Norfolk 22 Bargain Hunt


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Norfolk 22

Antiques challenge. In Norfolk, Paul Laidlaw's team do some tough talking whilst bargaining for a bed. But Jonathan Pratt's team gets snowed in and can't make the auction.


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'Welcome to Norfolk. Our teams have one hour to find three bargains.'

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Their only limit is £300

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and also how good they are at bargaining.

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'Coming up on the show, Paul Laidlaw bargains for Britain.'

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But I'd need you to take some pain on that.

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What's the death on it?

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Here's me trying to pull a deal off, you're not helping.

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'Whereas Jonathan Pratt is, well, just showing off.'

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-Hello, ladies.

-You look like the Artful Dodger.

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-THEY LAUGH

-Thanks very much.

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So, today, for the Reds, we've got Sue and Lex.

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In-laws. So, Sue, you've got connections with Japan.

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-I have, yes.

-Tell us about that.

-My youngest son, David, lives in Japan.

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Have you developed a taste for things Japanese?

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Yes, I do. I love Japanese porcelain. I've got a small collection.

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-And when you go to Japan, do you check it out, what's it worth over there?

-Yes.

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-It's very expensive in Japan to buy it.

-Is it?

-Yes.

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Is there a bit of a tip here. Should we be getting some Japanese ceramics perhaps today on Bargain Hunt

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-and telling the Japanese it's coming up in the auction?

-Absolutely.

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-Yes.

-There is an idea. Lex, you've got links overseas, too.

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Yep, my parents and all of the rest of my family live in Australia.

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-You had a nice life there?

-Yes, we were out there for a few years, Mum and Dad came back

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-so I came back with them, and they went back out there again and I stayed.

-Very nice, too.

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Tell me, how is the dynamic going to work between the in-laws?

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-Well...

-The mother-in-law, of course.

-I think Lex knows who's in control.

-Yeah. He's ready to submit.

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-THEY LAUGH

-It'll be very interesting to see how it pans out. Nice to chat to you.

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Now for the Blues, two drama queens, June and Brenda. How did you meet?

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-We met at a local amateur dramatic society about ten years ago.

-Oh, yes?

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I'd been there a few weeks and my first impression of Brenda was that she was a bit stuck up

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and I wouldn't really get on with her. That was completely dispelled

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-when we did a pantomime.

-Called?

-Sleeping Beauty.

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-Ah, yes.

-And there was a scene where we had to lay on the floor and be very quiet.

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-Difficult.

-Well, it was rather.

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Our heads were together and we were supposed to be asleep, when a member of the cast stood on Brenda's hand.

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-Ah.

-To which Brenda whispered very loudly a rude word which I couldn't possibly repeat now.

-Not on daytime.

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-And we've been friends ever since.

-That's the togetherness of am-dram.

-Absolutely.

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-Brenda, you're retired now.

-Yep.

-What do you do to keep out of mischief?

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I play the piano for some singing groups.

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-Tell us about your singing groups.

-The amateur dramatic group where June and I met,

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I've been there for 32 years, a founder member, and I'm now their musical director,

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so I play the piano and have other musicians with me.

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Who's going to be the most competitive?

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-Both of us.

-We're both equally competitive.

-Are you?

-And we love shopping.

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-Do you?

-Yeah. And spending other people's money.

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Well, that's what it's all about. Talking about money, this is the money moment.

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Here's your £300. £300 apiece. You know the rules, your experts await. Off you go and very good luck.

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All the world's a stage, and the men and women on it merely players.

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Guys, what's on the shopping list today?

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-I quite like bronze, if we can find something at a good price.

-Fingers crossed.

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Art Deco, 1920s, lovely stuff.

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Deco bronze. Everyone wins.

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I think just look for small, novelty items, bits of furniture,

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-anything that catches your eye, let's go for it.

-OK.

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That's lovely.

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-What is it? Is it bronze?

-There's no age to it.

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It's too good to be true at that price.

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'Always is.'

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There's that fish lamp over there. I mean, it's £150.

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-It's horrible.

-I know, but we mustn't think of horrible,

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it's whether it's going to make any money. Doesn't matter if it's horrible or if you or I like it.

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-Not really, no.

-Actually, it is pretty horrible. Not, that it horrible.

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'I'm glad that one missed the net.'

