10th Anniversary Special 4 Bargain Hunt


10th Anniversary Special 4

Birthday celebrations continue at the antiques fair as four experts make up the red and blue teams shopping for bargains, while Tim looks back at over 700 episodes.


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Transcript


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How lovely! A party invitation!

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"..to celebrate ten wonderful years of Bargain Hunt."

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I do love a party! And there's so much to celebrate.

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So, let's go Bargain Hunting!

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This week, we're in party mood and today's bash comes from Wetherby,

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where we're guaranteed a grand northern welcome.

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The rules remain the same.

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The teams are made up of experts competing against one another.

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That's bound to make entertaining viewing.

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If that's not enough to make the party go with a swing,

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there are other fun things to enjoy.

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'Tom Plant remembers an exciting moment.'

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The contestant started to cry. She couldn't believe it.

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'At the fair, he and David Harper hit it off

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'when it comes to buying.

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'We find out more about James Braxton,

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'and what he gets up to in his spare time.'

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I love my car, my 1952 MG, 57 years old this year.

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'The tension mounts at the auction.'

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One more, sir!

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'And I take a trip through ten years of archive,

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'picking out some of my favourite bits.'

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Let's go and meet the teams.

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Today, there's not a Sheila in sight.

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It's an all-male crew. David and Tom for the reds.

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Mark and James for the blues. What could be nicer, chaps?

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-Tom?

-Yes.

-How does it feel facing the pressure,

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as an expert and as a contestant?

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Exhausting. So much stress.

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-Is it?

-I'm terribly worried.

-Can you handle the pressure?

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-I've got David to support me.

-Better than a tablet.

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So much easier to take!

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David, what's your highlight of your Bargain Hunt career?

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Tim, there's so many highlights

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but I think, for me, it's spending quality time with you.

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Are you confident that you're going to beat these smooth blues?

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Well, Thomas and I have never met. I've seen him on TV.

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I'm all in awe, stood next to the man himself.

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You'll have to bond quickly.

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-These two have spent ages in their company.

-They dress the same!

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Identical, isn't it? Look at that!

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Shoes, trousers, underpants! It's just a remarkable thing, this.

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All from a high street shop near you!

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-You're all bonded-up already?

-Yes.

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What about you? James, you've been on the show a long time.

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-You are one of the original babes?

-Auctioneer in the first series.

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Then invited to become an expert. My first gig was Paris in May 2001.

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-That was the time when Bargain Hunt...

-Decent budget!

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-Paris? We only go to Powys!

-And it's been every disused airfield since then!

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I know, but it says here that you take Bargain Hunt,

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the profit-making process,

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-incredibly competitively, is that true?

-You know me well enough...

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Not really. No, we have a go. We try and find things.

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I normally fall flat on my face at every auction we go to.

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Give the contestants a fun time, hopefully bring a couple of smiles.

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What is good about this as an experience for all experts, is that it's a levelling process.

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We get to go to the auction.

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You have to stand there when the sale doesn't go well, through no fault of your own.

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I personally take my hat off to you because I think you're very brave.

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I can do humiliation very well now.

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Mark, how do you feel about having James?

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It's great fun. We get on really well.

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Although I have to keep him away from these overpriced bits of unsaleable goods he's used to.

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-We'll do very well, I'm sure of it.

-I'm sure you will.

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Are you up to the challenge of lashing the reds into submission?

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Of course. We've watched those two on television. Piece of cake!

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Well, you said it. Now, the money moment. £300 each.

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There are no experts waiting because you're the experts, and off you go! And very, very, very good luck.

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The way these four boys are likely to misbehave it'll be less of a party and more of a riot!

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-Ready for the off?

-Absolutely.

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-What's our tactics?

-Let's go around together and in moments of desperation, split up.

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-Have you got any tactics?

-Do you normally have a tactic? I don't.

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Do we need to establish a master and servant situation?

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If you said you were the servant!

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'So, ten years of Bargain Hunt, eh?

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'The first and very best antiques show on daytime television!

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'In that time, there have been lots of...improvements.

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'We've had golden gavels and team surveillance.

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'And we've even had live shows.'

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I'm here to buy Beswick.

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Now for something that's hardly changed over the years, our rules.

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Each team gets £300 and an hour to shop for items which they sell later

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and the team that makes the most profit wins.

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'Today, any profits go to charity.

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'Let's see if our experts can do us proud.'

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Thomas.

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-Probably wouldn't have it at home.

-I'm a retro fan, definitely.

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-That's very retro.

-Very '50s.

-"'50s teapot, never used."

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If you had this in your house in the '50s, you'd have been pretty cool.

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-Why never use it? Could be a wedding present.

-It could have been.

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That's original felt lining. The cover, I suppose, is a tea cosy.

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Absolutely, keeps your tea warm.

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What's interesting is the texture, the shiny chrome.

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-Yeah.

-And the lovely cream glaze.

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-That's a sweet little number.

-It is quite good fun.

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£18 is £18. You need to get it for much less. Well, little bit less.

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There's the man! What would "much less" be?

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-15.

-What about a tenner?

-No.

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Sure. 12.

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-Shall we say we'll have it at a tenner?

-Yeah.

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-We'll have it at a tenner.

-Oh.

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-£10.

-Good man.

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'These chaps are smoking!

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'First item bought after four minutes. That's pretty impressive.

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'Are the blues as fired up?'

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Shall I show you this thing?

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It's silver.

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What do you do with it? Oh, you engrave?

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-That's probably what you would do.

-Birthdays and things.

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-That's a great idea. We could put the auction date down.

-Could do!

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On this, I'm going to be very cheeky here.

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We're trying to beat those wretched reds.

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Any chance of doing it for 25? < That hurts.

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-It does hurt.

-Sorry.

-30 sounds better.

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How old is it? 1994? So... Yeah.

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Should we think about it? Sorry. It's very kind of you.

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Good luck with the scarves, guys!

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That's quite fun, though.

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Let's just keep looking.

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'They're taking their time, having a good look round.

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'Something has caught the eye of the reds.'

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I don't think these are opera. They're utilitarian.

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They'd definitely be for field.

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-You don't think they're trendy...?

-Quite masculine.

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It's not masculine to me.

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-Are they not doing much for you?

-They're not rocking my boat.

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Thanks a lot.

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'Mark and James are such a laid-back duo,

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'too laid-back.'

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-You don't see ostriches in ceramics very often.

-No.

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We don't want a lot of porcelain.

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-How about Copenhagen?

-It doesn't do very well now.

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We're ambling a bit, James. We're losing time.

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'While they faff around a bit, let's go and learn a bit more

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'about one of our experts.

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'He's been with Bargain Hunt almost from the beginning.'

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I was working for a firm in Bath.

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They filmed Bargain Hunt there with David.

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I was just a junior auctioneer.

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My manager said, "Tom, as it's your first auction do you mind doing it?"

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I thought, "In for a penny, in for a pound."

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And I was the auctioneer

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in August 2000 - it was great fun.

