London Bargain Hunt


London

The two teams, guided by experts Charles Hanson and Catherine Southon, hit the stalls at the busy Portobello Road market in London. Presenter Tim Wonnacott visits Doddington Hall.


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Transcript


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Do you know that there's over 25,000 streets in London?

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I'm looking for the one that's got a world-famous market on it.

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Now do you suppose I go left here or should I go straight ahead?

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Well, I suppose I will find it by the end of the titles,

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but right now... let's go bargain hunting!

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And guess what - I was here all the time!

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Portobello Market is, as ever, incredibly busy.

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Even on a brilliant sunny day like this, you never know, there could be a nasty cloud on the horizon

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that could affect our teams' performance.

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Coming up: everything's a game for the Reds as they decide to buy or not to buy.

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-The Blues set their sights on poor Charles Hanson.

-If I don't make that at auction, I'll gun you!

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Hoo hoo! And from their reactions at the auction, do you think Charles is safe?

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But more of that later. First, let's explain the rules

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with the help of one or two visitors here at Portobello. How many teams are there?

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How much money do they have?

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How much time do they have to shop?

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Oh, gosh! We are an international lot here at Portobello.

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So whether they make more yen, dollars or simply pounds, the team that makes the most wins.

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Let's meet today's teams.

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For the Reds we have very best friends Lily and Hannah. Welcome.

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And for the Blues, very best friends Ruth and Marilyn. Welcome.

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-Hannah, where did you two meet?

-We met at uni, when we were both working in a cafe.

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And if we make enough money today we will open our own cafe

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with lots of fair trade tea and coffee and antiques on the walls.

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Cakes are very dear to your heart.

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When we're at Portobello, we always pick up a red velvet cupcake.

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We might get you one later.

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-Really? My very own cupcake?

-Yes.

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-Hannah, are you good at finding a bargain?

-Absolutely! We're very competitive and very determined.

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Good luck, you girls. Now for you girls. What do you do, Ruth?

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I'm a writer for magazines and I've written a book about opera houses around the world

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-from London to Sydney.

-Have you always been a writer?

-No, I was in the travel business for 20 years.

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-I travelled the world.

-You had a strange encounter with a lion.

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That was in Kenya in the jungle. We went to different lodges.

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We were in an ambassador's house. I walked in, pitch black dark.

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And all of a sudden looking at me was this lion with a great big mane.

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-I thought that was my number up.

-How far was it?

-Face to face.

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-Get away!

-We were told, "Stand still, don't move," but I screamed and I ran for my life!

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Very good!

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-And what do you do, Marilyn?

-20 years ago we started a charity for mentally ill people

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and we built a residential home, we run a day centre, we run a charity shop.

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You've raised a lot of money and have been honoured for your efforts.

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Last year in the New Year's Honours List I was awarded the MBE for our charity.

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-It's lovely that the charity was recognised.

-A really good effort.

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-20 years' work...

-Slog! 20 years of slog!

-Well, it means something.

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I'm sure we'll have great fun today on Bargain Hunt. Now what we've got next is the £300 Money Moment.

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-There's your £300.

-Thank you.

-You know the rules. The experts await. Off you go! Very good luck!

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Well, look at this. A super programme ahead with - how can I put it? -

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age and experience versus youth and enthusiasm.

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And here to guide our young Reds, it's the lovely Catherine Southon.

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Sure to be led a dance by our Blues is Charles Hanson.

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So, girls and boy, you have one hour to shop. Get cracking!

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-OK, shall we get started?

-Let's do it!

-The clock is ticking!

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-Experts, talk to me.

-It's silver.

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Where are we going?

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-Look at that plate. I know you like history, Ruth.

-I love it.

-This oozes history.

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-This dates to how long ago? 1730?

-< I think early 1700s. 1710.

-1720.

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Made during the reign of Queen Anne.

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-Manufactured 70 years before the French Revolution.

-Ah!

-History.

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-Now you like it, right?

-I do.

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What's the best price on these?

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-< 140, but that really is it.

-Can we think about it?

-We'll come back.

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A possible there for the Blues. What about the Reds?

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That's so good.

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-Em...

-No.

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Very decisive, Lily.

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Now can the Blues do the same?

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There's a lovely array of objects on here. You've got some pottery, Staffordshire, flat backs.

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I love this little clock in there, but it looks quite modern.

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-I love that.

-Pretty.

-I love that.

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These are nice. 18th century again. What's that, please, sir?

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-£10.

-£10. Goodness me.

-This is the one.

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-That was made in Shropshire.

-I've heard of Shropshire!

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It's dated around 1785.

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-£10. £10!

-But we need a saucer.

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-That's a bargain.

-It's got no saucer.

-That's a coffee cup, though.

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-It's lovely.

-It's a coffee cup.

-It is very pretty.

-That to me is worth £30.

