Anglesey 14 Bargain Hunt


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Anglesey 14

Antiques challenge. Experts David Harper and David Barby are on hand as the teams do battle in Anglesey, North Wales. Tim Wonnacott checks out Penryhn Castle in Bangor.


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LineFromTo

My name is Tim Wonnacott and it's my job to guide you through our stupendous programme...

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if only I could get out of here.

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Let's go bargain hunting!

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Ooh! That's better.

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Nestling next to the Snowdonia mountain range

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on the island of Anglesey, is the Mona Showground,

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which is the setting for today's antiques antics.

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Coming up on today's show...

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the Blues have some tough decisions to make.

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-What do you think?

-No. I don't really like it, to be honest.

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I do like it. I think it's quite nice.

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I don't think they'll sell, though.

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-Can we have a family row?

-I did say there'd be some disagreements.

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And the Reds look for something to impress the ladies.

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Bachelor silver tea service. Hey, you two are a couple of bachelors.

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And hopes are high over at the auction.

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It's worth more than that.

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We'll see more of that later.

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Let's go and meet today's teams.

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So, a big welcome to our teams today.

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For the Reds, we've got R and R, which used to mean rest and relaxation,

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but today means Ronald and Robert. Welcome to Bargain Hunt.

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-And for the Blues, we've got husband and wife, Lee and Lindsay. Welcome to Bargain Hunt.

-Thank you.

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Great. Now, you've been friends for 30 years. Yes?

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-Yeah. At least, Tim. Yeah.

-Now, Ronald, you don't take life terribly seriously.

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-Definitely not.

-No.

-Live every day as though it's going to be your last.

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-Oh, Lord.

-Love it... I know.

-Right.

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One of the best jobs I ever had was working for a holiday firm

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and I was in charge of the entertainment for the over-50s.

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-Were you a Red Coat?

-No.

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-A Blue Coat, actually.

-Were you?

-A Blue Coat.

-Oh, you were a turn coat.

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I was a turn coat. Yes.

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But it used to be wonderful. I used to do the line dancing, karaoke.

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-The worst paid but the best job I ever had.

-Yes.

-Lots of fun.

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Great. What makes you think you're going to do well on Bargain Hunt?

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Well, I feel as though I've got an eye for a bargain. That's the most important thing.

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My granny brought me up from the age of three and she was a great collector of antiques.

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Royal Doulton and Devonport and lots of stuff like that.

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She travelled quite a lot, which going back to the '20s and '30s,

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people didn't travel like they do today.

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And she always brought something back of value.

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Now, Robert, your hobby involves horses and it's also a way that you make a bit of money, isn't it?

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Well, I'm an on-course bookmaker.

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-Are you?

-So I go to various venues...

-Yeah.

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..various times, about 40 a year, something like that.

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-Have you ever been to a car boot or fair like this?

-Yes.

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-I do at least two or three car boots at a weekend.

-Do you really?

-Yes.

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And there are amazing things around in the fairs at car boot sales.

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-There's nothing you can't buy at a car boot.

-It'll be interesting to see what you two come up with today.

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And very good luck.

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Now, for the Blues. Now, what do you do for a living, Lee?

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Well, I'm actually a plasterer by trade but I was injured last year, in July,

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so at the moment, I'm a parking enforcement officer.

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-Oh, are you?

-Yeah.

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Nobody likes a traffic warden, but I mean, it's not the ideal job for me.

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-I still love plastering.

-You want to go back to plastering.

-Yeah.

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As soon as I can, I want to get back into Venetian and marble plastering.

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It says here that you want to present an antiques show, like Bargain Hunt.

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-I was kind of hoping to take your job.

-Well, I'm glad you're injured. No.

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I think it's just the antiques, really.

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I've just got a real passion for them.

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Today's your opportunity to shop till you drop which is really good.

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-And a bit later on, you're going to enjoy the auctions, so I hope it's a good experience for you, Lee.

-Yeah.

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Now, Lindsay, you've got a reputation for being

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an absolute ruthless dragon round the house, throwing everything away. Is that true?

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Yeah. I have been known to throw things away which, possibly, are worth a bit of money.

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-Like what?

-Well, Lee had some...

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are they Lilliput houses, is that what they're called?

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Yeah. They weren't actually Lilliput ones, they were from Tetley teabags, from 1978, 1979.

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-Yes.

-I had lots and lots of them.

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I tend to throw a lot of things, like anything that I think's clutter goes in the bin.

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Are you interested in history or is it all about modern for you?

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I prefer modern stuff, really. There are a lot of historic stuff I like to look at,

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don't have an awful lot at home, but yeah, we've got an interest in that type of thing.

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We go to car boot sales, seeing if we can find anything that's worth anything.

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And what do you do in your spare time?

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Well, we generally go to family events.

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Woodfest is one we like to go with the children and go to car boot sales.

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What happens at Woodfest?

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It's a local place that happens every year and they're doing carvings out of pieces of wood,

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-climbing up the telegraph poles.

-It sounds like great fun.

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Yeah. Lee doesn't go there to actually look at the wood stuff, he goes there for the local liqueurs.

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-Oh, does he?

-Ciders.

-They have ciders.

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They use really special apples, Dabinett apples and other various English or Welsh apples.

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Right. So you're a specialist-cider drinker, then.

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Not really, but I do buy expensive cider.

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I'll only drink expensive cider.

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Well, I'm glad, Lee, you're a man of expensive tastes, which is exactly what we need

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today on Bargain Hunt because here comes your £300.

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You know the rules. Your experts await. And off you go.

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And very, very, very good luck.

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Well, I reckon I've seen everything.

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Well, that's the teams taken care of but who's going to be playing alongside our Reds and Blues?

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Who do we have here, then? Anyone look familiar?

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That's our man.

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This looks like a motley crew.

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Which one is our expert for today?

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Sold.

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Right. Let's get the game going.

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-You make the money.

-OK.

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-Thank you very much.

-OK.

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-Quality. Quality. And some quirky.

-Quirky.

-All right.

-Yep.

-Yeah.

-Let's start the exploration.

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We must have a little tete-a-tete about the parameters within which the teams have to operate.

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They each get one hour, one expert and £300 and quite frankly, I wouldn't have it any other way.

