Newark 30 Bargain Hunt


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Newark 30

Paul Laidlaw and David Barby are the experts helping the teams at the County Showground in Newark. Tim Wonnacott also finds time to visit historic Lyme Park in Cheshire.


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In times of financial hardship,

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isn't it nice to know that there's still somewhere that you can go

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and be given £300 to go and buy whatever you like,

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providing it's not a lot of old tat and it'll make a profit at auction.

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So let's go bargain-hunting!

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Here we are in the County Showground in Newark,

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with all sorts of fun and frolics in store.

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Where the hell was the Moorcroft?

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Well, there's tension on today's show.

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We've got family feuds with the Reds...

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-We've just got to buy something. How much is this?

-We can't do that.

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We've just got to buy something!

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..expert arguments with the Blues...

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-Shall we take a chance on 140? What do you think?

-Yes.

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Much to David's disgust, but there you go.

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I want them gift-wrapped for that.

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And the feuding continues at the auction.

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-What?

-I think we'll stick.

-What do you mean?

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-You're not going with the bowl?

-OK, we'll go.

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So grab your tea and biccies, put your feet up

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and I'll introduce you to the teams.

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So today, for the Reds, we've got father and daughter,

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George and Krista, and partners Lee and James for the Blues.

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Welcome, everybody, lovely to see you.

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So, George, you're keeping it all in the family, what?

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Yes, I am. Krista's here.

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-She organised the day for me to come here.

-Did she?

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She contacted me one day, completely out of the blue.

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And said, "You're on Bargain Hunt, Dad!"

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Yeah, and I slumped back in the settee in a state of shock.

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-And you have a passion for antiques, don't you?

-I do, yes.

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-I collect Whitefriars glass, Powell...

-Powell as well, yeah.

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And we've got some dating from about 1877 right through the 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s up to Baxter.

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You go as far as Baxter?

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Yeah. Anything and everything.

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Let's hope you find some.

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-Thank you.

-Fingers crossed.

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Is your father an inspiration to you, Krista?

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He is, yes, certainly in the areas of antiques and collectibles, and he's passed a few pieces on to me...

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A lot of tips, we hope.

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Yeah, absolutely. Hopefully they'll be useful today.

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-And you had a brush with television in the past?

-Yeah, I auditioned for The Big Breakfast weather presenter.

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I was probably about 17 and queued for six hours, six or seven hours,

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-outside of Earls Court, and then went in and completely fluffed the audition...

-Oh, no!

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I put the sun where the clouds should be and the rain where the sun should be.

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-Yeah, it didn't go very well.

-Oh, dear. So that was it, then?

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-No, not famous.

-No more telly presenting work for you.

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-That's it, no.

-I hope you have better luck today. Thank you.

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Although it's looking rather grey. Whether we'll be lucky with the weather, I don't know,

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and I feel rather, kind of, damp myself.

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Anyway, you guys - are you scared or not?

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-No, we're ready. We're ready.

-You're ready for them.

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Very good. How did you two meet, Lee?

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We met through friends of friends. We were at the same birthday meal,

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got talking, ended up swapping numbers and the rest is history.

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Lovely. And do you collect?

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Well, it wasn't an intentional collection but my dad

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took me to football matches so I'm quite a big Stockport County fan,

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so I've had a collection of football programmes building up for quite a few years.

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Now, Jimmy, what do you do?

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I'm a sexual health nurse advisor.

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Ooh, God. What does that mean?

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We go along to pubs and clubs and we do some screening,

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we do education in schools and colleges and the main thing we do

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is Chlamydia testing on people under 25.

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Gosh, that sounds painful! Now, are you into footy too?

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I am now. I never used to be Lee's got me involved with Stockport County.

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I enjoy going to the matches and I know a bit more about football than I ever used to.

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-You've got your own scarf, I hope?

-I have indeed.

-Very good.

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Now, this is the money moment.

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We've got £300 here, £300 coming up. All right, ready for this?

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There's your £300, £300 apiece. You know the rules.

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Your experts await, and off you go. And very, very, very good luck.

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So will it be the footy-mad Blues

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or the antiques-mad Reds who make the biggest score today?

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And keeping an eye on our teams are experts...

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Now, let's get moving. Remember, you only have 60 minutes from now!

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Some either sporting memorabilia or some kind of autographed piece possibly.

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-Maybe look for a painting as well.

-Painting? OK, OK.

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We just want something a bit different, don't we? A bit quirky.

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Anything traditional and unique that's quite eye-catching.

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I'm not really interested in silver.

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Well, both teams seem to have a good idea about what they want,

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but as we know on this show, anything could happen.

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Seen anything you like, Dad?

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There's a little tazza there, a Victorian Majolica tazza,

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-but it's got a little chip in the bottom, I think.

-How big is it?

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-Cracked.

-A crack, yeah.

-Is that how you test that?

-You can hear that...

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-Yeah, you can hear it.

-Unlucky.

-That's good to know, yeah.

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-That could've been a good call.

-Yeah, shame.

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David's doing a spot of naval gazing.

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This is sort of naval items,

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and this would've been on the bulkhead of a ship, so the very fact that it says,

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"Stop, let off, half, half, volume..." this would indicate down to the boiler room

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what sort of pressure is required by the captain up in the bridge.

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I like it. I think it's unique. It's something I've not seen before.

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-Let's have a think about it, eh?

-Yeah.

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-I don't think, at £120, it's going to walk fast.

-Right, OK.

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What is it, Dad? A reading table. There's a price on it.

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140. Aye, it's enough money at that.

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-If you could get it for 60 quid, I'd be going for it. I'll ask.

-Yeah.

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With the seller away from his stall, it's down to his apprentice to act as the middle man.

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-What are you thinking of about?

-60?

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No, he can't do that much.

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-He'd do 120, he said.

-Oh, no.

-That would be it.

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-Cos it's quite a nice thing, that.

-It is.

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They're quirky, which is why I like them, but they're never

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great sellers because people don't know what to do with them.

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Do me a favour. At the risk of being really irritating, ask him

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if there's any way on God's Earth he could do it for 80 quid.

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It's just that it cost him not much less than that so...

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-Oh, aye, aye, aye.

-Can you do any better than that?

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Yeah? Oh, right. Right.

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He says he'll do it for 100.