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-Lovely object.

-OK. We will get it.

-£10.

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-They're all odd cups, aren't they?

-What's that for? Any idea?

-That's gorgeous, isn't it?

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-Japanese.

-What would you use this for? Any ideas?

-No.

-Nuts. A nut dish.

-Would you?

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-Teapot stand.

-You could put nuts and sweets in it, though.

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How much is that? That's £30. >

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-Nice object. If we bought those two together...

-Marilyn, do you like it?

-For the two pieces?

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-£30. For the two together.

-Yeah.

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-Shall we go for it?

-Yeah. How much?

-£30 for the two.

-OK, all right.

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Thank you, sir. We'll take them. I'm very happy with those two lots.

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-I'll stand by them.

-I would put nuts in there.

-Nuts!

-A teapot stand!

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Huh. Yeah, well. I think the Reds might have spotted something, too.

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That is so cool. Come on, that is a "have to buy".

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-It's certainly a decorator's piece.

-You're warming to my wisdom.

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-I'd buy that at auction.

-Yeah, definitely.

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-Oh, it is wood.

-But it's been given that finish to make it look older than it is.

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This is not right. It's not working.

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-Whose store is it?

-Is this your store?

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< It's just been sold. Oh, no!

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-Shame. That's a shame.

-Hard luck.

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-This is a bit desperate. We haven't got anything.

-But you're together.

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-Charles is on his own now.

-Where's my team gone?

-Oh, dear.

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In there. Good luck! 25 minutes in and the Reds have found something.

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-It's got a mark on it.

-The registration mark.

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Each of these will be able to date. It's Victorian. We can date it to a specific year.

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-Can you see there? It's got a name imprinted.

-It's Brown, W and Moore and Co, or something.

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Oh, OK. It's not the most exciting of patterns. You'll find lots of these. They're not unusual.

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I must tell you that.

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It is a little worn, a bit tarnished. It's transfer-printed, not hand-painted.

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-Aww.

-But nevertheless, you liked it, didn't you?

-Mmm! You were drawn to the pattern.

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-And they do look nice together.

-I like that it's like that.

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Great piece and it has a function.

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-Yeah, it has a function.

-How much did they say?

-£30.

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You're very positive. Lots of positive energy.

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-First item - happy?

-Yeah.

-Done.

-Done. Good.

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-Charles has finally found Marilyn and Ruth.

-What have we seen that we like?

-Pretty silver brooch.

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And the pretty little glass with a silver top scent bottle.

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-They were both lovely and I would say - my knowledge isn't much - collectable.

-Yes, OK.

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-Very pretty.

-But we can't find it.

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-You can't find it?!

-No! We've got to find the stall.

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-We'll be running out of time.

-Come on.

-Uh-oh, Charles. Your troubles aren't over!

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-They're quite cute. What do you think, Lily?

-I think they're boring.

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But how much time have we got? I don't want to run out of time.

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-We haven't got a lot of time.

-For the pair...

-What do you think?

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-These are in quite nice condition.

-Do they sell well at auction?

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The glass is in good condition, although the silver's a bit dented.

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-And it comes with the spoon.

-They'd normally have a spoon each.

-Oh, I see.

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Just concentrate on the two salts. You'd need to really... What's your best price on those?

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25.

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-25?

-25, yeah.

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-To be honest, I think £20, 22, is a fair price.

-So that's £11 each.

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Why don't we have a look and then we can come back?

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-If you really want them, fine.

-If we make a profit, I'll buy you dinner. If we don't...

-Fine.

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I just think they're a bit boring.

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-You're so indecisive, you two!

-Rock, paper, scissors.

-Rock, paper, scissors? Go for it.

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Three. ..Yes! I win.

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-We get them?

-We get them. Winning. As usual.

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Rock, paper, scissors for the Reds, but the Blues are still playing hide and seek with that elusive brooch.

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-No, it wasn't here.

-Move on.

-We haven't got a lot of time.

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I can't believe we can't find it.

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-We didn't go that far. Hang on, what's this?

-What about here? Silver charms.

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We're wandering and wandering. It's going OK, but we seem to be aimlessly looking.

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-Can we go up this way?

-Sorry?

-This way.

-Again?!

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-We're looking for the jewellery.

-Come on, team. Focus now.

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-Let's see some focus and motivation.

-So focus is the buzz word, eh?

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It's creating an atmosphere. Hopefully we'll work as a team.

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-Ah, working as a team, is it?

-Where's my team gone now?

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It's a masterplan, isn't it?

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Have a look at this little novelty.

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What we've got here is something with a very hairy end on it,

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but when it was originally made in 1823, it was a good deal hairier than it is today.

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What we see has worn down. These hairs are very specific.

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They come from the badger and this is a part of the badger's brush which has been gathered

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specifically because the badger's hair is soft

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and absorbent and you can use it to make up a lather.

