Kedleston 1 Bargain Hunt


Kedleston 1

Tim Wonnacott is joined by experts Anita Manning and Philip Serrell as the blue and red teams do battle at Kedleston. Tim heads off for some peace at nearby Kedleston Hall.


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Transcript


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Welcome to Kedleston, in the heart of Derbyshire.

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This place is mentioned in the Domesday Book as having a mill worth twenty shillings!

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Well, that's over a thousand years ago, and thankfully, property prices have gone up in the meanwhile.

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But it's still a great place to do deals, so let's go bargain hunting!

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Ah, I smell some frolicking in the air today.

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Let's have a sneaky peek

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at what's coming up in the show.

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Today it's a tale of two contrasting teams.

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Anita thinks her Reds are on fire.

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What a team I've got here!

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But Philip's Blues could be down in the dumps.

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We're doomed here.

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Have the Reds struck gold with a silver fruit bowl?

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I told you you should have gone with it.

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And Phil has a swinging time with the Blues!

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Oh!

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The rules are simple.

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With just £300 at their disposal, the teams have just one hour

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to find three items here at the Jaguar antiques fair with a view to selling

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them on later at auction and making a profit - with the help, of course, of our delicious experts.

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And our ab fab fruity duo today are the fabulous Anita Manning...

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..and Phil Serrell.

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Only kidding, Phil.

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Now, let's meet the teams.

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So today for the Reds we've got Carl and Joyce, who are just good friends,

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and for the Blues we've got mother and daughter Christine and Trace. Hi, guys, lovely to see you.

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Now, Carl, how did you two meet?

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Well, I am responsible for the local St John Ambulance division

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in Bakewell, and I was asked to go to a public event to do first aid, and it was the Mayor's tea party.

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-Mm-hm.

-And watching Joyce and how she responded with

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the young people, I thought this is a young, enthusiastic person that needs to be involved in St John,

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so I asked her to join us, and she's our youth president.

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-How long have you been involved in St John's?

-Thirteen years.

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-And it inspired you to take up nursing full time?

-Yes,

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I'm a staff nurse at the Royal Derby hospital, in the emergency department.

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-And what do you collect, Carl?

-I collect small pieces of silver, mainly vesta cases and watches.

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Do you ever sell things on? Can you make a profit, do you think?

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I once came across a small box at a car-boot sale with a gold ring in it that I managed to sell for £120.

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-How much did you pay for the box?

-Five pence for the ring.

-Did you?!

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OK, I'm already convinced! And what do you do, Joyce?

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I'm a deputy registrar, superintendent registrar, and I go out and I marry people.

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-Do you really? What a lovely job!

-It is a lovely job.

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Have you got any funny stories about your registraring?

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Yes, there was one where I did a wedding, and it was a very, very, wet day

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and I had to stand in front of a log fire, quite close to it.

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And a lady had hysterics all the way through the wedding.

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A few months later, I did another one, and she was the bride,

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and she said, "Do you remember me from a friend's wedding?"

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I said yes. And she said, "I'll tell you why I was laughing.

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"Your bottom steamed all the way through the ceremony."

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-And it did! I was absolutely roasting!

-How sweet!

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I think you're going to do terribly well today.

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-Very good luck to both of you.

-Thank you.

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Now Christine and Trace. What do you do for a living, Christine?

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-I'm a gardener.

-Are you?

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-What's this about you and chickens, then?

-I breed chicks.

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You breed chicks, which presumably involves keeping hens.

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Yes, it does, so I have Mummy and Daddy hens.

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-Yes.

-The mummy lays eggs...

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-Yes.

-..and then Mummy gets broody.

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-This is how I've explained it to my two-year-old granddaughter.

-Yes.

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-Mummy sits on the eggs...

-Yes.

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..and three weeks later, out pops a chick.

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Well, that's a miracle, isn't it?

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Yes. The only thing that my granddaughter couldn't come to terms with

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was when she had a dippy egg two days later, she cracked it open and there was no chicken inside.

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No, quite. This is disappointing, isn't it?

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-It was, yes.

-But you managed to explain it away, no doubt.

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Yes, so what I do, I put them in an incubator.

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What, the grandchildren?

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She's got a great laugh, hasn't she?

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No, not the grandchildren, the chicks, you idiot, Wonnacott!

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-No, not the chicks!

-Not the chicks?

-The eggs!

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-OK, put the eggs in.

-Yes.

-And you give them gas mark five for two or three hours. Is that it?

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-That's right, for 21 days.

-21 days? Oh, Lord.

-Yeah.

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And it's absolutely fantastic - out comes this wet, soggy chick.

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-Yeah.

-And then within an hour it's up and it's looking around and looking at us.

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Yes. And you're a proud collector of a beautiful daughter...

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-Yes.

-..our Trace.

-Our Tracey. She's gorgeous.

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-What do you do, Trace?

-I'm a support worker for adults with learning difficulties.

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Where do you do that, darling?

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I do it in Buxton, and I just help them to live as independent a life as possible for them.

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-Would you say that you get on well with your mother?

-Absolutely!

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Yes, I spent three weeks in a tent walking the Pennine Way with my mum.

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-What, on your own?

-Just the two of us, yes.

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Now, the money moment. £300 apiece.

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-Here we go, look, £300.

-Fantastic.

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You know the rules. Your experts await in the wings, and off you go!

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-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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OK, teams, you only have one hour to shop, so let's get cracking.

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Now, I know both of you like silver, so we might have some cases in here. Will we have a wee quick look first?

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Yes, let's go and have a look.

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OK, my loves, it's going to have to be a real yomp.

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-Right.

-Turbocharged.

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Joyce, don't you think those handbags are absolutely fabulous?

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-Look at the cones!

-Wow, they're nice.

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Girls, you want to buy fir cones?!

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-Pardon?

-Fir cones?

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-Fir cones.

-You want to buy fir cones?

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-No. I just like them.

-We're doomed here.

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We're doomed!