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100... Er...

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If you ask again, you'll get it for 80 quid.

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-What do you think? It's quirky as hell.

-It is, yeah.

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-It's a full-on piece of Victorian furniture.

-It's quite nice.

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I'd go in at 80-120 as my estimate on that. It's got to be worth that.

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Ask him... Bat your eyelids and say, "Look, at 80 quid, it's..."

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Go on, Dad, bat your eyelids!

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It'll have to be 100. He can't do any less than that.

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-What about 85?

-He really wouldn't. He's dropped it down from 140.

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- Has he got 145 on that? - What about 90, meet halfway?

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140. He has been really straight and really generous.

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And he's got to make a profit at the end of the day.

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Is he not going to...? Ask him if he'd do another tenner,

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and I know he's taking pain,

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but...they're going to take more pain on national TV!

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It'll be a brown paper bag job for me, I can tell you!

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I'll ask him. He might knock a fiver off, but he might just stick at 100.

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-Say we're nice sorts.

-Yeah.

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Right. See ya.

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-He says he'll knock you a fiver off that.

-A fiver off - 95.

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Well, I think it's worth 80-120 so you're right in the middle.

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Yeah, yeah...

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-OK, I think...

-We'll take it? 95.

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-OK, yeah.

-We'll go for it, yeah.

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Some very persuasive negotiating by the Red team means they bagged their first item in 20 minutes.

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Negotiating, I think, is all about just asking civilly, you know.

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Where is the happy ground where we both benefit?

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I think they've done all right.

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Meanwhile, David's getting down and dirty with the Blues.

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-I think it's art glass.

-Right.

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And if I look through the side,

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you can see it's got these little bubbles.

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It's something you might find from sort of the Monart factory which I think is quite nice.

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-It's different, isn't it?

-It is.

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It's filthy!

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Absolutely filthy. Let's see.

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What's the price there?

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-How much?

-Yes.

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-It's filthy.

-I know it is, yeah.

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That's how it came out. Tenner?

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Five.

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Go on, yeah, OK.

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Hold it.

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-What do you think, Lee?

-Different.

-It is.

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I've not seen anything like it. What's the green...?

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It's just dirt, I think!

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Oh, wow, look at that once it's clean!

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Yes.

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-OK?

-Yeah, let's go for it.

-£5.

-It'll be your job to clean. OK.

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I think it has possibilities, that one.

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Blimey! Yours for a fiver?

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Don't go too mad with your money, will you, David?

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-That's quite nice. Nice colours.

-That's a Moorcroft.

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-Yeah, it's quite nice.

-Nice wee bowl.

-It's a pansy.

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-How much is on it?

-30.

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And what would that go for in auction?

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-Is the condition all right?

-Yeah.

-Yeah?

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-There's nothing the matter with that, is there?

-Elegant, it's nice.

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That's got to be worth 20-40, 50 if you're lucky,

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so it's about right, but squeeze it down a little?

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OK, give it a go.

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(Obviously doing a lot here.)

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-Yeah, you see loads of it on this programme.

-Willing to do it for 25.

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-It's 30 at the moment, so...

-What do you think?

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-I think we just think about it and come back later.

-Yeah.

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-It's always an option at the end of the day.

-See what else there is.

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Call back later, that's if it's still here. Keep looking?

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All right, then. Great, thanks.

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Always a risky strategy.

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It might just not be there when you come back.

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Now, what sort of paintings are you looking for? Northern art?

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-Maybe a scene from the north?

-A scene from the north. Oh, dear, oh, dear.

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Northern Japan!

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That's quite good.

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It's modern.

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I don't know the artist but it's quite effective.

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I'd call it a room-furnishing picture.

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From a distance it looks marvellous, close up not so hot.

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-Do you like that?

-Yeah, I like that.

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If anybody asked me what to collect, I'd suggest they collect Portmeirion pottery

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because it's still fairly plentiful and it's such marvellous designs.

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-Sir, the Portmeirion...

-Which one?

-Phoenix.

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Um, I can do it for 45 for the set.

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How much, sir?

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-45.

-45.

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-Is that the very best you can do?

-Do it for 40.

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40.

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-What do you think?

-Lovely, stylish set.

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-Very, very, stylish set.

-One for the future.

-Yeah.

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-Well, that's what I would say.

-And that one there.

-That I like.

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I think that's very, very present, and the cups are big,

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but you're looking at very stylish, iconic 1950s, 60s.

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That sort of period. Can you do it for 35, please?

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-That one there?

-Yeah.

-Yeah, go on.

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So 35. It's up to you.

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-Shall we have a closer look?

-Yeah, let's have a look.

-OK.

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And while the boys check the set over,

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shrewd David just can't resist another haggle.

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-It's got to be 35.

-32.50?

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35. LAUGHTER

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35... Are you happy at 35?

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-Yes.

-Yes, £35?

-Yes.

-You sure?

-Yes.

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-Fantastic.

-Fantastic.

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James and Lee have bought two items but, with only 20 minutes to go,

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the Reds have still only bought one thing.

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-The clock's ticking, team. No time for a tea-break.

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-Dad?

-What's your immediate reaction to that as a piece of design?

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-Yeah, it's very nice.

-If you've an eye for 20th-century glass, you can see the quality in that.

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It's called Picquot Ware,

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immediate post-war period.

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It's got a few more scratches on it, this one, but that's age, isn't it?

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What strikes me is the burnish on it. That is really sharp.

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These things, when they're abused, they oxidise and they're a lost cause. That is really sharp.

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And the trays OK, isn't it?

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The trays don't survive. Where I come from, that's a £50 set...

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And it's useable as well, isn't it?

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-Absolutely.

-It's nice.

-Really good lines.

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It's not just an ordinary square tray, you know.

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It's nice bevel here, bevel there as well, and the chrome.

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-Excuse me, what's your best on the...?

-25, darling.

-25?

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-Yeah, that is my best.

-What are you thinking, Krista?

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I was thinking about 15.

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-No, no way.

-She's hard, our Krista.

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-No, 25's the absolute best.

-OK.

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Would you for it for 20? I'm sorry, 25. 22?

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-It's a hard woman you're dealing with.

-25.

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-I think it's £25, folks.

-The tray's worth that. Yeah.

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-Yeah.

-Give it a go?