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You make up your lather with this badger's brush, then apply it to your chin for a good scrape.

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What's nice about this thing is if I unscrew this end, you can see that the brush part comes away.

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And it will insert by taking off that cover and shoving it into this cylinder.

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You then close this end and it's perfectly safe, then, for travel.

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This thing, Georgian silver, all complete and ready to go,

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would cost you up the road £70.

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Now that's what I call a close shave.

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Now what are the chances of our Blues finding that silver brooch?

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-It was on this stall here you saw the brooch?

-On this side.

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-We think we've found the brooch! I'm really hoping...

-Yes, I know.

-I'm crossing my fingers now.

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I'd cross everything, Charles!

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You've only got one buy so far. The Reds could have number three!

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Now I like that. That's lovely.

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-Oh, that is really nice.

-That's special. It's like a gentleman's travelling case.

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-See that?

-It's so nice.

-Leather. With the little glass bottles.

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I guess scent bottles or toiletry bottles. They're all silver.

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They're all hallmarked. Each one is London. Can you see?

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London hallmarks. Letter L.

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It's 1926. It's got a nice bit of age to it.

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I think that's charming. A nice make as well - Finnigans.

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I think they're Bond Street in London. Shall we see how much it is? It might be a bit pricey.

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Excuse me, sir. Can I ask how much is on that?

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-The very best price, £190.

-£190.

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-That's quite a lot.

-It is. It is a beautiful object.

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We've got to think about making money on that. It's beautiful.

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-It is lovely.

-Let's just have a look.

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-Shall we just bear it in mind?

-Yeah.

-Have a look and then come back.

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-If we're going to go for them.

-Yeah.

-Let's go.

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It is pricey, but the Reds seem to be working very well together.

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Hannah is so excited about this whole thing. There's no stopping her.

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-Is that too far?

-That's a bit too far.

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'Lily is more cautious. She's standing back, thinking about it.'

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Very clever, a bit more reserved. And wants to come back to items, which is very sensible.

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So the Reds are moving along nicely

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as the Blues are...

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Let's keep going, guys.

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We're in trouble.

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They're running round like headless chickens, actually.

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-We're dallying around.

-We are.

-Where's Marilyn gone?

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Marilyn? Ruth? Let's come here very quick.

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I know we're short of time. Look.

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Silver embossed. It is solid silver. I'm looking for the hallmark now.

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-Thank you. Thanks for coming, Marilyn.

-I only come to please.

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Yeah, I've noticed(!)

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There we are, look. There's our hallmark.

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-Birmingham. 1915, 1920-ish?

-Yeah, it's about that. >

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George V. So it's got an early silver case,

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with a later pocket watch that is also silver. There is some damage.

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It's been through a bit of restoration.

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To me that's worth £80-£110. Sir, because of the condition, what's your absolute best price?

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80. > Not 60?

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-Would you meet halfway at 70?

-No.

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No, 80.

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-Yeah, I think it's nice.

-You've got to help us a bit.

-I am!

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No, a bit more because we are panicking now to buy something.

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-They are desperate and terrified.

-I've come down to 80.

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-Good man.

-Come down to 70 and we'll pay you now.

-No, no. 80, otherwise I've made nothing.

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-The gent's...

-75, come on.

-I'm making a loss at that!

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-Come on. 75 and we'll pay you now.

-80.

-I don't think we can do it.

-OK.

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I like it very much.

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Marilyn, we must be reasonable. This gent's offering a very good price.

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-We ought to snap it up.

-All right, Charles, yes. Is it working?

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-Look at me, Marilyn. Look at me.

-If I don't make that at auction, I'll gun you! I'll shoot you!

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-Oh, right.

-What a charmer!

-He'll worry about that later.

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Are we in?

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-Thank you, sir. We appreciate it. We'll take it. Marilyn?

-Buy it!

-She's been persuaded.

-OK.

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-Now the Reds take a shot at that expensive find they saw earlier.

-Are we sure about this?

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Go and have a look.

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-It is lovely.

-It's really nice.

-We definitely should go for it.

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I trust Lily's judgment! Let's go for it!

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-The money is here to be spent.

-Could he go a little lower?

-Lower?

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-180.

-You can try.

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It is a fair price. He's got to try to make a little money as well.

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-If you want to try, try.

-Lils?

-There's no harm in trying.

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Well, we'll ask. OK.

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Will you take 180?

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-I'm sorry...

-185. Just to barter that £5.

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-£185.

-Yeah! thank you very much.

-Brilliant.

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-Thank you so much.

-You're welcome.

-Wonderful. We're happy with that.

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-It's really lovely. Excellent.

-We need a team high five!

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Team high five!

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We're going to win!

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-Let's have a high five!

-Very girlie.

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Our Reds have their three items. Any chance the Blues have?