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It's just not for me.

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This is lovely, is it not?

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-It just speaks quality.

-Absolutely quality.

-And quirkiness.

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Have a look at it and tell me what it says to you.

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Dare we try it as a whistle?

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-Go on. Go for it.

-WHISTLE PEEPS

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-It works.

-It does, yeah.

-Well, it's not a policeman's whistle, is it?

-No. No.

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-It's a bit kind of feminine.

-It's quirky, though.

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Well, 1892, Birmingham, £135.

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Nice thing.

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Bit much. Surely it's not that difficult to find something...

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at less of a price but still quality...or is it?

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The difficult thing is finding something that's going to make a profit,

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because if it was that easy, I'd have a Bentley outside.

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-OK.

-Point well made, David. We all would.

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But it's not going to be a walk in the park.

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Now, let's see what kind of a start the Blues have made.

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Look at this.

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I think this is a good find.

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These are quite unusual. It's the original upholstery.

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Needs a bit of restoration here and there.

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What you've got to consider is this... These are unusual.

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-What do you think?

-No. I don't really like it, to be honest.

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-You don't like that one.

-No. It doesn't interest me.

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But it's all original. There's nothing done.

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-It's just as it was made, probably round about 1860.

-OK.

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-Wow.

-It's actually older than I thought, then.

-Yeah.

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I think it's cos I've got boys, you see, so I've no interest in girly things any more.

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Did you not have a doll's house as a child?

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I did, but I tended to play with my brother with his cars.

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-What do you think?

-I do like it. I like the fact that it looks like

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-a three-piece suite you'd see in somebody's house, in a stately home, apart from it's miniature.

-Exactly.

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I don't think they'll sell, though.

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-Can we have a family row?

-I did say there'd be some disagreements.

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I know there are collectors of this out there.

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There's a huge market for miniatures.

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-Right.

-I like it.

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Well, if you like it, then we'll go with it.

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Excuse me, how much is the dolls' furniture?

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-45.

-45. Is that the best you can do?

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There's an awful lot of restoration on it.

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Well, it is, really.

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35 would be the very best, really.

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-35.

-I couldn't go much lower than that.

-It's the overall impression

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with the legs missing. I think it'll affect the value.

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35... Can you do it at 30?

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How about 32?

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32. Right. What do you think of 32?

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-You're happy with 32. Both of you are.

-Yeah.

-OK.

-Thank you very much.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thanks a lot.

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Cor, it was touch and go, there, but for £32, you've got yourself

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a miniature drawing-room set and who cares if it is missing a leg or three?

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Meanwhile, the Reds are looking at a bit more silver.

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What do you think of that? That's quite a nice design, isn't it?

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-It is a nice design. It's a bit different.

-Yeah.

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Ron, what do you feel about that?

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Quite a difference. 110.

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I mean, vestas are always collectable, aren't they?

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And the thing is, as a match holder, on your fireplace, or to light candles at dinner parties,

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that kind of thing, it's an incredible posh piece of kit.

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-Yeah.

-It's got that roped twist...

-Yeah.

-..which I think is wonderful.

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110. 1892. Late Victorian, again.

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What do you think of that?

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Shall we ask him?

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What would be the best on that?

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-Now, be kind, won't you?

-90.

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-90.

-£90. My best price will be £90.

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-Really.

-Would it?

-Yeah.

-OK.

-I think we should go for it.

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And they did go for it.

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£85 for a silver vesta case.

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-And it seems the Blues also have their eyes on something silver.

-I like silver.

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-I quite like them ones.

-What are they used for?

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-I don't know. Let's find David.

-David.

-Yeah.

-I found these.

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Could you tell me anything about them?

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You've got expensive tastes, that's all I can say. How much are they?

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-148.

-£148.

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That is a lot of money for a pair of plated grape scissors.

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Right. OK.

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Those are very nice. £148.

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-Let's put them back.

-Not for silver-plated.

-No.

-No.

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Get focussed, Blues. Time's ticking on.

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-We've used up half an hour.

-Right. So we need to get...

-You've only bought one object.

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-..two more. Let's go.

-We need to get moving, then.

-Let's go.

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There's some small objects here, which I think will interest you.

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-I do like that.

-Do you know what it's for?

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-Is it for your matches, no?

-It's for your matches. Yeah.

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And underneath, you've got a rough section... you feel that.

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-To strike your match.

-It's where you...

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..strike your match.

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-So it has a purpose.

-Yeah.

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And this would have been, possibly, in a gentleman's study.

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So he'd light up his cigarette, or cigar.

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-Yeah.

-I like that. It's £69, but if you're interested, Lindsay, you'll have to negotiate on that.

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-Yeah.

-See what you can get.

-Right.

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-I think we'll have a go at that.

-Do you want to have a word?

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How's it going?

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OK. Not bad. Not bad. We do quite like this, yes, but we don't think

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-that at auction we're going to make anything on £69.

-Do you not?

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-Have you seen anything like that?

-I haven't seen...

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It's quite unusual and quite quirky but I know the type of auction house that we're going to

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-and unless it's a good price, I don't think we're going to make any profit.

-What's the best price?

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You can have it for 55.

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-55.

-That's it.

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It's up to you. It's your item.

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-You've a good chance with it.

-OK. I'm going to go for it. I like it. £55.

-Nice to see you both.

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And you.

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Well, done, Lindsay. Great negotiation.

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Two items in the bag, £87 spent, but how are they feeling?

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..and that leaves us how much?

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-87.

-How much?

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-Hello.

-87 left?

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-No. We spent 87.

-You spent 87.

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-Yes.

-So I've got £213 to spend.

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-What, on...?

-Another item.

-On one more item.

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And for something for me to buy, as well.

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They're quite canny buyers, actually.

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But I'm worried about this £87, because it's not much, is it?

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-No.

-We're going for a big bang with the next one.

-A big bang.

-A big bang.

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We've got £213 left to spend.

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-And it's burning a hole in their pockets, that's the trouble.

-Yes.

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-And time's marching on.

-Yes. It is.

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-I mustn't delay you. Good luck.

-Thank you.

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Now, the Reds need to get cracking.

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What have you found there?

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What is it, then? A barometer? Or is it a thermometer? Barometer?