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Not facing doom are our Red team, who look as though they've spotted

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something already, an eye-catching fruit bowl.

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You like that?

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It's very different, isn't it?

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-It's got that lovely Art Nouveau sweep to it.

-Yes.

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I think it's electroplated Britannia metal,

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which is a sort of pewter-y effect.

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-Yes.

-What can you do that one for?

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Can you do that for thirty?

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No, the very, very best would be forty.

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Would be forty. Uh-huh.

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-Forty.

-Forty.

-Mm.

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-It's very Art Nouveau-like, isn't it?

-It is, actually.

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I like the Art Nouveau period.

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-Yes, I do.

-And there is a lot of detail.

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You've got this pierced work round here, you've got these beautifully

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shaped handles, sweeping handles, and you've got embossed work

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at the bottom. It's Edwardian.

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It's from up to about the 1920s, I would say.

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And I think that it has a wee bit of that zing factor.

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-That's beautiful.

-It's got a lot going for it.

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For forty, it's not that much.

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See if you can get him down.

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Use your youthful charm.

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We do really like it.

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I'm sorry, it is a nice piece.

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I did pay quite a lot for it, and honestly, the best is forty.

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Can we get 38? Well, go on, then, 38.

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-Thank you very much indeed!

-That's so nice of you.

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-Thank you.

-Thank you so much.

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What a way to negotiate! Reds, you have your first buy.

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But how are those Blues getting on?

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Phil?

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-Yes?

-What do you think of something like that?

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I think they'll make twenty quid, my love. That's what I think.

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-Right.

-How much is that, please?

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Erm, best amount is 95 quid.

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-55, did you say?

-95!

-Sorry, the hearing's gone terrible.

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Yeah, your hearing always is terrible when it comes to money, Phil.

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The Blues might need a lifeline here, and they might just have found one.

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Morning!

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How much is your lifebelt?

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-25 to you.

-Do you like that?

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So what age is that? < It's old.

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-I'm old!

-Well, we're all old!

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I would think that's probably...

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-1930s, '40s, something like that.

-Is there any name on it?

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No, not yet, but we'll have Titanic on it by the time the auction comes.

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-Fifteen quid.

-Twenty.

-Fifteen quid, we'll walk off with it, look.

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-Eighteen.

-We're getting there, aren't we?

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We are, aren't we? I can't go any lower. I won't be making anything. £18.

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Fifteen quid?

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-Sixteen, and that's me final offer!

-I'm going to creep away here.

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-I think that's a good deal, actually, sixteen.

-I like that.

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Yeah. What do you think, Tracey?

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-Sixteen, that's a good deal.

-It's different, isn't it?

-It is.

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So, will that float anyone's boat at auction?

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If you asked somebody for a light in the nineteenth century,

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they would be unlikely to get a lighter out.

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They'd offer you a match.

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The match probably wouldn't sit in a matchbox.

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It would sit in a little silver vesta case, a little bit like this.

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What we've got here is in enamel a picture of a steamship.

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Turn it over to the other side and you'll find a visitor's card

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enamelled into the silver surface,

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and that says "Captain Hains Cunard RMS Aurania".

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She was built in 1882 and she was scrapped in 1906.

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If you look up the details of the vessel,

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you'll find her first captain was a Captain Hains.

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So this thing ties very nicely into a bit of maritime history.

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One end is hinged, into which you'd shove the matches, and the other end

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is serrated, against which you would strike the match.

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Today, this type of vesta case is extremely desirable,

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because this is a serious collector's item.

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In an appropriate sale, this little vesta case is worth £1,200.

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Strike a light!

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The Blues are now scouring the fair for their next bargain,

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but the Reds have decided to stay put in the tent where they bought their first buy.

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That could prove a smart move.

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It's a silver flask here, Anita.

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It says it's solid silver, and it's £70.

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That's absolutely lovely.

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Hallmarked silver here.

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Have we got a date on it?

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Our auctioneer will be able to date that.

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Would the monogram make any difference?

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The monogram is actually quite a decorative feature.

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If it was very plain and it was JB very obviously,

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but I'm looking at that and I'm seeing it as a decorative element in it.

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I don't know if it's in its original box.

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We have Dixon's initials here, so this is the box that this

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was in, and Dixon & Sons were good silversmiths.

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-Mm-hm.

-They were good folk.

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It sits well in your hand, doesn't it? It's quite a nice feeling.

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The thing is, it's silver.

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And seventy is not a lot for a big chunk of silver like that.

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-Sorry, this is quite a nice thing.

-Yeah.

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-Fifty.

-Fifty?

-Yes.

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A couple of wee dints...

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We can't go any lower than fifty?

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-I'll do 45.

-45.

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-Yeah.

-OK, I'll respect that. Thank you. Thank you.

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Well done. Well done. Thank you very much. Thank you.

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Cor, those Reds are doing well.

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How does Anita feel about them?

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How are you doing, Anita?

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Great, but I don't think these guys need me.

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They're way ahead of me all the time, they're looking, they're talking, they're asking questions,

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they're bargaining, and I just manage to catch up at the last minute, when they've done the deal.

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We do need you. Honestly. Honestly!

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They're wonderful. Good eye, both of them.

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So, you've bought two items so far.

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You're about halfway through, so you're quite comfortable about that, which is lovely.

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Are you going to let Anita have her say, then?

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Is she going to be allowed to advise you about something?

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-Oh, she's been advising us.

-Oh, has she?

-She's been very, very helpful, yes.

-Yes. OK, fine.

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As you would expect, Anita.

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-Carry on!

-Thank you.

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With only 25 minutes to go, it's Reds 2, Blues 1.

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Phil and the girls need to sniff out another couple of bargains,

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but instead they're sniffing out something else.

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-How are you doing? You all right?

-All right, there.

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Morning!

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What about a bacon sandwich? How much is that?

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-Doesn't this look good in here? A proper bacon sandwich.

-£1.

-Eh?

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Hey, but a bacon sandwich won't make you a profit, Phil.

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You need another buy, mate!