-Yeah, give it a go, Paul.

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I think it's a good thing.

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-OK. Thank you.

-25, thank you very much.

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Well, it's going quite well.

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They've got an idea of what they actually like and what they actually want.

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We've got so much money to spend now - well over £200 - so we've got to look for that extra-special thing.

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I think James is very keen on buying a painting,

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but we've got to be careful because paintings are all subjective.

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-Where does this look like...?

-That looks terrible.

-Oh, right!

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-Oh, no!

-Do you know what I'm going to say to you?

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I'm going to say - we'll keep looking for paintings

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-but I feel that we should also keep open to anything else.

-OK.

-OK.

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No, David, what you're saying is - you don't want them to buy a painting.

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Just remember, it's not up to you.

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Meanwhile, over on the Red team,

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it seems that Krista's choices aren't going down too well either.

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Murano Latticino. I think that's a bit twee.

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What's this?

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-No.

-No!

-My inexperience. What's this?

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That one looks quite good to me.

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-No, no, that's not...

-I think it's pretty but Dad's not keen.

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-What about the Bunnykins?

-Doesn't smack you in the face.

-No, not keen.

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Oh, dear, poor Krista.

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What's the metal with the guy sort of doing this? No...

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It's probably spelter.

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-The statue.

-No, it's spelter.

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Not keen, no.

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I'll get there in the end, find something.

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Still, it's not all gloom and doom, and David seems to have steered his team away from the paintings.

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-What about the mouse bookends?

-What's the price on that one?

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-The price underneath...

-That one.

-Yeah.

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£165.

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Robert Mouseman Thompson.

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A pair of oak bookends.

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-I'd like to see those well under 100.

-OK.

-Right.

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-Excuse me, sir.

-Excuse me.

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-How much can you do on the bookends? A really good price for us.

-145.

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-Too much.

-Too much. No?

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Is that the very best you can do - £145?

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140, then, seeing as you're such a good-looking chap.

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-And my wife fancies you.

-I'll give you 160 for that.

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OK, let's cogitate on that.

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-OK.

-OK.

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But there's only ten minutes to go, team, and with the pressure on to buy their last item,

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it's those Mouseman bookends that are just preying on James's mind.

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-I remember my grandma telling me about...

-The Mouseman.

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..the Mouseman on the furniture, and my grandma describing it to me...

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So it's full of sentimentality and emotion?

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Yeah, I think so.

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-Do you feel...?

-I'm confident in you.

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-Shall we go for it?

-Come on, then.

-Let's go and see.

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It's got to be cheaper than 140.

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-Has it?

-Mmm. Let's go and see.

0:16:510:16:53

Let's go and see what he can do.

0:16:530:16:55

Five minutes left, and the Reds are starting to sweat.

0:16:560:17:00

What do you think, folks?

0:17:000:17:02

Are we still looking or getting to the point where...?

0:17:020:17:04

-Give it another couple of minutes. If we can't find anything, we'll have to...

-Decide.

0:17:040:17:09

What about this? No. Right.

0:17:090:17:12

-Come on, then, Dad.

-Hang on.

0:17:120:17:16

-Is that just a modern one?

-It's quirky.

-We've only got a few minutes now, so shall we just...

0:17:160:17:22

..move?

0:17:240:17:27

-Hi there.

-Still got to be 140.

-140.

0:17:270:17:31

- Can you do any better on 140 or not?

0:17:310:17:33

- No, absolutely not. Absolutely 140 is the death.

0:17:330:17:37

- Not even 135? - No.

0:17:370:17:41

- No, I think there's profit at that and I have to make a living. They're not dear.

0:17:410:17:47

I would like to pay just slightly under the 140, sir.

0:17:470:17:51

-No, can't do it.

-135.

-No, I can't do it, really.

0:17:510:17:54

Shall we take a chance on 140? What do you think?

0:17:540:17:57

-Yes.

-Yeah, think so?

0:17:570:17:59

Yeah, I willing to go for it.

0:17:590:18:01

-Yeah. Shall we go for them?

-Yeah.

0:18:010:18:03

- OK. - 140?

0:18:030:18:05

- Much to David's disgust, but there you go.

0:18:050:18:08

- I shall wrap them up.

0:18:100:18:12

I want them gift-wrapped for that!

0:18:120:18:14

-- You'll get them wrapped.

-£5.

0:18:140:18:16

- Yeah. - All right?

0:18:160:18:18

Yeah, 140. Yeah, we'll take them.

0:18:180:18:22

-No, I like them.

-I'm happy with that.

-Yeah.

0:18:220:18:24

I hope they're going to make a profit,

0:18:240:18:27

if not sell for what we paid for them.

0:18:270:18:31

Cheer up, David, at least it's not a painting!

0:18:310:18:34

Krista and George have just 60 seconds left and have decided

0:18:340:18:38

to go for the little Moorcroft vase they saw earlier,

0:18:380:18:42

but no-one can remember where it is.

0:18:420:18:45

Where the hell was the Moorcroft?!

0:18:450:18:47

-D...427, I think it was.

-Was it?

0:18:470:18:51

Dad, what about here?

0:18:530:18:54

-Do you want a map?

-Might be an idea if you've got a spare one.

0:18:540:18:59

We've just got to buy something now.

0:18:590:19:01

Is this your stall? Do you mind... Is this yours?

0:19:010:19:05

-How much is this?

-No, we can't do that, Kris.

0:19:050:19:08

-Can't do that.

-We've just got to buy something!

0:19:080:19:10

We've got to find the Moorcroft.

0:19:100:19:13

Five...

0:19:130:19:15

Are we left here?

0:19:150:19:17

-No.

-Or was it this row?

0:19:170:19:19

I think it was the row up at the top, wasn't it?

0:19:190:19:21

-Four...

-We've got to run. Oh, no!

0:19:210:19:24

-Three...

-Down here.

-It was down on the right, wasn't it? Quite far.

0:19:240:19:30

-Two...

-He's off like a whippet!

0:19:300:19:34

One...

0:19:350:19:37

Just in the nick of time, the Reds nab the Moorcroft vase,

0:19:370:19:41

but with no time for negotiating, they pocket it for £25.

0:19:410:19:47

-I quite like it.

-Drinking out the cup!

0:19:470:19:49

The cup of hope.

0:19:490:19:51

Time's up. Let's see how the Reds got on.

0:19:540:19:56

The Reds were well-read with this red...

0:19:560:19:59

sorry, brown reading table at £95.

0:19:590:20:03

The Picquot Ware tea-set set them back £25.

0:20:030:20:06

And they needed a map to find the Moorcroft bowl

0:20:060:20:08

just in the nick of time.

0:20:080:20:11

Cor, talk about headless chickens and last-minute action!

0:20:110:20:14

-Yeah.

-That was ridiculous with you two.

0:20:140:20:17

-It was hard going.

-I think you peaked early, that's what it was.

0:20:170:20:20

We peaked very late, actually, cos I think we broke the four-minute mile record.

0:20:200:20:24

Well, anyway, well done, and you got your third item which is brilliant.

0:20:240:20:28

-Absolutely.

-And you managed to spend how much?

-£145.

0:20:280:20:32

-You spent £145.

-Yeah.

-Brilliant.

0:20:320:20:34

And how have you got on with our canny man from north of the border?

0:20:340:20:37

-Excellent.

-Have you? Well,

0:20:370:20:40

Paul has a reputation for assisting teams to make spectacular profits.

0:20:400:20:45

At least, it's worked in the past, hasn't it, Paul?

0:20:450:20:48

Pile it on, Tim, pile it on.

0:20:480:20:50

-So I'd like £155, please.

-Yeah, got that here.

-There we go, £155. No need to count it.

0:20:500:20:54

-You're an honest-looking girl.

-Thank you.

0:20:540:20:56

So 155, Paul. Is that going to be a challenge?

0:20:560:20:59

I think not, given the scope we have here. Get my bargain radar out.

0:20:590:21:03

Yes, go and look up a few chums!

0:21:030:21:06

No. Anyway, very good luck with that.

0:21:060:21:09

Why don't we check out exactly what the Blues are doing?

0:21:090:21:12

They had a much more leisurely shop,

0:21:120:21:14

starting with this dirty great vase at a measly £5.

0:21:140:21:18

This stylish 1950s' coffee set set them back £35,

0:21:180:21:23

and swayed by childhood memories,

0:21:230:21:24

they paid a princely £140 for the Mouseman bookends.

0:21:240:21:28

Well, that was good, wasn't it?

0:21:290:21:31

Everybody falling out spectacularly at the last fence.

0:21:310:21:34

What is it with you? Is it all sentiment or what?

0:21:340:21:37

I really like the product and my grandma describing them to me when I was younger... I like it.

0:21:370:21:42

-I think we'll do well with that.

-You do?

0:21:420:21:44

If you ignore Barby's advice, I tell you, you do so at your peril!

0:21:440:21:49

-Seriously, though, have you had a nice time?

-Fantastic.

0:21:490:21:52

-Never known an hour go so quick, though.

-I know, it's ridiculous, isn't it?

0:21:520:21:56

No, I'm confident, I'm happy. Now, you spent how much?

0:21:560:21:59

-We spent £180?

-Yes.

-So you've got £120, yes?

0:21:590:22:02

-£120.

-£120 goes to David Barby.

0:22:020:22:05

-Thank you.

-No better man to spend it, I have to say.

0:22:050:22:07

What have you got in mind, David?

0:22:070:22:09

I have something in mind. I can't say too much cos it'll give it away.

0:22:090:22:13

-Oh, will it?

-Yes.

-We don't want anything given away.

0:22:130:22:15

Particularly when you've got £120 to spend.

0:22:150:22:18

Anyway, off you trot, David, and good luck!

0:22:180:22:21

I'm off somewhere spectacular.

0:22:210:22:23

And I've slipped across to Disley in Cheshire

0:22:230:22:28

to visit Lyme Park, home to the Legh family for over 550 years.

0:22:280:22:33

Lyme started off life as a modest hunting lodge,

0:22:330:22:37

but following a grant of land from the Crown in the 16th century,

0:22:370:22:42

the Leghs expanded things a bit.

0:22:420:22:46

Richard II granted an annuity to Margaret Legh after her grandfather courageously rescued

0:22:460:22:52

the Prince of Wales, also known as the Black Prince, at the Battle of Crecy.

0:22:520:22:56

Now, before we continue, it's shoes-off time.

0:22:560:23:01

And in the entrance hall, there's a reminder of all that family history

0:23:010:23:05

with the family's portrait of the Black Prince,

0:23:050:23:08

who's looking particularly black.

0:23:080:23:11

But what's drawn me to the entrance hall is that, in fact,

0:23:110:23:14

there's a fest of textiles going on in this space,

0:23:140:23:18

which includes the carpet and the tapestries on the walls.

0:23:180:23:23

Now, this carpet is really rather special.

0:23:230:23:25

It was made around 1850

0:23:250:23:28

and it was designed by Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin.

0:23:280:23:33

And what's special about it, apart from the brilliant colours,

0:23:330:23:36

is that some of these designs - for example, that quatrefoil -

0:23:360:23:41

you can see reflected in Pugin's glazed wall tiles.

0:23:410:23:46

So, next time you go into a gentlemen's lavatory -

0:23:460:23:50

that's assuming you're a gentleman -

0:23:500:23:52

watch out for the tiles on the walls.

0:23:520:23:56

But the tapestries have been at Lyme for yonks,

0:23:560:24:00

since at least the 18th century,

0:24:000:24:03

and what's brilliant about them is, apart from being early,

0:24:030:24:06

because they were woven in the 1620s at Mortlake in Surrey,

0:24:060:24:11

is that they tell a story.

0:24:110:24:14

In this case, it's the classic story of the love affair between Leander and Hero.

0:24:140:24:21

In this tapestry, we see them meeting,

0:24:210:24:24

and you can tell that the love process is about to start,

0:24:240:24:28

because winging through the sky at some altitude is a little Cupid,

0:24:280:24:33

and he's firing off a few arrows at the young couple,

0:24:330:24:37

who have formed an attachment as a result.

0:24:370:24:41

They sadly have to part.

0:24:410:24:44

He lives on one side of the Hellespont and she lives on the other.

0:24:440:24:48

The Hellespont being the modern-day Bosphorus.

0:24:480:24:53

So Leander decides he's going to have a swim across the Bosphorus

0:24:530:24:57

and go and visit Hero.