0:13:370:13:41

No. Hang on a minute. It's more than a barometer.

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It's for cooking, isn't it?

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Because look, you've got water boil...

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-That's right.

-Can you see that, Bob?

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-Yes, I can.

-Soft ball...hard ball... crack small...crack caramel.

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-Yeah.

-OK. So it's a thermometer, not necessarily for water, because down here at 100,

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-that's where you're boiling water, but of course, if it's a sugar solution...

-Much hotter.

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Exactly. The temperature will rise much higher. So it goes up to...

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what, 420?

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-420. Yes.

-420.

-Right.

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Actually, that's quite interesting. It's actually a kitchen piece. I like it.

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-Quirky again.

-It's quirky.

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It's got a little registration. And it's only a tenner.

0:14:190:14:21

We can't lose.

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Grand. The thermometer is theirs for £8.

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And as Ron says, they can't lose much...

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can they?

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Now, they've only got one item to find, but it's always the hardest to nail down.

0:14:310:14:37

Ah, that's nice. Bachelor's silver tea service.

0:14:390:14:42

-Hey, you two are a couple of bachelors.

-We are. Yeah.

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It's appealing, but the price is wrong, really, for us.

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Let's move on. We can't be procrastinating.

0:14:480:14:51

Let's go.

0:14:510:14:53

What do you think of this, David? This looks a rather nice item.

0:14:530:14:56

It's instantly recognisable. It's got to be Moorcroft. The most common, you'll find...

0:14:560:15:00

-See that blue in there?

-Oh, yeah.

0:15:000:15:02

-The body is generally that colour. It's a beautiful colour.

-Right.

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-So this, actually being cream, is actually slightly rarer than the standard blue.

-Right.

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-But, bizarrely, not as valuable as blue.

-I see.

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In my experience...because it's the blue that really shouts out at you that it's Moorcroft.

0:15:150:15:21

It's absolutely vibrant, the colours of the flowers.

0:15:210:15:24

Now, do you recognise that flower in there?

0:15:240:15:26

Yeah. It's an enema.

0:15:260:15:28

-Pardon. What was that?

-Anemone.

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Now, be very careful how you say that.

0:15:310:15:33

How you say this, yeah.

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-An anemone.

-It's an anemone, Ron.

0:15:340:15:36

-Exactly. Yeah.

-That's it.

0:15:360:15:38

-Make a mistake there and you could be in trouble. Yeah.

-You could, indeed.

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What would you use it for?

0:15:420:15:43

Well, you could put trinkets in.

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-I mean, for us...

-Cufflinks, stuff like that.

0:15:460:15:50

..guys about town, you know, bachelors out there, pulling the birds...

0:15:500:15:55

-I think our cufflinks in there.

-Yeah. Or our chains.

-Gold chains...

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-to get blinged up before we go out.

-Get blinged up. Yeah.

0:15:590:16:01

I think this is our third item.

0:16:010:16:03

-You don't know that, yet.

-We need to speak to the stallholder.

-Exactly.

-That's right.

0:16:030:16:08

Hi, there. Just a quick one. What's your price on that one?

0:16:080:16:12

-45.

-45. OK.

0:16:120:16:14

We'll just have a quick chat.

0:16:140:16:16

-45 quid.

-I'm sure we can do better than that.

0:16:160:16:19

Well, I'm sure we can. Let's just start from...

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-Start from 30.

-Well, yeah, but what's it going to make?

0:16:210:16:24

-I think it's worth 45 quid.

-What do you think?

0:16:240:16:26

Would 30 quid buy it?

0:16:260:16:28

No. 35.

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-35.

-35.

0:16:300:16:32

-Well, I think we'll do the deal.

-Done.

-Looks like we've got it.

-Thanks very much.

0:16:320:16:36

Doesn't look like you had much of a say in it, David.

0:16:360:16:39

Still, all items purchased, unlike those Blues, who are fast becoming panicky.

0:16:390:16:46

I have absolutely no idea what to buy next.

0:16:460:16:49

Well, something a little bit more expensive.

0:16:490:16:51

Befuddled by everything on offer...

0:16:530:16:56

-What's that?

-It's a tool. It's a plane.

0:16:560:16:58

-But what's the date?

-..and are running out of time.

0:16:580:17:01

It's quirky and unusual but I don't think anyone would want it.

0:17:010:17:05

Cue the time police!

0:17:050:17:06

I'm going to have to give them their ten-minute warning.

0:17:060:17:09

Right, guys, you're doing well. You've only got ten minutes left, OK.

0:17:090:17:13

-OK.

-Ten minutes. Good luck.

-Thank you.

0:17:130:17:16

-This is where the panic comes in.

-I know.

0:17:160:17:18

-We need to buy something...

-Yeah.

0:17:180:17:20

-..right now.

-They need an item that's going to save their bacon.

0:17:200:17:24

Is it fish-selling?

0:17:240:17:26

-No.

-It's for?

-Weighing pigs.

0:17:260:17:28

-Weighing pigs.

-Weighing pigs.

0:17:280:17:30

-And, you would... Can I just have a look?

-Yes.

0:17:300:17:33

This is quirky and unusual.

0:17:330:17:36

There's two ways of using it.

0:17:360:17:38

Can you see that? Oh, that's quite good.

0:17:380:17:40

-The only one I've seen.

-£35. Do you like it?

0:17:400:17:44

Well, I've told you the last item's up to you.

0:17:440:17:47

I mean, I'm quite happy to go with what you say.

0:17:470:17:50

I just don't know whether it's going to do an awful lot for us at auction.

0:17:500:17:55

-I've never seen one like this.

-I've never seen one at all.

0:17:550:17:58

And people do collect balances and weights.

0:17:580:18:00

-Yeah.

-OK.

0:18:000:18:03

-And the best price was... 30?

-Five.

0:18:030:18:06

35 for that.

0:18:060:18:08

-Happy?

-It's up to you.

0:18:080:18:10

-35.

-Sold.

0:18:100:18:12

I can't believe this.

0:18:120:18:15

Finally, all items are in the bag.

0:18:150:18:18

Time's up and the shopping is over.

0:18:180:18:21

Now that the teams have finished their shopping,

0:18:210:18:24

they'll hand over any leftover lolly to their experts who'll pop off and find the bonus buy.