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Can you see a resemblance there?

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-You like your dolls, don't you?

-I do, yes. It's a craze.

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Let's bear that in mind, have a quick whizz up here.

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Phil, do you like me walking stick?

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It's good, isn't it? It's lovely.

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-It's different, isn't it, that?

-It's absolutely lovely.

-Will that be silver?

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It's an old coin, that, I would think, that someone's let in there.

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This is a root or a piece of...

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-um, rose bramble.

-Yeah.

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OK? And I think that's beautifully carved.

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What age would you put it at?

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I would think that's probably turn of the last century.

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That's a coin that's let in there. I think it's absolutely lovely.

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Why don't you ask him what's the very best he can do?

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-What did he say?

-95.

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We should be looking at about 65 for it.

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Yeah. Yeah. Have a word.

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Excuse me, what's your very best on this?

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Eighty.

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Shall I try and get seventy?

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-Do you like it?

-I do.

-You haven't said much yet, have you?

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-No, I haven't. I'm the quiet one.

-Speak. Go on, what do you think?

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It's very nice. It's very unusual, isn't it?

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-And it's just our size, as well.

-For us little ones.

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If that came into my saleroom and I was asked to put a sales estimate on it, I'd probably put £50 to £80. OK?

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So, he said £80. That's the top of what I think it might be worth at auction.

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To a collector, it might make a hundred.

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But it might not. I think it's a really nice thing, but I think it's all down to money.

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If you can get that for around 60, 65, I think you might be all right.

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- I'm looking at about £60 for this. - Aren't we all?

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No, I can't, honestly, no.

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What's the very, very best you can do for me?

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£70. £70...

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I've got a suggestion to make.

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- You won't find another one. - Pardon? - You won't find another one.

0:15:410:15:44

I've got a suggestion.

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-Why don't you ask this good man if he'll put it by for you for half an hour?

-Right.

-Right?

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-You can't guarantee to buy it, but at least you've got something you both like then.

-Uh-huh.

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Could you look after that for me for a little while? No problem.

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-Half an hour? Yep. Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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The stick I think is an inspired choice. It's a really good thing, good, proper antique.

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It's all down to price, isn't it?

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Will it make a profit?

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They're in with a chance.

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Oh, I don't know, Philip.

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Only one item bought, and time is running out.

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I think I need to have a word with our Blues.

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Hello, sailor.

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Hello!

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Sailor and two molls, what?

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How are you getting on? Not very well, I'm told.

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You've bought one item and you've only got ten minutes left.

0:16:280:16:31

-We've got a plan.

-Yeah, we have, yes. There's something up his sleeve.

0:16:310:16:35

-There's something coming together here, I can feel it.

-A yacht going up your sleeve?

0:16:350:16:39

We bought a lifebelt. I think we might need it shortly.

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-We need the yacht now to go with it.

-I see. There is some thought process here, isn't there?

0:16:420:16:47

Not a very coherent one, but there is a plan.

0:16:470:16:49

Well, I can only remind you, ten minutes left and you've only bought one piece.

0:16:490:16:52

Just keep chilled. Don't panic. The thing is, don't panic.

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Whatever you do, don't panic.

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Go and find something. Off you go.

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There's a glove box.

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It's a pair of them. Oh, no, they're £22 each.

0:17:020:17:05

Oh, look, the Reds have finally surfaced from that tent.

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I quite like this.

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A porcelain hammer!

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Do you know, I was just coming to look at those.

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I think they're lovely. How much are they?

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45 for a pair.

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Hellfire!

0:17:200:17:22

-Are you ready, then?

-Yep.

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Careful, Philip!

0:17:260:17:28

They're fantastic.

0:17:280:17:29

They are, but they're expensive.

0:17:290:17:31

Yeah, but what would you use them for?

0:17:310:17:33

Well, the gentleman's got down there "exercisers".

0:17:330:17:35

I don't know who the hell would ever exercise with these.

0:17:350:17:38

You need to have muscles the size of Popeye!

0:17:380:17:40

Huh! More pop an artery than Popeye, I think.

0:17:400:17:43

-The price is hot.

-Too hot.

0:17:430:17:46

That's why I brought them to you. Burning my hands.

0:17:460:17:49

I think at auction these would make twenty to thirty quid. That's what my view is.

0:17:490:17:53

You've got to ask this good gentleman what he can do them for.

0:17:530:17:56

What's your very best?

0:17:560:17:57

My very best would be thirty,otherwise I'll be losing money on them meself.

0:17:570:18:01

Can you do 25?

0:18:010:18:03

Go on! It's a lovely hot day,

0:18:040:18:08

and I know that you're going to do me a big favour.

0:18:080:18:11

I'll split the difference with you.

0:18:110:18:13

26. 27.

0:18:130:18:15

Tell you what, there's some weird maths going on round here, isn't there?

0:18:150:18:19

27 and a half, but never mind.

0:18:190:18:21

27. That's as low as I can go.

0:18:210:18:23

I think they're really nice, actually.

0:18:230:18:25

Deal. Thank you very much.

0:18:250:18:28

That's a good idea.

0:18:280:18:29

No! No! No, no, no, no, no!

0:18:290:18:32

-You're supposed to be doing that sort of stuff with them.

-Oh!

0:18:320:18:35

Careful!

0:18:350:18:36

Well, all that exercise means the Blues have bagged their second bargain. Well done.

0:18:360:18:42

But our dependable Reds have finally utilised one of Anita's assets, her canny Scottish patter.

0:18:420:18:49

So, you really like Denby, then?

0:18:490:18:52

-I was born in Denby.

-Oh, right!

0:18:520:18:53

So you're a Denby lass! Ah!

0:18:530:18:56

A vase is always more functional than a plate.

0:18:560:18:58

-And the subtle colours seem to work better on it, I think.

-It feels nice, as well.

-Yes.

0:18:580:19:04

I think something local for a local saleroom would be good.

0:19:040:19:09

-How much could you do that one for?

-Twenty.