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£9 profit on this.

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'Tom's still working as an auctioneer, and life's pretty busy.

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'At home, it's just as hectic.'

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My activities have been curtailed with the arrival of Gemima and William,

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taking up loads of my time, which is wonderful.

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It's the greatest thing I've ever done.

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Well done to Angela for having the twins. They are wonderful.

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They are the lights of my life.

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'He and Angela have their hands full with Gemima and William,

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'but how does Tom let off steam?'

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I do enjoy fencing.

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Not putting up fences. No, it's fencing with swords.

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I'm what we call a sabreur, which is a sabre fencer.

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That is a weapon which you cut with.

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Rather than point.

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With my foil fencing at university, I won the southern championships.

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At school, I was captain.

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I was president of the university fencing team. I really enjoyed it.

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'Tom's adversary today, James Braxton, is also a family man.

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'He lives in Sussex with Joanna, four children and two dogs.'

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When I'm not on Bargain Hunt, I have a very busy home life.

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Our big girl's at Leeds Art College. Our son is building.

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He's about to start a big job in London.

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Our two little ones are at school.

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And, of course, my day job.

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I'm a director of Dreweatts 1759, Newbury based business.

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A light lunch!

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'When he does have a moment, James loves being creative in his garden.'

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I like building. I'm doing a flint obelisk at the moment.

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I've become a course junkie.

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I've done a green oak timber framing course.

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My son and I did a flint walling course. It's fabulous. Love it.

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Bit of lime mortar.

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'There's another passion.'

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I love my car, my 1952 MG.

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57 years old. That keeps me occupied.

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There's always some problem with the fuel line or distributor cap.

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'One classy car and one classy gent.

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'Our red boys also have a touch of class,

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'and they're pretty savvy.

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'20 minutes in, it's time for tactics.'

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We are going to Derby.

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I did see these great big pieces of Crown Derby.

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-We've got the Imari pattern.

-That's a big winning pattern.

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-TAPS PLATE

-It sounds all right.

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-Hm...

-I saw that. That is a shame.

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It's a nice early back stamp, the '20s,

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when they moved the England to the side.

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-That's a good sign.

-It is.

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The quality is extreme. It's based on the Japanese Imari pattern.

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Derby made it symmetrical.

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-Whereas all the Imari...

-It's all over the place!

-Asymmetrical.

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These classically trained artisans didn't understand it.

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That's the sort of thing people would buy online, on the phone.

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It's got the stamp, the design.

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I've noticed the price, 155.

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I think it needs to be sub £100 for us to have any chance at all.

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-Whether they'll do it.

-Shall we try?

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-Are you sure you want to?

-Yes. I'll hit hard.

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'Tom and David are on the case, unlike Mark and James.'

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-I'm waiting for something to leap out at me, James. Are you?

-Yeah.

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That's fun. Look. An actual hourglass.

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-Sort of Newlyn school.

-What's Newlyn about that?

-Haven't a clue.

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You and your Newlyn school! It's unusual.

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-That's Glasgow.

-It's not Newlyn?

-No.

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It's Glasgow! JAMES LAUGHS

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-I bid her 70.

-Really?

-Yeah.

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What do you reckon? I meet her halfway at 75, if you're happy.

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-I'm happy at that.

-How much would that be new?

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-You can buy them new.

-It's going to be, what, 250?

-More!

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-375?

-Could be 500 quid.

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-Oh, hello.

-Why are you so confidential, you two?

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Something's going on here. You don't want anyone else to hear.

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This is the problem, isn't it? They watch you like hawks.

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They see you pick something up and think it's going to be good.

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When I pick it up, they run away from me!

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You've bought one item, which is fab, and you're on with the second?

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-We're discussing.

-Oh, discussing.

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I'll shove off, then. Good luck.

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I think it's cheap. I think she's going to meet halfway at 75.

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-If I can't get it for 75, I'll agree on 80, are you happy?

-Very happy.

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'Goodness! These guys are ruthless!'

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Yes, of course you can. Can you stop the clock, please?

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-There we are.

-Thank you.

-I hope you're having a good day.

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-James, another person didn't recognise you!

-No. I've done mine!

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-How are you doing?

-I got it for 75.

-Brilliant!

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-I don't think I could have done that.

-It's the dealer, you see.

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-That is brilliant. I'm really impressed.

-Good. I'm very pleased.

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'The blues should take note. That's the way to do it.'

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Like all our experts, I spend time scouring the stalls,

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finding things, sometimes of high value, which I share with you,

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sometimes of historic interest, which I share with you,

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and sometimes I find things that I just find interesting!

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One of the things that I found at a fair like this

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is a little joker that I wear on the end of my chain every day.

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At the time that I bought it, it was a mystery.

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A curious end of a watch chain, what's called a "fob".

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What I found most peculiar was the bark-like engraving,

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and the fact that a little branch sticks out

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that provides the support for the ring that supported the chain.

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The other oddball feature is the engraving on the fob.

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On one end it says September 23 1901.

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At the other, HRH Duke of Cornwall and York.

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That's peculiar. HRH means His or Her Royal Highness.

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But Cornwall AND York? Two royal dukedoms?

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That was a big question mark in my mind.

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So I wrote to the royal archive at Windsor Castle.

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I got a lovely letter back.

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They confirm, in this letter,

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that on September 23 1901,

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the Duke of York was visiting Canada.

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For nine months of that year,

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the future Prince of Wales and King of England, George V,

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was known as the Duke of Cornwall and York.

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Suddenly, the jigsaw started to come together.

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On that day, he visited a lumber yard at Rockcliffe, outside Ottawa,

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and it's recorded that he was presented with a watch and chain.

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This is the fob off that watch and chain

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and that's why it looks like a section of log.

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So, the future King and Emperor

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once owned this little trinket and wore it.

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And now, I wear it.

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Every day. How sweet is that?

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'Right, with 30 minutes gone, have the blues actually found something?'

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What's that unusual Doulton figure?

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-The Sandcastles.

-Do you mind if I look?

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-Brand new, is it?

-Adrian Hughes.

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I worked with his son at Bonhams.

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Yeah. It's not very much. 68.

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-1983.

-Have a go.

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We have to be a bit cheeky, I'm afraid, cos we have to win.

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I would offer James to give you a kiss, but you'd put the price up.

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-WOMAN:

-Oh, I don't know! >

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-Ooh! Let me move out of the frame.

-I can feel 25 coming on.

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-I can feel a "double it" coming on.

-Really? 50?

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-Well, let's think about it.

-We'll think about it...

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'What? I don't believe it!

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'You'd think that after ten years they'd know they won't win unless they actually buy something.'

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-Ah, country chairs.

-Country chairs!

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I've got to say, they make my heart warm.

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-What date do you put on these?

-The design is 1770.

-Yes.

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Because they're obviously country, they could be as late as 1820, 1830.

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It's interesting, in those days, if a design was penned in London,

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by the time it was made in any numbers,

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-in Durham, it could have been 50 years later.

