Derby 14 Bargain Hunt


Derby 14

Tim Wonnacott heads to Derby University as the red and blue teams go head-to-head in another Bargain Hunt battle, with help from experts Thomas Plant and Jonathan Pratt.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Derby 14. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

TIM WHISTLES BARGAIN HUNT THEME TUNE

0:00:030:00:06

HE WOLF-WHISTLES

0:00:100:00:12

Let's go Bargain Hunting!

0:00:120:00:14

Wow! Universities didn't look like this in my day.

0:00:430:00:47

But we're here for the Jaguar Antiques Fair,

0:00:470:00:50

which is being held in the heart of Derby University.

0:00:500:00:53

Our teams are going to be tested to the extreme in today's programme.

0:00:530:00:59

I'll tell you one thing - it ain't going to be pretty!

0:00:590:01:01

Coming up later - do the Reds have ideas above their station?

0:01:030:01:07

-What's that colourful glass called?

-Whitefriars and it's too expensive.

0:01:070:01:11

And the Blues get very confused.

0:01:110:01:15

-207 plus... Did he say 47 or 57?

-57, wasn't it?

-57.

-57.

-207 + 57... what's my mathematics?

0:01:150:01:22

-No, no...

-It's 263.

0:01:220:01:24

Meanwhile, when we get to the auction, there's only one way to break the news.

0:01:240:01:28

-That's a wallop, that is.

-Oh!

0:01:280:01:30

That's all coming up shortly but now let's have a reminder of the rules.

0:01:310:01:35

Two teams, £300 each.

0:01:360:01:39

Each team has to buy three items to take to auction in just one hour.

0:01:390:01:44

And the team that makes the most profit or the least losses wins.

0:01:450:01:51

Yep, the rules are well-known, but the teams are not.

0:01:510:01:55

Let's go and get to know them.

0:01:550:01:57

And here they are!

0:01:580:01:59

We've got friends Angela and Dave,

0:01:590:02:03

and an engaged couple Terry and Mavis. Welcome to Bargain Hunt.

0:02:030:02:06

-Superb! Now, Angela, how did you and Dave meet?

-We met about six, seven years ago.

0:02:060:02:13

We worked together at an aggregates company in Leicester

0:02:130:02:17

and we had a night out at a comedy club and cemented our friendship over a few beers, so to speak.

0:02:170:02:23

-And you are a self-confessed party girl, aren't you?

-I am, yes.

0:02:230:02:27

Definitely. I intend to be partying until I'm at least 80.

0:02:270:02:30

-You also go ghost-hunting, don't you?

-I do, with Dave, yes.

-Do you ever find any?

0:02:300:02:34

Not actually seen a full apparition, but we've had so many personal experiences happen to ourselves

0:02:340:02:40

-that there must be something out there.

-Really?

-Mm-hm.

0:02:400:02:44

-Dave, what do you do as a job of work?

-I work at Loughborough College as a client account manager.

0:02:440:02:49

-You also manage a football team, don't you?

-Kind of.

-What do you mean, "Kind of"?

0:02:490:02:53

Last year. Under-8s, I was the manager at the back end of the season.

0:02:530:02:57

-We finished bottom of the league, so...

-Oh.

-I'm now deputy manager of the 2nd team,

0:02:570:03:01

assistant manager of the 2nd team.

0:03:010:03:04

-You're going to do rather better on Bargain Hunt than you do managing a football team.

-Definitely.

0:03:040:03:10

-Angela and I are particularly good-looking, witty...

-Oh, yes, quite.

0:03:100:03:14

We'll spend all the money, probably make the biggest profit

0:03:140:03:17

-you've ever seen.

-These are brave, brave words, aren't they?

0:03:170:03:21

Perhaps they're reflected in your football management skills. I don't know. We will find out.

0:03:210:03:26

-Let's not be prejudiced. Now, you two - two entertainers, right?

-Yes.

0:03:260:03:31

-How did you two meet?

-I was doing a charity show about five years, Tim.

0:03:310:03:35

-We were singing, comedy and a bit of magic...

-Yes.

-..and I looked across the floor,

0:03:350:03:41

and it was like a vision and there was Mavis, face-painting in the distance.

0:03:410:03:45

After I'd finished I walked over to her, I had a chat to her, got on well,

0:03:450:03:50

I asked her out for a drink and the rest is history.

0:03:500:03:53

-And now you're engaged.

-Yes, we are - about a year.

0:03:530:03:57

About a year you've been engaged, well, that's good. When's the happy day?

0:03:570:04:01

-Well, I decided to make it April 17th, 2046.

-2046.

0:04:010:04:08

-I shall be just 100.

-Oh, right, and that's the age to marry, you reckon?

0:04:080:04:13

Yes. We've been there before, both of us, and we think that's about right, give ourselves a bit of time.

0:04:130:04:18

-So how did you get into the face-painting business?

-Oh, dear.

0:04:180:04:21

I've got a friend who was in a turmoil, she'd got one face-painter not turn up on Saturday

0:04:210:04:26

for a supermarket, so she sent me in and I thought, "Well, it's either no hope of Bob Hope."

0:04:260:04:33

-I'd never done it before and that was it.

-You were obviously successful and you stuck by it.

0:04:330:04:39

-I did.

-I think you'll enjoy it on Bargain Hunt today.

-I think I will.

0:04:390:04:44

Now, the money moment. Here we give them £300. Here comes the £300.

0:04:440:04:47

There we go. There's £300. You know the rules, your experts await and off you go!

0:04:470:04:52

And very, very, very good luck!

0:04:520:04:54

Do you think I should have my face painted? Oh, yes.

0:04:540:05:00

Like our teams, our experts might be on friendly terms NOW,

0:05:020:05:06

but will that stay the same

0:05:060:05:08

as Thomas Plant makes his way round the fair with the Reds,

0:05:080:05:12

and goes head-to-head with Jonathon Pratt, who's helping the Blues?

0:05:120:05:15

Now I always think there's nothing like a plan to get you underway.

0:05:160:05:21

-Are we ready?

-We're ready. Let's go.

-We've got one hour. Have we got any strategy?

-No.

-No?

-No.

0:05:210:05:28

-So what are we going to do?

-We'll have a look.

-Off we go, then.

0:05:280:05:33

Ah, well, maybe not, but this sounds better.

0:05:330:05:37

-What is it you're interested in buying?

-We like silver, don't we?

-Yeah, we like silver.

0:05:370:05:42

I like Beswick...

0:05:420:05:44

Novelty's what we're looking for as well, so if we find things we like

0:05:440:05:48

-that says something...

-Yeah.