0:24:570:24:58

In this tapestry, we see him arriving after his long swim.

0:24:580:25:05

On the foreshore is a servant,

0:25:050:25:08

and she's beckoning to her mistress,

0:25:080:25:11

who's inside the bathing shed saying, "Come and get it!"

0:25:110:25:16

They enjoy an evening of bliss together and, just before dawn,

0:25:160:25:21

Leander heads off, which we see in the third tapestry in this series,

0:25:210:25:27

back home across the Bosphorus.

0:25:270:25:29

Sadly, he drowns en route

0:25:290:25:32

because the light that was guiding him across the Bosphorus

0:25:320:25:35

was turned out and the final tapestry in the series,

0:25:350:25:39

the fourth one, now hangs at the Victoria and Albert Museum

0:25:390:25:45

and it shows Hero lamenting the loss of Leander.

0:25:450:25:49

Charming, isn't it?

0:25:490:25:51

The big question is today, of course,

0:25:510:25:53

which of our teams over at the auction will be sinking or swimming?

0:25:530:25:57

Well, we've come flitting over the Pennines

0:26:060:26:09

to the flat plains of Cheshire to Frank Marshall & Co in Knutsford

0:26:090:26:13

where we are with auctioneer Nick Hall.

0:26:130:26:15

-Nick, good morning.

-Welcome, Tim.

-Very nice to see you.

0:26:150:26:19

Good. Now, the Red team, Krista and George, their first item

0:26:190:26:23

with Paul Laidlaw was this adjustable Victorian bed table.

0:26:230:26:27

Not perhaps the most saleable bit of Victorian furniture, what?

0:26:270:26:31

They used to make a lot of money, used to be very popular things but, of course,

0:26:310:26:35

with a lot of this late-Victorian brown furniture, it's dwindled.

0:26:350:26:39

One or two condition problems, I think, might hamper it slightly.

0:26:390:26:42

-So what do you think it's worth, Nick?

-Well, we've put £100-£150.

0:26:420:26:46

Good. Well, our team will be delighted cos they only paid £95. That would be a result.

0:26:460:26:51

Now, what about this brushed aluminium Picquot Ware tea-set?

0:26:510:26:54

Mmm, it's a difficult thing to sell.

0:26:540:26:56

There's no great collectors, it's not a particularly well-known name

0:26:560:27:00

in the collecting field of post-war modern decorative design.

0:27:000:27:03

-How much, then?

-We've put £20 on it.

0:27:030:27:06

-20 to what?

-20-40 to be kind.

0:27:060:27:08

-Oh, that's nice. £25 they paid.

-OK.

-And what about the Moorcroft bowl?

0:27:080:27:13

You can't go wrong with Moorcroft. It's not early in date.

0:27:130:27:17

£40-£60 we've got against it.

0:27:170:27:19

-That's very good. £25 they paid.

-There should be a profit in that.

0:27:190:27:23

Good. So a sure-fire profit perhaps on the Moorcroft,

0:27:230:27:27

a little bit dodgy on the Picquot tea-set

0:27:270:27:30

and maybe they'll wipe their face on the Victorian bed table

0:27:300:27:34

which adds up to almost certainly needing their bonus buy,

0:27:340:27:37

so let's go and have a look at it.

0:27:370:27:39

-George, Krista, you spent £145.

-Yes.

0:27:400:27:45

You gave Paul £155. What did he spend it on?

0:27:450:27:49

Right, moment of truth.

0:27:490:27:50

We looked for some period glass...in vain.

0:27:500:27:52

-Does that tickle your fancy?

-That's quite nice.

-Yeah.

0:27:520:27:56

It's a kind of dull colour but what sold it to me entirely is the mould.

0:27:560:28:03

What an absolutely delicious acanthus-cum-thistle-like design.

0:28:030:28:08

I think that's the way to view it. Lovely piece of glass.

0:28:080:28:11

-What do you think of that design, Krista?

-I think it's nice,

0:28:110:28:14

quite pretty and, although you don't like the colour, I think it's quite nice.

0:28:140:28:18

-What do you think, Dad?

-I like it.

0:28:180:28:20

There's a couple of little dinks in it, but it depends how much you paid for it, Paul.

0:28:200:28:25

-I paid £10 for that.

-Mmm.

0:28:250:28:29

And how much do you think it will make?

0:28:290:28:31

Anywhere, it's going to make £30, maybe £40.

0:28:310:28:35

-Really?

-No fortunes to be made but not a bad margin.

0:28:350:28:38

-Do you know the maker of it?

-It's a difficult one.

0:28:380:28:40

It could be French but it could just be north-east England.

0:28:400:28:43

-It's not marked or anything, is it?

-No, I have had a good look.

0:28:430:28:47

Frustratingly, no clues.

0:28:470:28:49

There's so much that's frankly numb. Not so in that case.

0:28:490:28:53

For a £10 note, I don't think you can go too far wrong with that.

0:28:530:28:57

I think we're all feeling numb, actually, Paul! Thank you very much.

0:28:570:29:01

Now, don't decide now, decide after the sale of the first three items,

0:29:010:29:04

but for the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Paul's bowl.

0:29:040:29:09

So, Nick, what do you make of this?

0:29:090:29:11

Typically Art Deco, nicely moulded.

0:29:110:29:15

Got the nice yellow tinting on it as well. Obviously it's copying Lalique.

0:29:150:29:19

I suspect it's made by another big Paris glass-maker of the time,

0:29:190:29:22

Sabino, Etling, one of that type. It's a nice piece of inexpensive Deco glass.

0:29:220:29:27

Ought to make £20-£30. Should do, really.

0:29:270:29:29

Paul Laidlaw will be delighted about that.

0:29:290:29:31

-He paid a £10 note, which is what we call a bonus buy.

-Excellent.

0:29:310:29:36

Anyway, that's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues,

0:29:360:29:39

-and first up for them is that Scottish globular pink vase.

-Mmm.

0:29:390:29:43

What do you make of that?

0:29:430:29:44

Very globular. It's trying desperately hard to be Monart but it's far too late.

0:29:440:29:48

It's not got the typical ground pontil mark you expect with the earlier Scottish art glass.

0:29:480:29:53

-This has got to be post-war.