-Really?

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Often these chairs were quite light.

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Look! They've put a new foot on!

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There's an example of a good quality repair.

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They were so valued by somebody

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they sent them to a good cabinet maker and had them restored.

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Because they were made to last for ever.

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What furniture can you buy that'll be around in 200 years?

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-Not unless you get something made and is going to cost you a fortune.

-Good point.

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So whatever these chairs are... I'll find out.

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-What have you got on the chairs, please...? 100 quid.

-Yeah.

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-£100.

-£33 each.

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-It's madly cheap.

-You couldn't buy the cheapest of cheap for that.

-No.

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-It's pathetic.

-Have you got an idea...?

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-It'd be great for 50 quid.

-I was thinking the same!

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Are you brave enough to bid him?

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-Shall I have a go?

-Charm him. You can do it.

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'Hm, I'm not so sure about those, but see what you can do, Tom, eh?

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'Parting the blues from their cash is no easy task.'

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-Looks like Royal Worcester.

-It does.

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-Little house.

-Blush ground.

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I'm always intrigued by scenes.

0:20:420:20:44

Oh, that's nice. It's titled. What does that say?

0:20:440:20:49

-"Dove Nest" or could it be "Dore Nest"?

-It is D-O-R.

0:20:490:20:54

-Dore Nest.

-Ambleside.

-It must be the name of the house.

0:20:540:20:59

-Where is Ambleside?

-Cumbria. So, Lake District.

-It's quite nice.

0:20:590:21:04

-It's 1905, so good age to it.

-Yeah.

0:21:040:21:07

Plus, at the moment, it's only 38 quid.

0:21:070:21:11

If we can get that for 25, that would be worth buying, I reckon.

0:21:110:21:16

Royal Worcester collectors would love this.

0:21:160:21:19

-Yeah.

-Shall I have a word with the dealer?

-Go on. Secure it.

0:21:190:21:24

We really like this. What's the very best you can do?

0:21:240:21:28

If I say 28, you'll come back at me. >

0:21:280:21:30

-25?

-Can we say 26, in the middle? >

0:21:300:21:34

-Really, 26?

-Yes, go on. >

-Fantastic.

0:21:340:21:37

-For chocolate. >

-I'll send you two bars of chocolate.

0:21:370:21:41

-I promise you. 26, James.

-Great.

0:21:410:21:44

-That's a done deal.

-Thank you.

0:21:440:21:46

'It's a miracle! They've bought something!

0:21:460:21:50

-Are we stuck at 90?

-< We're stuck at 90.

-Wow!

0:21:510:21:54

Why don't we have a wander around and if we're down to one minute,

0:21:540:21:59

-we'll run and give him 90 quid.

-I think that's very fair.

0:21:590:22:03

All you regular Bargain Hunters know about the bonus buy.

0:22:060:22:11

That piece found by the experts at the end of shopping,

0:22:110:22:15

using up the team's leftover lolly.

0:22:150:22:18

It's produced at the auction and they decide whether to go with it.

0:22:180:22:23

It can make the difference between winning and losing.

0:22:230:22:27

Hang on! Today, we've got no experts to find the bonus buy,

0:22:270:22:31

so it has to be me.

0:22:310:22:33

I've been given £100 to find a bonus buy for each team.

0:22:330:22:38

So stand by for a bit of fun.

0:22:380:22:41

That's pretty, James.

0:22:420:22:44

Little inkstand.

0:22:440:22:46

1897.

0:22:460:22:48

-What's that, James?

-Nice simple fellow.

0:22:480:22:52

-What's the mark?

-I've forgotten. Who's R&B?

0:22:520:22:56

JAMES: How much is on this fellow? DEALER: 195.

0:22:560:23:00

Well, let's have a little think.

0:23:000:23:03

'Mark and James are doing what they do best, thinking about it.'

0:23:030:23:07

-What do you think about that?

-It is fun.

0:23:070:23:10

I have no idea how to value that.

0:23:100:23:13

Is he meant to have a handle?

0:23:130:23:15

-To sort of wheel it around?

-Probably.

0:23:150:23:19

Or you strap it to your Chihuahua!

0:23:190:23:21

BOTH LAUGH I wouldn't know how to value it.

0:23:210:23:24

I find that fascinating. Is it 50 quid or 500?

0:23:240:23:28

-Shall we speculate? I reckon that's 250.

-I think it might be more.

0:23:280:23:33

-Shall we look at the price tag?

-375.

0:23:330:23:36

-You want to go 375?

-I'm going to bomb!

-We don't know. Let's look.

0:23:360:23:41

295!

0:23:410:23:43

-Ooh!

-You were closer!

-In the middle.

0:23:430:23:46

'Tom and David are so confident, they're just having fun.

0:23:460:23:52

'Mark and James can't muck about. This is getting serious.'

0:23:520:23:56

James? What's he doing?

0:23:560:23:59

-You and your stuffed birds! Can you keep on track?

-I am.

0:23:590:24:03

We're struggling here, you know.

0:24:030:24:06

We've only bought one item and only spent £26!

0:24:070:24:11

I was relying on you to find all the bargains.

0:24:110:24:15

Unusual colours.

0:24:180:24:21

-It's not quite the traditional Imari.

-No.

0:24:210:24:25

What's the mark?

0:24:250:24:27

It's got to be 1910 or so.

0:24:270:24:30

I suppose that's a cabaret.

0:24:300:24:32

-A teapot and things.

-Yeah. It's quite a nice tray. How much?

0:24:320:24:36

-About 100.

-100 or less.

-Really?

0:24:360:24:39

-Shall we ask them the best price?

-Yeah.

0:24:390:24:43

Well, don't ask the best price.

0:24:430:24:45

Let's negotiate shall we? I was going to say 60.

0:24:450:24:49

DEALER: No. 80 would be my best.

0:24:490:24:52

70 for cash, please? If I beg? I'll give you a kiss!

0:24:520:24:57

-DEALER: 75.

-Go on, 70.

-Go on, 70.

0:24:570:25:00

-Are you sure?

-That's really kind.

-We've got to have it for 70.

0:25:000:25:04

It is Derby. If it doesn't sell in Derby it won't sell anywhere.

0:25:040:25:09

-Come on! We could be...

-In a lot of trouble!

-Gassing all day!

0:25:110:25:16

'The penny's dropped with David. Down to business.

0:25:160:25:20

'After all, there's no bigger thrill than when things make a profit.'

0:25:200:25:25

One of my favourite objects was the Pilkington bowl.

0:25:250:25:30

I thought, "This is really good."

0:25:300:25:32

This is made in Britain at the height of the art pottery movement by Richard Joyce.

0:25:320:25:38

That's what the shield and the R is.

0:25:380:25:41

'The team was not keen. They really needed pushing into this.'

0:25:410:25:45

-Now, this is on at £255.

-That is a lot. We only have 300.

0:25:450:25:51

-I have got it down already to 200.

-200? OK.

0:25:510:25:54

'But they went with it.'