0:18:240:18:29

That's revealed later at auction and if the team decides to go with it,

0:18:290:18:34

and they make a profit, they'll be delighted.

0:18:340:18:36

If it makes a loss, though, they'll just have to take it on the nose.

0:18:360:18:40

Now, let's remind ourselves what the Reds bought.

0:18:400:18:43

-What do you think of these?

-First up, the silver vesta for £85.

0:18:430:18:48

Next, Ron and Bob acquired a thermometer for a cool £8.

0:18:510:18:56

And before David Harper could even say leftover lolly,

0:18:580:19:00

the Reds purchased the Moorcroft bowl for £35.

0:19:000:19:05

We would have been scuppered without that Moorcroft.

0:19:050:19:08

How exciting then, chaps. Well, done. You've finished.

0:19:080:19:11

-Yeah.

-And how much did you finish up by spending overall?

0:19:110:19:14

We spent £128.

0:19:140:19:16

You spent £128 which is £172 of leftover lolly. Is that right?

0:19:160:19:19

-Correct.

-Well, the good Lord giveth with one hand and taketh away with the other.

0:19:190:19:23

That's a reasonable sum. What are you going to do with all that?

0:19:230:19:26

I don't really know. I haven't had very much chance. These two are like a whirlwind.

0:19:260:19:30

I've seen a few items that you two have bypassed.

0:19:300:19:32

-We'll leave that in your capable hands.

-Well, don't say capable. That's the kiss of death.

0:19:320:19:39

Just before you go though, which is your favourite piece, Ron?

0:19:390:19:43

-I think the last piece.

-Yeah, the Moorcroft.

-The Moorcroft.

0:19:430:19:46

-The Moorcroft.

-I think that'll make a good profit.

0:19:460:19:48

We paid £35 for it, you know.

0:19:480:19:50

Yeah. Which item's going to bring the biggest profit?

0:19:500:19:53

I still say the Moorcroft. And you do, too?

0:19:530:19:55

-Yeah.

-You're unanimous on Moorcroft.

0:19:550:19:57

Very good. Anyway, very good luck, David.

0:19:570:19:59

-See you, guys.

-Off with your task.

0:19:590:20:01

Why don't we remind ourselves of what the Blues bought?

0:20:010:20:05

The Blues started with the Victorian doll's house furniture for £32.

0:20:050:20:11

Next, the cauldron vesta -

0:20:110:20:13

a bubbling £55.

0:20:130:20:15

And finally, the cast iron and brass piggy scales. £35.

0:20:160:20:21

Let's take them to market.

0:20:210:20:24

I'm not going to berate or say anything.

0:20:240:20:26

You said you were going to get the big bang and what do we end up with?

0:20:260:20:29

-Do you have a big bang?

-No.

-No.

0:20:290:20:31

We fizzled out.

0:20:310:20:33

Yeah, but you took it to the line there, didn't you?

0:20:330:20:35

-Absolutely.

-Hardly a minute... two minutes to spare.

-Yeah.

0:20:350:20:38

So which is your favourite piece?

0:20:380:20:40

My favourite piece is going to be the little bit of silverware, the cauldron match striker.

0:20:400:20:45

The cauldron match-striker thingamajig.

0:20:450:20:47

-Yes.

-What about you, Lee? Which is your favourite?

-Definitely the miniature doll's house.

0:20:470:20:52

-I think we'll do well with that one.

-That's your favourite.

0:20:520:20:54

-Which is going to bring the biggest profit, though?

-The doll's house.

0:20:540:20:58

-And I'm not going to say.

-Why aren't you saying then?

0:20:580:21:02

Cos I'll be wrong and he'll be right.

0:21:020:21:04

-That's the joy of being married, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:21:040:21:06

How much did you spend, again?

0:21:060:21:08

-£122.

-Yeah.

0:21:080:21:10

So I want £178 of leftover lolly.

0:21:100:21:12

Who's got the money? Here we go, look.

0:21:120:21:13

That goes straight to David Barby. That's a lot, isn't it, David?

0:21:130:21:16

-I've never had as much as this in all my life.

-So what are you going to do with it, then?

0:21:160:21:20

I don't really know. I need half an hour to look round.

0:21:200:21:23

-There's so many interesting things here.

-Yes.

0:21:230:21:25

I tell you what, I'll give you half an hour.

0:21:250:21:27

-Thank you.

-And we want a splendid result, please.

0:21:270:21:31

But for the viewers at home, I'm going to head off somewhere castellated.

0:21:310:21:35

It's a hint though, I think.

0:21:350:21:37

They say that every man's home is his castle.

0:21:470:21:52

Well, the one behind me, Penrhyn Castle, is something rather more than just a home.

0:21:520:21:59

Penrhyn was the fantasy of George Dawkins-Pennant, who inherited the estate in 1816.

0:22:000:22:08

He considered it old-fashioned and wanted something...

0:22:080:22:12

well, a bit grander.

0:22:120:22:14

He employed the relatively unknown architect, Thomas Hopper,

0:22:140:22:19

works started around 1819 and were completed in 1838.

0:22:190:22:24

His reasons for choosing to build in the Norman style are not clear

0:22:240:22:28

but it certainly fitted his fantasy vision.

0:22:280:22:31

And Hopper's work wasn't exclusively restricted to the outside.

0:22:310:22:35

Thomas Hopper, clearly, was no ordinary architect.

0:22:370:22:41

Apart from having the technical skills to be able to construct this massive castle,

0:22:410:22:48

the edifice from outside, he was also able to drill down into all the detail inside.

0:22:480:22:55

The Neo-Norman style, his preferred choice for Penrhyn,

0:22:550:23:01

is something that's been evolved from drawings

0:23:010:23:04

and engravings that literally date back to 1066 and all that.

0:23:040:23:10

What we've got in the drawing room, here, is an extraordinary space

0:23:100:23:15

that's completely plastered in carved mouldings.

0:23:150:23:19

Literally, no piece of wood is left unadorned in this room.

0:23:190:23:25

The ceiling is full of stars.

0:23:250:23:28

There's a kind of celestial magic and it's completely plastered in these Neo-Norman mouldings.