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Have you seen anything interesting? No.

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We've not seen anything that we're sold on yet.

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That's pretty.

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Ruby glass.

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Victorian glass jug. If it was on the table over there for a fiver, I'd have liked it.

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But £28. We may be able to go lower than that, but I'm not a great fan of that sort of thing

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and it's not the easiest thing to sell. What's the deal on it? Under a tenner?

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He might be able to do a deal on that. He says he's had it quite a long time.

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-How long? Since the war, I suppose.

-I've been waiting for you to appreciate it.

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He said three years, so I can leave you to do the deal. You're far too honest.

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-Some things hang around a while, some things don't.

-I'm saying £5.

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They mentioned £5. You might not do it for £5.

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But you'd make money out of it. I'm going to leave you to negotiate.

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So, what would be your best price on that? A fiver?

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-How much is on it? 28, is it?

-28, yeah.

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-Ten is a good discount. I think it should be perfect.

-It's really sweet.

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You don't want to take it home. You've got so much stuff here. We could take it off your hands for £5.

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-Just for you.

-Yes!

-Thank you.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you!

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'You weren't going to take no for an answer, were you, girls?'

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No, nothing for you? Fine, then.

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'Nope, I can't see anything, either.'

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Looking over my shoulder at that telescopic stand.

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That was a Victorian telescopic oil lamp once,

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sitting next to the bed.

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-Wow.

-I'm just trying to throw you possibilities.

-Shall we have a little look?

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Make a quick decision. Do you want it, what will you pay for it? If you don't like it, let's get sprinting.

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-OK.

-'Step away from that lamp.'

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-We're running out of time.

-We're running out of time, we haven't got anything yet.

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'Ah, Sue, the penny's dropped. Focus, guys.'

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-The teapot, that's nice.

-It's a good country style.

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You make this stoneware body then apply these moulds on the outside.

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It's Royal Doulton, which is as good as it gets for this date,

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early 20th century reproducing 18th century style. It's decorative, it's good kitchenalia.

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-Are they all in good condition?

-Yeah.

-What's the price?

-£55. £50.

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-Is that your best price?

-50.

-I like it, actually.

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It's kind of slightly outside my field because I tend not to concentrate on ceramics,

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-but I like it, as well.

-I quite like it.

-I do. We both like this.

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I would say an auction estimate would be £40 to £60.

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If you pay 50 for it, you could make a tenner, but you might make 20.

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-I'd be disappointed if it didn't break even, to be honest.

-Is that your best price?

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-Can you go a little lower?

-A fiver. 45.

-45?

-What do you think?

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I'd bid for that and I'd use it in my kitchen.

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And I think there would be a market for that. Yes.

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-Good, OK.

-Good. Yes. Thank you very much indeed.

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-We're getting there.

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

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'Girls, you are on fire!

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'Second bargain sorted.

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'And have the Reds found a sleeper?'

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-A bed.

-It's £120.

-There's no slack in there?

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If you were going to put it in auction,

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-it would be a difficult thing to make a profit on, the way the market is.

-On that price.

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-It's got to be that sort of money, has it?

-100 and that'd be it.

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-Yeah.

-What do you think?

-That is still too much, really, isn't it?

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-Much interest in it, apart from me?

-It's not the biggest thing on here.

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THEY LAUGH

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-"I didn't sign up for this," she said!

-THEY LAUGH

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Do me a favour with the bed, I'd love to sell it to these guys.

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They're the boss, I haven't even asked them. I'd love to break the rules.

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But I'd need you to take some pain on that. I don't know what sort of slack you've got.

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-Pain? He wants me to break a leg.

-THEY LAUGH

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'That's it, Paul, get them a bargain!'

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-Show me the name.

-I haven't found a stamp on it,

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but you know as well as I do that a bed like that, five or six years ago, would be £200, £300

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-and they'd be queuing up to grab it.

-10, 20 years ago, you'd be laughing.

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-But that's then and this is now.

-It just needs a polish.

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Do us a massive favour. Give us the bed at a real knock-down price

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and let's all watch the programme in six months and see what happens.

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-70 quid.

-It's sort of on the money that, isn't it?

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Ignoring where you started, just thinking about moving forward,

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-can it ever be 40 quid?