0:25:540:25:57

Then we saw it at the auction. I think the estimate was pretty low.

0:25:570:26:01

AUCTIONEER: 204, lots of interest. I shall start on my book at £100.

0:26:010:26:06

'Then the bids came in.'

0:26:060:26:09

300, 20, 340, 60...

0:26:090:26:13

The phone came in.

0:26:130:26:14

..540 on the phone. 560. 580.

0:26:140:26:18

600.

0:26:180:26:21

The greatest thing was

0:26:210:26:23

the contestant started to cry, she couldn't believe it.

0:26:230:26:27

At £680, the phone bid takes it. BANGS GAVEL

0:26:270:26:31

It was wonderful.

0:26:320:26:33

£680!

0:26:330:26:37

'Just as well they trusted Tom. I'm not sure I trust James Braxton.'

0:26:370:26:42

It was at Wetherby in Yorkshire, a lovely sunny day.

0:26:420:26:47

And we decided wouldn't it be fun to play a hoax on Tim?

0:26:470:26:52

-How did you get on?

-Caught the sun.

-You did!

0:26:520:26:56

-What did you buy?

-I had a trip down memory lane...

0:26:560:26:59

So, we got these plates, and I pretended that I'd been round,

0:26:590:27:04

I'd been looking for ever and a day

0:27:040:27:07

for plates matching a pattern my grandmother had.

0:27:070:27:10

I remember having banana sandwiches, cake, off it.

0:27:100:27:15

I haven't seen a bit ever since.

0:27:150:27:17

You're so romantic!

0:27:170:27:19

I showed these things to Tim with great glee, and as I handed it to him, I affected that they dropped.

0:27:190:27:26

God!

0:27:280:27:30

-LAUGHING HYSTERICALLY:

-This is just terrible!

0:27:300:27:34

Florence blue bit the dust!

0:27:360:27:41

Tim was very apologetic. Everybody was in on the joke apart from poor Tim.

0:27:410:27:46

Lucky, Tim, I bought another.

0:27:460:27:49

I don't believe it!

0:27:510:27:53

And another!

0:27:530:27:55

That's a terrible thing to do to anybody, even on television.

0:27:570:28:02

'It's taken me a long time to forgive the old rogue.

0:28:030:28:07

'Back to our anniversary special.

0:28:070:28:09

'The final ten minutes, and both teams have an item to buy.'

0:28:090:28:13

-I'm running out of ideas. Are you?

-We should give that bowl a go.

0:28:130:28:18

Let's dash over there. Have a quick scout round. Look at your bowl.

0:28:180:28:23

-Then we'll have to make our decision.

-OK. Done.

0:28:230:28:26

We've lost two minutes getting into the lift.

0:28:280:28:30

'Lift going down.' No, lift going up.

0:28:300:28:34

That's 11 quid.

0:28:340:28:36

< That's a sugar block cutter.

0:28:360:28:39

-- There's always that.

-Oh, no.

--

-Is that a greaser?

0:28:390:28:42

-What about that coffee pot?

-I prefer the tray.

0:28:430:28:47

Oh, no!

0:28:470:28:49

-It's lovely quality. I love it.

-Who's going to buy it?

0:28:490:28:53

How much on this? 150. Each.

0:28:530:28:57

OK, do we go with the chairs?

0:28:570:28:59

-I'd buy the chairs and I'd like to take the risk.

-OK.

0:28:590:29:04

-If the chairs have gone...

-We're coming straight back!

0:29:040:29:08

Try him at 80. Halfway at 85?

0:29:080:29:11

We have to rush, James.

0:29:110:29:13

If they have gone, Thomas, we're in trouble.

0:29:150:29:19

And your price? Best price would be 150.

0:29:200:29:24

-It's a good weight, nice foot, good maker.

-It is a good maker.

0:29:240:29:29

Could you do 110 on it?

0:29:290:29:33

Now, we don't want him to know that we're desperate.

0:29:330:29:37

-More stalls this way.

-Is it one more?

0:29:380:29:42

Where is he? Can you do them at 80?

0:29:470:29:50

-DEALER:

-No.

-Meet us halfway and we're happy. 85.

0:29:500:29:54

-All right.

-Yes!

-Good man!

0:29:540:29:57

James, we've got one and a half minutes.

0:29:570:30:00

-And counting.

-125...

0:30:000:30:02

I'll support you, whatever happens.

0:30:020:30:05

Yeah. That's kind. Thank you.

0:30:050:30:08

Oh, my gosh! That was VERY tight. Scarf's come off and everything!

0:30:080:30:13

-And a minute to spare, James!

-Really?

-A minute to spare!

0:30:130:30:18

Time's up. Let's remind ourselves what the reds bought.

0:30:180:30:23

'Is the 1950s teapot a good retro thing? Or were they potty to buy it?

0:30:230:30:29

'That Crown Derby Imari cabaret tray has got to be a good buy.

0:30:290:30:34

'Those chairs may be Georgian, but who wants three damaged seats?

0:30:360:30:41

'Crikey, Moses!'

0:30:410:30:43

You've finished your shopping, which is fantastic!

0:30:430:30:47

-You gossiped like crazy through the process.

-I know!

-Terrible, really.

0:30:470:30:52

-You spent £170. Are you quite confident?

-Very confident.

0:30:520:30:57

-We got three really different items we had great fun buying.

-Absolutely.

0:30:570:31:02

It's not just fun for you guys. It's not just entertainment!

0:31:020:31:07

-We want profits!

-We have discussed this at great length.

0:31:070:31:11

As you will see. We reckon that each item has a profit to be shown.

0:31:110:31:16

Meanwhile, let's remind ourselves what the blues bought.

0:31:160:31:20

'The 1905 Royal Worcester pin dish is both sweet and a little dear.

0:31:200:31:26

'They also found a Crown Derby tray, similar size, different design.

0:31:270:31:34

'And they bought this classy Sheffield silver bowl.

0:31:340:31:39

'But they may struggle to make a profit.'

0:31:390:31:43

-A minute to spare.

-One minute to go?

-One minute left.

0:31:430:31:48

Now we know what terrible trauma we put our contestants through.

0:31:480:31:52

-You've been beastly to your contestants for ten years.

-I know.

0:31:520:31:58

You've got your three items. What did you spend overall?

0:31:580:32:02

-Two hundred and...?

-21.

0:32:020:32:04

-221? That's very good.

-Heads held high. Played the game.

0:32:040:32:09

My task is to find your bonus buy. I've been given £100 to do that.

0:32:090:32:13

Before that, the audience and I are going to head off somewhere special.

0:32:130:32:19

'We've been lucky enough

0:32:200:32:23

'to visit some of Britain's magnificent stately homes,

0:32:230:32:27

'hear their stories and look at their gorgeous contents. Oh, yes.'

0:32:270:32:33

This grand house is Eyam Hall in Derbyshire's Hope Valley.

0:32:330:32:38

It was built for an economical price because Eyam was in depression,

0:32:380:32:43

having lost one-third of its population in the plague.