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-What have you found so far?

-Nothing.

-Still browsing.

-Still browsing? Focus!

-We are!

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-What have you found?

-Nothing.

-All right.

-We know what we want.

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-What have you found, Marilyn?

-Nothing. We're watching time now.

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-OK, let's go, guys.

-Just a second.

-They've only got 10 minutes left.

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The Reds are already stuffing their faces. Hope they got one for me.

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-Mmm!

-Mmm!

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-Where is he? Charles?

-Yes?

-Can you help us a mo?

-Charles?

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-What is this stone, Charles?

-That's aquamarine.

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-And...

-What is this round it?

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That's really pretty, isn't it?

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-What is this round it?

-Well, look at the shape first of all.

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-It's a really pretty heart.

-It looks Victorian to me.

-Very elegant.

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Looking at this nice organic freshwater pearl and these seed pearls here with the aquamarine

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and to me it's 1895, 1905 in period. It's got that great late Victorian feel.

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The great Edwardian Art Nouveau. On the back...

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-You've got a brooch as well.

-It's been converted to a brooch.

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-It is really pretty.

-It could be either.

-Either/or.

0:20:190:20:23

That will affect value. It detracts because it has been tampered with. You mustn't forget that.

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I would value it, as a necklace without the clasp,

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it would be worth £200-£250. With these alterations,

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I feel it's worth...£100-£150. On a bad day, 80.

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-But look...

-We don't want a bad day!

-You speculate. If you both like it,

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-we've been looking for a brooch for the last hour.

-We have.

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-We've now found a brooch that wasn't a brooch. I say buy it.

-We both like it.

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Yes, if it was cheaper we wouldn't be hesitating.

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-I'm going to make a decision.

-Go on.

-We're going to buy it.

-We both like it.

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-I'm scared about it...

-Sir, we're taking it. 120.

0:21:050:21:10

-Have you got a case for it?

-No case.

-Good man.

0:21:100:21:14

-Does it come in a box?

-No, no case.

0:21:140:21:17

That's it! Time's up! Now for the Leftover Lolly,

0:21:220:21:26

which will be given to the experts to go and find their bonus buy,

0:21:260:21:31

revealed later at auction, which can torpedo the team's chances or lift them to sublime profits.

0:21:310:21:38

More of that later. Right now, let's see what the teams bought.

0:21:380:21:42

Lily and Hannah started off with this jug and basin for £30.

0:21:420:21:47

They made a play for this pair of silver-rimmed salts for £22

0:21:480:21:52

and they splashed out £185 on this travel case

0:21:520:21:57

with four silver-topped bottles. Wow!

0:21:570:22:00

Well, I don't know. We have never had paper, scissors, stone as the selection process!

0:22:000:22:07

-That's a first. Did you have a good time?

-Great time, brilliant time.

0:22:070:22:11

Now you made a massive prediction about how much profit you'll make.

0:22:110:22:16

-Are you still sticking by that?

-We think so.

0:22:160:22:19

-Being optimistic.

-Very positive.

-That's nice, isn't it?

0:22:190:22:23

-How much did you spend overall?

-We spent £237.

0:22:230:22:27

You spent £237. So I would like...£63, please.

0:22:270:22:32

-There you are.

-Look at this!

0:22:320:22:35

There we go. £63. That's very good.

0:22:350:22:39

-Wonderful.

-You're looking cold!

-I'm freezing!

-We got you a present.

0:22:390:22:43

-You got ME a present?

-From our favourite shop.

-Ahh, which is...?

0:22:430:22:47

-Cupcake!

-Oh, no! Look at that. A thoroughly naughty little cupcake. Just what I need for my diet!

0:22:470:22:54

-Catherine, what will you do with your £63?

-I'm going to go out in style and spend the lot.

-Delicious!

0:22:540:23:00

Almost as delicious as the cupcake. Let's remind ourselves what the Blues bought.

0:23:000:23:05

Marilyn and Ruth bought this coffee cup and teapot stand early on for £30.

0:23:050:23:11

Then they dithered before Charles persuaded them to buy this silver pocket watch and case.

0:23:110:23:17

And they never did find that silver brooch, so they bought the seed pearl and aquamarine pendant.

0:23:170:23:23

-You've had quite a morning looking after this lot.

-Testing!

0:23:250:23:29

-But for the right reasons.

-We've been very good!

-Very good.

0:23:300:23:35

That's not what I've been told. You've been wandering off.

0:23:350:23:39

-We couldn't find a particular stall that we found 10 minutes before!

-It is a confusing place.

0:23:390:23:44

Look at all these people! There must be 20,000.

0:23:440:23:48

This street is something else. How much did you spend all round?

0:23:480:23:52

-What did we spend?

-230.

-That's the dentist's time.

0:23:520:23:56

-Correct!

-Tooth hurty.