-..we might make some money out of it.

0:05:480:05:52

Let's look and see how we get on.

0:05:520:05:53

-What's that colourful called?

-Whitefriars and it's too expensive. Come on.

0:05:590:06:03

-What about the rings, Mavis? Do you like the rings?

-Oh, I love rings.

0:06:030:06:07

-That's nice. It's Carlton ware.

-Carlton...

-Carlton ware, yeah.

0:06:110:06:16

Despite their lack of a plan, it looks like the Reds have spotted something that's taken their fancy.

0:06:160:06:22

-Super quality, isn't it? This sort of stone ware...

-It's really intricate.

0:06:220:06:28

-You like that, do you?

-Yeah.

-Charles Meigh's jugs used to sell extremely well

0:06:280:06:34

and we are quite close to the potteries, so you've got a good chance.

0:06:340:06:39

The price is a little bit strong, um, but it is mid-19th century.

0:06:390:06:44

You've got this registration mark here. Can you see that?

0:06:440:06:47

-Mm-hm.

-Yeah, the registration mark and you've got the date letter

0:06:470:06:51

for whichever one it means. I think the R might mean that it's, er... On the label it says 1852.

0:06:510:06:58

-Is there anything more you can do?

-I've been known to take two and sixpence off this at times.

0:06:580:07:04

-£115.

-£115? Would you make it a nice round £100?

0:07:040:07:09

-Yes, for you, I'll take £100.

-Really?

-Oh, really?

-What would you see it making?

0:07:100:07:14

Well, if you get it for £100, you've probably got a good £20 profit there.

0:07:140:07:22

I really like it. It just feels so tactile, doesn't it? It's nice.

0:07:220:07:26

Do you want to buy it now or put it down and think about it?

0:07:260:07:30

-You know, we've been shopping for, like, five minutes.

-Bit of an impulse man, to be honest.

0:07:300:07:35

-You're an impulse man? Getting a good feeling.

-Go for it.

-Really?

-What do you think?

0:07:350:07:39

-We are early on, but I like it. I like it.

-Thank you very much, they'll take it for £100.

0:07:390:07:46

Dave just can't help acting on impulse and the Reds have their first purchase in the bag.

0:07:530:07:57

-And then you've got...

-A very usual piece of erotica.

0:07:590:08:02

-Oh, go on, show us the erotica.

-I'll show you.

-OK.

0:08:020:08:07

-Edwardian. Is it Meerschaum?

-Meerschaum.

-Yeah.

0:08:070:08:11

-I've got £250 on her.

-Oh, right.

0:08:110:08:15

Oh, she's not the innocent lady I thought she was.

0:08:150:08:17

-More than the bog standard Meerschaum that you see.

-Yeah.

0:08:170:08:21

Do you want to see her? It's a pipe and I was wondering where the bit was that you put in your mouth.

0:08:210:08:26

Not very PC these days, is it?

0:08:260:08:29

Fantastic. That would be great to have, but it's too much money.

0:08:290:08:34

-It's a lot of money for us.

-I could do you a very good price.

0:08:340:08:37

I had £250 on that. I could let it go for £150 and I know that will sell for a lot more than that.

0:08:370:08:44

It is such a difficult thing because, look, I've not seen one before,

0:08:440:08:47

-and that's a great start, Meerschaum is collectible.

-It's in good order.

0:08:470:08:51

-It's a fairly brittle material. As a punt, it's interesting. Tim will love it.

-It's different.

0:08:510:08:58

-It's blowing £150 straightaway.

-Is that the best price, £150?

0:08:580:09:03

It has to be. I can tell you now, Tim will love it because he loves dainty things with a cheeky side.

0:09:030:09:10

-Why not? Let's go £150.

-I do like it.

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Let's go for it.

0:09:100:09:15

OK, sir, thank you very much.

0:09:150:09:16

-Thank you very much.

-Thanks very much!

0:09:160:09:20

Whether I like it or not is just not important, Jonathon. It's whether it makes a profit at auction.

0:09:200:09:26

Put that in your pipe and smoke it.

0:09:260:09:28

So both teams have made their first purchase with 45 minutes still to go,

0:09:330:09:37

and talking of time, take a look at what I've found.

0:09:370:09:40

Some days is good days, some days is bad days

0:09:400:09:43

and some days are just interesting days

0:09:430:09:46

and, boy, have I got something interesting to show you here!

0:09:460:09:49

If we look at this little watch,

0:09:490:09:51

on the face of it, it looks like a pretty boring and standard ladies' gold wristwatch.

0:09:510:09:58

But if I put it down there

0:09:580:10:01

and I put my watch next door to it,

0:10:010:10:04

what's the difference between my watch,

0:10:040:10:06

apart from it being a gent's and it being bigger than the fellow next door?

0:10:060:10:12

Can you spot the difference?

0:10:120:10:14

You can? Well, you're very clever.

0:10:140:10:16

Cos not a lot of people would notice that my watch has got a winder on one side,

0:10:160:10:22

and this watch has no winder.

0:10:220:10:25

Clever, isn't it?

0:10:260:10:29

You can see it's inscribed, Harwood, on the dial,

0:10:290:10:32

but how would you change the hour hand if you haven't got a winder

0:10:320:10:37

going through from the outside.

0:10:370:10:38

Harwood cracked this problem

0:10:380:10:41

by having a revolving bezel and if I turn that slightly,

0:10:410:10:45

you can see the outer edge moves and when it gets to a certain point,

0:10:450:10:51

it starts to move the minute hand,

0:10:510:10:54

effectively enabling you to change the time.

0:10:540:10:58

Now if those was one of those standard ladies' watches dating from 1930 in a nine-carat gold case,

0:10:580:11:06

it would be worth around £180-£220, something like that,

0:11:060:11:10

but this one, because it's of this rare variety with the unusual movement,

0:11:100:11:16

would bring much, much more.

0:11:160:11:19

I suppose I'd estimate around £2,000-£3,000. Tick-tick-tock, eh?

0:11:190:11:27

The Blues have £150 left to spend and it looks like something shiny has caught their eye.

0:11:340:11:41

-Can you come down a little bit?

-No.

-No?

-He's a hard man.

0:11:410:11:45

-You are a hard man. Not even a fiver?

-No.

-50p?

-No.

-10p?

-No.

0:11:450:11:51

He knows you won't be robbed at £45 for those.

0:11:510:11:54

What I think we should do with those is we put them back in the case...

0:11:540:11:57

-Have a shop around.

-..and we'll have a shop around and if it's still here...

0:11:570:12:01

-Thomas won't look at that. He's too busy looking at pots. Thanks very much.