0:32:430:32:47

Here is a very beautiful love poem inscribed to Fanny,

0:32:470:32:51

etched with a diamond on this window pane.

0:32:510:32:56

It's thought to have been done by Robert Wright,

0:32:560:33:00

owner in the late 1700s.

0:33:000:33:02

The curious thing is that neither of Robert Wright's wives were Fanny.

0:33:020:33:08

Eyam Hall has been home for the same family, the Wright family, for over 300 years.

0:33:080:33:14

It was built by John Wright in 1671,

0:33:140:33:18

when he married local heiress Elizabeth Kniveton.

0:33:180:33:22

She must have been a shrewd housekeeper.

0:33:220:33:26

Almost the first thing she did was to commission these bacon settles.

0:33:260:33:32

They're rare things.

0:33:320:33:34

The rare bit is this whole panelled piece.

0:33:340:33:39

If I open it up, you can see some later shelves

0:33:390:33:43

that have been fitted into it.

0:33:430:33:45

When this was made as a bacon settle

0:33:450:33:48

you'd have hung, on this rank of secret hooks,

0:33:480:33:52

the flitches of bacon.

0:33:520:33:54

Dear old Mr Wright had a socking great lock and made quite sure

0:33:540:34:00

that nobody nicked that bacon, probably all their meat to survive the winter.

0:34:000:34:07

Fascinating piece of social history.

0:34:070:34:09

The next thing to get into is this.

0:34:090:34:12

Yes, you've got it, a delicious bacon sandwich!

0:34:120:34:17

Cheers.

0:34:170:34:18

'Back at the fair, I found something special, too.'

0:34:180:34:22

Finding these bonus buys isn't easy. Let's try this on for size.

0:34:220:34:27

Nice little piece of jewellery

0:34:270:34:30

in its original box, 1960s style.

0:34:300:34:33

I'll tell you more when I reveal it to the experts.

0:34:330:34:36

Let's see what the gold is worth in this thing. Shove it on the scales.

0:34:360:34:41

Up it comes with 7.2 grams.

0:34:410:34:45

Gold's worth about £8 a gram. Seven eights are 56, plus a bit.

0:34:450:34:50

There's £60 of gold in this brooch. What did I buy it for?

0:34:500:34:55

You'll have to wait till I tell the boys.

0:34:550:34:58

'With that in my pocket, time to see whether we can raise some money for charity in today's sale.'

0:35:000:35:08

It's grand to be back in Mackworth

0:35:080:35:11

at Charles Hanson's saleroom with the supremo himself.

0:35:110:35:15

Great to see you, Tim.

0:35:150:35:17

-Let us run through our contestants, who happen to be experts.

-Indeed.

0:35:170:35:23

Who will be waiting nervously on your every word.

0:35:230:35:27

For poor David and Thomas, their first item from Wetherby

0:35:270:35:32

was this handsome 1950s, chromium plated case, insulated teapot.

0:35:320:35:37

Yes, it's iconic in period. Yes, it's got that Scandinavian touch.

0:35:370:35:44

This wonderful hammered finish.

0:35:440:35:46

For any good late decorative art, condition is everything.

0:35:460:35:51

-What's it worth?

-It's marked Made In England. We know it's late.

0:35:510:35:56

-If they bought it for £15, £20, it'll make a profit.

-£10 was paid.

0:35:560:36:02

-Oh, great.

-By David, which is pretty reasonable.

-Yes, it is.

0:36:020:36:07

In your heartland on the outskirts of Derby, this must be the place

0:36:070:36:12

to sell a cabaret tray like this.

0:36:120:36:14

We're not far away from the Osmaston Rd museum and the factory.

0:36:140:36:19

This is Imari.

0:36:190:36:21

It's the great variant of the Imari, called the Witches,

0:36:210:36:25

2451 pattern, rather than the 1128.

0:36:250:36:28

And, of course, we think Derby began producing Imari in 1800, 1810.

0:36:280:36:35

-But this thing dates to about 1920.

-It is, Tim.

0:36:350:36:39

From the date code, 1917, 1918.

0:36:390:36:42

It's expensive stuff. It's flashy and in good condition.

0:36:420:36:46

My guide price, Tim, would be £100.

0:36:460:36:49

-That's great. £75 paid.

-Good.

-They'll be chuffed by that.

-Pleased.

0:36:490:36:54

Now, the three country chairs.

0:36:540:36:56

I like the chairs very much. They are fairly wide seats.

0:36:560:37:01

In my experience, the wider the seat

0:37:010:37:04

I tend to think we are rolling back into the Georgian period.

0:37:040:37:08

-Rather than them being from the 1820s, I think they're probably late 18th century.

-Fair enough.

0:37:080:37:15

A sort of loose Hepplewhite design.

0:37:150:37:18

I can't, quite frankly, understand why our experts spent £85 on these.

0:37:180:37:23

They're uncomfortable. They have a period look.

0:37:230:37:27

-I would use them as hall chairs, but I like them.

-You like them?

0:37:270:37:32

-That's great. What's your estimate?

-We have been quite low, between £40 and £60.

-Ah!

0:37:320:37:39

That reflects the current market.

0:37:390:37:41

David and Thomas have been very cute to buy them so we'll wait and see.

0:37:410:37:46

They're trying to make a profit on 85 and they may have difficulty.

0:37:460:37:51

Overall, I think they've done well but the chairs might drag them back,

0:37:510:37:55

in which case they're going to need MY bonus buy.

0:37:550:37:59

Let's have a look at this joker!

0:37:590:38:01

Now we come to the bonus buy moment.

0:38:010:38:05

I'll reveal it - and this is particularly aimed at you, Tom.

0:38:050:38:09

-Look at that! Wow!

-This man knows about 20th-century decorative art.

0:38:090:38:14

-That is one of the pulses that gets Thomas Plant up in the morning.

-Yes.

0:38:140:38:20

-Let me feel. It's going!

-Have we got boomety boomety boom?

0:38:200:38:25

-These leaping... These are gazelles, aren't they?

-Antelope. Ibex.

0:38:250:38:30

Leaping Art Deco gazelles, one of the seminal classic designs.

0:38:300:38:36

-These leaping...

-It certainly is Art Deco. It's period.

-Yeah.

0:38:360:38:40

-Any markings, Tim?

-"Made in France", so presumably it's French.

0:38:400:38:46

-It's not Lalique, then?

-How far off Lalique do you think it is?

0:38:460:38:51

-Well, Lalique...

-It's got a Lalique feel.

-It has.

0:38:510:38:54

Lalique is moulded glass, when you look at it that way.

0:38:540:38:58

It's not that far off, actually. How much was it?

0:38:580:39:02

-What do you think it's worth, Tom?

-I would put that in between...

0:39:020:39:06

-£60 and £80 in an Art Deco sale.

-What about you?

-It should do £100.

0:39:060:39:10

Really, in a good sale.

0:39:100:39:13

50 quid would be absolutely bang-on.