-Are you sure it was that much?

-230.

0:23:560:24:01

-There was 80...

-120 and 30.

-What was 80? The two bits of china?

0:24:010:24:06

-No.

-No, 30 that was.

-80 was the pocket watch case.

-Yes.

0:24:060:24:10

-30 was the china.

-Correct. And 120 was your lot.

0:24:100:24:14

-Don't you go falling out!

-I said it was 110!

0:24:140:24:18

-I've got £70 left over, hopefully.

-Can I have the £70, please?

0:24:180:24:23

There's the £70, thank goodness. That's most of the show taken up.

0:24:230:24:27

All right, Charles. You better slip off smartish. See you later, girls.

0:24:270:24:31

We're heading off somewhere really interesting. We're leaving the south and going oop north!

0:24:310:24:37

To Doddington Hall. Ooh, aye!

0:24:370:24:40

Today I'm in Lincolnshire, heading for a family home

0:24:440:24:49

that has passed through the female line five times and has never been sold.

0:24:490:24:55

Not much has changed at Doddington Hall since it was first built over 400 years ago.

0:24:560:25:03

It's beautifully proportioned, symmetrical and has a lovely warm atmosphere.

0:25:030:25:09

Early in the 17th century, most folk lived in wattle and daub hovels.

0:25:100:25:15

What a palace this place would have appeared to them.

0:25:150:25:19

Can you imagine the tittle tattle going around the village about the comings and goings on here

0:25:190:25:25

and all the belongings?

0:25:250:25:29

One of the items that would, no doubt, have been discussed often by the local cottagers

0:25:360:25:43

about the contents of a grand house like Doddington would have been the number of mirrors in the place.

0:25:430:25:50

The cottagers would have been intrigued by mirrors because they probably didn't own one,

0:25:500:25:55

because the cost of producing mirrored glass in the 17th and 18th century was extremely high.

0:25:550:26:02

Here in the drawing room, we've got no less than a suite of four of these oval fellows

0:26:020:26:09

dotted around the room. Now they look to be most beautifully carved.

0:26:090:26:15

Carved out of lime wood or beech, perhaps.

0:26:150:26:19

With elegant, long, rococo pendants that reach up towards the ceiling.

0:26:190:26:25

Except, I have to tell you, these are bogus.

0:26:250:26:30

Well, they're not bogus. They were made in the middle of the 18th century,

0:26:300:26:36

but in imitation of the more expensive carved wood variety.

0:26:360:26:40

You can see here where it's been nibbled away.

0:26:400:26:43

There's some fibrous paper-like substance behind.

0:26:430:26:48

These mirrors are entirely made of moulded cardboard.

0:26:480:26:53

It's called carton pierre. It's a type of papier mache,

0:26:530:26:58

dating from around 1760.

0:26:580:27:01

But they're not the only glass-related objects in this room.

0:27:010:27:06

So what's the glass connection on this cabinet?

0:27:210:27:25

Well, it's not immediately obvious, but if you look at the 20 or so panels

0:27:250:27:31

that adorn this thing, they're all actually thin sheets of glass.

0:27:310:27:37

Rub your finger on the surface and you can't detect any paint outside

0:27:370:27:42

because each of these sheets of glass has been decorated with a reverse decoration process.

0:27:420:27:49

In other words, the sheet of glass is clear, the artist decorates it using his oil and gouache paints,

0:27:490:27:57

from behind, and then plants it on the surface of the piece of furniture.

0:27:570:28:03

That way he'll protect the colour and create this very luxurious effect.

0:28:030:28:08

This is one of a pair of cabinets that dates from the latter part of the 17th century,

0:28:080:28:15

round about 1680, something like that. Probably made in southern Italy,

0:28:150:28:21

maybe Sicily or even Spain.

0:28:210:28:24

All in all, a most interesting piece of furniture.

0:28:240:28:28

The big question today is over at the auction are we going to get any interesting results?

0:28:280:28:35

Well, we've come marginally west from Portobello to Chiswick

0:28:470:28:52

-to Chiswick Auctions to be with our auctioneer William Rouse.

-Welcome, Tim.

-Excellent to be here.

0:28:520:28:58

We're really rather excited about our first item here - this jug and basin set. Like it?

0:28:580:29:05

I do. They aren't always the easiest thing to sell, but this is a good maker.

0:29:050:29:11

They aren't particularly known for these, but a good design.

0:29:110:29:15

-What do you think it's worth?

-It ought to fetch £80-£100.

0:29:150:29:20

Good Lord. Our girls only paid £30. That's pretty good, isn't it?

0:29:200:29:24

Now the silver-rimmed salts. You get a lot of cut-glass ones, but not so many like this?

0:29:240:29:31

-You're frowning.

-I think we do see quite a lot.

0:29:310:29:35

-Not the most exciting thing I've seen.