0:19:100:19:13

-Just to try it out.

-25 is about the best we can do on that.

0:19:140:19:17

-Just to give it exposure.

-Yeah. 25's the best we can do on that.

0:19:170:19:20

I think that it's quite an interesting piece and there will be interest in it.

0:19:200:19:25

It'd be nicer to get it at round about the twenty.

0:19:250:19:29

-I couldn't really do it for that.

-Could you do it for 22?

0:19:290:19:32

Oh, go on. As it's you.

0:19:320:19:33

Oh, thank you, darling!

0:19:330:19:35

Well, Anita's happy. The Reds are done and dusted.

0:19:360:19:41

What a team! What a team!

0:19:410:19:44

What a team I've got here!

0:19:440:19:46

But at the Blues, there's an emergency meeting.

0:19:480:19:51

Right, girls, you've got six minutes left. You've bought the lifebelt.

0:19:520:19:56

You've bought those, which I think are wicked.

0:19:560:19:58

-Are you going to keep looking, or do you like the walking stick?

-I like the walking stick.

0:19:580:20:02

-You've got about four minutes left before that guy will sell it to somebody else.

-Yes.

0:20:020:20:07

-Yeah.

-So if you want to buy it, you've got to run round there now with your money and buy it.

0:20:070:20:11

-Right, let's go for it.

-Do you want it?

-Yes, please.

0:20:110:20:14

Better pick up your heels, girls! No point waiting on Philip.

0:20:140:20:18

There we go, Mum.

0:20:180:20:20

Oh, right, that's fantastic. I think that's absolutely wonderful.

0:20:200:20:23

£70. OK?

0:20:230:20:25

You've got a deal. Thank you.

0:20:250:20:28

Now the shopping's over, the experts have to shop for the bonus buy,

0:20:280:20:32

using the leftover lolly not spent by the teams in their shopping.

0:20:320:20:37

This mystery item will be revealed later at auction,

0:20:370:20:42

and the teams then have to take a gamble,

0:20:420:20:44

because it could bring more profit or it could add to their losses.

0:20:440:20:50

But right now, let's check up with the Red team.

0:20:500:20:53

The Reds bagged this plum Art Nouveau fruit basket for £38.

0:20:540:21:00

They slipped a silver flask into their pocket for 45.

0:21:000:21:03

And they're hoping that this Denby vase bought for £22

0:21:030:21:07

will smash its way through the auction roof.

0:21:070:21:10

Ha!

0:21:100:21:12

So, you're the good guys, then.

0:21:120:21:13

You've been around, you've been self-sufficient,

0:21:130:21:16

you've been motivated, you've been happy, you've gathered your goods.

0:21:160:21:20

-Absolutely!

-There we have it.

0:21:200:21:21

And how much did you spend overall?

0:21:210:21:23

-£105.

-£105. I'm going to have £195 of leftover lolly, which is that lot.

0:21:230:21:30

Super-duper. That's off to you, then, Anita.

0:21:300:21:33

Well, I hope I'm as good as you lot!

0:21:330:21:36

-I'm sure you are!

-Have you got anything in mind, Anita?

0:21:360:21:39

-Have you seen anything?

-Not yet.

-No.

0:21:390:21:40

I'll have to do a bit of digging around. But I'll enjoy it in this sunshine.

0:21:400:21:44

-Enjoy the sunshine and let's hope you find a good bonus buy, and good luck with that.

-OK, thank you.

0:21:440:21:50

Why don't we check out what the Blues are up to?

0:21:500:21:53

The Blues might be sunk with this lifebelt, bought for £16.

0:21:540:21:58

Will their exercise clubs prove to be a fit buy at £27?

0:21:580:22:03

And they leant towards this walking stick, which cost them seventy.

0:22:030:22:07

Well, that was all pretty last-minute, wasn't it?

0:22:100:22:12

It was a quick sprint at the end! We had to run from one end of the field to the other.

0:22:120:22:17

So, Trace, how much did you spend, darling?

0:22:170:22:19

We spent £113, Tim.

0:22:190:22:21

So I want £187 of leftover lolly. You've got that, Christine?

0:22:210:22:26

-There's 180, and there's the seven.

-There's your seven. Lovely.

0:22:260:22:29

-That's very nice.

-Do I have that now?

0:22:290:22:31

I didn't get to hold it for long, did I?!

0:22:310:22:33

-Didn't spend much, did we?

-That's a lot.

-That's a whole month's wages in Worcestershire.

0:22:330:22:37

That's Worcestershire life for you. Now, what are you going to spend it all on?

0:22:370:22:41

It's such a secret that not even I know yet.

0:22:410:22:43

-Ah.

-Thank you very much.

-Bye-bye.

-All right, good luck.

0:22:430:22:46

Good luck, Phil. For me, I'm heading off somewhere special.

0:22:460:22:49

Not very far away, though. Just over there - Kedleston Hall. See ya!

0:22:490:22:53

Kedleston Hall is literally a stone's throw away from the fair, so I've simply walked here.

0:23:040:23:11

It's a magnificent Palladian building and considered by some

0:23:110:23:16

to be the very finest example of mid-eighteenth century English architecture,

0:23:160:23:22

designed, of course, by none other than the great Robert Adam.

0:23:220:23:26

But in one of the rooms inside there's something decidedly fishy going on.

0:23:260:23:32

Kedleston Hall was the brainchild of Sir Nathaniel Curzon, First Lord Scarsdale.

0:23:320:23:38

He inherited Kedleston in 1758, aged 32 years old, and proceeded

0:23:380:23:44

to demolish the existing house and start again.

0:23:440:23:49

The family had used a succession of architects,

0:23:490:23:53

but in 1760, Nathaniel Curzon had met and appointed no less a person that Robert Adam.

0:23:530:24:01

The two of them got on

0:24:010:24:03

and of course Adam had cut his teeth in Rome and was seeped in all things neoclassical.