0:39:130:39:16

-£50 paid. They're very good.

-That's brilliant!

0:39:160:39:19

-I reckon that's got a good chance of making a profit.

-Dead right.

0:39:190:39:24

-We'll have to hope for the best.

-I'm chuffed you got that for us.

0:39:240:39:29

On that happy note, let's find out, for the viewers, what the auctioneer thinks about my bonus buy.

0:39:300:39:36

-Charles, what do you make of that?

-Tell me about it.

0:39:360:39:40

This is Lalique style,

0:39:400:39:42

but close as close can be to Mr Lalique.

0:39:420:39:46

It's not pretending to be Lalique, but it's close enough to Lalique.

0:39:460:39:51

Close enough to one of his ibex form pots which would cost £1,000

0:39:510:39:56

if you were to buy it signed by Lalique.

0:39:560:39:59

-To find that for £50...

-You paid £50 for it?

-..is pretty masterful!

0:39:590:40:05

-What's it worth?

-I think it's worth £150 to £250 on a good day.

0:40:050:40:11

-Do you think £100 to £150?

-Yes, I do.

-That's all I need.

0:40:110:40:15

That's it for the reds. Interesting this. Now, for the blues.

0:40:150:40:19

Mark found this Royal Worcester dish. £26 he paid for this joker.

0:40:190:40:25

I don't know where you come from, but the blush,

0:40:250:40:28

around the outside, is not the most popular.

0:40:280:40:34

-No.

-But any sort of hand-painted middle scene,

0:40:340:40:38

particularly if its named, makes it interesting.

0:40:380:40:41

Obviously, we can look in Henry Sandon's bible on Royal Worcester,

0:40:410:40:46

we can check out the shape number,

0:40:460:40:48

decipher its correct definition, I'm sure a pin dish.

0:40:480:40:52

With the number of dots from 1892,

0:40:520:40:55

we arrive at...six, 12, 13, 14...

0:40:550:41:00

1892 plus 14 is 1906, so it's that period.

0:41:000:41:04

-What's your estimate, then?

-It ought to make £40 or £50.

0:41:040:41:09

Brilliant. Now, isn't life peculiar?

0:41:090:41:12

Here we are on the outskirts of Derby and another Derby cabaret.

0:41:120:41:18

We're always told that Imari pattern is more commercial...

0:41:180:41:23

-Yes.

-..than this Louis XV rococo-y type.

0:41:230:41:28

-Didn't this ought to make more?

-But because of this cartouche shape,

0:41:280:41:34

I've been a bit daring and put a guide price of £80 to £120.

0:41:340:41:38

Same estimate, then, on both trays?

0:41:380:41:41

I feel it will make bottom estimate, while this one

0:41:410:41:44

will make £40, £50 more, and will make perhaps 120, 130.

0:41:440:41:48

-That's the logic.

-We cannot predict it.

0:41:480:41:52

-£70 was paid.

-Good.

-There's hope there.

0:41:520:41:55

-Lastly, found by James, is this silver bowl.

-Yes.

0:41:550:41:59

The bowl, very simple, very refined.

0:41:590:42:02

The base, with this wonderful almost Vitruvian, wavy cast foot rim.

0:42:020:42:08

It's hallmarked Sheffield 1945.

0:42:080:42:10

-To a collector, it's extremely commercial.

-What's it worth?

0:42:100:42:16

I would value it at between £100 and £120.

0:42:160:42:20

-Very good. £125 was paid by James.

-Good.

0:42:200:42:25

-He rates it. He sees it as a potential present.

-Yes.

0:42:250:42:29

If one thing is going to go wrong, not make the price that was paid, it's that bowl.

0:42:290:42:36

They may need their bonus buy and, as I found it, let's have a look.

0:42:360:42:41

-Now, boys, you spent £221.

-Yup.

0:42:420:42:45

I have been given £100 to spend on your bonus buy.

0:42:450:42:50

I've been out and bought you this.

0:42:500:42:53

-Ooh!

-Ooh, I like a box!

0:42:540:42:56

"I like the box!"

0:42:560:42:59

-We'll open the box like this and...

-Ooh!

-Ooh!

0:42:590:43:03

-Now, that is rather special.

-That IS nice.

0:43:030:43:08

-Gold?

-Gold.

0:43:080:43:10

-What period is it, Tim?

-'50s? Early '60s, that sort of thing.

0:43:100:43:15

-How much did it cost you?

-It cost me £70.

0:43:150:43:19

I like that a lot.

0:43:190:43:21

-It's a bit of quality, compared to what we bought!

-Yeah!

0:43:210:43:25

You pick later.

0:43:250:43:28

Let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about my brooch.

0:43:280:43:32

Charles, feast your eyes on that little treasure.

0:43:330:43:36

It's my bonus buy. I invested a whole £70.

0:43:360:43:41

Why did I do it? Not because, perhaps,

0:43:410:43:44

this is the most popular period of jewellery right now.

0:43:440:43:48

But if you look at this brooch in any detail,

0:43:480:43:52

it's a complicated construction, not just some stamped-out form.

0:43:520:43:57

It's solid 9-carat gold.

0:43:570:44:00

I'm intrigued that it comes in its original box.

0:44:000:44:04

And I rate it as a little piece of 1950s, early 1960s design.

0:44:040:44:09

-It has a lovely feel. It's weighty. It's crisp.

-And it will endure.

0:44:090:44:14

The next collecting period for jewellery is going to be the '50s.

0:44:140:44:19

It's all there as a present

0:44:190:44:22

to a lady of leisure who will come to our sale... And taste!

0:44:220:44:25

-Discernment.

-We have lots of ladies with taste.

-And they love you!

0:44:250:44:30

-Well, Tim...

-It's why we're here! And very good luck with your hammer.

0:44:300:44:34

'Good man, Carlos. I know you'll do your best for us.

0:44:340:44:39

'It's David and Tom first for the reds.'

0:44:390:44:42

This is a turn-up for the books! The other side of the fence.

0:44:420:44:46

-For us all!

-I'm just as nervous as you are about the old bonus buy.

0:44:460:44:51

First up is your teapot.

0:44:510:44:53

CHARLES: Have a good look, please.

0:44:530:44:56

1950s, a real icon of the period.

0:44:560:44:58

I've got one, two, three bids.

0:44:580:45:01

< I will start... Go on!

0:45:010:45:03

..at 12, 15, 18...

0:45:030:45:07

..£20. Do I see two, now?

0:45:070:45:12

£20. I'll take two. Come on! I'll take two, surely. Two!

0:45:120:45:16

Five. Eight?

0:45:160:45:19

One more! 28?

0:45:190:45:21

"No," she says. I've got 25. Do I see eight?

0:45:240:45:27

One more, do I see? We say sale at £25. Eight!

0:45:270:45:31

You're in, sir, at £28.

0:45:310:45:34

Do I see 30, now? At £28, sir, we say sale.

0:45:340:45:38

-Give yourselves a clap.