-My pleasure.

0:12:010:12:06

-Have a good day.

-Cheers.

0:12:060:12:08

Actually, Thomas ISN'T looking at pots.

0:12:090:12:13

He's spotted a silver card case and there's nothing potty about that.

0:12:130:12:17

What one would do is that you'd call at your friend's house

0:12:170:12:22

and you'd take out your card and you'd give it to the butler

0:12:220:12:26

and that would be presented on a card tray, then presented to the person.

0:12:260:12:31

If they wanted to see you, they'd either say yes or no. It's a calling card case.

0:12:310:12:35

-So how old would that be this is probably...

-1880.

-..1880s...

-Really?

-..1900.

0:12:350:12:40

This is mother-of-pearl with carved design

0:12:400:12:42

-and this abalone design around here.

-I like that.

0:12:430:12:46

-It's caught the light with the different colours.

-Nice quality.

-You've got £45 on that...

0:12:460:12:50

£40's the best, sir.

0:12:500:12:52

-£40. What do you think? You both it.

-We do, yeah. Can you come down another five for us, 35?

0:12:520:12:59

I can't, I'm afraid on that. I've priced it quite reasonably.

0:12:590:13:03

-That's not a bad deal.

-I think I would pay around that for it if I wanted it.

-Yeah.

0:13:030:13:08

Look, at 40 quid, it's worth buying in my honest opinion.

0:13:080:13:12

-Like that, Ange?

-I like that.

-Go for it.

-Our second one.

0:13:120:13:16

-I think so.

-Thank you, sir. OK. Lovely.

0:13:160:13:20

And it looks like Jonathan and the Blues have also been dazzled by silver

0:13:220:13:26

with this pair of trumpet vases.

0:13:260:13:28

Birmingham... A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H. 1908.

0:13:280:13:32

-It's on the card.

-"1907-1908."

0:13:320:13:35

-Now you've always got lead-filled bases for stability.

-What would these be used for?

0:13:350:13:40

Just put a specimen flower in there on the mantel, either side of the flat-screen television,

0:13:400:13:46

-you know, with a flower coming out.

-It's nice having the pair as well.

0:13:460:13:49

It's a straightforward trumpet shape, but there's an essence of the period.

0:13:490:13:53

-It's Edwardian.

-Nice look about them.

0:13:530:13:55

Cos they're weighted, if you drop them, it'll hit the ground and fold in half.

0:13:550:14:00

The fact is that they've been looked after. There you go, take one each.

0:14:000:14:03

-Thank you.

-We've got one on the side and we've bought one item.

0:14:030:14:08

We've got a possible with the little salt spoons, which are part silver.

0:14:080:14:13

You're not saying, "Wow, I really love them." The thing about silver is you've got to clean them.

0:14:130:14:18

That's what puts people off a little. What would be your best price for it?

0:14:180:14:23

-I could go to £65.

-£65.

0:14:230:14:25

-What do you think, Mavis? Do you think they're good?

-I like them.

0:14:260:14:29

-I'd like them better still if they were a little bit cheaper.

-Yes.

0:14:290:14:33

-How much cheaper?

-Well, £50-£55.

0:14:330:14:36

£50's too low. I'd do £60. I'd bring it down to £60 for you.

0:14:360:14:41

-Meet halfway, £55.

-£55's low. £58.

0:14:410:14:45

-£57.

-Now you're haggling...

-I'm not going to say £57.50, so I'll do £57.

0:14:450:14:51

-Thank you very much.

-Cheers.

-Thank you.

0:14:510:14:54

DOLLY PARTON: # My life is likened to a bargain store

0:14:540:14:59

# I may have just what you're looking for

0:15:000:15:04

# If you don't mind the fact that all the merchandise is used

0:15:040:15:10

# But with a little mending it could be as good as new. #

0:15:100:15:15

In this centre of educational excellence,

0:15:150:15:18

it appears that maths might not be your strongest subject, Blues.

0:15:180:15:22

-You've got 39 minutes gone.

-Right.

-Bought two items.

-Bought two items.

0:15:220:15:27

-Got one on the reserve, as it were.

-Yeah.

-So, um,

0:15:270:15:31

we can always go back and get those two spoons.

0:15:310:15:33

-And that leaves me with...

-Yeah.

-..about a fiver, doesn't it?

-Yes.

0:15:330:15:37

-207 plus 40. Did he say 47 or 57?

-57, wasn't it?

-57.

0:15:370:15:41

-207 and 57. What's my mathematics?

-No, no, it's...

-263.

0:15:410:15:45

-No, we didn't spend that. 150...

-150...

0:15:460:15:50

207. And what were those spoons?

0:15:500:15:53

-Er, the spoons were 40...?

-..5.

0:15:550:15:58

Would he go 45?

0:15:580:16:00

-Do you think he went as low as that?

-I don't know.

-They were 45.

0:16:000:16:03

-They were 45? That's 207 plus 45. That's 200 and...

-..52. 252.

0:16:030:16:09

-That'd leave me 48 quid which is...

-Far too much.

-Ample.

0:16:090:16:12

-Far too much. Come on, let's shop.

-We've not got a last rush in us.

0:16:120:16:16

Back to the Reds now. And in the immortal words of Sir Tom Jones:

0:16:160:16:20

SHATTERING GLASS

0:16:200:16:21

TOM JONES: # What's new pussycat

0:16:210:16:24

# Woa-o-o-o-o-oh... #

0:16:240:16:26

-I've got a black cat. It's like my Jasper.

-Yeah. You've got a real black cat?

-I've got a real black cat.

0:16:260:16:31

By Branham in Barnstaple.

0:16:310:16:34

Cats are very popular because people like you love pussycats.

0:16:340:16:37

Can I have a look?

0:16:370:16:39

Look at that! Isn't he handsome?

0:16:390:16:42

On here you've got the CH Branham

0:16:420:16:45

which is the factory. That's the stamp - Branham ware. And, um,

0:16:450:16:50

"Made in England" is on there but it's a bit smudged.

0:16:500:16:53

That gives you a sort of date to sort of the 20th century.

0:16:530:16:57

Branham ware is made in Barnstaple and it's terracotta, which this is.

0:16:570:17:02

-Mm-hm.

-Pottery. It started in the late 19th century.

0:17:020:17:07

He's rather handsome.

0:17:070:17:08

It's your pussycat, isn't it?

0:17:080:17:11

He's quite good-looking.

0:17:110:17:12

I don't mind him. What's your very best?

0:17:120:17:15

-100.

-100.

-100's my very best.

0:17:150:17:18

He's early 20th century.