-Right. How much, then?

0:29:350:29:39

-£20, maybe?

-Well, that's fine. She only paid £22.

0:29:410:29:44

-Any more than £22 and we'll be jumping up and down, very happy.

-Good.

0:29:440:29:50

The big risk factor for this team is this green-cased Finnigans scent bottle set, quite frankly.

0:29:500:29:57

-They invested a lot of money in this.

-This is nice. It just feels right.

0:29:570:30:03

Nice green colour. Almost shagreen in look.

0:30:030:30:07

-What's your estimate on it?

-£70-£100?

-There you go, you see. £185 they paid for this.

0:30:070:30:13

I mean, they paid, top, top wodge. We might be wrong and it makes £250 and everybody's smelling of roses.

0:30:130:30:20

In case not, though, let's go and have a look at the Bonus Buy.

0:30:200:30:24

Now, Lil and Han, you spent a magnificent £237,

0:30:240:30:28

of which I am incredibly proud. You only gave the lovely Catherine 63 smackers to find a Bonus Buy.

0:30:280:30:36

-What did you find?

-Ready, girls?

0:30:360:30:39

-Oh, God!

-You wanted something wacky.

0:30:410:30:44

Do you remember? These are a pair of 19th-century dividers.

0:30:440:30:50

-You're not very impressed, I know!

-It's so unusual.

-How does it work?

0:30:500:30:54

Well, this is what you would put into the middle here, a bit like a compass.

0:30:540:31:00

-And then draw...

-Oh, I see! Right!

0:31:000:31:02

-Not like a book divider.

-Oh, no, no.

-Oh, good.

0:31:020:31:06

-It's very interesting.

-It is.

-How much did you pay for it?

0:31:060:31:10

-Well, I paid £43, which I didn't think was too bad.

-And do you expect it to make a profit?

0:31:100:31:16

I would like to see those with an estimate of £69-£80.

0:31:160:31:22

-Oh, really?

-I would like to. Whether they do is another matter!

0:31:220:31:27

Anyway, you don't have to decide until after the sale of your items.

0:31:270:31:32

For the audience at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks.

0:31:320:31:37

-So, Will, do you think this is an object of torture?

-I'm not really sure what it is!

0:31:380:31:44

I suppose it's a pair of dividers, but what would you do with it today?

0:31:440:31:48

-It would look well in the dungeon.

-It is a bit scary.

0:31:480:31:53

Slightly scary. It's for scribing circles.

0:31:530:31:58

Anything in a wood turning, cutting business.

0:31:580:32:02

I think a very unusual object.

0:32:020:32:05

So what's your estimate, Will?

0:32:050:32:08

-£20-£30.

-OK, well, she paid £43.

0:32:080:32:13

-She might be lucky to scratch up a profit.

-You never know.

-That's it for the Reds. Now the Blues.

0:32:130:32:19

We've got these two oddball bits of 18th century, early 19th century porcelain. Do you rate those?

0:32:190:32:26

Well, people do collect them, but a single coffee cup on its own

0:32:260:32:33

and a rather scratched teapot stand are not the most saleable things.

0:32:330:32:38

-There we are. £30 paid. Not bad for a retail-type price. Might they get their money back?

-Every chance.

0:32:380:32:45

-That's good. Now the pocket watch in the embossed silk case. It's all right, isn't it?

-It is.

0:32:450:32:53

Quite a nice thing. The watch is later than the case.

0:32:530:32:57

But the watch is mint, like it came out of the factory yesterday.

0:32:570:33:02

So that might be worth £50 and the case might be worth £50. Might be £100-worth there.

0:33:020:33:08

-There certainly should be.

-Good. They paid 80. Lastly, this piece of jewellery.

0:33:080:33:13

Plaster it in diamonds, everybody wants it. But semi-precious like this, is it popular?

0:33:130:33:19

-Jewellery is doing pretty well at the moment and the gold price is high.

-Yes.

-But it is very light.

0:33:190:33:25

You can hardly feel it in your hand on its own.

0:33:250:33:30

-So £70-£100.

-£120 they paid.

0:33:300:33:33

So overall I fancy they'll need the Bonus Buy. Better have a look.

0:33:330:33:37

Now, Ruth and Marilyn, the Bonus Buy moment.

0:33:370:33:41

What you've been waiting for for yonks.

0:33:410:33:45

You left Charles with £70 of leftover lolly. What has he bought?

0:33:450:33:50

I spent £60 on this. OK? Half the story.

0:33:500:33:55

Within we go... and OK, really, what I've bought

0:33:550:33:59

is a statement. It's a statement to hopefully educate

0:33:590:34:04

and to advise that for £60 you can buy a wonderful set

0:34:040:34:09

of six Exeter silver teaspoons.

0:34:090:34:12

-From around 1810. George III in period.

-Yes.

-Do you like them, Marilyn?

0:34:120:34:18

I do. I think they're very elegant.

0:34:180:34:21

-If we cleaned them up, that would make a big difference.

-I think they like it, Charles.

0:34:210:34:27

-I think we do.

-You like them?

-We do. We've both run homes and could appreciate something like this.

0:34:270:34:34

Absolutely. Good. Lovely, Charles.

0:34:340:34:37

You don't choose right now, but let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about them.

0:34:370:34:44

-There we go, Will. That looks pretty straightforward to me.

-Yep.

0:34:450:34:49

They're cased in a later case, but they're very nice clean teaspoons.

0:34:490:34:55

Georgian teaspoons. Absolutely. What's so nice is they're unfussy.

0:34:550:35:00

They could have been made by a contemporary silversmith. Nice to have the thick bits here.

0:35:000:35:05

Hardly any wear. They're great.

0:35:050:35:09

So we like them, and the case. What do you think they might bring?

0:35:090:35:12

I'm now looking at my estimate and thinking I was mean at £30-£60. Got to be worth £10 each.

0:35:120:35:19

Yes. Good. That's confidence building.

0:35:190:35:24

William, thank you. See you later.

0:35:240:35:27

260. 270.

0:35:270:35:29

280. 290. 300.

0:35:290:35:31

320. £320.

0:35:310:35:34

Hannah, what's your expectation? You've seen the room. Where do you think you'll be at the end of this?

0:35:350:35:41

-We've got friends in the audience.

-Have you?

0:35:410:35:45

-You're just kidding.

-Yes.

0:35:460:35:49

OK, first up, Lily, is your pitcher and basin. Here it comes.

0:35:500:35:55

The Brown, Westhead and Moore floral-decorated jug and bowl set.

0:35:550:36:00

A nice lot. £20. 22 now.

0:36:000:36:03

-25.

-It's going.

-30.

0:36:030:36:06

32. 35. 38.

0:36:070:36:10

£38. At 38. Anybody else?

0:36:100:36:13

Seems very cheap. 38.

0:36:130:36:15

38. That's £8 profit. In this market that's jolly good.

0:36:150:36:20

-Plus £8.

-Two glasses of wine.

-Two glasses of wine.

0:36:200:36:24

Mine's a Chardonnay.

0:36:240:36:27

OK, now the silver-rimmed salts.

0:36:270:36:30

Lot 75A are a pair of salts. 75A. Together with a silver spoon.

0:36:300:36:36

£10 for the salts? £5 I'm bid.

0:36:360:36:39

£6. £7.

0:36:390:36:42

8. 9. 10.

0:36:420:36:45

12. £12 I'm bid. £12. Are you all done for 12?

0:36:450:36:50

£12 is minus £10. Overall, you're minus £2.

0:36:500:36:55

Minus 2? Oh, can we just go now?

0:36:550:36:58

76A is a green leather case. And I've got some interest in it as well.

0:36:580:37:04

-I'm bid straight off £60.

-We need a lot more than £60.

0:37:040:37:10

70 with me. 75. 80 with me.

0:37:100:37:12

My last. 85 in the room. 85. 90 upstairs.

0:37:120:37:17

-Oh, somebody upstairs waving.

-100.

0:37:170:37:21

110. 120.

0:37:210:37:23

-It's an extremely good lot.

-I really want this to go.

0:37:230:37:27

Anybody else? 120, then?

0:37:270:37:30

£120. Poor babies. That's £65 down.

0:37:300:37:35

You are minus 67. What will you do about the dividers or scribers?

0:37:350:37:39

-I think we should go for it.

-Is it going to be divide and rule?

0:37:390:37:43

-GROANS

-What are you going to do?

-Definitely.

-You don't have to.

0:37:430:37:48

-It could be a winning score. £43 is what they cost.

-Bear in mind how much it's been struggling.

0:37:480:37:54

Going with the lot? We're going with the Bonus Buy.

0:37:540:37:58

Lot 80A is a pair of 19th-century bent wood dividers. With steel tips. There they are.

0:37:580:38:04

-I've got a bit of interest in them.

-We need lots of interest.

-£18.

0:38:040:38:09

20. 22.

0:38:090:38:12

24. I've got 25.

0:38:120:38:14

£26 in the room. Anybody else at £26?

0:38:140:38:20

-I'm going to sell them at 26.

-£26. Well, that's great(!)

0:38:200:38:24

-£26 is 14...£17...

-You are the only one that made a profit.

-Oh!

-You should be proud of that.

0:38:240:38:30

£84. Minus £84, girls.

0:38:300:38:33

-That's not much, is it?

-It's OK.

-That could be a winning score.

0:38:330:38:37

-Now Marilyn and Ruth, do you know how the Reds got on?

-No!

-We haven't got a clue.

-Not at all.

-Lovely.