-I'm not liking the sound of this. What's your estimate?

0:29:530:29:58

-We put £20-£40 on it.

-Really?

0:29:580:30:00

-Yeah.

-Well, they paid a fiver.

0:30:000:30:02

For £5 it wasn't a bad buy if the right buyer's in the room,

0:30:020:30:05

but it just won't appeal to the Scottish art glass buyers.

0:30:050:30:09

-Next up is the coffee set.

-Yes.

-Well, that's pure 60s, isn't it?

0:30:090:30:12

Very much so. Yeah, Portmeirion, Susan Ellis.

0:30:120:30:16

It's not one of the desirable patterns but it's an OK name.

0:30:160:30:21

Not too bad. There will be collectors looking at it at £30-£50.

0:30:210:30:25

I suspect the lower end will probably be more in tune with it.

0:30:250:30:28

That would be brilliant cos £35 is all they paid.

0:30:280:30:30

What about the oak bookends?

0:30:300:30:32

Yeah, Robert Thompson, the Mouseman, always collectible.

0:30:320:30:35

There's always buyers for it.

0:30:350:30:36

Date-wise, it's not an early piece of Mouseman, but they are very nice, commercial-friendly pieces.

0:30:360:30:42

How friendly is your estimate?

0:30:420:30:45

We've gone for a mouse-friendly £60-£100.

0:30:450:30:47

-Oh. £140 they paid.

-That's at a retail price, isn't it?

-Yes, I know.

0:30:470:30:51

If two collectors get stuck into it... They've just bought a nice set of books

0:30:510:30:55

and they want some Mouseman bookends, then they might pay that and a bit more for it but...

0:30:550:30:59

-Strictly speaking, your real estimate is £60-£100 and that's fine.

-Yeah.

0:30:590:31:03

Very good. Overall, I fancy they'll need their bonus buy so let's go and have a look at it.

0:31:030:31:08

So, Lee and James, you spent £180, you gave David Barby £120 to buy

0:31:080:31:13

your bonus buy, and he's got it there set out on the table.

0:31:130:31:16

-Well, it's not a cake, Tim.

-It's not a cake.

-Ah!

0:31:160:31:21

-I remember this.

-Oh, do you, really?

-Yes.

0:31:210:31:24

Ah, well, this is from a Dutch barge and this is from the wheelhouse

0:31:240:31:29

to the engine room below, and you can...

0:31:290:31:31

BELL RINGS

0:31:340:31:35

Stop, move, halt, goodness knows what?

0:31:350:31:38

This is so decorative, and if you have a minimalistic kitchen

0:31:380:31:42

or a hallway and you want something startling

0:31:420:31:45

to get people's attention, this is it.

0:31:450:31:48

It's a handsome little piece. It cost £80 but I think it was very, very reasonable.

0:31:480:31:54

-And our chances today?

-If there's enough people here

0:31:540:31:57

that are interested in this type of decorative object,

0:31:570:32:00

-I think you could probably go over the £100 mark.

-Fantastic.

0:32:000:32:03

I love it. I remember it caught my eye when we were walking round.

0:32:030:32:07

It just looks very classic, it looks...

0:32:070:32:10

-It does look classic, doesn't it?

-It stands out.

0:32:100:32:12

It could be a talking piece, couldn't it, if you had it on display?

0:32:120:32:16

Would you pay £80 for that, to have a talking piece?

0:32:160:32:19

Maybe it's not my talking piece that I'd have, but we're hoping someone here...

0:32:190:32:23

-Yeah, but it's just a fun piece.

-Definitely.

0:32:230:32:26

And very unusual. Well done, David.

0:32:260:32:28

-Thank you.

-You're testing the auction house.

0:32:280:32:30

But for the audience at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about David's ship's telegraph.

0:32:300:32:36

What do you make of this Dutch telegraph gadget?

0:32:360:32:39

I suspect he might well be sinking without a trace.

0:32:390:32:42

It's an obscure thing.

0:32:420:32:44

Will there be buyers for it? I've got my doubts.

0:32:440:32:46

There are serious marine collectors knocking about, but who wants this in Dutch?

0:32:460:32:51

Well, I'm hoping that someone from overseas might pick up on it.

0:32:510:32:54

-Like a Dutchman?

-Ideally.

-That would be great, wouldn't it?

0:32:540:32:57

-It would help, I think we'll struggle otherwise.

-What's your estimate?

0:32:570:33:01

-£30-£50.

-Barby paid 80.

-Pounds or euros?

0:33:010:33:03

-Doesn't make much difference these days!

-Not a lot.

0:33:030:33:06

Thank you very much. Are you taking the auction?

0:33:060:33:08

-I am indeed.

-Ah, we're in safe hands.

0:33:080:33:10

Now, you two, how are you feeling?

0:33:150:33:18

-Hopeful.

-Hopeful.

-Nervous.

-Why are you nervous?

0:33:190:33:22

Excited, borderline nervous.

0:33:220:33:24

We're putting all our trust in Paul.

0:33:240:33:27

-Does that mean you'll be blaming him when it all goes wrong?

-Probably!

0:33:270:33:32

Well, first up is going to be the Victorian adjustable bed table, right?

0:33:320:33:37

Yes, the reading table.

0:33:370:33:38

-Bed table.

-Bed table. OK, Tim.

0:33:380:33:40

Call it reading table if you like, but they were made as bed tables.

0:33:400:33:44

OK. Here it comes.

0:33:440:33:47

Lot 130A, the Victorian mahogany adjustable reading table.

0:33:470:33:51

60? £60 if you will, please.

0:33:510:33:54

-50? 40? We're going the wrong way!

-It's all right, get it started.

0:33:540:33:58

Someone somewhere at £40? Can you not hear me?

0:33:580:34:00

A Victorian mahogany adjustable reading table

0:34:000:34:03

with a Landers maker's stamp. Are you bidding, madam?

0:34:030:34:06

-£20. That hurts me, madam, but I'll take it.

-I think we're doomed!

0:34:060:34:10

25 online. Are you still in, madam?

0:34:100:34:12

Worth a lot more and you know it.

0:34:120:34:14

30, new bidder stepping in.

0:34:140:34:16

Are you bidding online?

0:34:160:34:18

It's £30 in the room. Bidding online?