0:17:180:17:19

I think you've got a very good opportunity

0:17:190:17:22

of selling that and making a profit and also...

0:17:220:17:25

-He needs a clean.

->

0:17:250:17:26

He needs a clean? He does now I've been playing with him.

0:17:260:17:29

-And also because it's CH Branham, it gives it that extra dimension.

-Mm-hm.

0:17:290:17:34

-What do you think?

-I'm happy.

0:17:340:17:36

-Would somebody pay 100?

-Would you do 90?

0:17:360:17:38

Go on.

0:17:400:17:42

Really, really tight.

0:17:420:17:44

Thank you.

0:17:440:17:46

-Do you want some money? Some readies?

-Yes, please.

0:17:460:17:49

-I've got you here £100. So if I can get £10 change, that would be lovely. Thank you.

-Yay!

0:17:490:17:54

Thank you!

0:17:540:17:55

With two definite purchases and a third reserved, with two minutes to go,

0:17:580:18:02

Jonathan spots a cheesy item for the Blues.

0:18:020:18:04

I don't think it's going to fool anyone but it's a nice-looking thing

0:18:040:18:08

and it would look quite smart. So you'd do it for 38?

0:18:080:18:10

-Yes.

-OK. Brilliant.

0:18:100:18:13

-See the little cheese dish and cover?

-Yes.

-Big dome, little rustic handles.

-That looks nice.

0:18:130:18:17

It's £48. It's a modern reproduction of... But if it were period,

0:18:170:18:20

in the heyday when the Americans were buying these things, it would have been £1,000 or more for a period one.

0:18:200:18:26

It's a reproduction and he wants £38. He said he can do a tenner off.

0:18:260:18:31

-That doesn't seem like a lot of money to me.

-No.

-No.

0:18:310:18:33

Let's go and have a look at it. No chips or cracks that I can see.

0:18:330:18:38

I quite like it. It looks in good condition.

0:18:380:18:40

There's no great age to it. The way this is painted over the foot rim

0:18:400:18:44

like that, they're trying to hide how modern it really is. But, you know,

0:18:440:18:51

-time is ticking away, as they say.

-Yeah.

0:18:510:18:54

-What's the best price on this?

-Er, £38.

-£38.

0:18:540:18:58

-Shall we go for that, then, Mavis?

-Yeah, I think we will.

-Would you put your cheese in it, Mavis?

-Yes.

0:18:580:19:03

Is this cheesy enough for you?

0:19:030:19:05

-LAUGHTER

-Oh, definitely.

0:19:050:19:07

-It could do him as a hat.

-Can we have it for £38?

0:19:070:19:11

-Fantastic. Job done. Three items.

-Sounds good to me. Mavis?

-All done. Three minutes spare. Perfect.

0:19:110:19:17

That's it! Time's up!

0:19:210:19:23

That's it for the teams, isn't it?

0:19:230:19:26

Well, perhaps not, actually, because we've got the leftover lolly to hand out to the experts

0:19:260:19:31

who are going to go and find that Bonus Buy that will be revealed later at auction,

0:19:310:19:36

that can make all the difference between winning and losing.

0:19:360:19:41

Heh-heh! First, let's just check out

0:19:410:19:44

what the Red team has already bought.

0:19:440:19:48

First the Reds poured £100 into buying the stoneware jug.

0:19:480:19:52

Oh, dear!

0:19:520:19:53

And, then, there was the silver calling-card case

0:19:530:19:57

bought for £40. Can it "call in" a profit?

0:19:570:20:00

And, finally, Angela was keen to get her paws on this Branham pottery cat

0:20:000:20:05

for £90. We'll find out if it brings the Reds any luck later on.

0:20:050:20:10

Hey, guys, finished!

0:20:100:20:11

-That's pretty good, isn't it?

-Yes.

-That's cool.

-Yes.

0:20:110:20:14

-In 45 minutes! Are you happy with that?

-Very. Very happy.

-Yes.

0:20:140:20:17

And you spent how much? 250?

0:20:170:20:19

-230 I think it was.

-£230. That's a very respectable amount of money

0:20:190:20:24

-is 230. I'd like £70, please, from somebody.

-There you go.

-£70. Good.

0:20:240:20:29

This is for Thomas's Bonus Buy. It could be your hope...

0:20:290:20:33

-TIM CHUCKLES

-..and prayer.

-Yes.

0:20:330:20:35

-What are you going to spend it on, Tom?

-I haven't seen anything right yet but I'm going to spend it all.

0:20:350:20:41

He's a devil like this, I can tell you.

0:20:410:20:43

It doesn't matter what it is. Well, good for you(!) Why not?

0:20:430:20:46

-Play the game, Tim!

-All right, play it, then, Thomas! Away you go!

0:20:460:20:50

Why don't we remind ourselves quite what the Blues have bought?

0:20:500:20:53

It's scary, isn't it?

0:20:530:20:55

Was it smoke signals that led the Blues to their first purchase

0:20:550:21:00

of a Meerschaum pipe, acquired for £150?

0:21:000:21:03

-A trumpet fanfare, please!

-FANFARE PLAYS

0:21:030:21:07

Oh, yes! They also bought a pair of trumpet-shaped silver vases

0:21:070:21:12

for a shiny sum of £57.

0:21:120:21:15

And, finally, Jonathan convinced the Blues

0:21:150:21:17

that, to get a slice of the profit, they should part with £38

0:21:170:21:21

for a modern majolica cheese dish and cover.

0:21:210:21:23

Well, well, well,

0:21:230:21:25

-you've finished!

-Yes.

-You are clever, aren't you?

0:21:250:21:28

-Very.

-Three items with three minutes to spare.

-We didn't think we could do a last minute rush at our age.

0:21:280:21:33

-No, quite. You can't overdo it, can you?

-Put them all to shame.

0:21:330:21:37

-Now, how much did you spend, sweet pea?

-£245.

0:21:370:21:40

-That would mean you've got £55 left over.

-Exactly.

-Is that £55 about your person?

0:21:400:21:45

-Yes.

-It is? Please may I have it?

0:21:450:21:47

-Yes.

-Not keen on passing this over, are you, Mavis?

-I can vouch for that.

0:21:470:21:51

CHUCKLING

0:21:510:21:52

So, what are you going to do with the 55, Jonathan?

0:21:520:21:55

There's a lot of good choice here so I'm actually going to enjoy a little bit more shopping on my own.

0:21:550:22:00

-Whatever it might be, make sure it makes a profit.

-Yes.

-That's what we hope for, isn't it?

0:22:000:22:06

Good luck, Jonathan. For me, now, and you, we're heading off somewhere spectacular.