-Well done for spotting that.

0:45:390:45:43

-Well done!

-Nobody predicted that. It really is a world record price.

0:45:430:45:48

-Fine and rare.

-This is your banker.

0:45:480:45:51

Delightful Imari Crown Derby 2451 cabaret tray...

0:45:510:45:55

-It's a good tray that.

-It really is.

0:45:550:45:59

..Delightful object in good condition.

0:45:590:46:02

I've got conflicting bids...

0:46:020:46:05

I like it. He's got to go straight in.

0:46:050:46:08

-..at £120...

-Ooh!

0:46:080:46:10

..Do I see 125?

0:46:100:46:12

120. Do I see 125 now? Delightful cabaret tray.

0:46:120:46:17

I'll take 125 or I shall sell. Surely 125.

0:46:170:46:21

At 120, I am bid...

0:46:210:46:24

-Go on!

-Go on!

-Go on!

0:46:240:46:26

..120. Are we all done? We say sale. All done? Fair warning.

0:46:260:46:31

You're all out? On the book, we say sale.

0:46:310:46:34

-That's still good going, though.

-That's plus £45.

0:46:340:46:39

CHARLES: Three George III oak country chairs. Nice saddle seats.

0:46:390:46:44

A fine type for a nice hallway. There we are. In my opinion!

0:46:440:46:49

Where do we start?

0:46:500:46:53

I'm only bid £30. 30, for three Georgian chairs. Unbelievable.

0:46:530:46:59

-30 I'm bid. They are delightful chairs...

-More!

-..Surely...

0:46:590:47:04

-No, no. Please.

-< ..Come on!

0:47:040:47:06

30. I'll take two. Come on. Two.

0:47:060:47:09

Five. Eight. 40.

0:47:090:47:12

Two. And I'm out. I'll take five, for these delightful chairs.

0:47:120:47:16

We are selling to you, madam,

0:47:160:47:19

at £42, down we go, to the lady.

0:47:190:47:22

You're minus £43, so the good Lord gives with one hand

0:47:220:47:27

and takes away with another.

0:47:270:47:29

You had 63. You've just lost 43.

0:47:290:47:32

-You have got plus £20.

-We're gamblers!

-We play the game.

0:47:320:47:36

-What you...?

-We're going with it!

0:47:360:47:38

-Bonus buy!

-Lalique style frosted glass globular lamp base.

0:47:380:47:44

In relief with this wonderful Art Deco form. A very nice example.

0:47:440:47:49

I've got one, two, three, four bids.

0:47:490:47:52

I shall start this lot at £45.

0:47:520:47:55

50. Five. 60. Five. 70.

0:47:550:47:59

That's my underbid. Do I see five? 70. I'll take five, surely?

0:47:590:48:05

Come on! 70...

0:48:050:48:07

ALL CHEER

0:48:070:48:09

..Five. 80. Five. 90.

0:48:090:48:11

Five?

0:48:110:48:14

I've got 100...

0:48:140:48:16

A bit of telegraphing there. Like a boxer! "I've got 100!"

0:48:160:48:20

..£100 on the book. We are selling. At £100, the gavel falls.

0:48:200:48:26

-Yes!

-Well done, you.

-A very good thing.

-Very smart thing.

0:48:260:48:30

-Nicely spotted.

-I always thought it was fake!

-No!

0:48:300:48:34

-That is plus 50.

-Excellent.

-Overall, then, you are plus £70.

0:48:340:48:39

-How's that?

-You have £70.

-Wow!

0:48:390:48:42

Is it a winning score? It deserves to be a winning score.

0:48:420:48:46

-So don't chat to our mates outside.

-We don't chat to them, anyway.

0:48:460:48:51

'What a result, eh?

0:49:000:49:02

'All that excitement has left me feeling a little pale.

0:49:020:49:06

'But not as pale as something I found at Charles's sale some years ago.'

0:49:060:49:12

It's described as "a case of moles". Quite a serious case, actually.

0:49:120:49:17

Particularly for the moles involved.

0:49:170:49:20

We've got an attractive blonde job wandering down the slope,

0:49:200:49:25

with her compatriots, one burying himself and one popping up.

0:49:250:49:30

There we go. Taxidermy.

0:49:300:49:32

What's it worth? Well, apparently, £25 to £35.

0:49:320:49:36

But would you want it in your home? That's the question.

0:49:360:49:40

'I can answer that question!'

0:49:420:49:44

You're not going to believe this, but I've still got 'em!

0:49:440:49:49

Unbeknown to you, I bought this case of moles for £35

0:49:490:49:53

from Charles Hanson's auction.

0:49:530:49:56

I've been intrigued by it ever since.

0:49:560:49:59

An albino mole, with its friend,

0:49:590:50:03

has sat in my kitchen for six years.

0:50:030:50:06

A couple of years ago, a man came up to me at a fair and said,

0:50:060:50:11

"You know that albino mole?" I said, "Yes."

0:50:110:50:15

He said, "They're very rare, them albino moles.

0:50:150:50:18

"One sold on the internet for £600!"

0:50:180:50:21

Oh-ho! £600 for an albino mole!

0:50:210:50:25

Not surprisingly,

0:50:250:50:27

this has excited in me an interest in taxidermy.

0:50:270:50:31

But only of the albino variety.

0:50:310:50:34

Last year, I came across this albino rat.

0:50:350:50:39

How good is that? What's he worth?

0:50:390:50:43

You'll have to ask him. "I'm not telling you, you dirty rat!"

0:50:430:50:48

Our teams today may not have bought any stuffed animals,

0:50:480:50:52

but let's hope that they manage to ferret out a bargain or two. Ferret?

0:50:520:50:56

-Do you know how those reds got on?

-No idea.

-We don't want you to.

0:51:000:51:05

-We're going to make a profit?

-Of course!

0:51:050:51:09

First is your Worcester named view pin dish. Here it comes.

0:51:090:51:13

CHARLES: Blush ivory. Painted with a brick house, Dore Nest Ambleside.

0:51:130:51:18

I'm bid 18. 20. Two. Five.

0:51:180:51:22

< Eight.

0:51:220:51:24

Do I see 30 for it? 28.

0:51:240:51:26

Do I see £30? 30, and two. Five?

0:51:260:51:30

One more I'll be out, madam. Are you sure? Really sure?

0:51:300:51:34

I've got 32. It could be yours...

0:51:340:51:37

-Go on!

-LAUGHTER

0:51:370:51:40

-..And I'm out...!

-Yes! Well done, madam!

0:51:400:51:43

..Do I see eight, now? 35. One more, surely? I'll take eight.

0:51:430:51:48

All done at 35? Once. Twice.

0:51:480:51:50

Three times to a lady.

0:51:500:51:52

We are selling to you, ma'am.

0:51:520:51:54

Was that £35, after all that?

0:51:540:51:57

-It was, Tim?

-Very good. That's all right, plus £9. OK, cabaret tray.