0:23:280:23:35

So having created this magical Neo-Norman space,

0:23:350:23:40

how do you furnish it? Because there's no original furniture from 1,000 years ago that you can use.

0:23:400:23:47

But old Hopper, he cracked it.

0:23:470:23:49

And his solution, well, it was just to design and build the Neo-Norman furniture himself.

0:23:510:23:59

This is Hopper's solution to the settee problem.

0:23:590:24:03

Build it big. Build it massive.

0:24:030:24:06

Hopper used great balks of oak to create

0:24:060:24:11

what must be one of the world's most uncomfortable settees.

0:24:110:24:16

Sadly, this didn't do old George Dawkins-Pennant an awful lot of good.

0:24:160:24:21

He didn't survive long to enjoy his masterpiece,

0:24:210:24:24

dying in 1840, just two years after the completion of the castle.

0:24:240:24:30

What we're dying to know, of course, today, is quite how our teams are going to get on in the auction.

0:24:300:24:36

Well, it's lovely to be in Mold, in the principality, at Dodds Auctioneers and Valuers,

0:24:550:25:01

with Anthony Parry.

0:25:010:25:03

-How are you?

-Very well, Tim. It's nice to see you again.

-Very good to see you, too.

0:25:030:25:07

Now, first up for the Reds, Robert and Ronald, is the vesta case.

0:25:070:25:12

How do you rate that?

0:25:120:25:13

Little silver vesta case.

0:25:130:25:16

They're collectable things.

0:25:160:25:19

Shall we say 20-30, maybe 40?

0:25:190:25:23

Really? Do you think that's all it's going to bring? £40 top end, with the wind up it?

0:25:230:25:28

-With the wind up it.

-They paid £85.

0:25:280:25:31

Oh, dear, Anthony, this isn't looking good.

0:25:310:25:34

How about the kitchen thermometer?

0:25:340:25:37

Right. Unusual bit of kitchenalia.

0:25:370:25:41

Not a lot of money. I hope they haven't spent a lot on this. £5-£10.

0:25:410:25:45

-£8 paid.

-Spot on, then.

0:25:450:25:47

Spot on. Good.

0:25:470:25:50

-Now, Moorcroft.

-Moorcroft.

0:25:500:25:51

Moorcroft from the 1960s, I'm told.

0:25:510:25:54

-Do you agree with that?

-Yeah.

-It's not old old.

-It's not old old. No.

-No. So, I guess desirable.

0:25:540:26:00

Yes. A lot of collectors.

0:26:000:26:02

-People love their Moorcroft, don't they?

-Yeah.

-So how much do you think?

0:26:020:26:05

-30-50.

-Oh, good. £35 paid.

0:26:050:26:08

-So there's a little bit of hope there.

-There's hope there.

0:26:080:26:11

And the thermometer might give them a bit of a hope, but the vesta...

0:26:110:26:15

oh, dear, that's so far off the beam...

0:26:150:26:17

I think they're certainly going to need their bonus buy so let's go and have a look at it.

0:26:170:26:22

So, boys, £128 is what you've spent.

0:26:220:26:25

You gave David 172. What did he spend it on?

0:26:250:26:29

Right. Are you ready? This is really out of my comfort zone.

0:26:290:26:33

Oh, right.

0:26:330:26:36

-I thought a couple of gentlemen like you could see the value in that.

-It looks very nice. Yeah.

0:26:360:26:41

-Silver?

-Yes. It is. It's not English silver.

0:26:410:26:43

It's continental silver but it is stamped 925...

0:26:430:26:46

-Yeah.

-..with amber or "amberette".

0:26:460:26:50

I don't know, Tim. Is it amber or is it not amber?

0:26:500:26:53

-Right.

-Well, who knows. You mean plastic.

-Could be plastic.

0:26:530:26:56

-As David Barby said, it's the earliest form of plastic.

-Right.

0:26:560:26:59

-It's so true.

-What is this likely to do?

0:26:590:27:01

What do you think? Bear in mind it is silver, nice quality, continental, probably French,

0:27:010:27:06

-I'd have thought, but a lovely present for one of your lady friends.

-Nice present.

-£75.

0:27:060:27:10

I think, as you said, 75 quid, it's got to be worth that all day long, to somebody, somewhere.

0:27:100:27:15

Whether they're in this room, I don't know. I paid 35.

0:27:150:27:19

Oh, well. In with a chance here.

0:27:190:27:22

-I think so.

-I think so.

-Yeah.

0:27:220:27:24

Look how Robert's face bucked up, then, eh?

0:27:240:27:28

He was looking rather depressed.

0:27:280:27:30

I was a little bit taken aback by it.

0:27:300:27:32

But having said that,

0:27:320:27:35

-we've got the begging bowl out now.

-Have we?

0:27:350:27:38

-We have.

-There's something in the stone, isn't there?

0:27:380:27:40

Yeah. I think it's probably reconstituted so it's heated something.

0:27:400:27:44

-It's probably got an insect in there.

-Possibly.

-It's Jurassic Park.

0:27:440:27:48

-That's what it is.

-Yeah.

0:27:480:27:49

We've got the DNA of a flea in there that once bit a dinosaur.

0:27:490:27:55

This is the business. Well, settle down, boys, because right now,

0:27:550:27:58

for the audience at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about David's Jurassic Park pendant.

0:27:580:28:04

Ooh-arr.

0:28:040:28:06

Anthony, a little something for you to wear at the weekend.

0:28:060:28:09

Well, yes. Yeah.

0:28:090:28:11

Quite a modern little piece.

0:28:110:28:12

-Yes. Yes. Like brand new.

-Yes.

0:28:120:28:14

Probably is silver. Might be amber but it looks a bit plastic-y to me.

0:28:140:28:18

Looks plastic to me as well, Tim.

0:28:180:28:19

-Yeah.

-Ah well.

-Decorative. £20-£30.

-That's very generous of you.

0:28:190:28:24

-Yes.

-£35 paid.

0:28:240:28:26

It might just scrape home, mightn't it? That's it for the Reds.

0:28:260:28:29

Now for the Blues, Lee and Lindsay and David Barby.

0:28:290:28:33

Their first item is this extensive doll's house furniture suite.

0:28:330:28:37

Gosh.

0:28:370:28:39

-I'm nearly speechless.

-Are you?