0:38:410:38:48

Anyway, first lot up is the bits of porcelain. Here they come.

0:38:480:38:53

An 18th-century coffee cup and a teapot stand. 96A.

0:38:530:38:57

What about £10 to go? I've got £10 here. £10.

0:38:570:39:02

£12. £14 in front of me here. At £14.

0:39:020:39:06

-Don't you put your hammer down!

-Anybody else? 16.

0:39:060:39:09

£18 here. 20.

0:39:090:39:11

-Come on!

-£20.

-He's going to put the hammer down!

0:39:110:39:16

£20. 22? Thank you, Chris. 24.

0:39:160:39:19

26. 28.

0:39:190:39:22

-30. 32.

-Yes!

0:39:220:39:26

35. No? £35 here.

0:39:260:39:28

-At 35.

-You're in profit.

-£35 and going.

0:39:280:39:32

A considerable achievement, girls. You don't realise, but it is.

0:39:320:39:37

-Plus £5. Well done.

-A Benson fob watch,

0:39:370:39:41

together with a watch holder. 97A.

0:39:410:39:44

Start me at £30. Thank you. I'm bid 30. 35.

0:39:440:39:48

40. 5.

0:39:480:39:51

50. 5. 60.

0:39:510:39:53

-5. £65.

-Keep going!

0:39:530:39:56

Anybody else? At 65 and going.

0:39:560:40:00

-Oh, dear.

-We lost our profit!

0:40:000:40:03

£65. You're minus £15. Overall, you're minus £10.

0:40:030:40:07

Here comes the necklet.

0:40:070:40:09

98A is a gold pendant with aquamarine and seed pearls.

0:40:090:40:15

Nice little lot. Start me at £30. 30 I'm bid here.

0:40:150:40:19

At £30 for the jewellery. At 30. 32, thank you.

0:40:190:40:23

35. 38.

0:40:230:40:25

40. £40, seated there. At 40.

0:40:250:40:28

Anybody else? At £40. At £40, I'm going to sell it.

0:40:280:40:32

-£40.

-He is going to sell it.

0:40:320:40:35

£40. That's minus £80.

0:40:350:40:38

Equals, overall, minus £90, girls.

0:40:380:40:41

-Now we have to be positive.

-We do.

0:40:410:40:44

-Life's too short.

-Minus £90. Could be a winning score.

-It could.

0:40:440:40:48

What'll you do with the Bonus Buy? Going to go with the teaspoons?

0:40:480:40:52

-We have to.

-The Georgian...

-Yes, we will.

-We will.

0:40:520:40:57

-Here it comes.

-102A. A case set of Georgian teaspoons.

0:40:570:41:02

102A.

0:41:020:41:04

-£20 for these?

-£20?

-Oh, dear. We'll have to work this.

0:41:040:41:09

-I knew we'd lose on them!

-12. 14. 16.

0:41:090:41:13

18. 20. 22.

0:41:130:41:16

£22 nearer to me. At 22. Still very cheap. 24.

0:41:160:41:21

-26 here. Thank you. £26.

-I knew we'd lose on these.

0:41:210:41:27

At £26. £26 and going.

0:41:270:41:30

It just shows how cheap these things can be.

0:41:300:41:34

Minus £34.

0:41:340:41:36

So that is £124

0:41:360:41:39

down the old proverbial.

0:41:390:41:42

What an extraordinary day we had! There are great similarities between our teams.

0:41:460:41:51

Each team made a profit on the first item that they sold, which is very encouraging.

0:41:510:41:57

And from thereon in, it went right down the drain.

0:41:570:42:01

Each team made substantial losses from that moment on. It's simply a question of scale.

0:42:010:42:08

The team with the massive loss of all are the Blues.

0:42:080:42:12

SCREAMS

0:42:120:42:14

-Woo!

-Yes. At least you're so happy about that. Well done, Marilyn.

0:42:190:42:24

-Good. £124 down the drain, but let's not dwell on that.

-No.

0:42:240:42:30

You've been a great pair of contestants. And the girls,

0:42:300:42:34

you managed to win by only losing £84, which is very respectable on this programme.

0:42:340:42:40

-So well done.

-Thank you!

-I hope you enjoyed it.

-We did.

0:42:400:42:45

We've loved having you on the show. You've all been very enthusiastic,

0:42:450:42:50

so join us soon for some more bargain hunting! Yes? Yes!

0:42:500:42:55

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd - 2010

0:43:090:43:13

Email [email protected]

0:43:130:43:16

The two teams hit the stalls at the busy Portobello Road market in London. Expert Charles Hanson has his hands full keeping the characterful blue team in check while Catherine Southon's red team lead her into a bakery. Keeping a watchful on them all is irrepressible leader Tim Wonnacott who also makes a dash to Doddington Hall to expose why some mirrors have two faces.


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