0:22:060:22:11

We're so lucky in this country that so much of our heritage survives,

0:22:200:22:24

particularly in the large number of country houses open to the public -

0:22:240:22:28

like Weston Park, here in the heart of England.

0:22:280:22:31

A house has stood here in the grounds of Weston Park since the 12th century and, over time,

0:22:330:22:38

a large collection of fine furniture and paintings has been assembled,

0:22:380:22:42

including a number of magnificent tapestries.

0:22:420:22:45

But what would happen if a spark came out of the fire and ignited the house?

0:22:480:22:53

Well, it jolly nearly happened here. In the 19th century,

0:22:530:22:58

two of the Bridgeman sisters were gathered before dinner in front of the fire

0:22:580:23:02

and a spark did ignite one of their petticoats. The other sister

0:23:020:23:06

flung herself upon her sister to try and save her and they both died -

0:23:060:23:11

burnt to a crisp.

0:23:110:23:12

So, what would you do if you were seriously worried about fire in a stately home like this?

0:23:140:23:20

Well, you'd probably print out your instructions in the event of a fire, which is what we've got here.

0:23:200:23:25

Not surprisingly, you'd tell them to ring the fire brigade. Ring the local fire brigade!

0:23:250:23:31

Ring Wolverhampton...10. Or Stafford...1!

0:23:310:23:38

Not difficult to remember these telephone numbers.

0:23:380:23:42

You'd then tell the staff, having rung the fire brigade, what to get out of the house first

0:23:420:23:47

in order of importance.

0:23:470:23:49

And first on the list here...

0:23:490:23:52

is tapestry.

0:23:520:23:53

Not surprising really because this is the tapestry room.

0:23:530:23:56

This is a room completely contained by tapestry -

0:23:560:24:01

tapestry that looks as if it was made for this space.

0:24:010:24:05

Actually the tapestry was commissioned by a member of the family in 1766

0:24:050:24:12

from the French Gobelin factory and it was fitted in their London house

0:24:120:24:16

and it wasn't removed to Weston Park until 1868,

0:24:160:24:21

just over 100 years later. And it's a kind of miracle

0:24:210:24:26

that this tapestry, made to fit a room nearly perfectly, fits this one.

0:24:260:24:31

There is just a little gap in some of the corners,

0:24:310:24:35

which have had to be filled in with some painted panels

0:24:350:24:38

and, if you look either side of the window,

0:24:380:24:40

there are two stripes there where they've had, later, a tapestry woven to more or less match.

0:24:400:24:46

These tapestry panels are important and valuable

0:24:460:24:51

and they've got woven in the middle panels a mythological scene. For example the one behind me,

0:24:510:24:57

which has Venus and Vulcan, her husband, at his forge

0:24:570:25:02

contained by various assistants

0:25:020:25:04

who are cyclopean - in other words they've only got one eye.

0:25:040:25:09

They're important. They're rare. They're top of the list to remove in the event of a fire.

0:25:090:25:15

And how would you go about that?

0:25:150:25:18

Well, you aren't going to believe this but over here,

0:25:180:25:20

tucked above the skirting in the corner, is a little cupboard.

0:25:200:25:24

If we open it up,

0:25:240:25:25

it reveals a knife.

0:25:250:25:28

A knife that lives in the cupboard in the tapestry room with one purpose -

0:25:280:25:33

in the event of a fire, you'd use it

0:25:330:25:35

for cutting away the stitching all around each of these tapestries

0:25:350:25:39

so that they could be rolled up and saved.

0:25:390:25:41

The big question today is, which of our teams will survive

0:25:410:25:45

the cut and thrust of the auction? Ooo-arrr!

0:25:450:25:49

Well, it's great to be at Charles Hanson's saleroom in Mackworth just outside Derby.

0:26:070:26:12

-It's filling up, Charles.

-Tim, it's getting busy. My eyes are everywhere

0:26:120:26:15

because there's clients and all sorts going on but it's great.

0:26:150:26:18

Anyway, for the Red team to start off with, Angela and Dave,

0:26:180:26:22

-they went with this drabware jug.

-Yes.

0:26:220:26:26

Tim, we call it drabware but it's high-Victorian taste and drab the type of earthenware body

0:26:260:26:32

but it's high Victorian.

0:26:320:26:33

It's fussy, it's over-the-top,

0:26:330:26:36

it's all of the wonderful period of the 1850s.

0:26:360:26:39

Yes.

0:26:390:26:41

..Right, what's it worth?

0:26:410:26:43

CHARLES CHUCKLES I would say between 40 and 60.

0:26:430:26:45

Very good. They paid £100.

0:26:450:26:47

It's in good condition.

0:26:470:26:48

-They paid £100.

-Right, it's expensive.

0:26:480:26:50

Next is the card case which is in good nick

0:26:500:26:53

and all together. Um, what do you think that's worth, Charles?

0:26:530:26:56

Calling-card cases are a great bygone of the past. Do you have a calling-card case of a similar type?

0:26:560:27:01

-No.

-No.

-I don't actually, Charles.

0:27:010:27:05

Tim, I... I know they make £50 to £60.

0:27:050:27:08

That one's had a bit of wear and tear so I'm being a bit mean at between 30 and 40.

0:27:080:27:13

-£40 paid.

-Right.

0:27:130:27:15

And, lastly, we've got this...

0:27:150:27:17

-this cat. It comes from Barnstaple.

-Yes.

0:27:170:27:19

And, of course, Barnstaple is where I was born.

0:27:190:27:22

-Yes.

-So it has a very, very soft spot for me.

0:27:220:27:24

Yes. I again... I've been a bit, I suppose, naive in putting a guide price of between £40 and £60

0:27:240:27:29

but knowing early art pottery and interest in cats it could make a bit more.

0:27:290:27:34

I think it might... They paid £90.

0:27:340:27:36

-Right, OK.

-I think you could find that it might make £100.

0:27:360:27:39

-Right.

-You know, I don't think they're so far off.

-No.

0:27:390:27:42

Fair enough for your estimate but, I think, stand by

0:27:420:27:45

and see how this little pussy does in the auction.

0:27:450:27:49

-Yes, indeed.

-If it doesn't do well, we might look for the Bonus Buy. In which case, let's look at it.

0:27:490:27:55

Angela and Dave, you spent £230 which is magnificent.

0:27:550:27:58

You gave to Thomas £70. Has he blown the lot? Thomas, show us what you found?

0:27:580:28:03

I didn't blow the lot. I went halves and I bought a Moorcroft dwarf candlestick.

0:28:030:28:08

-Mmm?