0:24:030:24:10

Now, Robert Adam was very particular about the furnishings that were included in his spaces,

0:24:100:24:18

but in this instance, at Kedleston,

0:24:180:24:21

the furniture maker, who was John Linnell, simply interpreted Robert Adam's designs.

0:24:210:24:29

And what we have in the withdrawing room here is four massive settees which dominate the room.

0:24:290:24:36

And boy, are these things massive!

0:24:380:24:41

John Linnell, the cabinet-maker and designer,

0:24:420:24:45

took Robert Adam's design, which has a neoclassical element to it.

0:24:450:24:50

Here we've got a mask that represents the god Bacchus,

0:24:500:24:55

appropriately god of wine,

0:24:550:24:58

and this curved back sort of fits with the scheme.

0:24:580:25:03

But when Linnell came to interpret Robert Adam's idea of sculpted figures on the outset corners,

0:25:030:25:11

boy, he went into overdrive!

0:25:110:25:14

Now, if we look at this settee and the settee at the other end of the room, they are pretty similar.

0:25:150:25:22

We have got a merman lying back, asleep,

0:25:220:25:25

with a bullrush underneath his armpit on that side

0:25:250:25:29

and a mermaid in similar condition here, as at the other end of the room.

0:25:290:25:34

But the other two settees have mermen and mermaids all doing different things,

0:25:340:25:41

largely playing and mucking around with shells.

0:25:410:25:45

And this is the fishy business about these settees,

0:25:450:25:49

because if you look at the front supports,

0:25:490:25:52

they're entwined dolphins

0:25:520:25:54

with their scaly tails which reach up to support the seat rail.

0:25:540:25:59

So why did John Linnell go so far off-piste when interpreting Robert Adam's designs for these settees?

0:26:010:26:08

Well, I think the secret is that actually, Linnell had entered a competition

0:26:080:26:13

to build George III a new coach.

0:26:130:26:16

He'd come up with the designs for that, plastered in these mermen and merwomen,

0:26:160:26:21

he didn't get the job for the coach, so instead he plastered them on Curzon's settees.

0:26:210:26:27

Very fishy.

0:26:270:26:29

Very naughty.

0:26:290:26:31

The big question is today, of course,

0:26:310:26:33

are our teams going to be getting up to any fishy business over at the auction?

0:26:330:26:38

Well, we've slipped the ten minutes or so round the ring road around Derby from Kedleston,

0:26:510:26:57

down to Bamfords auction house to be with James Lewis.

0:26:570:27:00

James, cracking to be here.

0:27:000:27:02

-Good to see you.

-Thank you for having us.

0:27:020:27:04

Now, first up for Joyce and Carl is this so-called Art-Nouveau-style comport in plate,

0:27:040:27:10

my least favourite type of plate, I have to say,

0:27:100:27:13

when it's plated on Britannia metal, but how do you see it?

0:27:130:27:17

-It has that grey appearance, doesn't it, quite a dull appearance for silver plate?

-Yes.

0:27:170:27:22

Yeah, I actually quite like it.

0:27:220:27:23

-Do you?

-As an object, I like it.

0:27:230:27:25

It's typical of its type, it's got a bit of style about it, it's useful.

0:27:250:27:29

-But unfortunately, there are not many of us out there who do.

-Right.

0:27:290:27:33

But I'm hoping there might be a couple in the saleroom.

0:27:330:27:36

-So what might it make?

-I think it's worth £25 to £35.

0:27:360:27:39

Well, they paid £38, so they may not be shy of it most terribly.

0:27:390:27:44

-All is not lost.

-Yeah, that's got a chance.

0:27:440:27:46

-The next item is their silver flask, which I think is pretty fab.

-Super, isn't it?

0:27:460:27:50

Yeah, it's a good size. It's the sort of thing that if you're going out on a long walk, the odd little whisky...

0:27:500:27:57

-On a cold day!

-Yeah.

-No, good for you, James.

0:27:570:28:00

So, how much, then? Solid silver, ready to go.

0:28:000:28:03

-I like it. I'm hoping that'll make £60.

-Really?

-Yeah, an estimate of 40 to 60, something around there.

0:28:030:28:09

That's pretty good because Carl found it for 45.

0:28:090:28:11

-Brilliant!

-You can't believe you can buy that so cheaply.

0:28:110:28:14

-That is a real bargain.

-It is a bargain, isn't it? Great. Now, the Denby vase.

0:28:140:28:18

-Mm-hm.

-What do you reckon to that?

0:28:180:28:20

Well, it's not the most sought-after of designs or periods.

0:28:200:28:24

It's quite a late one. I'm hoping it might make 25.

0:28:240:28:27

-Well, that would be lovely, because they paid 22.

-Oh, brilliant.

0:28:270:28:30

But you're a great stalwart, James, and I know you'll do your very best.

0:28:300:28:34

But looking at this group, they may need their bonus buy, so let's go and have a look at it.

0:28:340:28:38

Now, Joyce and Carl, this is your bonus-buy moment,

0:28:390:28:42

because we're going to find out what Anita Manning spent the £195 you gave her on.

0:28:420:28:48

What did you spend it on, Anita?

0:28:480:28:49

Ooh!

0:28:500:28:51

It's a little nursery spoon and knife.

0:28:510:28:56

-Right.

-Sterling silver, and we have scenes of nursery rhymes.

0:28:560:29:00

But the thing about this little lot here is that it's Tiffany's,

0:29:000:29:06

and that's a magic name with the buyers - Tiffany's,

0:29:060:29:11

always associated with quality, style, design and luxury.

0:29:110:29:16

And these little things are absolutely gorgeous.

0:29:160:29:19

Have a wee look at them.

0:29:190:29:21

Thank you.

0:29:210:29:22

How much did you spend?

0:29:220:29:24

£40.

0:29:240:29:27

-Each?

-No, forty for the two.

0:29:270:29:30

-£20 each, hey?

-Yeah.

-For Tiffany?

0:29:300:29:32

-Yeah.

-It's good, isn't it?