-When I look at this bed, because of the recession and what it's done to us,

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if I was to weigh that in at the scrap yard, that'll weigh in about £70.

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But let's not get into that. Let's not do that. Let's talk buying something.

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-Yeah, it's a little bit worn.

-It's the lacquer that they put on them.

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-I'm trying to pull a deal off, you're not helping.

-If the price was better...

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-SHE LAUGHS

-You can tell he's on the Red Team, red for danger.

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Look, can that ever be 40 quid and let's see what we do?

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-No, it cannot!

-What can it be, then?

-60. It owes me 50.

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-Can you meet us in the middle?

-I'll tell you what I'll do.

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-Only cos it's you, £55.

-The lady's being really nice to you and time's ticking.

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-The ball's in your court.

-You've put so much effort into this, we'll have to say yes.

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-If you put it in the right saleroom... Thank you very much.

-That was good craic.

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-HE LAUGHS

-Thank you very much.

-Firm handshake.

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'Wow! Now that was what you call a haggling master class from Bargain Hunt grand master Paul.

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'Talking of grand masters...'

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So, what do you think about this? It's got a tremendous amount of work on the top, hasn't it?

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Just look at the fine Islamic script running around the outer edge.

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Then you've got a circular division

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and yet more script in the middle,

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looking as if it's arranged over a chequer board surface.

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On the back, there's a pierced panel with a flower head

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with yet more Islamic script running around the outer edge.

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If I move back this clasp and open it up,

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it reveals a completely plain interior.

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But the thing to note is that where the design has been engraved in the top from the outside,

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so thin is this silver, you can see the indentation inside

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of the pressure that was put on the metal when the engraving was done from without.

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If I shut it up again, the other thing to note outside

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are these two oddball hinged lugs. What are they for?

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And why is it slightly concave on the bottom?

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Well, the secret becomes clear

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when you consider its religious connotation.

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This is a little solid-silver Qur'an box.

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And if you were an Islamic warrior in the 18th or 19th century,

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you would take with you to battle on a sheet of paper

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a text from the Qur'an,

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put it in this box and then lash it to the forearm using those little lugs.

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So you might be gripping your sword or your pike

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or your shield in your hands,

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but attached to your forearm would be the Holy Qur'anic text.

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Marvellous, isn't it? Now, these things, in this country,

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are as rare as a hen's tooth.

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How many hens do you know with teeth? Not many.

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So what's this worth? Well, this is a 19th century one,

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but it's not top, top quality

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and I suppose, in an Islamic sale,

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you might get perhaps £300 to £500 for it.

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What's it worth in a fair like this?

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Well, it could be yours for between £60 to £80.

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That really did strike us when we walked past.

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-Oh, it's all...

-It's really lovely, isn't it?

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LOW TUNELESS NOISES

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THEY LAUGH Sounds like me after I've had a few.

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The Lost Cause.

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THEY LAUGH

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'This master's voice is a bit off-key today.'

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-What about a metronome?

-No.

-No.

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I don't know what to say. It's worth £20 at auction on a good day.

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-Right.

-They just keep turning up.

-It's coming down to time.

-Yep.

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-I'll open it up.

-OK.

-That's pretty.

-Pretty.

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-Yeah. It's quite new. What's the death?

-£50.

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It's just a Georgian-style boat in silver, English marks.

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As such, there's no great substance to it. It's worth £40, £50.

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But by Asprey and it's a fact, at auction, in the high street, a name is what they're looking for.

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-It maybe doubles its appeal. How do you feel? Is that making any sense?

-Yes.

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-I love it. It's very pretty. As long as the auctioneer mentions that it's...

-No issue with that.

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The auctioneer's going to do you a good job. It'll be spotted and well-sold.

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-Yeah, it's good, that. It's very dainty. It's nice.

-It has no great substance to it

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but that's compensated for by the name.

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-I think we've got a winner.

-It came out of the blue, that.

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I think that was divine intervention. Shake the guy's hand.

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-Do the deal.

-Thank you.

-Thanks for that, I think you helped us.

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-Thanks very much.

-Thank you.

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'Something the Reds like. A miracle indeed!

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'Both teams just need one more item. Hurry along now. Ten minutes left.'

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-What is that there?

-That's just a little silver box.

-Pill box.