0:51:570:52:02

Nice oval cabaret tray, decorated with a shaped cartouche,

0:52:020:52:07

rococo Edwardian revived style.

0:52:070:52:09

Royal Crown Derby. Home, sweet home.

0:52:090:52:12

I am bid, straight in,

0:52:120:52:15

at £75.

0:52:150:52:17

Do I see 80?

0:52:170:52:19

Delightful thing.

0:52:190:52:21

Do I see 80? Come on! Fair warning.

0:52:210:52:24

Sorry. Out we go at £75. Yes, we are!

0:52:240:52:29

-You're fired!

-He's such a nice man!

0:52:290:52:32

That's plus £5. Nothing the matter with that. Plus 14 overall.

0:52:320:52:36

Now, the silver bowl.

0:52:360:52:38

Sheffield, post-war. I've got one, two, three, four, five, six bids.

0:52:380:52:44

A bid here at £90. 92. 95.

0:52:440:52:49

Do I see 98, please? 95...

0:52:490:52:53

-Yes, please!

-..Do I see eight for it? Eight!

0:52:530:52:57

100. 105. 110.

0:52:570:53:00

115? Are you sure...? JAMES: Come on! Come on!

0:53:000:53:05

..110, now. Do I see 115? A delightful bowl for that. 110.

0:53:050:53:10

Do I see 115? One more. 115!

0:53:100:53:12

-I've got 120...

-Go on! One more, sir!

0:53:120:53:16

..125? Look at me!

0:53:160:53:18

We need a profit!

0:53:180:53:21

120. I'll take 125...

0:53:210:53:23

We're teetering.

0:53:230:53:25

..Once, twice. We go on commission at £120.

0:53:250:53:28

We're all out in the room...

0:53:280:53:31

Go on! One more!

0:53:310:53:33

..We are all out.

0:53:330:53:35

£120, so close!

0:53:360:53:38

-Very close.

-Minus five. You are still plus nine.

0:53:380:53:42

This is a difficult one. £9 profit. It could be a winning score.

0:53:420:53:47

What will you do about your bonus buy, my £70 gold brooch?

0:53:470:53:52

-It's a no-brainer.

-No-brainer?

-We're definitely going for it.

0:53:520:53:56

We're going for it, Tim.

0:53:560:53:58

-You're quite sure you want to?

-Course we are.

0:53:580:54:01

-We've got confidence in you.

-Fine.

0:54:010:54:04

They're going with the bonus buy, this gorgeous 9-carat gold brooch.

0:54:040:54:09

An impressive, magnificent, concentric sunburst brooch.

0:54:090:54:15

-It really is very, very nice...

-It's wonderful.

0:54:150:54:19

Where do we start? There we are. One, two, three bids.

0:54:190:54:23

25. 30. Five.

0:54:230:54:27

40. Five. 50. Five. 60. Five.

0:54:270:54:31

-70. Five I'm bid...

-Yes!

0:54:310:54:35

..£75...

0:54:350:54:36

-I'm not humiliated.

-THEY LAUGH

0:54:360:54:40

..£75. Do I see 80? Surely.

0:54:400:54:43

£75. Do I see 80? Surely, one more. Fair warning.

0:54:430:54:48

I'll take one more. All done at £75?

0:54:480:54:52

Once, twice, three times. Yes, we are.

0:54:520:54:55

-Well done, Tim.

-£75.

0:54:550:54:58

I'll make a cheque out in the morning!

0:54:580:55:01

-Seriously, £75.

-I'm happy with that.

-You've got a £5 profit.

0:55:010:55:05

I haven't been humiliated, but I thought it might have made a bit more, but don't we all?

0:55:050:55:11

-Quite frankly, a profit is a profit.

-Exactly.

-You've got £14.

-Fantastic.

0:55:110:55:16

It's been a journey which I've been proud to accompany you on.

0:55:160:55:20

We shall reveal whether that's a winning score in just a mo.

0:55:200:55:25

-What fun is this? Been chatting?

-EVERYONE: No!

0:55:300:55:34

They always say that.

0:55:340:55:36

It is lovely to be able to hand out profits to both teams.

0:55:360:55:40

It's all a question of scale, as per usual.

0:55:400:55:44

It's incredibly sad to reveal that the team that is slightly under par

0:55:440:55:49

-are the blues.

-REDS LAUGH

0:55:490:55:51

I love it when it goes like this!

0:55:510:55:55

-Don't get too chippy! You got a lovely profit on the Worcester.

-Yes.

0:55:550:56:00

-A lovely profit on the Crown Derby.

-Yeah.

0:56:000:56:04

The silver bowl let you down, only marginally. So you were up £9.

0:56:040:56:08

A considerable achievement, as we know, on Bargain Hunt.

0:56:080:56:12

A small profit on the bonus buy, which took you to £14.

0:56:120:56:16

I am going to give you £14.

0:56:160:56:18

-We hope you've had a nice time.

-Good time.

0:56:180:56:21

But the champions today are the reds.

0:56:210:56:25

-£70 of profits!

-Yes!

-Clever team!

0:56:250:56:29

Before you get too cocky, they were only £20 up till the bonus buy.

0:56:290:56:33

Which gave them 50 of their 70. So...

0:56:330:56:36

Let's be generous about this.

0:56:360:56:38

-You got £18 on that ghastly teapot.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:56:380:56:42

£45 on THEIR tray! Funny, isn't it? Same factory, same place.

0:56:420:56:46

£45, so it's thumbs up for the Imari pattern.

0:56:460:56:50

Then those stinking chairs let you down. They lost £43 on the chairs.

0:56:500:56:56

Anyway, plus 70 is plus 70. There's £70.

0:56:560:56:59

-Thank you very much.

-You don't have to split that because we're going to shove it in the pot.

0:56:590:57:06

-Have you had a good time?

-Wonderful.

-Fabulous.

0:57:060:57:09

-Join us soon for some more Bargain Hunting, yes?

-YES!

0:57:090:57:13

'How brilliant is that? Four days of anniversary Bargain Hunts and four profits for charity, totalling £691.

0:57:130:57:21

'Let's hope we do as well for our final 10th anniversary programme,

0:57:210:57:26

'which comes from London.

0:57:260:57:28

'We'll see how the lovely Anita Manning keeps herself so bright...'

0:57:280:57:33

I need colour in my life. Scotland can be a dark place in the winter.

0:57:330:57:37

'..and Jonathan Pratt so fit.

0:57:370:57:40

'And how they fare in a battle between youth and experience.'

0:57:400:57:44

Chill. That's the way. Threshing around at our time is not good.

0:57:440:57:49

-That way?

-That way.

-Come on, then.

0:57:490:57:51

'See you tomorrow.'

0:57:510:57:53

Subtitling by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:120:58:14

Birthday celebrations continue at the antiques fair as four more experts make up the red and blue teams shopping for bargains.

Hoping to make money for charity, Thomas Plant, David Harper, James Braxton and Mark Stacey put themselves to the test as Tim Wonnacott looks back over some 700 episodes to find the highs and lows.


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