0:29:320:29:34

-I think these are lovely because I like the nursery-rhyme idea on the handle.

-Mm-hm.

0:29:340:29:38

Anyway, team, you don't have to decide right now. You decide later.

0:29:380:29:41

But for the audience at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Anita's little set.

0:29:410:29:48

So, here you are, James. You're a family man.

0:29:480:29:50

Does this excite you? Little christening set.

0:29:500:29:53

The design isn't anything exciting, I don't think, but the name, of course, Tiffany,

0:29:530:29:58

is the name you want, isn't it, on a bit of silver? How much did they pay for those?

0:29:580:30:02

Anita paid forty, because it's her bonus buy,

0:30:020:30:04

so she's really hoping you're going to pull all the stops out here.

0:30:040:30:07

-But there it is. How much do you think?

-Forty, fifty?

0:30:070:30:10

£40 or £50. It'd be great if you could achieve it, baby.

0:30:100:30:14

Now, that's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues, Christine and Tracey.

0:30:140:30:18

Pretty wacky group of things here.

0:30:180:30:20

-Philip Serrell, rather typically, found the old lifebelt.

-Yeah.

0:30:200:30:25

He's always looking for a lifebelt, that man.

0:30:250:30:27

But he's gone and bought one now. How do you rate that, James?

0:30:270:30:32

Do you know, I really don't know.

0:30:320:30:34

It's not the easiest thing to sell.

0:30:340:30:37

-Not in landlocked Derby.

-No, we're just about as far from the sea as you can get here!

0:30:370:30:42

So a lifebelt like that isn't the most logical thing to sell in Derby.

0:30:420:30:47

-But we're close to the Trent, at least.

-Yes.

0:30:470:30:50

-I haven't sold one like that for at least five years.

-Oh, it's difficult to estimate.

0:30:500:30:55

-£20, £30.

-£20, £30? That would be great. £16, Phil paid.

-Fine.

0:30:550:30:59

Next, the so-called "exercise clubs".

0:30:590:31:01

What do you make of those, James?

0:31:010:31:03

I think they're brilliant! I really like them!

0:31:030:31:06

And I don't know if they're exercise clubs or not, but we sold a pair of them very similar

0:31:060:31:11

to that, painted in bands in the antique sale, and they did very well. I think these have been stripped.

0:31:110:31:16

-Right.

-I think they would have been painted when they were new.

0:31:160:31:19

-I think they're worth around £40, something like that.

-£27 they paid.

-Oh, well, £30, £40 is fine.

0:31:190:31:25

-So we've got this wacky lifebelt, we've got the almost wackier so-called exercise weights...

-Yeah.

0:31:250:31:31

..and thirdly, this master stick.

0:31:310:31:33

Now, this is something that's going to ignite you, I know, James, because you love these things...

0:31:330:31:38

I absolutely hate it.

0:31:380:31:40

Only because... Well, no, actually I think it's wacky and fun.

0:31:420:31:46

But goodness me.

0:31:460:31:48

-What would be your guess?

-I think it's £20.

-Do you?

-Mm-hm.

0:31:480:31:52

Well, I'm afraid their heart definitely led them on this, because they paid £70.

0:31:520:31:56

-Ah. I think it's too much.

-£70, you reckon, is too much.

-Yeah.

-That could be their dark hole.

0:31:560:32:01

That could mean that they're going to need their bonus buy, so let's go and have a look at it.

0:32:010:32:06

OK, girls, you spent £113.

0:32:060:32:08

You gave the balance, some £187, to that rascal Philip Serrell.

0:32:080:32:12

-Did he spend the lot?

-No.

0:32:140:32:15

No, I bought this, girls.

0:32:150:32:17

I thought that was really sweet.

0:32:180:32:20

It's a little hallmarked-silver...

0:32:200:32:24

cigar holder, look.

0:32:240:32:26

And this is amber and that's gold.

0:32:260:32:28

-Oh, wow!

-I just thought that was really sweet.

0:32:280:32:30

A bit of an old-fashioned lot, probably for a bit of an old-fashioned bloke, really.

0:32:300:32:34

So why did you buy this?

0:32:340:32:37

What sort of question's that?

0:32:380:32:40

-It's a bit unfair! That's putting me on the spot, isn't it?

-No.

0:32:400:32:43

Why did I really buy it?

0:32:430:32:45

Well, it was £40, and I think it gives you a chance of perhaps making £10, £15 profit on it.

0:32:450:32:51

-That's the real reason.

-It's really nice.

0:32:510:32:53

-Sorry, what did you say?

-It's really nice.

-Louder.

0:32:530:32:57

-It's something I've not seen before. It's really nice.

-That's going downhill here!

0:32:570:33:01

For the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Phil's little holder.

0:33:010:33:06

-So, James, a little classic collector's item.

-Yeah.

0:33:060:33:12

-It's one of the first things I bought when I started to collect antiques. I bought one of these.

-Did you?

0:33:120:33:17

-I think this has got to be £20 to £40.

-£20 to £40.

-Yeah.

0:33:170:33:19

Well, it's Phil's bonus buy.

0:33:190:33:21

He's got high hopes. He paid forty, so we'll have to see what happens.

0:33:210:33:25

-It's probably worth that. Just.

-Just.

-Yeah.

-Well, we'll see what happens in a minute. Good luck!

-Thank you.

0:33:250:33:30

25 bid. 30 now. 45 bid.

0:33:300:33:33

50. 5. 60. 5. 70.

0:33:330:33:36

5. 80.

0:33:360:33:38

-Now, Joyce and Carl, how are you feeling here?

-Fine.

0:33:380:33:41

-A little bit nervous.

-Are you nervous about anything in particular?

0:33:410:33:44

Slightly worried about the fruit bowl, but not excessively.

0:33:440:33:47

If the worst comes to the worst, you can always fall back on Anita's bonus buy.

0:33:470:33:50

First lot up is your fruit bowl, and here we go, Joycey.

0:33:500:33:54

Lot number 750, the Art Nouveau silver-plated fruit bowl.

0:33:540:33:58

There we are. By James Dixon, a good maker. Good bowl. I love it.

0:33:580:34:03

-Yes!

-He's trying to sell it for you.

0:34:030:34:07

..good look, and where shall we be for it?

0:34:070:34:10

I've got one bid on it, so I'll start it at the lower-end estimate, at 20.

0:34:100:34:14

One bid. That's why I'm starting at the lower end of the estimate.

0:34:140:34:17

£20. And 5, do I see in the room? 25.

0:34:170:34:19

30. 35. 40. 45. 50.

0:34:190:34:23

-5.

-Look at that, girl!

0:34:230:34:26

5. 70. 5. 80. 5. 90. 5.

0:34:260:34:30

95. 100. >

0:34:310:34:32

-You won't be under the desk at the office!

-£100!

0:34:320:34:35

-Look at her face. It's a picture.

-£100 with me.

0:34:350:34:38

And 5, do I see? And 5 on the phone.

0:34:380:34:40

Look at that on the telephone, girl!

0:34:400:34:43

-Yes!

-At 110 with me. 115 where?

0:34:430:34:46

-At £110.

-This is ridiculous!

0:34:460:34:49

At 110. >

0:34:490:34:51

-I told you you should have gone with it, Joyce.

-Well done, Joyce.

0:34:510:34:54

..the silver spirit flask.

0:34:550:34:57

Stand by. Look, here comes the flask.

0:34:570:34:59

Solid silver. Good, big oval hip flask.

0:34:590:35:02

Rugby season's coming,

0:35:020:35:04

stand on the terraces with that and fill it full of malt whisky.

0:35:040:35:07

It'll make your Saturday. It really is a good object.

0:35:070:35:10

Lovely quality. £50 bid.

0:35:100:35:12

And 5, do I see? At 50. And 5.

0:35:120:35:15

60. 5. You're at 65.

0:35:150:35:17

70. Shakes his head. 70 with me.

0:35:170:35:20

And 5 beats it. 75 at the back? 75 in the doorway. And 80 now.

0:35:200:35:24

At £75 in the doorway.

0:35:240:35:26

And 80, do I see? At 75.

0:35:260:35:28

Any advance? At £75.

0:35:280:35:30

Look at that!

0:35:300:35:33

Yes!

0:35:330:35:35

That's a profit of £30.

0:35:350:35:37

That is fantastic. And look out, here comes your Denby vase.

0:35:370:35:41

And there we are. Here's a little bit of local stoneware. And £10.

0:35:410:35:46

Got one bid. 10 starts it. 12 now.

0:35:460:35:48

12 anywhere? 12. 15. 18.

0:35:480:35:50

18. 20. And 2.

0:35:500:35:51

20 has it with me. And 2 now? At £20.

0:35:510:35:55

An absentee bid at 20. And 2, do I see? One more?

0:35:550:35:59

-Go on.

-Go on!

0:35:590:36:01

-Go on!

-Go on! No? It's a no. >

0:36:010:36:04

It's at £20. It's with me. And 2, do I see? At £20...

0:36:040:36:08

£20. You are minus £2 on that.

0:36:080:36:10

-That's not bad.

-Overall, you are £100 up.

0:36:100:36:14

-That's wonderful!

-What do we do now?

0:36:140:36:18

What do you mean? Well, first of all, the drinks are on you,

0:36:180:36:23

all right?

0:36:230:36:25

Pretty good, though, isn't it, £100 profit?

0:36:250:36:27

Right, now, the next decision is, are you going to bank your £100,

0:36:270:36:33

or are you going to risk £40 on the Tiffany baby set?

0:36:330:36:38

-We still win.

-I think we can't lose on this.

0:36:380:36:40

-I think we've got to go for it.

-We're going with the bonus buy?

0:36:400:36:44

It's all on you, then, Anita. Here it comes.

0:36:440:36:47

..is the Tiffany & Co child's feeding set,

0:36:470:36:49

a little knife and spoon,

0:36:490:36:51

very pretty indeed, cast with the figures on the terminals there.

0:36:510:36:55

Very stylish, and Tiffany & Co...

0:36:550:36:58

-Good auctioneer. He's helping you.

-Yes, he's excellent.

0:36:580:37:01

So where shall we start it? I've got one, two, three bids on it, and £42 starts it. 45 now.

0:37:010:37:08

Anita, how miraculous!

0:37:080:37:11

45. 48. And 50. And 2. 55.

0:37:110:37:13

-52 with me. One more?

-52...

0:37:130:37:16

-Go on.

-Go on.

0:37:160:37:19

Go on! Every pound counts. Yes?

0:37:190:37:22

At 52. It's with me. You meanie!

0:37:220:37:24

At 52. 54, do I see? It's worth it!

0:37:240:37:28

-At 52.

-£52! I can't believe this!

0:37:280:37:31

It's so good!

0:37:310:37:33

Yes!

0:37:330:37:34

That's very good. You made £12 on that. Well done, Anita.

0:37:340:37:39

So that is £112 profit. Now, next step, don't tell the Blues a thing.

0:37:390:37:44

OK. Very good!

0:37:440:37:48

-Now, Christine and Trace, have you been talking to the Reds?

-No.

0:37:560:37:59

-You don't know how they've got on?

-No.

-You won't want to know.

0:37:590:38:01

First up, though, is the cork lifebelt, and we'll find out whether it is indeed a lifesaver or not.

0:38:010:38:08

Here it comes.

0:38:080:38:09

Early twentieth-century canvas life ring. There we are.

0:38:090:38:13

And good early one. It's not a repro.

0:38:130:38:17

Nice to see an original one.

0:38:170:38:19

Could be late nineteenth century. A good thing.

0:38:190:38:21

And two bids exactly the same. >

0:38:210:38:25

£30 starts it. At 30. And 2 now.

0:38:250:38:27

At £30. And 2, do I see? At £30. 2.

0:38:270:38:30

Absentee bids. 32 in the room.