0:28:390:28:41

-Makes a change.

-Yeah. Legs off.

0:28:410:28:44

Legs off. Yes.

0:28:440:28:46

-Legless, completely.

-Yes.

0:28:460:28:49

-Woodworm in this one.

-I can tell you like it, Anthony.

-Yeah.

0:28:490:28:53

Generous £30-£40 estimate.

0:28:530:28:56

Very good. £32 paid.

0:28:560:28:58

-Right.

-This estimating's going just perfectly.

0:28:580:29:01

Yes. It's better, isn't it?

0:29:010:29:03

Good. The silver-mounted cauldron vesta striker.

0:29:030:29:07

That's the sort of thing that a lot of collectors go for, isn't it? Got a bit of silver on it.

0:29:070:29:13

Bit of silver on it and it's got the strike on the bottom.

0:29:130:29:16

And something rather Welsh about it, too, with all those kind of cauldrons.

0:29:160:29:20

The cauldron's boiling away.

0:29:200:29:21

-Bubbling in the cottages.

-Yeah. That's right.

0:29:210:29:24

-Yes.

-25-35.

0:29:240:29:26

£55 paid, sir.

0:29:260:29:28

-That is a lot of money, though, isn't it, £55?

-Bit strong. Yeah.

-Bit strong.

-Yeah.

0:29:280:29:32

-As they say, cor, strike a light.

-Yes.

-Yes.

0:29:320:29:36

The next item is this balance.

0:29:360:29:38

-And I can put you out of your misery here, Anthony, cos they paid £35 for this.

-Did they?

0:29:380:29:42

Yes. They thought they were coming to an agricultural area.

0:29:420:29:46

Well, yes, we've got a cattle market in the town here.

0:29:460:29:49

They saw all sorts of agriculturists wandering around,

0:29:490:29:53

passionate to get their mitts on a lovely rustic balance like that.

0:29:530:29:58

-Now, was that the correct strategy, Anthony, or not?

-No.

-No.

0:29:580:30:02

Farmers are a little bit tight, aren't they, in the pocket?

0:30:020:30:04

-So, £20-£25.

-Really?

0:30:040:30:07

OK. Well, that's not so far off £35.

0:30:070:30:10

-But on the other hand, it might just make a £10 note, mightn't it?

-Yes.

0:30:100:30:14

Yes. You said that rather too readily, Anthony...

0:30:140:30:17

in which case they're certainly going to need their bonus buy. Let's go and have a look at it.

0:30:170:30:22

Now, Lee and Lindsay, you spent £122. You gave David Barby £178.

0:30:220:30:28

What did he spend it on?

0:30:280:30:30

This. I bought this little bit of silver for £40.

0:30:300:30:35

This is a Chester piece of silver and it is a cheroot holder.

0:30:350:30:40

And it's the case for a cheroot holder.

0:30:400:30:42

This is silver. Dates from the earlier part of the 20th century and when I click it open like this...

0:30:420:30:48

out comes a little amber piece with a gold mount which corresponds

0:30:480:30:51

with the date letter on this particular piece here.

0:30:510:30:55

So we have the cheroot holder and then the little case for it.

0:30:550:30:58

So, if you wanted, you could put it round the neck as a pendant

0:30:580:31:01

or if you were a gentleman, you'd have it on a fob chain.

0:31:010:31:04

But now, these are quite collectable, just to have round the neck

0:31:040:31:07

and if you want to put pills or anything in it, you could do.

0:31:070:31:10

See, it's quite a handsome little piece.

0:31:100:31:12

Not ornate. Very plain. Very simple.

0:31:120:31:15

-How much did you pay for it?

-£40.

-40.

-£40.

0:31:150:31:20

-And it is silver Chester.

-Is it real gold, inside?

0:31:200:31:23

It's real gold, inside.

0:31:230:31:26

I think Lindsay has fallen in love with it...I really do.

0:31:260:31:30

What do you think we might make as a profit on that?

0:31:300:31:33

Well, I think there's a good interest in Chester silver, here,

0:31:330:31:37

so I think that you might make a profit, hopefully, of round about £20, that sort of price range.

0:31:370:31:43

-Right.

-It's small and quirky and small and quirky sells well.

0:31:430:31:48

I hope you're right, there... for various reasons, Lee.

0:31:480:31:51

We'll have to see if we make a profit or not and see whether you want to go with it.

0:31:510:31:55

-OK.

-That's exactly right. I'm reassured that at last the bonus buy arrangement has sunk in.

0:31:550:32:01

You don't decide right now. But for the audience, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks

0:32:010:32:06

about David's little cheroot holder.

0:32:060:32:09

-There we go, Anthony. Something for the cabinet.

-Yes.

0:32:090:32:13

It is a cheroot holder.

0:32:130:32:15

And it is Chester hallmark.

0:32:150:32:19

-Ah, that's good.

-That's the plus side.

-Yes.

0:32:190:32:21

-The downside is the cheroot holder itself has been broken and stuck back together with glue.

-Oh, dear.

0:32:210:32:29

-That lets it down.

-It does.

0:32:290:32:32

So, tongue in cheek, I've said £30-£40.

0:32:320:32:35

Now, what does tongue in cheek mean? Does that mean you think it's quite generous, 30-40?

0:32:350:32:40

It's a bit generous.

0:32:400:32:41

It depends how good their eyesight is, looking at the damage.

0:32:410:32:44

Oh, I see... Mr Barby paid £40 for it and he reckons he's going to make a profit on it.

0:32:440:32:49

I think he needs new glasses.

0:32:490:32:52

-You might have a point there, Anthony.

-Thank you.

0:32:520:32:55

-Are you going to be taking the auction?

-I am. Yes.

0:32:550:32:57

We're in safe hands.

0:32:570:32:59

£14. 16. 18.

0:32:590:33:02

20. No.

0:33:020:33:03

20 over there.

0:33:030:33:05

20...5. 30...5.

0:33:050:33:08

Now, R and R...

0:33:090:33:11

-Indeed.

-Yes.

-Are you definitely going to beat the Blues today?

0:33:110:33:14

-Without a shadow of a doubt.

-Yeah. Yeah.

0:33:140:33:16

I love this bravado, don't you?

0:33:160:33:19

-Confidence.