-Hmm? Have a look at it.

0:28:080:28:11

Now, I spent £32 on this fine piece of Moorcroft, which is obviously a very popular pottery,

0:28:110:28:18

highly collected. What do you think of it?

0:28:180:28:20

I quite like that.

0:28:200:28:22

-Yeah.

-Do you?

-Mmm.

-A pretty pattern.

0:28:220:28:24

No, it doesn't really appeal to me. It's nice colours and everything else but...

0:28:240:28:29

I spent £32 on that.

0:28:290:28:31

-And what do you think it's...?

-I predict a profit.

-Of?

0:28:310:28:34

Of £3 at 35!

0:28:340:28:36

THOMAS CHUCKLES

0:28:360:28:37

It should make between £35 and £40. It is widely collectable.

0:28:370:28:42

Let's find out from the auctioneer what he thinks about Thomas's single candlestick.

0:28:420:28:47

Right, then, Charles, a single candlestick, um, Moorcroft.

0:28:480:28:51

Yes, a short candlestick, Tim. It's on a plain white ground.

0:28:510:28:55

We think of the great patterns.

0:28:550:28:58

It's what it is, Tim, between £30 and £40.

0:28:580:29:00

£32 paid by Thomas Plant so he may have got that absolutely spot-on if, of course, the team go with it.

0:29:000:29:06

-Yes.

-Now, that's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues, Terry and Mave, the first item up

0:29:060:29:12

-is the wee pipe.

-Oh, dear, Tim.

0:29:120:29:13

-Yes? How are you with this, Charles?

-Well, Tim,

0:29:130:29:17

we are of the opinion it is composition...

0:29:170:29:20

-..rather than being...

-Pukka Meerschaum?

0:29:210:29:23

..Meerschaum. Correct.

0:29:230:29:25

Right, so it's not what perhaps they thought it was.

0:29:250:29:28

As a composition copy, what do you think it's worth?

0:29:280:29:31

-Difficult. I'm putting it in at between £30 and £50.

-Fair enough.

0:29:310:29:36

It could race away and reveal all or it could make very little.

0:29:360:29:39

Well, frankly it has revealed all! That's most interesting, Charles.

0:29:390:29:43

-They paid £150.

-Oh, golly.

0:29:430:29:45

Next is the trumpet-shaped silver Birmingham vases.

0:29:450:29:49

-Perfectly simple, straightforward almost modern-looking, aren't they, but actually 1908?

-Yes.

-Mmm.

0:29:490:29:54

Tim, my guide price on them - I quite rate them - between £50 and £80.

0:29:540:29:59

Brilliant, £57 they paid.

0:29:590:30:01

-So they may be clawing some of their losses back on old Meerschaum the bare bottom.

-Yes, let's hope so.

0:30:010:30:07

What about that cheese cloche?

0:30:070:30:10

-Tim, it's what I would call lumpy.

-Lumpy?

-Lumpy.

-Yes.

0:30:100:30:14

The value of it is decorative.

0:30:140:30:17

-Mmm.

-And when we use the word "decorative", we politely let clients down.

-Yes.

-By saying,

0:30:170:30:22

-"Thanks for coming."

-Yes.

-It's ornamental without any significant pedigree.

0:30:220:30:27

-How much do you think?

-My guide price is between 20 and 30.

0:30:270:30:30

-Is that all?

-It ought to make 35.

-Yes. It'll make £35 or £40 or maybe even £50.

0:30:300:30:36

-Yes.

-It's just that you're pointing out that this is not the right one.

-Correct.

0:30:360:30:40

-Well, the way it's looking, I think that that pipe is going to be going bottoms-up, right?

-Yes.

0:30:400:30:45

In which case, they're going to need the Bonus Buy, so let's go and look at it.

0:30:450:30:49

Now, this is moment where Jonathan Pratt,

0:30:490:30:52

your expert, would ordinarily reveal what he's spent all the leftover lolly on.

0:30:520:30:56

But, sadly, because of a family illness, he's not here today.

0:30:560:31:01

So I'm going to have to step in.

0:31:010:31:02

-This is the object that Jonathan bought and I'm going to reveal it. Ta-da.

-That's nice.

0:31:020:31:08

-Look at that.

-It is nice, isn't it? I know he never spent more than £55 on it,

0:31:080:31:12

-because that's all we had left.

-Quite right.

-So...

0:31:120:31:15

Jonathan is very canny. I'm going to pass it to you.

0:31:150:31:18

That's a piece of metalwork that was made in Austria

0:31:180:31:21

around about 1900.

0:31:210:31:23

1900/1905. Complete with its liner, and traditionally used for sugar.

0:31:230:31:29

-What do you think about that, Mavis?

-Part of a tea service.

0:31:290:31:32

So it's pierced and on those little squat feet.

0:31:320:31:36

It's not made of silver, it's silver plate,

0:31:360:31:39

but nevertheless, it's very finely made and in good condition.

0:31:390:31:44

-So how much did he spend on this?

-Jonathan Pratt paid £40.

0:31:440:31:47

-£40?

-Yeah. He thinks that in it, there is £10-£20 profit.

-What age is this, would you say?

0:31:470:31:54

-1910, I'd say.

-1910.

-Yeah. Well, you don't need to decide right now, decide later

0:31:540:31:59

after the sale of the first three items, but for the viewers at home,

0:31:590:32:03

let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Jonathan's little basket.

0:32:030:32:07

So, Charles, we'd very much value your opinion on this.

0:32:070:32:10

I think it's got two great forms here. We've got the Art Nouveau,

0:32:100:32:13

with this wonderful almost bellflower embossed frieze.

0:32:130:32:16

Below in the handle, with the feel of the Continental...

0:32:160:32:21

-Secessionist?

-Yes.

0:32:240:32:26

Secessionist. It's very stiff.

0:32:260:32:28

-Yes.

-Very stiff modernism, shall we say.

0:32:280:32:30

My guide price is between £20 and £30.

0:32:300:32:32

-OK. Jonathan paid £40.

-OK.

0:32:320:32:35

-So there is some hope.

-Yes, I hope so.

-Good.

0:32:350:32:38

-Good luck in the auction.

-I might need it!

0:32:380:32:41

All out...

0:32:460:32:48

-Have you ever seen such a busy sale? I mean, it's crammed, isn't it?

-Yeah. It's brilliant.

0:32:500:32:55

-All here to bid on our items.

-All to bid on your items?

-Yes.

-Well, there's confidence for you!

0:32:550:33:01

Right, first up, though, is the jug and here it comes.

0:33:010:33:04

Here we are.