0:38:300:38:32

Do I see 32? >

0:38:320:38:34

Any advance? At £30.

0:38:340:38:36

Take it to the sea and make a profit.

0:38:360:38:39

Take it to an auction room in Portsmouth or something like that.

0:38:390:38:42

No? Anybody want to...? It'd cost you that in petrol. I know.

0:38:420:38:46

£30. Any advance? I'm selling at 30.

0:38:460:38:50

-Yes!

-Well done, girls.

0:38:500:38:52

Well, that's very good. That makes you £14 profit.

0:38:520:38:55

And here we come with the batons.

0:38:550:38:57

They make great doorstops for a big country house.

0:38:570:39:01

There we are.

0:39:010:39:02

And I've got one, two, three, four bids on them,

0:39:020:39:06

and £42 starts them. At £42.

0:39:060:39:09

Absentee bid. 44. 44 anywhere?

0:39:090:39:11

44. 46. 48.

0:39:110:39:14

No. At 46. 48 now.

0:39:140:39:17

At £46. Absentee bid. At 46.

0:39:170:39:22

£46! What was that, three shy of thirty?

0:39:220:39:25

Is that £19? Plus £19.

0:39:250:39:28

Look out, here's your stick.

0:39:280:39:30

..a walking stick.

0:39:300:39:31

You get five objects in one in this.

0:39:310:39:34

It really is an unusual stick, and I've got one bid on it, and £25 starts it. 25.

0:39:340:39:40

30. 5. 40. Shakes his head at 40.

0:39:400:39:45

40. 5. 50.

0:39:450:39:49

-Go on!

-50 bid. Shaking his head at 50. And 5 anywhere? >

0:39:490:39:51

It's a great talking point if you're a stick collector. At £50. And 5 now.

0:39:510:39:56

At 50. And 5 anywhere? At £50.

0:39:560:39:58

I think that's a good result.

0:39:580:40:00

50...

0:40:000:40:02

£50. Sorry, baby, it's minus £20.

0:40:020:40:06

You were plus 33 before, all right?

0:40:060:40:09

You just lost 20, which means you are in profit to the tune of £13 right now.

0:40:090:40:14

Now, that is no bad thing, is it?

0:40:140:40:17

-£13 up, Phil!

-It's a result in this game!

0:40:170:40:19

-It is a result, yeah. It is a result.

-Mm.

0:40:190:40:22

Bad luck on that stick, but you got £13 profit, which is great.

0:40:220:40:26

Now, what are you going to do about this bonus buy?

0:40:260:40:28

Are you going to risk it for the cigar holder?

0:40:280:40:31

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

-Yes, go on. Yeah.

0:40:310:40:32

-Oh, no!

-We have trust in you, Phil.

0:40:320:40:34

You fools, you!

0:40:340:40:36

OK, fine, we're going with the bonus buy. We're going with the bonus buy. It cost £40.

0:40:360:40:41

..cigar holder, and £20 is bid.

0:40:410:40:44

20. 22. 25. 28.

0:40:440:40:46

And 32. 35. 38. And 42. 45.

0:40:460:40:51

45 anywhere? At £42. 45, do I see?

0:40:510:40:55

At £42, front row. 45 now.

0:40:550:40:58

45, do I see?

0:40:580:41:01

At £42. Anybody else? At 42...

0:41:010:41:04

-£42. Well done, Phil.

-It's a smidgeon of a profit.

0:41:060:41:08

In the room plus £2.

0:41:080:41:10

A smidgeon is better than no smidgeon, I tell you now!

0:41:100:41:13

Anyway, plus 15, you are, then. So overall, that could be a winning score.

0:41:130:41:17

-Don't say a word to the Reds.

-No.

-We won't.

-Mum is the word.

-Absolutely!

0:41:170:41:20

And all will be revealed in a minute.

0:41:200:41:22

-So, you teams have been chatting to one another?

-No.

-No conversation.

-No.

0:41:300:41:34

Well, it is amazing how very, very pleased with themselves both teams

0:41:340:41:38

look today, because, of course, both teams have made profits!

0:41:380:41:43

How lovely is that? Both teams have made a profit on two of their items.

0:41:430:41:48

Both teams' experts have made a profit on their bonus buys.

0:41:480:41:53

But which team is marginally behind?

0:41:530:41:58

And that just happens to be today, sadly, the Blues.

0:41:580:42:01

Aw-w!

0:42:010:42:02

Actually, you're quite a long way behind.

0:42:020:42:05

You made a profit of £15.

0:42:050:42:07

And here comes your £15. OK?

0:42:070:42:08

-£15.

-Thank you very much.

0:42:080:42:10

-You happy about that?

-Yes, we are.

0:42:100:42:13

-Yes.

-Very nice, though, to see these profits rolling in.

0:42:130:42:15

You just had some bad luck with that stick.

0:42:150:42:19

If you'd done better with the stick, it might have saved the situation,

0:42:190:42:23

but it wouldn't have been good enough, I'm afraid, to beat the Reds today,

0:42:230:42:27

who are going to go home with a profit of £112.

0:42:270:42:31

Here comes the 110, and a couple of smackers coming out also.

0:42:310:42:38

£112. Now, what are you going to do with all this money?

0:42:380:42:41

-We're going to send it to the eye hospital in Jerusalem, which is run by St John Ambulance.

-Right.

0:42:410:42:48

And this should hopefully pay for a cataract operation.

0:42:480:42:51

-Well, isn't that a wonderful thought?

-We think so.

0:42:510:42:54

Well done. Anyway, congratulations. I hope you've had a great day.

0:42:540:42:57

-We have, yeah.

-Join us soon for some more bargain hunting. Yes?

-YES!

0:42:570:43:01

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:080:43:10

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:100:43:12

Tim Wonnacott is joined by experts Anita Manning and Philip Serrell as the blue and red teams do battle at Kedleston. Competitive spirit is high and Tim scampers off for a few minutes peace at nearby Kedleston Hall, but something is a little fishy.


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