0:34:180:34:20

Not even a flicker.

0:34:200:34:22

At £30 in the room. I think we're there, we're done at £30.

0:34:220:34:26

All we'll get today... 35, there's a late bid coming in.

0:34:260:34:28

40 I have. Back in the room again at £40...

0:34:280:34:31

He's good though. He's keeping them going.

0:34:310:34:33

At 45, I think we're there. I think we've exhausted it.

0:34:330:34:36

At £45... 50, online bid.

0:34:360:34:39

Two of them want in it.

0:34:390:34:41

It's not dear at 50.

0:34:410:34:43

50 I'm selling, last chance. Make no mistake, at £50...

0:34:430:34:47

Ah, he's sold it for 50. Well, there we go, it got better and better.

0:34:470:34:52

Only minus £45.

0:34:520:34:54

-I don't feel so bad about that, do you?

-We'll get it back.

0:34:540:34:56

That's the attitude George!

0:34:560:34:58

Lot 131A is a four-piece Picquot Ware chrome tea service.

0:34:580:35:03

What are we going to say? £20 for it? 20 I'm offered.

0:35:030:35:06

-Good at 20.

-Get it started.

0:35:060:35:09

20 in at the start. 5 anywhere do I hear?

0:35:090:35:11

Anyone else coming in? 25? New bidder by the doorway.

0:35:110:35:14

30, 5, 40, 5. At £45, straight at the back in the doorway. I'm selling.

0:35:140:35:19

All done, last chance at £45...

0:35:190:35:23

£45, that's OK. £45 is plus £20

0:35:230:35:27

which means you're only minus £25. We're clawing it back here.

0:35:270:35:30

Lot 132A is the little piece of Moorcroft this time.

0:35:300:35:34

This small pansy-pattern pin bowl.

0:35:340:35:37

£40, no money. Thank you, madam.

0:35:370:35:39

-Straight in at 40.

-It is Moorcroft. 5, anyone? Bidding online.

0:35:390:35:42

There's a flicker. 45.

0:35:420:35:44

Internet bid at 45.

0:35:440:35:46

-Coming in at 50...

-Yes!

0:35:460:35:49

Bid's in the room at £50, and 5, sir? Thank you. 55 with you.

0:35:490:35:54

-Fantastic!

-And it's 60 against you with the lady.

0:35:540:35:57

At 60 I'm selling if you're all finished...

0:35:570:36:00

£60. Well, that's very good, isn't it?

0:36:000:36:03

-Not bad at all.

-£65. That's plus £35

0:36:030:36:05

which wipes out your minus £25, which means you're plus £10.

0:36:050:36:09

Ooh!

0:36:090:36:11

We are in such a jammy profit arrangement.

0:36:110:36:15

I mean, that started off so badly, didn't it, with that ruddy table.

0:36:150:36:20

-Now, listen. Thanks to Krista, you have £10 in cash...

-Well done.

0:36:200:36:25

..which could be a winning score.

0:36:250:36:28

You don't have to risk that £10 on the glass bowl, but it's up to you.

0:36:280:36:33

-What do you think?

-It cost a tenner! Of course it'll make money!

0:36:330:36:37

-I want to stick.

-You want to stick?

-Because we're going to...

0:36:370:36:40

-You're going to what, Dad?

-I think we'll stick.

-What do you mean? Are you not going for the bowl?

0:36:400:36:44

-OK, we'll go, then.

-Go with the bowl. Go with the bowl.

0:36:440:36:47

What are you going to do, George?

0:36:470:36:49

-Go for it.

-Going for the bonus buy.

0:36:490:36:50

Very good. Here comes the glass bowl and here we go.

0:36:500:36:53

Lot 136A, a bit of Art Deco glassware this time. The amber-coloured bowl.

0:36:530:36:59

Where are we going to go? £20? £20 if you like for it.

0:36:590:37:02

Nice bit of Art Deco glassware. Good colouring, nice moulding.

0:37:020:37:05

£20 only. 18? 15?

0:37:050:37:08

Not going to make me beg, are you? 15?

0:37:080:37:10

Start me at 10, get it away.

0:37:100:37:12

-Nice bit of Art Deco glass...

-You're kidding me!

0:37:120:37:15

It's not looking good.

0:37:150:37:18

Thank you, 10 I'm offered. Any further bid on £10?

0:37:180:37:20

Are we all done at £10? Are you sure? Last chance.

0:37:200:37:23

-At 10 I'm selling. It's going...

-£10.

0:37:230:37:26

-Thank God!

-£10, wiped its face.

0:37:260:37:29

Right, no profit, no loss, no shame.

0:37:290:37:31

I can't believe how cheap that was, but there we are.

0:37:310:37:33

We're out of trouble. We're back in a plus-10 situation

0:37:330:37:37

which seriously, you guys, could be a winning score.

0:37:370:37:40

Thank you very much. Excellent.

0:37:400:37:42

Well, father and daughter just about made it through the auction

0:37:420:37:45

in one piece and clung on to their profit.

0:37:450:37:48

Let's hope the Blues can survive as well.

0:37:480:37:50

-OK, boys. Now, do you know how the Reds got on?

-No idea.

0:37:520:37:55

-No idea.

-You don't want to know either, I tell you.

0:37:550:37:58

-Now, first up is going to be your Scottish globular pink vase.

-Yes.

0:37:580:38:02

Found by David, £5 paid for that.

0:38:020:38:05

-Bargain.

-Here it comes.

-Lot 155A...

0:38:050:38:08

It's lovely. Clean, bright, fantastic.

0:38:080:38:11

A 20th-centry coloured glass vase, a bit of Scottish art glass.

0:38:110:38:16

-This'll do well, this'll do well.

-£20 for it?

0:38:160:38:18

£20? Anywhere at £20? 18?

0:38:180:38:19

15? 10 will start me.

0:38:190:38:22

-Oh, come on.

-£10 to start me.

0:38:220:38:26

-Somewhere, £10?

-No?

0:38:260:38:28

Surely a tenner's worth.

0:38:280:38:29

5 I'm bid. Thank you.

0:38:290:38:32

-Come on, bid!

-Any advance on £5?

0:38:320:38:35

Are you all done for a fiver?

0:38:350:38:37

-No!

-At 5 I'm selling.

0:38:370:38:38

-Oh, no!