0:33:040:33:05

It's a delightful Charles Meigh & Son salt-glazed stoneware jug.

0:33:050:33:10

-We have got interest. I am bid £25.

-God!

-That's all.

0:33:100:33:15

Do I see £28 now? Come on. 8, 32.

0:33:150:33:19

-I'm out. Do I see 5?

-Oh.

0:33:190:33:21

-At £32, do I see 5 now? Come on, it's very inexpensive.

-Go!

0:33:210:33:26

At £32, surely 5?

0:33:260:33:28

At £32, miss, are you in?

0:33:280:33:31

No. Not quite yet.

0:33:320:33:34

We'll wait for you. It's your bid, sir,

0:33:340:33:36

fair warning. I'll take 5, or at £32 we sell, once, twice,

0:33:360:33:42

three times to you, sir, at £32.

0:33:420:33:45

Yes, we are.

0:33:450:33:46

-£32, that's a bloodbath, that is.

-No!

-That's terrible.

0:33:460:33:50

That's £68 down the spout. £68. Oh, dear.

0:33:500:33:54

-This is the one, then.

-This is the one. This is the one that's going to claw back.

0:33:540:33:58

Rectangular card case of around 1900.

0:33:580:34:03

My great colleague on the phone there,

0:34:030:34:06

donning his sports jacket.

0:34:060:34:08

Lot 93, lozenge card case. And I am bid straight in at 30.

0:34:080:34:14

-Come on!

-That's good, that's good.

0:34:140:34:16

Come on. 2,

0:34:160:34:19

5, 8, 40, 2...

0:34:190:34:22

Are you sure? Look at me. No? You're out, I'm in. 40,

0:34:220:34:27

I'll take 2 now. The lady at the back, you're in at £42.

0:34:270:34:30

£42...against our £60 loss.

0:34:300:34:33

We'll go to the phone in one sec. At £42,

0:34:330:34:36

do I see on the phone 5? 50, madam? I'll take 48. Yes!

0:34:360:34:42

48, 50...2...

0:34:420:34:46

-"At 50, I'll go 2, I'll go 5." It's frustrating!

-Why not go 60?

0:34:460:34:51

No. £50.

0:34:510:34:54

All done. We sell at £50. Once, twice, three times,

0:34:540:34:57

the phone bid secures it.

0:34:570:34:59

-Yes!

-Well done. £50, perfect.

0:34:590:35:01

-Plus £10, well done, Tom, that was your find.

-That's all right.

0:35:010:35:04

-So, now, the cat.

-Come on!

0:35:040:35:07

This is a Branham cat. There we are,

0:35:070:35:11

delightful, dark green glazed earthenware cat.

0:35:110:35:15

I'm only bid £25.

0:35:150:35:18

-No!

-Rubbish.

0:35:180:35:20

£25.

0:35:200:35:23

Do I see 8? A delightful cat, 28, 30, 2. 5, 8.

0:35:230:35:28

40, 2. 5, 8.

0:35:280:35:30

-50, 5. 60...

-Come on, come on.

0:35:300:35:33

55, doorway bid. That's better. Do I see 60 in the room now?

0:35:330:35:37

-55, there, come on, 60.

-More!

0:35:370:35:39

55 I'll take, 60, miss?

0:35:390:35:41

No, she says. 55, do I see 60 now?

0:35:410:35:45

Once, twice, three times, we sell.

0:35:450:35:47

Make no mistake, it's going to the doorway bid

0:35:470:35:49

at £55...selling...

0:35:490:35:53

Minus £35 pounds on that.

0:35:530:35:55

Minus £93 which is a disaster. Are you going with the Bonus Buy or not?

0:35:550:35:59

-Yeah, definitely.

-Definitely.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

-Go with it?

0:35:590:36:02

-We have to.

-Here it comes.

0:36:020:36:04

Moorcroft, not marked.

0:36:040:36:08

What do you mean? It's stamped!

0:36:080:36:10

It's stamped. My apologies. - It's stamped on the base.

0:36:100:36:14

- It's very faint... - It's stamped. It's stamped.

0:36:140:36:18

- It is Moorcroft,

0:36:180:36:19

and I am bid straight in here 30. It's Moorcroft,

0:36:190:36:24

do I see 2?

0:36:240:36:25

-Yes, you do.

-Yes.

-Yes, you do, come on.

0:36:250:36:28

30, I'll take 2 now. Come on. 30. Where's 2?

0:36:280:36:32

30, I'll take 2 now, surely?

0:36:320:36:34

We're very quiet... 2! 5, 8.

0:36:340:36:37

Yes!

0:36:370:36:39

One more, 38...

0:36:390:36:42

More! One more!

0:36:420:36:45

CROWD LAUGHS

0:36:450:36:46

It's against you...

0:36:460:36:49

and I'm out, you're in. £38, all done we say,

0:36:490:36:52

I'll take 40, or at £38 all out, fair warning, all done,

0:36:520:36:57

the lady in the centre.

0:36:570:36:58

-Well done.

-Well done.

-£38. A profit of £6, Tom, is a profit of £6.

0:36:580:37:04

That gets you down to £87.

0:37:040:37:07

You are minus 87, all right? Let's not get excited about this,

0:37:070:37:11

-this is MINUS 87, all right?

-Had better days.

0:37:110:37:14

-Well, the thing is now, don't tell the Blues a thing, all right?

-No.

0:37:140:37:17

-Out of embarrassment.

-Keep them in the dark. Don't say another word.

0:37:170:37:21

Terry and Mavis, how are you feeling?

0:37:260:37:29

-Better than good, me.

-Better than good?

-Better than good.

-I'm a bit apprehensive.

-Are you?

0:37:290:37:33

-Yeah.

-Have you been talking to those Reds?

-No.

-Good.

0:37:330:37:36

-You don't know how well or how badly they've done?

-No.

-That's just as well, then.

0:37:360:37:40

Good. Anyway, first up is this dodgy, naughty,

0:37:400:37:44

semi-erotic pipe bowl and here it comes.

0:37:440:37:47

There we are, being shown for you there -

0:37:470:37:50

carved to one side with a female head, the reverse quite startling.

0:37:500:37:54

There we are.

0:37:540:37:56

-Good old Charles, he's doing his best.

-He's trying.

0:37:560:38:00

Lot 113, I'm bid here £35 straight in.

0:38:000:38:05

Oh, all right. Come on, come on.

0:38:050:38:09

Do I see 40 now for a good novelty...

0:38:090:38:13

object. Surely...?

0:38:130:38:15

Come on, come on! Come on! A bit more!