-Great.

0:33:190:33:20

Now, the first item is going to be the silver vesta, yes, with the rope-twist design.

0:33:200:33:25

You paid £85 for that.

0:33:250:33:27

-I have to tell you that the auctioneer's only estimated £20-£30 and here it comes. Here you go.

0:33:270:33:32

98. A very nice silver vesta case.

0:33:320:33:34

Rope-twist decoration.

0:33:340:33:37

Quick 50 to start it. £20 then to start it.

0:33:370:33:40

-Go on.

-Get in there.

-Go on. Go on.

0:33:400:33:43

£20. £25.

0:33:430:33:45

-£30. £35. £40. 45.

-Keep going. 50.

0:33:450:33:50

-50.

-60.

0:33:500:33:52

Five. 55. £55. 55. Where's 60?

0:33:520:33:57

£55. 55. Is that all it's to make?

0:33:570:34:01

All done at 55, then.

0:34:010:34:03

£55. I'm afraid that's minus £30.

0:34:030:34:06

Not so good that, is it? But anyway, minus £30.

0:34:060:34:12

Next item is the thermometer which you paid £8 for and he has estimated £5-£10.

0:34:120:34:20

Lot 100. The brass-cased kitchen thermometer.

0:34:200:34:23

What shall we say for that? £20.

0:34:230:34:25

Oh, dear.

0:34:260:34:28

A £10 note, then. Thank you. £10. Ten. £10.

0:34:280:34:33

-£12. Thank you. 14. 16. 18.

-What?

0:34:330:34:38

-20.

-I know I'd like to buy it.

0:34:380:34:40

£22. 22. Four, is it?

0:34:400:34:43

£22. Is that all it's to make? All done at 22, then.

0:34:430:34:47

-Yeah!

-£22.

0:34:470:34:50

That's not bad, is it? You've got plus 14 on that.

0:34:500:34:54

Yes... Which means you're minus £16.

0:34:540:34:57

You're £16 down.

0:34:570:34:58

-Yeah.

-Still, in with a chance.

0:34:580:35:00

The Moorcroft bowl, which you paid £35 for, he has estimated £30-£50.

0:35:000:35:05

It's my prediction that we do well with the Moorcroft.

0:35:050:35:08

-Very good. And off we go.

-Right.

0:35:080:35:10

Pottery bowl. Little Moorcroft one.

0:35:100:35:12

20 to kick it off. 20, I've got.

0:35:120:35:15

£20. £22. 24. £24.

0:35:150:35:18

24. 26. 28. 30.

0:35:180:35:22

Two. 34. 36.

0:35:220:35:26

36 is there. 36. 36. Where's eight?

0:35:260:35:30

£36. Is that all it's to do?

0:35:300:35:33

-38. Thank you.

-Get in there.

0:35:330:35:36

£38. 38. 38. 40, is it?

0:35:360:35:40

£38. All done at £38, then.

0:35:400:35:44

-That's a profit.

-£38.

0:35:440:35:45

You made a profit of £3 on that, which is very nice.

0:35:450:35:50

-You are overall minus £13.

-What a result.

0:35:500:35:54

What a result. What a result.

0:35:540:35:57

Only a modest loss, I have to say.

0:35:570:36:00

Nevertheless, it is a loss so are you going to go with the bonus buy, the silver pendant?

0:36:000:36:05

£35. David was paying for that.

0:36:050:36:07

It's a nice pendant, but I think it'd be a rope round our neck.

0:36:070:36:11

-Oh, do you?

-Yes.

-Have you worked that one out, Rob?

0:36:110:36:14

Yes.

0:36:140:36:16

Not going with the bonus buy. Well, we're going to sell it, anyway.

0:36:160:36:20

White metal pendant, set with amber on a link chain. £20 for it.

0:36:200:36:24

A £10 note for it.

0:36:260:36:28

Ten. Thank you, Holly. £10. Ten.

0:36:300:36:33

-Ten. 12? £10. £10.

-You might have made a good decision.

-Hopefully.

0:36:330:36:39

12. Thank you. 12.

0:36:390:36:41

14.

0:36:410:36:43

16. 18.

0:36:430:36:46

£18. 18. 18, no, 20, she's coming back.

0:36:460:36:49

£20. Thank you.

0:36:490:36:51

-20 is the lady at the back there. All done at 20.

-There we are.

0:36:510:36:55

-£20.

-Good decision, boys.

0:36:550:36:57

-Well done.

-Minus £15.

0:36:570:36:59

Thank you very much. Thank you.

0:36:590:37:02

So, the bonus buy sadly made a loss of £15. You made the right decision.

0:37:020:37:05

-We did, indeed. Yeah.

-Overall, you're minus £13.

0:37:050:37:08

You've ring-fenced that. Don't tell the Blues a thing.

0:37:080:37:11

Not a word. It's not unlucky for some.

0:37:110:37:13

-Now, Blues, do you know how the Reds got on? Got any idea?

-No.

0:37:170:37:20

-No.

-No idea. We don't want you to know, so that's good.

0:37:200:37:24

Going to have a quick run through your lots now.

0:37:240:37:26

-The doll's house furniture, which was your find, David, wasn't it?

-It was.

0:37:260:37:30

Nice extensive group pieces, there.

0:37:300:37:32

Needs a little bit of restoration, Tim.

0:37:320:37:34

Don't we all? £32 you paid for that.

0:37:340:37:37

30-40 is his estimate.

0:37:370:37:40

-That's encouraging.

-So that is encouraging.

0:37:400:37:42

-Good. And here it comes.

-122.

0:37:420:37:44

An interesting little lot. A doll's house drawing-room furniture.

0:37:440:37:48

What shall we say for those? £50.

0:37:480:37:51

You don't see them today, do you?

0:37:510:37:53

Original upholstery on it.

0:37:530:37:54

£20, then. Ten, I've got.

0:37:540:37:57

12, I've got. 14. 16.

0:37:570:38:00

18. 20.

0:38:000:38:02

22. 24.

0:38:020:38:04

-26. 28. One more.

-Come on!

0:38:040:38:09

28's near me. 28.

0:38:090:38:11

£28. 28. 30's where?

0:38:110:38:15

All done at £28 then?

0:38:150:38:17

I'm afraid it's £28, David.

0:38:170:38:20

That's minus £4.

0:38:200:38:22

However, do not despair...

0:38:220:38:26

because the little cauldron vesta is next.

0:38:260:38:29

You paid £55 for that. The auctioneer's estimate is £25-£35.

0:38:290:38:34

-So, he's going to have to buck up.

-Yes.

0:38:340:38:36

He's going to have to light the fire if we're going to get a decent profit on this, but here it comes.

0:38:360:38:42

124.

0:38:420:38:44

Nice little Welsh lot, here. Match striker in the form of a cauldron.

0:38:440:38:48

£50 worth.

0:38:480:38:51

Oh.

0:38:510:38:53

£20, then.

0:38:530:38:55

Someone must collect match strikers.

0:38:570:38:59

A £10 note. £10.

0:38:590:39:01

Ten. 12, is it? 12. 14.

0:39:010:39:03

16.

0:39:030:39:05

18. 20.

0:39:050:39:08

Have you stopped? 22. 24, in the centre, there.

0:39:090:39:12

22's down here. £22.

0:39:120:39:15

22. This is very little money.

0:39:150:39:18

£22. But it's gone at £22.

0:39:180:39:22

£22. It's minus £33, Lindsay.

0:39:220:39:26

-Oh, well.

-Not so good.

0:39:260:39:27

Now, the balance.

0:39:270:39:29

It's all in the balance.

0:39:290:39:31

-Yes.

-As they say.

0:39:310:39:33

126. A cast iron and brass pig balance.

0:39:330:39:37

What shall we say for that? Unusual item. A £10 note to start.

0:39:370:39:42

A £10 note.

0:39:450:39:46

Price of bacon's going up, you know.

0:39:460:39:49

It's bound to be. It's market day.

0:39:490:39:51

A £5 note, then. Thank you.

0:39:510:39:53

Five. Six. Eight. Ten.

0:39:530:39:56

12. 14.

0:39:560:39:59

14. 16. 16. 16. 18, for you.

0:39:590:40:03

18. 18.

0:40:030:40:06

-You having another?

-No. I don't think I'll bother.

0:40:060:40:08

You don't think you'll bother. All right. 18's over there.

0:40:080:40:11

£18. 18. Where's 20?

0:40:110:40:14

£18, we done?

0:40:140:40:16

£18. Two shy of 20.

0:40:160:40:19

That is minus £17 on that.

0:40:190:40:23

You are, overall, 37, 47, minus 54.

0:40:230:40:27

£54 down the proverbial lavatoire.

0:40:270:40:32

-Oh, dear.

-So, minus £54. Could be a winning score, though.

0:40:320:40:35

What are you going to do about the cheroot holder?

0:40:350:40:37

-We should go for it.

-Yeah. We'll go for it.

-We'll trust you.

0:40:370:40:41

-We're down anyway.

-Do you reckon?

-Yeah. We'll go for the bonus buy.

0:40:410:40:44

The auctioneer's estimate is actually £30-£40 on it,

0:40:440:40:47

so that's supporting your payment of £40, so let's see what happens.

0:40:470:40:53

130. A cheroot holder.

0:40:530:40:55

Nice silver cheroot holder with the original amber mouth piece.

0:40:550:40:59

Nine-carat gold.

0:40:590:41:01

-It's a Chester hallmark on the silver. 1897.

-That is good.

0:41:010:41:05

20. Thank you. 20. Two. 24.

0:41:050:41:08

£24. 24. 26. 28. 30. Two.

0:41:080:41:13

34. 36. 36 is down here. 36.

0:41:130:41:18

38. Thank you.

0:41:180:41:19

40, a fresh bidder. £40. Two. 42.

0:41:190:41:24

42. 44. 46.

0:41:240:41:28

-£46. 46.

-Come on.

0:41:280:41:30

Are we finished at 46? No more?

0:41:300:41:35

Well, done, David. £46.

0:41:350:41:37

£6 is £6 which takes you to minus £48. You are minus £48, overall.

0:41:370:41:42

-That's not a bad score, is it?

-No.

-Not a bad score.

0:41:420:41:45

Don't tell the Reds a thing and we will reveal all in a moment. Well done.

0:41:450:41:49

So, been chatting, have we?

0:41:540:41:56

-Happy family chats?

-No.

0:41:560:42:00

Just as well, isn't it, really? Cos there's not much between the teams, I have to say.

0:42:000:42:04

But I'm not actually going to be giving out much in the way of cash, to go home with, either.

0:42:040:42:10

If we're talking about ring-fencing losses, the team with the largest losses are, I'm afraid, the Blues.

0:42:100:42:16

-Oh, no!

-Yes!

0:42:160:42:18

-So, David Barby, despite contributing a profit on your cheroot holder...

-Yes!

0:42:180:42:25

..which turned out to be the only profit on today's performance,

0:42:250:42:30

the losses were minus £48 and I'm afraid that was not good enough to win.

0:42:300:42:34

So, you've been a great team between you both, our double Ls.

0:42:340:42:38

Look after yourselves. We shall miss you.

0:42:380:42:41

But the victors, today, most certainly are the Reds, by only losing £13...

0:42:410:42:46

-Excellent.

-..which is quite close.

-It is. Yeah.

0:42:460:42:48

But £14 profit on your kitchen thermometer is nothing else but phenomenal, really.

0:42:480:42:55

Just shows this is what we all have to buy and bring to Mold

0:42:550:42:58

-is what temperature you have to boil your jam at.

-That's right. Yeah.

0:42:580:43:02

The Moorcroft bowl didn't do you too bad, either, did it?

0:43:020:43:04

-No. A small profit.

-Made a £3 profit on that. So, congratulations.

0:43:040:43:08

Overall then, minus £13 wins it today. We've had tremendous fun.

0:43:080:43:12

-Join us soon for some more Bargain Hunting. Yes?

-Yes.

0:43:120:43:16

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:340:43:37

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:370:43:40

The setting for this edition is Anglesey in North Wales, where presenter Tim Wonnacott and his teams of bargain hunters attempt to outdo each other buying and selling antiques.

Experts David Harper and David Barby are on hand providing advice and guidance. Tim checks out the stunning Penryhn Castle in Bangor.