-All finished? At £5 it's going.

0:38:380:38:41

-£5 sold.

-That's ridiculous.

0:38:410:38:44

Well, no shame, no gain.

0:38:440:38:46

-Wiped its face for £5.

-Lot 156A is the Portmeirion coffee service.

0:38:460:38:49

This is by Susan Williams Ellis, a complete service.

0:38:490:38:53

-Where are we going to go? £30?

-Yes, come on.

-25? £20?

0:38:530:38:57

Thank you, madam. 20 I'm bid. Lady seated at 20. And 5, anyone?

0:38:570:39:00

With you at 20. Anyone else? Are you all done? 5 online.

0:39:000:39:04

-One more go.

-Come on!

-One more go.

0:39:040:39:07

At 25 against you. At 25, selling...

0:39:070:39:10

£25, maiden bid on the internet.

0:39:100:39:13

That is minus £10. That's not right.

0:39:130:39:16

-OK, now, the bookends.

-Come on!

0:39:160:39:19

Keep everything crossed for these.

0:39:190:39:22

Lot 157A, nice little collector's lot.

0:39:220:39:25

This is the Robert Thompson Mouseman solid oak bookends.

0:39:250:39:29

We've got commission bids. Not dear but I've got commission bids.

0:39:290:39:32

Start me at 35 for the bookends. Any advance on 35?

0:39:320:39:35

40 I'm bid. 45.

0:39:350:39:37

50 seated. The book's out at 50.

0:39:370:39:38

Bidding to do? It's £50, gent seated.

0:39:380:39:40

And 5, new bidder.

0:39:400:39:42

Still in, sir? 55 against you.

0:39:420:39:45

-Madam? 60 on the end.

-Come on, keep going!

0:39:450:39:48

At 70, 5, 80, 5, 90, 5... 95, gent seated bang in the centre.

0:39:480:39:55

£95. New bidder at 100. Fresh bid at £100.

0:39:550:39:58

110, £120. At 120 I'm bid.

0:39:580:40:02

All done at £120? All sure?

0:40:020:40:05

Oh, blast it! £120.

0:40:050:40:08

Well, it got on with it, James. You must be pleased about that.

0:40:080:40:11

-It's a loss of £20.

-Against all expectations!

0:40:110:40:14

-And there's nothing to be proud about any losses, of course, but it did well.

-Yeah.

0:40:140:40:18

A lot more than the auctioneer's estimate which is great.

0:40:180:40:21

So, anyway, you're minus £30.

0:40:210:40:23

What are we going to do about the barge mechanical connector?

0:40:230:40:27

-Leave it.

-You're going to leave it or go with it?

0:40:270:40:29

-We're going to leave it.

-Definitely going to leave it?

0:40:290:40:32

-Are you sure about that?

-I've seen how it's going today.

0:40:320:40:35

It could be, here in Knutsford, Dutch marine engineering objects are incredibly popular!

0:40:350:40:40

-I don't think it's going to sell.

-No, no.

0:40:400:40:43

-You don't think it's going to sell.

-No.

0:40:430:40:45

You're definitely not going with it.

0:40:450:40:46

We're going to sell it anyway. Here it comes.

0:40:460:40:49

-Doesn't it look lovely?

-Lot 161A, an unusual lot.

0:40:490:40:52

This is the early £20-century Dutch ship's telegraph.

0:40:520:40:56

Where are we going to go? £30 for it?

0:40:560:40:58

£20? 15? 10 will start. £10 for it. Thank you, sir.

0:40:580:41:01

10 I'm bid, and 12 against you. 12 I've taken. 15 with you? 15 offered.

0:41:010:41:05

Still in, sir, at 18? Thank you, 18 bid. Any advance on £18. 20.

0:41:050:41:09

It's not going to get to 80. There's no way it's going to get to 80.

0:41:090:41:13

20 against you. 22 I'm bid. And 5? Thank you. 25 on the phone.

0:41:130:41:17

He's got Rotterdam on the phone.

0:41:170:41:20

All done at £25? At 25, selling...

0:41:200:41:24

-£25.

-That was a good move.

0:41:240:41:27

That is a narrow squeak at minus £55. That's all right.

0:41:270:41:31

So, as it is, you have ring-fenced your losses at minus £30.

0:41:310:41:36

-Minus £30 could be a winning score, all right, so don't say a thing to the Reds.

-OK.

-Bravo.

0:41:360:41:42

-So have you guys been chatting at all? Communicating?

-No.

0:41:510:41:55

Kept everything very quiet?

0:41:550:41:56

-So you genuinely have no idea who is the winner and who is the runner-up today?

-No.

0:41:560:42:01

No? We don't have losers any more.

0:42:010:42:03

Not on Bargain Hunt we don't, anyway.

0:42:030:42:05

So I have something to reveal here, and it is of serious import.

0:42:050:42:10

Both teams had a couple of wiped faces,

0:42:100:42:13

-but sadly, the runners-up today are the Blues.

-Ohh!

0:42:130:42:17

Minus £30 overall. Are you upset about that?

0:42:170:42:21

-We've had a good day and we've enjoyed it.

-You had a bit of fun?

0:42:210:42:24

-We have indeed.

-That's the main thing, isn't it?

0:42:240:42:27

You've been great contestants. Great expert, great contestants - what more could you ask for?

0:42:270:42:31

But the victors today,

0:42:310:42:33

going home with a £10 note...!

0:42:330:42:37

Not a vast fortune but at least you can count it.

0:42:370:42:40

-Are you pleased about that, Krista?

-Very pleased.

-How about you, George?

0:42:400:42:43

-That's OK, yes.

-That's typical, you checking it, isn't it?

0:42:430:42:47

No, seriously, jolly good. The victors today on Bargain Hunt, and congratulations.

0:42:470:42:52

-And join us soon for some more bargain-hunting, yes?

-Yes!

0:42:520:42:55

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:120:43:16

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:160:43:19

Paul Laidlaw and David Barby are the experts helping the teams find those hidden gems at the County Showground in Newark.

Things turn prickly for the red team when father and daughter do not see eye-to-eye, and David struggles to keep the blue team on the rails. As always, Tim Wonnacott is on hand to help smooth over the cracks, and he also finds time to visit historic Lyme Park in Cheshire.