0:38:150:38:18

Look for 40. 40, are we in in the room? Surely one more?

0:38:180:38:23

I've got £35, do I see 40 now?

0:38:230:38:26

He's trying, he's trying. He's trying.

0:38:260:38:29

You're out?

0:38:290:38:30

Out. Fair warning, we shall sell, make no mistake, going...

0:38:300:38:36

at £35. Once, twice, out in the room no takers...

0:38:360:38:40

-Oh, dear. That's a sting.

-It didn't even sell?

-Minus 115.

0:38:400:38:45

-No, it sold for £35.

-Oh.

-Oh, it sold.

-Minus 115,

0:38:450:38:49

that's a wallop, that is. I mean, bare bottom or not.

0:38:490:38:52

Anyway, here come the vases.

0:38:520:38:54

Beaded, crimped vases on loaded bases, made in Birmingham.

0:38:540:39:00

I am bid £40 for these vases. Do I see 2?

0:39:000:39:04

40, I'll take 2 now. Come on. 40, I'll take 2.

0:39:040:39:08

They're silver, hallmarked. Do I see 2? Come on.

0:39:080:39:10

Come on, I say come on!

0:39:100:39:12

40, 2, I'm out, sir.

0:39:120:39:14

I'll take 5 here? You in, ma'am?

0:39:140:39:16

-Yes.

-45. Well, thank you for coming! 45!

0:39:160:39:19

48, 50.

0:39:190:39:22

-More!

-Come on.

-I'll take 2, sir. £52,

0:39:220:39:26

-yes or no?

-Yes!

-No, he says. The lady in at 50,

0:39:260:39:30

I'll take 2 now. 50, I'll take 2, one more surely?

0:39:300:39:33

At 50 all done...

0:39:330:39:35

50, we say to the lady at the front, sale. Yours.

0:39:350:39:39

50 at the front. There we go, then. Minus £7.

0:39:390:39:42

Oh, dear, oh, dear. This is going worse, isn't it?

0:39:420:39:44

Here comes the cheese dish.

0:39:440:39:48

Here is a rather remarkable cheese standing cover

0:39:480:39:52

in the 19th-century aesthetic taste. There it is.

0:39:520:39:56

We have got interest here. I am bid 20, I'll take 2 now.

0:39:560:39:59

20, I'll take 2 for good luck.

0:39:590:40:00

20, I'll take 2, come on.

0:40:000:40:03

I say come on! Come on! What's the matter with them today? Come on!

0:40:030:40:07

Look at me. 20, I'll take 2.

0:40:070:40:09

2 surely? 20...

0:40:090:40:12

£20...

0:40:120:40:14

I'll take 2, going once. I'll take 2.

0:40:140:40:15

All out...we sell it, make no mistake...

0:40:150:40:19

£20...is my bid.

0:40:190:40:23

And we are going at 20.

0:40:230:40:26

All out and done.

0:40:260:40:27

-£20, well, that's hard cheese.

-It is.

0:40:270:40:30

-Is this a record?

-Yeah, it is. Pretty bad record.

0:40:300:40:33

That's minus 18 on that, 22, 32...

0:40:330:40:37

-Minus £140.

-Well, that's not too bad, then(!)

0:40:370:40:40

-What?! Minus £140!

-Thank goodness it wasn't our money!

0:40:400:40:45

I mean, £140! This is...knee-wobbling bad.

0:40:450:40:50

-It is.

-It is.

-Who knows? We could make it up on the Bonus Buy.

0:40:500:40:53

-You could make it up on the Bonus Buy.

-Yes.

-OK, fine.

0:40:530:40:56

-You going to go with this Bonus Buy?

-Definitely.

-You've got no choice, have you?

0:40:560:41:00

We're going with Jonathan's Bonus Buy. Here we go.

0:41:000:41:02

There we are. It's a very nice Continental, pierced,

0:41:020:41:08

plated, handled basket in the Art Nouveau, early 20th-century style,

0:41:080:41:13

with a clear glass liner.

0:41:130:41:15

Nice object, this. Bit of interest.

0:41:150:41:19

-I am bid £20. Do I see £25?

-We need this to make 150.

0:41:190:41:25

22, surely 5 now. Come on.

0:41:250:41:28

-Come on, the lot of you.

-22.

-Come on!

0:41:280:41:31

5, 8, sir, 30?

0:41:310:41:33

And I'm out. Do I see 2? Surely...

0:41:330:41:37

30, I'll take 2. Come on.

0:41:370:41:39

30, I'll take 2 now.

0:41:390:41:40

One more do I see? 30, all out, once, twice...

0:41:400:41:44

three times, to you, sir, we say sale.

0:41:440:41:46

Oh, dear. £30. I'm afraid that's another £10 loss,

0:41:460:41:50

-which rounds it up to minus 150.

-We are consistent, aren't we?

0:41:500:41:54

-It's a nice round figure, that is.

-It's a lovely round figure.

0:41:540:41:57

-Mmm.

-Not many can do that, you know!

-No!

0:41:570:42:00

Well, on Bargain Hunt, as you know, we don't have losers any more, we simply have runners-up.

0:42:060:42:12

And today, the runners-up, by a considerable margin, are the Blues.

0:42:120:42:15

-Oh, no!

-Really?

-Yes!

0:42:150:42:18

Minus 150...

0:42:180:42:20

is a pretty good score by anybody's count.

0:42:200:42:23

Aided and abetted by the fact that you went with the Bonus Buy, which added another £10 to your losses,

0:42:230:42:29

so minus 150.

0:42:290:42:31

Congratulations on doing...well, moderately well, shall we say?

0:42:310:42:36

But the winners today by a long chalk -

0:42:360:42:38

by only managing to lose £87...

0:42:380:42:40

ALL LAUGH

0:42:400:42:41

Yes, you did make a nice profit on your card case,

0:42:410:42:44

-which is very nice.

-Yes.

0:42:440:42:46

-And you made a profit on your Moorcroft candlesticks, which is nice.

-Yes.

0:42:460:42:50

-But I don't think we'll be talking much about the rest.

-ALL: No.

0:42:500:42:53

-But did you have a good time?

-Excellent.

-We had a great time.

0:42:530:42:56

-Join us soon for more Bargain Hunting, yes?

-ALL: Yes!

0:42:560:42:59

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:160:43:19

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:190:43:22

Tim Wonnacott heads to Derby University as the red and blue teams go head-to-head in another Bargain Hunt battle. Joined by experts Thomas Plant and Jonathan Pratt, the teams find a variety of items that all fare very differently at auction. Tim also heads out to Staffordshire and pays a visit to the stately home of Western Park.


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS