.

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-They're all marked...

-Typical British weather.

-I'd have these.

-Would you?

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Yes.

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-Oh, isn't that great? I think we should find out how much we can get those for.

-Yes.

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They're £79 at the moment.

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-Well, let's see what we can get them for.

-OK. Let's see. Brilliant.

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Now, this is a bit of fun that I've found on the stall here in the antiques centre.

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What we've got here is a basic Staffordshire porcelain tea cup and saucer

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and a little booklet.

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Ordinarily, you'd expect an ordinary Ainsley tea cup and saucer

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to have been made around about 1905 and in the white, completely unmarked.

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It might be worth, at most, at auction, about 50p!

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But this is rather special.

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What we've got is a cup and saucer

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which are marked with a whole lot of mumbo-jumbo.

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Stars and symbols.

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Fortunately, the cup and saucer comes with a booklet. Here it is.

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It says, "Would'st learn thy future with thy tea?

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"This Magic Cup will showth it thee."

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So what this is is a tea-leaf reading kit.

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You've got the tea cup, you've got the saucer

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and you've got the little booklet telling us how to do it.

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You pour the tea into the cup,

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not with a teabag, with old-fashioned tea leaves!

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Swirl the tea leaves in the cup, splash it into the saucer

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and start making your predictions.

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Now, it tells you here that what you've got

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are planetary signs, which are the red ones running round the star in the middle.

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It tells you in the booklet that depending on where the tea falls within the cup,

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enables you to make a prediction.

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So if your tea leaves happen to have the odd long stem in them,

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and that long stem, for example, was to land here,

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on that lunar symbol,

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you can read that your wife, sweetheart or husband

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will be "very rash, headstrong and independent,

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"of a peculiar disposition, artistic and erratic."

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So watch out!

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This whole outfit - the book, the cup and saucer -

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could be yours today for £15.

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Is that cheap or expensive? I don't know.

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But it's great fun!

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Now, back to our Bargain Hunters.

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What fortunes lie ahead for them?

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-The thing is...

-It is what it is.

-Broken.

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-Does that say "Wiltshire men in London?"

-Yes. Mark, we quite like this.

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"Wiltshire men in London" snuff box.

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-Yes.

-Table snuff box.

-No.

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-Why not?

-Because I don't think anybody's gonna use it.

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How old is it?

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-1910.

-Yeah.

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-No?

-I don't think anybody's gonna buy it. That's the problem.

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Hang on, Mark. This is up to the girls. At least let them have a look.

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-I've just heard from the chap about the carpet bowls. We can have them for £60. So £19 off.

-Brilliant.

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-We'll go with that.

-I think they'll sell.

-They will.

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You liked those, both of you. So we've got to go with those.

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-Why don't you like this snuff box?

-First, because it's light weight.

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What's that telling you? It's not...

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I just don't think people are gonna go for it, to be honest.

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Oh, dear. The reds warned us about their debating!

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How are the blues doing?

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£20. You'll struggle with that.

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Keep looking, blues.

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Have Wendy and Shelley convinced Mark yet?

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-We'll sell it in Somerset.

-But we're Wiltshire girls.

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But not Wiltshire men!

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-It's a snuff box.

-And it's hallmarked.

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-Hallmarked.

-Hallmarked there and on the lid.

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Tell me why you like it so much. I think it's awful!

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I like the shape. It's useful to have on your dressing table.

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You could stick rings or bangles in it.

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-And it looks nice.

-It does look nice. It's clean and tidy.

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There's not a lot one can say about it. It's hallmarked, a bonus.

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I suppose it comes down to how collectible the society is.

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At £105, if there isn't anybody there to collect it, it'll bomb.

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But who knows?

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-I think we need to try and get that down a bit.

-How much do we need to get it down by?

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It's difficult to say, but we need to get it down to 80 or less.

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-OK.

-Right, OK.

-We must try and get that down.

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-Are you up for it?

-Definitely.

-Let's go.

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Don't mess with the girls, Mark!

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They picked up the silver hallmarked snuff box for £85.

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Also, as a desk, where do you put your computer?

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-These are older pieces of silver.

-How do you know that?

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Because you can read the labels. 1912!

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89 quid. Let's have a look and see what we've got there.

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-Doesn't look like a lot. There's a split there.

-A bit of a split.

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It's almost certainly a German movement.

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Probably dates to about 1900.

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It's got an eight-day movement.

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It's quite fun. They've obviously tarted it up a bit.

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It's quite a showy thing for that money.

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That's what I thought. It stood out.

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When it was made, it would have been a relatively cheap model.

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But trying not to be.

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89 quid. If we can get it for 60 quid or something like that.

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-It might be worth it.

-Let's have a go.

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That's the blues' second. The 19th-century German mantel clock

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came in at £70.

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-Oh, look, Shelley, is that a...

-A Spirograph!

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At £360, girls, so shall we move on from that, I think?

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15 minutes left and so far the blues have spent £95 on the plaques

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and £70 on the clock, leaving them 165 to spend.

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We're back at those candlesticks.

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-Do you think they might be...

-Well, they are pretty smart.

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They spotted these candlesticks earlier.

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Will they be as tempting this time round?

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-Shall we get them out and have a look?

-Yes!

-I think we ought to.

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A pair of boxed Linley column walnut candlesticks.

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150. Nice and clearly stamped here, "Linley".

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From the workshops of Viscount Linley.

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One of the more respected furniture designers and makers of the last and into this century.

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I know they're not old. In fact, they almost couldn't be newer.

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-You could see them in a new house.

-Absolutely.

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I don't know what they sold for new.

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I would imagine... I would imagine more.

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I think it might be worth a call, to see how far we can get them.

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If we can get them closer to 100 than 150, you might see them making that.

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Shall we see if a deal can be done?

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They were asking 150, but our boys in blue snapped up the Linley candlesticks

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for 120.

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Now, both teams should be thinking about how much leftover lolly

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they're gonna leave their experts.

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Any unspent cash will be handed over to Mark and Philip

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whose aim will be to find a mystery bonus buy.

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This surprise will be revealed to our teams later.

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Then after the sale of their third item, both teams will take a gamble

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on the money their bonus buy could make.

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Any profit it makes they'll keep,

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but any loss will be deducted from their final score. That could decide who wins.

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Back to Shelley and Wendy.

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They've splashed out 60 on the bowls, 85 on the snuff box

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and need to decide on the cruet set.

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Ten minutes and £155 left. Decisions, please!

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What do you like about it, Wendy?

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It's a bit unusual. They're not your average scale that you find.

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No, because they're tobacco scales.

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-So they're not in every household!

-Not in every household!

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They are made by a very good maker.

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Avery is one of the most well known.

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-What's it made out of?

-Metal, but it's had paint put on to simulate a wooden frame.

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-I guess this is made 1940s, I guess.

-OK.

0:18:420:18:47

You could still go in tobacconists' then and buy loose tobacco and have a cigarette blended.

0:18:470:18:53

-I think it's unusual. It's not the set kind of standard thing that people...

-Looks good.

0:18:530:18:59

-Yeah.

-How much is it?

0:18:590:19:00

Well, the label here says it's £85.

0:19:000:19:04

That's a bad sign. We need to get that down.

0:19:040:19:07

If we get this, we can't get the salt and pepper pots.

0:19:070:19:09

True. If we get this, the salt and pepper's out.

0:19:090:19:13

You're not over impressed with that. It's still a consideration.

0:19:130:19:17

-I prefer this.

-I think this is...

-It's got a chance...

0:19:170:19:20

-It's different.

-..of making more money than the salt and pepper pot.

0:19:200:19:24

Well, to be honest with you, the limitation with this is who wants it.

0:19:240:19:30

People collect tobacco memorabilia and pipes and ash trays and snuff boxes!

0:19:300:19:35

You're selling it to me. Let's hope the people of Crewkerne like it.

0:19:350:19:39

-Yes. OK.

-They'd be silly not to!

0:19:390:19:42

That's both teams over the finishing line with their three items,

0:19:480:19:52

so let's have a quick reminder as to how the reds got on.

0:19:520:19:55

Reds got the day started with the 1930s boxed set of carpet bowls.

0:19:550:20:01

Next up, the silver snuff box.

0:20:030:20:05

Mark thinks it's more duff than snuff, but the girls disagree.

0:20:050:20:10

And weighing finally was the set of tobacco scales.

0:20:100:20:14

Oh, dear!

0:20:140:20:15

-Did they run you round?

-They've run me ragged.

0:20:150:20:18

-But I've enjoyed it!

-I don't blame you!

0:20:180:20:21

-Well, girls, you had a good shop.

-Yes.

0:20:210:20:24

Yes, absolutely hectic. Which is your favourite piece, Shell?

0:20:240:20:28

Favourite piece? What do you think?

0:20:280:20:31

-I really like the scales.

-Yes.

-Mark gave us such a hard time about them.

0:20:310:20:35

The scales your favourite piece?

0:20:350:20:37

You spent a magnificent £205. That was really hot.

0:20:370:20:41

-£95 of leftover lolly. Thank you very much. £95 to you, Mark.

-Thank you, Tim.

0:20:410:20:46

We absolutely understand the difficulty you've been having!

0:20:460:20:50

Super!

0:20:500:20:51

-So you're up for this?

-Yes I think I've found something that might clean up a profit.

0:20:510:20:57

Clean up? There could be a hint there.

0:20:570:20:59

I wonder if they'll pick up on that?

0:20:590:21:01

But the girls don't get to see the bonus buy till we get to auction.

0:21:010:21:06

-Something to look forward to.

-Absolutely.

0:21:060:21:08

You slip off and make sure that you get it.

0:21:080:21:11

Meanwhile, let's remind ourselves of what the blues bought.

0:21:110:21:16

Brian and Paul's first buy

0:21:160:21:18

were the mid-19th-century Copeland & Garrett wall plaques.

0:21:180:21:23

Then they found the late 19th-century German mantel clock.

0:21:230:21:26

But last, and not least, were the Viscount Linley walnut candlesticks.

0:21:280:21:33

What is our favourite piece, Paul?

0:21:340:21:36

I'd say my favourite is the Linley candlesticks.

0:21:360:21:39

-You, Brian?

-I like the Spode plaques.

0:21:390:21:42

You like those best. Great.

0:21:420:21:44

You spent a magnificent £285.

0:21:440:21:46

Here are 15 miserable smackers for you to find that bonus buy.

0:21:460:21:51

-Sorry!

-Thanks(!) I'll do what I can.

0:21:510:21:54

What you do, you do.

0:21:540:21:56

-Very good luck with your trawl.

-I think that might be needed for this one!

0:21:560:22:00

We are gonna head off to the auction. But before that,

0:22:000:22:05

I'm going to the most beautiful house - Mompesson House, Salisbury.

0:22:050:22:10

Gotta be careful how you say that!

0:22:100:22:12

Set within the walls of the world famous Salisbury Cathedral,

0:22:190:22:24

actually at Number 53, Cathedral Close,

0:22:240:22:27

is Mompesson House,

0:22:270:22:29

quite the most glorious Queen Anne house you're ever likely to find.

0:22:290:22:34

It also enjoys spectacular views.

0:22:340:22:37

But I'm here to take a peek at a spectacular collection of glass.

0:22:450:22:52

Rebuilt in the late 17th century,

0:22:520:22:54

Mompesson has stood in its present state since 1701.

0:22:540:23:00

Inside, you'll find one of the finest bequests belonging to the National Trust.

0:23:000:23:06

Mompesson now houses the Turnbull collection of English drinking glasses

0:23:090:23:15

of which this is only a small selection.

0:23:150:23:19

Actually, there are 370 pieces or so in the house.

0:23:190:23:23

The English glass industry was revolutionised in the 1670s

0:23:230:23:27

when a man called George Ravenscroft introduced glass with a high lead content.

0:23:270:23:34

This flinty-grey glass was very soon adopted

0:23:340:23:38

by the drinking glass makers

0:23:380:23:41

and baluster glasses of this form were produced.

0:23:410:23:45

This glass dates from round about 1700.

0:23:450:23:48

It's got a tapering conical bowl

0:23:480:23:51

and it then sits on this baluster -

0:23:510:23:54

it looks a bit like a squashed mushroom -

0:23:540:23:56

and on a foot that's been over-folded.

0:23:560:23:59

If you imagine that foot progressing to its normal extremity

0:23:590:24:04

the glass would be very thin by the time you get to the end.

0:24:040:24:08

So whilst it's still in a molten state,

0:24:080:24:11

it's bent and folded over on itself.

0:24:110:24:15

Hence you get this fold-over foot which makes it much stronger

0:24:150:24:19

and means the thing will survive without chipping.

0:24:190:24:23

I've selected this little glass to look at.

0:24:230:24:26

The indication of its usage is engraved on the outside

0:24:260:24:30

where we've got a hop and an ear of barley.

0:24:300:24:34

In fact, ale was brewed to a higher alcoholic content in the 18th century.

0:24:340:24:40

It was as alcoholic as wine.

0:24:400:24:42

You had weak beer, which was watered down stuff for everyday drinking.

0:24:420:24:47

Probably better for you than the water.

0:24:470:24:49

Or ale, which, in elegant society, you would drink out of a glass like this.

0:24:490:24:56

Now, this glass is the absolute epitome

0:24:560:25:00

of what an 18th-century drinking glass collector is looking for.

0:25:000:25:05

It's a cordial with a tiny little bowl.

0:25:050:25:09

Cordial was a drink that was made out of usually brandy

0:25:090:25:15

with various fruits soaking in it.

0:25:150:25:17

So, pick your blackcurrants,

0:25:170:25:19

prick them, soak them in brandy for a year or two,

0:25:190:25:23

decant it, and that very alcoholic cordial drink

0:25:230:25:27

would go into a little glass like this.

0:25:270:25:29

And joy of joy,

0:25:290:25:31

the top edge has been enamelled,

0:25:310:25:34

probably by the Beilby family.

0:25:340:25:36

This enamelling is powdered glass that's been painted on

0:25:360:25:41

and then fired on the outer surface.

0:25:410:25:44

Finally, and perhaps most amusingly, we have this little glass,

0:25:440:25:49

which is called a toastmaster's or firing glass.

0:25:490:25:53

You can see that the small bowl is very thickly drawn

0:25:530:25:58

and that's so that it deceives the eye into thinking

0:25:580:26:02

that there's more alcohol inside it than there really is.

0:26:020:26:06

At a smart affair, the toastmaster, who'd announce each of those toasts,

0:26:060:26:11

had to keep sober!

0:26:110:26:13

Yet he had to drink a little something to be sociable.

0:26:130:26:17

So this sort of glass would cut down on the amount of alcohol he's taking on board

0:26:170:26:22

meaning that he could continue with his job.

0:26:220:26:25

Anyway, the big question is today,

0:26:250:26:28

are we going to be in a position to raise our glasses and toast our teams over at the auction?

0:26:280:26:34

Cheers!

0:26:340:26:36

Still to come on Bargain Hunt:

0:26:370:26:39

our red sisters are still debating.

0:26:390:26:43

-I think so!

-I don't know!

0:26:430:26:45

And the blues clock up some profit.

0:26:450:26:48

Very good, Paul.

0:26:480:26:50

First, let's check in at Lawrence's Auctioneers in Crewkerne

0:26:520:26:56

to see how auctioneer Richard Kaye rates our items.

0:26:560:26:59

Wendy and Shelley's first item are these carpet bowls.

0:27:030:27:06

-Plastic, 1930s, in a box. They're complete.

-Yes.

0:27:060:27:10

And they have the instructions, if you don't know how to play.

0:27:100:27:13

It's nice to have them in their original box. Since they're probably 75 years old,

0:27:130:27:18

nice that they're complete and undamaged.

0:27:180:27:21

-Not sure about the plastic.

-No. These are in a different league.

0:27:210:27:24

-How much do you see them giving for this set?

-£20. £30, perhaps.

0:27:240:27:29

£60 paid. You need to be pretty hopeful.

0:27:290:27:32

Talking about being hopeful, next up is the snuff box.

0:27:320:27:36

-Is it a snuff box?

-It looks like one from here.

0:27:360:27:39

Looking at the bottom,

0:27:390:27:40

one can see that it's had four supports removed,

0:27:400:27:44

cabriole legs that would have been three-quarters of an inch long.

0:27:440:27:48

-Originally it was a dressing table box.

-Ah!

0:27:480:27:51

Those have been snapped off in order for it to be presented

0:27:510:27:54

to "The Wiltshire men in London",

0:27:540:27:56

whatever they were doing between 1861 and 1911.

0:27:560:28:00

It's commemorated with this box. We'll never know.

0:28:000:28:03

-£30, perhaps, maybe a little more on a good day.

-With the wind up its tail.

0:28:030:28:07

With the wind up its tail. But with its legs missing,

0:28:070:28:11

people will walk away from that.

0:28:110:28:13

I think you're absolutely right, Richard. They paid £85 for it.

0:28:130:28:17

It'll be a struggle to get that for it. Really.

0:28:170:28:20

-When you were a nipper...

-Not that long ago!

0:28:200:28:24

No, quite! That's my point! Do you remember going to the sweetie shop

0:28:240:28:29

and being presented with a fine Birmingham-made set of scales like these?

0:28:290:28:34

I never looked at the scales.

0:28:340:28:36

-You probably did!

-I did!

-I was looking at the liquorice allsorts!

0:28:360:28:40

-Which came pre-packed!

-What we have is something that would have stood on the shop counter.

0:28:400:28:46

It's nicely authentic and old-fashioned.

0:28:460:28:50

-Yes.

-I think that they might make 30 or £40.

0:28:500:28:54

Do you regard that as a bullish estimate?

0:28:540:28:57

-That's as much as I'd expect them to make. I don't think it's conservative.

-No, OK.

0:28:570:29:02

£60 they paid, our lads. We have a trio here, in my view,

0:29:020:29:07

of what might be termed really "sticky" objects

0:29:070:29:11

in terms of making profits.

0:29:110:29:13

-FRENCH ACCENT:

-So for certain they're gonna need the bonus buy. Let's have a look.

0:29:130:29:19

You spent £205, girls, which is magnificent.

0:29:200:29:23

You gave Mark Stacey £95. What did he spend it on?

0:29:230:29:26

This, Tim.

0:29:270:29:28

Now, this is... No, don't laugh, girls. It's wonderful.

0:29:280:29:32

It's a Royal Doulton stoneware soap dish

0:29:320:29:36

especially made for Wright's Coal Tar Soap.

0:29:360:29:39

It cost me £58.

0:29:390:29:41

Right. OK.

0:29:410:29:43

-What do you think, girls?

-It was made for a soap?

0:29:440:29:47

Wright's Coal Tar. All the information is on the bottom.

0:29:470:29:51

I love that little dragonfly, don't you?

0:29:510:29:54

-It looks really dunky.

-Dunky?

0:29:540:29:57

Sorry, Mark! Is this the kind of stuff you have in your house?

0:29:570:30:00

-I would have that in my house.

-Really?

0:30:000:30:03

This is the girl who bought the tobacco scales!

0:30:030:30:07

-Well, I just...

-OK. How much do you think it will make?

0:30:070:30:11

Well, they do vary. It could, on a good day, make 60 or £70.

0:30:110:30:16

-Look at his eyes!

-But on a bad day...

0:30:160:30:18

-Right.

-You obviously don't like it much!

0:30:200:30:22

That doesn't matter. Don't decide now. Decide later.

0:30:220:30:26

For the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks of the soap dish.

0:30:260:30:31

Well, Richard, one soap dish.

0:30:310:30:34

I think that's quite a pretty piece. The fact that it's Doulton will appeal to collectors.

0:30:340:30:39

I don't think anyone who buys this will put it in their bathroom.

0:30:390:30:43

-No?

-I don't think so. It's too nice for that.

0:30:430:30:45

No chips or marks on it. The glaze is even. Nicely marked on the base.

0:30:450:30:49

I see that making 30 to £50.

0:30:490:30:51

So enthusiastic. Brilliant.

0:30:510:30:53

£58 was paid by Mark Stacey as his bonus buy.

0:30:530:30:57

We won't tell him about your estimate, all right?

0:30:570:31:00

Keep that quiet for a bit!

0:31:000:31:02

That's it for the reds. Now the blue team.

0:31:020:31:05

Their first item is this German frightfully elaborate mantel clock,

0:31:050:31:10

like it's just come out of the showroom!

0:31:100:31:12

It's a test of time that has not stood the test of time very well.

0:31:120:31:16

Because when one looks at it closely,

0:31:160:31:18

there are all sorts of amendments and repairs to it

0:31:180:31:22

which I think will put people off a little.

0:31:220:31:26

What is definitely clear is that one of the finials on the case

0:31:260:31:30

has been completely remade

0:31:300:31:33

and also it's suspiciously glossy and shiny.

0:31:330:31:37

It's architectural. It's quite fun.

0:31:370:31:39

-It is.

-But terribly shiny!

0:31:390:31:41

Clock collectors, as you know, are terribly concerned about originality.

0:31:410:31:45

-Even if they're only spending 50 or £60.

-Oh, yes.

0:31:450:31:48

-Which is probably all this will make on a good day.

-50 to £60, you reckon? £70 paid.

0:31:480:31:54

The next item are the pair of plaques.

0:31:540:31:56

Apparently Copeland Garrett plaques.

0:31:560:31:59

-So collectible relief-moulded plaques with these classical subjects.

-Yes.

0:31:590:32:04

Rather ruined frames, aren't they?

0:32:040:32:07

The frames are not what people will buy them for.

0:32:070:32:10

-The collector might be more interested in what's in the frame.

-Yes.

0:32:100:32:14

Although the frames do give them a nice period feel

0:32:140:32:17

-and I'd rather have them in frames like that than modern frames.

-Yes.

0:32:170:32:21

-The plaques are not too bad condition.

-No, and nice subjects, too.

0:32:210:32:26

-How much do you think they're worth?

-They might make 60 to £80, if we're in luck.

0:32:260:32:30

Yeah. £95 paid.

0:32:300:32:32

Now we come to these jokers. A pair of brand-new candlesticks.

0:32:320:32:37

-The only thing classical about them is the shape of the columns.

-Yes.

0:32:370:32:41

-Probably not even ten years old.

-No.

0:32:410:32:44

But again, they're a pair of candlesticks and people like that.

0:32:440:32:47

But the intriguing thing about them is that they are stamped "Linley".

0:32:470:32:51

The quality is a little surprising in that respect.

0:32:510:32:54

Not as good as you'd expect from this...

0:32:540:32:58

He's associated with exceptional quality of craftsmanship.

0:32:580:33:02

Maybe these are not the best reflection of what he does best.

0:33:020:33:06

They're still a handsome pair of candlesticks and I think they might make 80 to £100.

0:33:060:33:11

Brilliant. £120 was paid.

0:33:110:33:14

So we're all on the right frame.

0:33:140:33:16

Just in case, we'll look at the bonus buy. Here it comes.

0:33:160:33:19

Paul and Brian, you spent a magnificent £285.

0:33:190:33:23

You gave him over there £15 only.

0:33:230:33:27

-Difficult job, that, Philip?

-Yes.

0:33:270:33:29

It was very difficult to find anything for sale for £15.

0:33:290:33:34

Here's the bonus buy. Oh. Yes.

0:33:340:33:37

-Wo!

-It is a rather neat barometer.

0:33:370:33:42

A little aneroid barometer.

0:33:420:33:44

Which I thought for 15 quid wasn't too bad at all.

0:33:440:33:48

Absolutely fantastic for 15 quid.

0:33:480:33:50

-Do you want to handle the merchandise?

-Definitely.

0:33:500:33:53

-We were looking at a barometer.

-We were.

-Not quite that size,

0:33:530:33:57

and you say it works.

0:33:570:34:00

The inevitable question, will it make a profit at auction?

0:34:000:34:03

I think there's quite clearly a profit in it.

0:34:030:34:06

I'm gonna predict a ten or £15 profit, I would have thought.

0:34:060:34:12

-Excellent.

-Well done, Philip.

0:34:120:34:14

They both love it. They both think £15 is a very inexpensive price.

0:34:140:34:19

You don't have to decide now. Decide later.

0:34:190:34:21

But for viewers at home, let's find out

0:34:210:34:24

whether the auctioneer thinks the barometer is set fair or not.

0:34:240:34:28

So, is all set fair for the auction?

0:34:280:34:30

Well, it says rain. And rain suggests disappointment.

0:34:300:34:34

It's the sort of thing that would hang in many homes. It doesn't have the rarity or scarcity appeal

0:34:340:34:40

to give it a great deal of market.

0:34:400:34:42

-Gives you something to tap at the bottom of the stairs.

-But it's set firmly at rain.

0:34:420:34:47

So low is the pressure and low is the expectation.

0:34:470:34:50

-I think ten to £20 at best.

-Really?

-Mmm.

0:34:500:34:53

He only paid £15, so it's pretty well spot on, isn't it?

0:34:530:34:57

-He'll be all right with that.

-Absolutely.

0:34:570:34:59

Are you an optimist or a pessimist? Is your cup half empty or half full?

0:34:590:35:05

My cup is always half full. But that empties it pretty quickly!

0:35:050:35:09

Well said!

0:35:100:35:12

Wendy and Shelley, we're at the auctioneers. How nice is that?

0:35:250:35:29

-Very!

-Yes.

0:35:290:35:30

-Are you excited?

-Yes.

0:35:300:35:32

Ever been to an auction before?

0:35:320:35:34

No. Car auctions.

0:35:340:35:36

Well, this is just the same

0:35:360:35:37

-and we hope people will pay thousands for your objects.

-Thousands and thousands, Tim.

0:35:370:35:43

First up, the carpet bowls. Here they come.

0:35:430:35:46

Lot 187. Boxed set of carpet bowls with instructions.

0:35:460:35:50

20, 22, £25 is bid.

0:35:500:35:53

£25 is bid. It's on commission.

0:35:530:35:55

28, now. I'm out. At £28.

0:35:550:35:57

-Come on!

-On my left at 28.

0:35:570:35:59

I'm selling now at 28. 30, new bidder.

0:35:590:36:02

32.

0:36:020:36:03

No? £32. Still on my left. Last time, then.

0:36:030:36:07

At £32. All done.

0:36:080:36:10

-Bad luck. Minus £28.

-Oh, dear.

-All is not lost.

0:36:100:36:13

Snuff box, engraved "Wiltshire men of London".

0:36:130:36:16

25, 30 £35 I'm bid.

0:36:160:36:20

-£35 I have.

-I'm surprised. I didn't think it would make that.

0:36:200:36:23

At £35.

0:36:230:36:25

Any more? At 35 and I'm selling.

0:36:250:36:28

For the last time at £35. All done.

0:36:280:36:30

-Bad luck, girls. £35, so it's minus 50 on that.

-Oh, no!

0:36:300:36:34

Lot 189 is a set of shop scales.

0:36:340:36:37

1940s, 1950s in date.

0:36:370:36:40

And 22, 25, £28 is bid. £28 I have. On commission again.

0:36:400:36:47

At £28. 30 now. I'm out.

0:36:470:36:49

-It's in the room now at 30 on my left.

-I'm amazed.

0:36:490:36:52

Selling at 30. Any further bids? At £30.

0:36:520:36:54

-35. 40.

-Good lord!

0:36:540:36:57

No? £40. Far left at 40.

0:36:570:37:00

I'm selling now at £40.

0:37:000:37:02

All done at 40?

0:37:020:37:04

That's not so bad. £40. Minus 20.

0:37:040:37:07

50, 70, £98.

0:37:070:37:09

Minus 98 overall.

0:37:090:37:11

OK. Shall we go for the...

0:37:110:37:14

What are you gonna do about the dish?

0:37:140:37:16

-Let's go for it.

-Why not. Go for it.

-Sure you want to do this?

0:37:160:37:19

-I think so.

-I don't know.

0:37:190:37:22

Sure you want to go with this?

0:37:220:37:24

-It's the difference between winning!

-Make your mind up!

0:37:240:37:27

I want to do it. Let's do it.

0:37:270:37:29

-They said that...

-Quickly!

0:37:290:37:32

-Fine. Do it.

-You're going with it?

0:37:320:37:34

Going with the bonus buy. Here it is.

0:37:340:37:36

Lot 193. Doulton stoneware soap dish.

0:37:360:37:39

Shall we say £50 for that? £50 for it?

0:37:390:37:42

At £50 if you will.

0:37:420:37:45

40, then to start. 40 I see. Who'll say five?

0:37:450:37:48

It's at £40. On my far right at 40.

0:37:480:37:51

At 40. 45 now. 50.

0:37:510:37:54

£50. By the cabinet at 50.

0:37:540:37:57

-£8 more.

-I'm selling at £50.

0:37:570:37:59

Any more? At £50, then, for the last time. At £50. All done.

0:37:590:38:02

£50. To get so far!

0:38:030:38:05

-Pants!

-Yeah, pants indeed!

0:38:050:38:09

Overall, you are minus £106.

0:38:090:38:12

-Gee!

-It was an experience!

-It was, yes.

-It isn't over yet!

0:38:120:38:16

-You could have won.

-We could have.

0:38:160:38:19

-OK.

-If it goes really badly for the blues, you could be ahead.

0:38:190:38:22

-How lovely would that be?

-Marvellous.

0:38:220:38:25

-Don't tell the blues a thing.

-We won't.

-Not a thing.

0:38:250:38:28

Things are going rather well today.

0:38:400:38:42

We don't want you to know how the reds got on, and you don't!

0:38:420:38:47

The first item is your mantel clock.

0:38:470:38:49

Here it comes.

0:38:490:38:50

Lot 209. Gothic revival mantel clock.

0:38:500:38:54

Bids. Start me here at 25. £28 is bid.

0:38:540:38:58

28. 30. Two.

0:38:580:38:59

35, now. £35.

0:38:590:39:02

38. 40.

0:39:020:39:03

Five. £45. To my left at 45. 50 seated.

0:39:030:39:07

55. 60. Five. 70.

0:39:070:39:11

Five. 80.

0:39:110:39:13

£80. Thank you. 85.

0:39:130:39:15

90. Five.

0:39:150:39:17

100 and ten.

0:39:170:39:19

£110, gentleman standing.

0:39:190:39:21

At £110.

0:39:210:39:23

And I'm selling now at £110 for the last time. All done at 110.

0:39:230:39:28

Plus 40. That is very good, Paul.

0:39:280:39:30

Very good. Now, the Copeland.

0:39:300:39:32

Lot 210. A pair of Copeland wall plaques.

0:39:320:39:37

From bids here I start at 45. 50. £55 is bid.

0:39:370:39:41

£55 is bid.

0:39:410:39:43

At 55. Can I say 60 for them?

0:39:430:39:45

It's at £55, then. And selling.

0:39:450:39:47

At £55 for the last time.

0:39:470:39:50

All done at 55 now.

0:39:500:39:53

Oh, no. That's minus 40.

0:39:530:39:55

You're back to square one!

0:39:550:39:58

A pair of walnut candlesticks

0:39:580:39:59

from the workshop of Viscount Linley.

0:39:590:40:02

Bids start me here at £30.

0:40:020:40:04

30 I have. 35.

0:40:040:40:06

40. Five. 50.

0:40:060:40:08

Five I have. At £55 now.

0:40:080:40:10

At 55. 60.

0:40:100:40:12

Bidding, madam? 65.

0:40:120:40:14

70. Against you. 75.

0:40:140:40:18

75, the lady's bid in front of me.

0:40:180:40:20

80, now. Gentleman on my right. It's against you.

0:40:200:40:23

85. 90.

0:40:230:40:25

£90 on my right. I'm selling at 90.

0:40:250:40:28

At £90 for the last time, then. £90.

0:40:280:40:31

All done at 90.

0:40:310:40:33

£90. Minus 30. Oh, bad luck.

0:40:330:40:37

What a helter-skelter that was!

0:40:370:40:40

-What a helter-skelter.

-We nearly done it, didn't we?

0:40:400:40:44

Nearly. Minus 30. No shame in that. What about the barometer? Are you going with it?

0:40:440:40:49

-We loved the aneroid barometer.

-You're going with it.

-We've got to.

0:40:490:40:53

Boys, you've done incredibly well. Even at minus £30.

0:40:530:40:57

We're going with the bonus buy, the barometer. Here it comes.

0:40:570:41:00

Lot 215. Mahogany aneroid barometer.

0:41:000:41:03

Start me here at £10, if you will.

0:41:030:41:05

£10 for it? At £10.

0:41:050:41:08

At £10.

0:41:080:41:10

Five anywhere? At £5. Five I see. Who'll say more?

0:41:100:41:13

At £5. Eight now.

0:41:130:41:14

Ten? £10. Back of the room at ten.

0:41:140:41:18

Selling at £10 only. All done at ten? Last time at ten.

0:41:180:41:21

Ten. There's a storm brewing.

0:41:220:41:24

Minus £5 on that.

0:41:240:41:26

Overall, minus £35.

0:41:260:41:29

That's not so bad.

0:41:290:41:30

-Don't tell the reds a thing.

-We won't.

-Don't tell the reds a thing.

0:41:300:41:35

We will reveal all as to whether that's a winning score in a moment.

0:41:350:41:39

I think both teams know they've made whopping losses.

0:41:490:41:52

What they don't know is the scale of the losses.

0:41:520:41:55

That's what I'm going to reveal now.

0:41:550:41:58

The team that has a seriously ginormous loss

0:41:580:42:02

is actually the reds.

0:42:020:42:05

Knew it!

0:42:080:42:09

Pretty good, minus £106, girls!

0:42:090:42:12

-If you're gonna do it, do it in style.

-You've done that!

0:42:120:42:15

It says here, "minus, minus, minus, minus, minus."

0:42:150:42:19

All I can say is bad luck.

0:42:190:42:21

-But you've enjoyed it, yes?

-Absolutely.

-£106 is quite a score!

0:42:210:42:26

Now, the victors.

0:42:260:42:29

They're looking kind of cocky, but still managed to lose £35.

0:42:290:42:34

It started off so beautifully, frankly.

0:42:340:42:37

Paul, with your mantel clock you made a stonking profit of £40.

0:42:370:42:41

£40 profit on the first item

0:42:410:42:44

and we thought you were in the money today

0:42:440:42:46

but it went downhill, didn't it?

0:42:460:42:49

Down the line it was minuses, but nevertheless, you won today.

0:42:490:42:52

I congratulate you with only minus £35.

0:42:520:42:55

Just don't do it again!

0:42:550:42:57

Join us soon for some more Bargain Hunting, yes?

0:42:570:43:00

Yes!

0:43:000:43:01

Subtitles by Moira Diamond Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:150:43:19

Tim Wonnacott welcomes teams of bargain hunters to Hungerford in West Berkshire, where they are joined by experts Mark Stacey and Philip Allwood.

And Tim discovers a fascinating collection at Mompesson House in Salisbury.


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