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That's kind of cute. A little silver buckle.

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Asking 48 for it. Early 20th century. Quite pretty.

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-You probably could use it.

-How do they go?

-They can do quite well.

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-The heart motif is quite cute.

-I think it's really pretty.

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It conjures up the feeling of the Arts and Crafts of that period, where the heart motif was used.

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-You could use it, couldn't you?

-Yeah, absolutely.

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But the important thing is it's got a full set of marks and some age.

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It's a Chester hallmark and it's just a Times Roman A.

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So it's 1897. That's what it is.

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-Oh!

-So it's late Victorian.

-That's quite old.

-Yeah.

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-I think that's lovely. What's the price?

-48.

-48. Is that your best price, my love?

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-You stand a chance with this.

-Do I? Excellent!

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-I bought this one well, I think.

-40 quid.

-40 quid.

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-35, maybe?

-38.

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Yeah, I think that's fair. It's a nice object.

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-Yeah? What do you think?

-I think it's lovely.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much indeed.

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'Now, those girls know what they want.

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'All three items now buckled up.'

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-Two things bought, two and a half minutes left.

-What?

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How long have you got left? Two and a half minutes?

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-THEY LAUGH

-What have you been up to, you characters? This is terrible!

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-Trying to stay out of the rain!

-That's no excuse! You have to get wet like me, get a mackintosh!

0:15:540:15:59

Oh, dear, this is terrible, isn't it? Two minutes to go.

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-Don't hang around here. Get on with it!

-THEY LAUGH

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-Oh, yes!

-Ow. Jam it on.

-Dapper. Look at that.

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-You look like the Artful Dodger, actually.

-Thanks very much.

0:16:160:16:21

'Very funny, ladies. But will you steal the show?'

0:16:230:16:27

-There's that lamp again.

-Oh, yes.

-We haven't got much time.

0:16:270:16:31

I tell you what, this is down to the last minute.

0:16:310:16:34

-What is your very, very best? We ain't got time to...

-50 quid.

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-Is it? That's not too bad. There's £38 on it.

-No, no.

0:16:380:16:42

-30 quid for them?

-30 quid.

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-You can't sell brass, that's the problem. You can't sell brass, can you?

-I can melt it down.

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Not for 30 quid. What's the death on it?

0:16:490:16:51

25, I'll do it for. You've got a deal.

0:16:510:16:53

-And I'll smile for the camera.

-THEY LAUGH

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-I don't think you've got any choice.

-Let's go for it.

0:16:570:17:00

Done again.

0:17:000:17:02

Our teams' time is up.

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Let's hope they spent their time and their cash wisely

0:17:080:17:12

Let's check out what the Red Team have picked up.

0:17:120:17:16

'The Reds made their bed, but will they have to lie in it?

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'£55 paid.

0:17:200:17:23

'The silver Asprey sauce boat was £48.

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'And the brass lamp could light up the auction for £25.'

0:17:270:17:31

-We did it all right, then. We got there.

-By the skin of our teeth!

-By the skin of your teeth!

0:17:330:17:38

Every two minutes on this programme, I'm jumping back at you.

0:17:380:17:41

-Did you get your last item?

-Yes, we did.

-Is it fab?

0:17:410:17:44

I think it'll be good. I think it'll do the business.

0:17:440:17:46

-A bit different.

-What does Paul think?

0:17:460:17:49

I think it could all come very good

0:17:490:17:54

-or crash and burn.

-Ah, good. That's enigmatic, as usual.

0:17:540:17:58

-Anyway, how much did you spend overall? Wasn't much, was it? £128?

-£128, yes.

0:17:580:18:03

So who has got the £172 of leftover lolly, please?

0:18:030:18:08

-£172? Have you got it?

-Nope.

0:18:080:18:10

Stop joking now. It's £172. Come on, Sue!

0:18:100:18:15

-Who's got the cash? Romain?

-You've got the money, Romain! All right.

0:18:150:18:20

Dear, oh, dear. We're all over the shop today.

0:18:200:18:22

You have that. Pop it in your pocket.

0:18:220:18:25

This is what we do on Bargain Hunt. Pop it in your pocket.

0:18:250:18:28

Then I ask you for the £172, OK?

0:18:280:18:31

-Have you got the £172?

-Yes.

-Oh, lovely, £172, that's good.

0:18:310:18:35

I pass it over to higher authority.

0:18:350:18:38

-There you go, Paul.

-Thanks, Tim.

-£172, that's a decent wodge.

0:18:380:18:41

-It's certainly a budget, yeah.

-It's a budget!

0:18:410:18:45

And a budget for north of the border, I tell you!

0:18:450:18:47

Anyway, what are you going to spend it on?

0:18:470:18:50

Lots of good things out there, Tim, but I've been on a mission with these guys running past them.

0:18:500:18:55

-I now need to go back and see if any of them are bargains.

-Check out the prices.

0:18:550:18:59

You guys can go and relax. Meanwhile, why don't we check out what's going on with the Blues, eh?

0:18:590:19:04

'£5 took the red glass jug off the dealer's hands.

0:19:050:19:10

'Will the Doulton harvestware reap them a profit at £45?

0:19:100:19:16

'The silver buckle cost £38, a highly polished performance, what?'

0:19:160:19:20

Now, you naughty girls, what did you finish up spending overall?

0:19:200:19:24

BOTH: £88.

0:19:240:19:27

It may be a strategy which takes you forward to profit.

0:19:270:19:30

-Hopefully.

-All right. We will hope for that.

0:19:300:19:33

-What's your favourite piece?

-My favourite piece, I think, is the little jug.

0:19:330:19:37

-Great. And what's your favourite?

-I like the belt buckle.

-Good.

0:19:370:19:42

-£88.

-Three objects, all very nice objects, all good examples and bought well.

0:19:420:19:49

That's the thing, you see? We could've spent £150 if you'd liked, but we bargained.

0:19:490:19:53

-Oh, right.

-Right?

0:19:530:19:55

I'd like £212 of leftover lolly, please. £212.

0:19:550:20:01

All right. What are you going to spend it on? Not sweeties, I hope.

0:20:010:20:04

I don't know. I mean, they like jewellery, we didn't get a chance to look at any.

0:20:040:20:10

I might go and have a look at that sort of thing, as that's one of my favourite things. Who knows?

0:20:100:20:15

You'll just let the cross currents of the fair take you and sweep you off somewhere.

0:20:150:20:19

-Yeah.

-All right. Standby for a shipwreck.

0:20:190:20:22

-THEY LAUGH

-Anyway, very good luck.

0:20:220:20:24

Meanwhile, we're heading off to the depths of Wisbech,

0:20:240:20:29

where there's something really gorgeous awaiting us.

0:20:290:20:32

'Welcome to Peckover House in Cambridgeshire.

0:20:370:20:40

'It was named by the National Trust after its last owners,

0:20:430:20:47

'a Quaker family who lived here for over 150 years.'

0:20:470:20:52

When wealthy banker Jonathan Peckover acquired this property in 1794,

0:20:520:20:58

he stayed true to his Quaker beliefs

0:20:580:21:02

and furnished it modestly.

0:21:020:21:05

But certain original fittings were both respected and restored.

0:21:050:21:12

And the most stunning original feature in this, the withdrawing room,

0:21:130:21:19

has to be the over-mantel mirror.

0:21:190:21:22

The room itself dates from the 1720s

0:21:220:21:25

and if you look, for example, at the over-door, with its broken arch pediment,

0:21:250:21:31

this is strictly angular and regulated.

0:21:310:21:35

If you compare that with the later over-mantel,

0:21:350:21:39

which dates from the 1750s,

0:21:390:21:42

you see a completely different style.

0:21:420:21:45

The decoration starts at the top with a massive eagle

0:21:450:21:49

holding a swathe of material in its beak

0:21:490:21:53

as it sweeps across the top

0:21:530:21:55

to be tied with ribbons in each corner

0:21:550:21:59

and then you get it descending, full of movement,

0:21:590:22:02

down the outside until it terminates in two tassels.

0:22:020:22:06

Similarly exuberant is the inner frame,

0:22:060:22:10

actually containing the mirror itself.

0:22:100:22:13

You've got two flower-wrapped vases at the top

0:22:130:22:17

and then lattice-filled shaped platforms

0:22:170:22:20

with more and more C and S scrolled mouldings,

0:22:200:22:25

until you get to the bottom, which is centred by the mask of a muse.

0:22:250:22:30

All of this has been created out of carved pine,

0:22:300:22:33

which is then sealed before it gets painted.

0:22:330:22:37

This over-mantel arrangement

0:22:370:22:39

can only be described as riotous and exuberant.

0:22:390:22:44

But it was in situ for 40 years

0:22:440:22:47

before the Peckovers bought this place

0:22:470:22:50

and, therefore, instead of ripping it out, they respected it,

0:22:500:22:54

even though it would've gone against their Quaker tradition.

0:22:540:22:58

But there is something in here that definitely dates from the Peckover period.

0:22:580:23:04

Which include this very nice window seat.

0:23:040:23:08

Now, if I carry that out and you stand back

0:23:080:23:11

and look at the shape of that window opening, it tapers, right?

0:23:110:23:16

So when Peckover ordered the window seat, he ordered it bespoke to fit.

0:23:160:23:21

So it's straight at the back, it's tapering on the sides

0:23:210:23:25

and you get a little bit of movement along the front edge, but not a lot.

0:23:250:23:30

If we crouch down and have a look at the legs, though,

0:23:300:23:34

they're incredibly plain.

0:23:340:23:36

This is not a fancy piece of furniture that's been made out of polished show wood,

0:23:360:23:42

it's simply made of beech or another wood so that it can be painted,

0:23:420:23:47

and it stands on simple feet.

0:23:470:23:50

There is one indication of some luxury, though,

0:23:500:23:54

and that's in this raised side rail

0:23:540:23:57

where you've got a dished piece like that

0:23:570:23:59

where you'd be able to rest your elbow comfortably.

0:23:590:24:02

But, in terms of the style, it's in complete contrast with the over-mantel mirror.

0:24:020:24:09

So what sort of paintings do you hang in a room

0:24:090:24:13

that's got such a spectacular Rococo over-mantel mirror?

0:24:130:24:17

Well, the Trust have selected a series of four pastel paintings

0:24:170:24:23

by the celebrated Venetian artist Rosalba Carriera,

0:24:230:24:28

who lived between about 1675 and about 1750.

0:24:280:24:33

These pictures represent the epitome of early Rococo taste

0:24:330:24:38

and you see the subjects are each an attractive young lady representing an appropriate season.

0:24:380:24:45

The symbol from the lady behind me is a bunch of summer flowers,

0:24:450:24:49

hence she's summer.

0:24:490:24:51

This girl has got her fur pelt around her, and she represents winter.

0:24:510:24:56

On the far wall, the spring flowers hint at springtime.

0:24:560:25:01

And in the far corner, we've got a girl baring her bosom

0:25:010:25:05

that's supposed to represent autumn,

0:25:050:25:08

although quite why she's clutching a rabbit so closely to her bosom

0:25:080:25:13

I couldn't tell you. Lucky fellow.

0:25:130:25:16

Now, we mustn't rabbit on about this, but the big question is,

0:25:160:25:20

which of our contestants today is going to make a thumping great profit?

0:25:200:25:25

So let's hop along to the auction and find out.

0:25:250:25:29

'No, we're not in Antarctica,

0:25:320:25:35

'we're in Abbotts Auction House in Suffolk.

0:25:350:25:38

'And warming us up today is auctioneer Jeffrey Barfoot.'

0:25:390:25:43

-Good morning, Jeffrey.

-Morning.

-Very nice to be here.

-Good.

0:25:430:25:47

-Lots of people viewing.

-Yes.

-That's encouraging.

-That's what we want.

0:25:470:25:50

Sue and Lex, for their first item, bought the brass bedstead, which is on view down the way.

0:25:500:25:57

-How do you rate it?

-Hm. Rather plain, simple, single Edwardian brass bed.

0:25:570:26:02

-Don't see it doing anything great.

-No, it is a problem, isn't it,

0:26:020:26:05

because you've got to get the base fixed, you've got to get a mattress that fits

0:26:050:26:10

and, quite frankly, who wants to go through all those hurdles

0:26:100:26:14

if you're going to simply go out and get yourself a single bed? It's a hassle.

0:26:140:26:18

-Yeah.

-What do you think it might bring?

0:26:180:26:20

-£30, £40.

-Well, they paid £55.

-Could be a struggle.

0:26:200:26:25

Next is rather more straightforward, the little gravy boat. Asprey's.

0:26:250:26:29

-Asprey's, yeah.

-But thin.

-Good make but very thin and lightweight.

0:26:290:26:34

Nice little thing. Gravy boat, cream jug, could use it for either.

0:26:340:26:38

-Silver's up.

-Silver's up, but it's very light.

-How much?

0:26:380:26:41

-I've got it in at £40 to £60.

-Well, they paid £48, so they paid the right price.

-There's a chance.

0:26:410:26:46

Their last item is the Surrey with the fringe on top, the brass standard lamp.

0:26:460:26:51

-Again, incredibly difficult to sell, I've noticed, at auction.

-Yeah.

0:26:510:26:55

-Brass is not flavour of the month.

-No.

-With that shade on it, it might be even more difficult.

0:26:550:27:01

-Shall we take the shade off?

-It probably would be an advantage.

0:27:010:27:05

No, we can't. Somebody loves that.

0:27:050:27:07

-How much?

-I put it in at £30 to £50.

0:27:070:27:10

Would you say that's an optimistic punt, Jeffrey, or not?

0:27:100:27:14

-I wouldn't stake my mortgage on it.

-No, quite. £25 paid.

0:27:140:27:17

So they paid the right price. You'll get it away for £25.

0:27:170:27:21

-Hopefully, yeah.

-Hopefully.

-Hopefully.

0:27:210:27:24

Well, we've got some dodgy issues here. They might need their bonus buy, so let's have a look at it.

0:27:240:27:29

Now, Sue and Lex, you spent £128. You gave Paul Laidlaw £172. What did you spend it on, Paul?

0:27:290:27:37

Right at the off, we had a chat about what we were looking for and bronze came up,

0:27:370:27:41

as did Art Deco.

0:27:410:27:44

Well, I think I came pretty close. What do you think, folks?

0:27:440:27:48

-THEY LAUGH

-Do you like?

0:27:480:27:51

-It's dandy, isn't it?

-THEY LAUGH

0:27:510:27:54

Well, I do like this. I think this is really rather charming

0:27:540:27:59

I say we came close. It's not bronze, it's bronzed spelter, base metal alloy.

0:27:590:28:03

OK? Not the finest of media, but that is academic.

0:28:030:28:08

What I really like about this is the quality of the modelling.

0:28:080:28:12

-There's nothing cheesy about that.

-Is it heavy?

0:28:120:28:14

-There's a good weight to that.

-Lex, you hold one end.

0:28:140:28:17

-Gosh.

-It's a good thing, that.

-So we've got some onyx here mixed with marble

0:28:170:28:23

-and marble veneered all the way round. Looks in good nick.

-It's all right.

0:28:230:28:27

-So, the next question is...

-How much was it?

0:28:270:28:30

-£30.

-30? Result.

0:28:300:28:33

THEY LAUGH £30?

0:28:330:28:35

-There you go.

-£30.

0:28:350:28:38

-£30, huh?

-I'd put it on the mantelpiece, I like it.

0:28:380:28:42

And what's your prediction of profit in this?

0:28:420:28:44

-I'd go £50 to £80.

-£50 to £80. But in your heart of hearts, you could see it making £100.

0:28:440:28:49

I'd like it to. If two people took a shine to it, if you came to me and said,

0:28:490:28:53

"I really like this. What should I pay for it?" I'd say, "If it cost you 120, you'd never regret it."

0:28:530:28:58

Well done, Paul. You don't have to decide right now, you decide after your first three items.

0:28:580:29:04

But for the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about the Art Deco sculpture.

0:29:040:29:09

There we go, Jeffrey, look at this.

0:29:090:29:11

We've got Daddy Deer, Mummy Deer and a little deer.

0:29:110:29:17

-Do you like it?

-It's very stylish.

-Yeah.

-Spelter, obviously, rather than bronze.

0:29:170:29:21

-Soft metal. But nice and stylish.

-Really nice.

0:29:210:29:24

With the marble and onyx veneered based, that's a good-looking thing.

0:29:240:29:28

-It's a bit grubby. Somebody would tickle it up.

-Yeah, I think they would.

0:29:280:29:32

Art Deco being the flavour of the moment, I can see that on a mantelpiece in a 1930s house

0:29:320:29:38

-looking absolutely splendid. What's your estimate?

-£60 to £80.

0:29:380:29:42

Paul Laidlaw's a mighty canny man. He only paid £30 for it.

0:29:420:29:47

-I think there's a good profit there.

-If this was in bronze,

0:29:470:29:50

-would it be worth £300 or £400?

-Yes.

0:29:500:29:52

I think he's done very well there. Will be interesting to see whether they take it

0:29:520:29:57

when they get their opportunity to go with the bonus buy.

0:29:570:30:00

That's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues, June and Brenda.

0:30:000:30:04

-Their first item is the little jug.

-Quite sweet, but not the most popular of things.

0:30:040:30:10

-Can't see a lot for that, really.

-I don't suppose you'd normally make it a single lot.

0:30:100:30:14

-Probably not.

-It'd be in a box with a few others.

0:30:140:30:18

-A few other groupings with it, yeah.

-What's your estimate?

-Very pretty. I'd put it in at £10 to £20.

0:30:180:30:24

OK, well, they only paid £5, so it's neither here nor there really

0:30:240:30:28

but interesting to see what it does bring.

0:30:280:30:30

Next is the stoneware tea set, which is Doulton and looks to be in pretty good nick.

0:30:300:30:36

But not old Doulton. Not a Victorian set.

0:30:360:30:39

-What would that be, 1930s?

-Yes, I would imagine so.

0:30:390:30:42

-But in good order.

-Yeah. And the nice thing about this stoneware is it is indestructible, practically.

0:30:420:30:47

You wouldn't want to drop it, but you could practically use it every day to make a cup of tea

0:30:470:30:52

-and it would go on for years and years.

-It's very useable.

-What's your estimate?

0:30:520:30:56

-£20 to £30.

-They paid £45.

-Could be struggling with that.

-Oh, dear.

0:30:560:31:00

-And what about the belt buckle?

-It's very nice. Chester, 1897. So late Victorian.

0:31:000:31:06

It's what every staff nurse used to wear in the hospitals.

0:31:060:31:09

Absolutely. That was always essential equipment for a nurse, to acquire the buckle.

0:31:090:31:14

-Nicely ornate.

-Celtic almost.

0:31:140:31:16

-Almost, with the design.

-So that's fully marked, is it?

-Yep.

-What's your estimate?

0:31:160:31:21

-I've put it in at £40 to £60.

-OK, £38 paid.

0:31:210:31:24

-So they should get a reasonable profit out of that.

-I think so.

0:31:240:31:28

-It may count to balance any losses from the tea set.

-Absolutely.

0:31:280:31:31

Nevertheless, they're going to need their bonus buy, so let's have a look at it.

0:31:310:31:35

Sadly, June and Brenda are stuck in their village in a show drift.

0:31:350:31:40

-So, on that basis, Jonathan, you're going to have to do your bonus buy reveal to me.

-This is a novelty.

0:31:400:31:45

Now, the team only spent £88. You were given £212 to spend.

0:31:450:31:51

-I'd like to know what you spent it on.

-I got quite excited when I saw it.

-Oh, my God.

0:31:510:31:55

-THEY LAUGH

-What is that?

-It's a little netsuke, Japanese.

0:31:550:32:01

-I can do some Shakespeare selling here.

-Can you?

-Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him well, Horatio.

0:32:010:32:06

I always knew you were well-educated. This is a really wacky thing.

0:32:060:32:11

The Japanese are amazing, aren't they, in terms of their symbolism,

0:32:110:32:15

the miniature forms of art that they produce.

0:32:150:32:17

-But the funny thing is, when I bought this, I don't know if I overpaid. I paid £150.

-How much?

0:32:170:32:23

-£150.

-Did you really?

-When I bought it, I was assured it was 19th century,

0:32:230:32:28

and if it's 19th century, it's worth about a grand.

0:32:280:32:31

But it's not. It's actually early 20th century.

0:32:310:32:34

And it's not ivory elephant, it's ivory from a mammoth.

0:32:340:32:39

If I was a team member and I was standing here,

0:32:390:32:42

I would ask you, "Jonathan, how much profit is there in it?"

0:32:420:32:47

-I think maybe this is an omen, because the mammoth's from the ice age...

-Just answer the question.

0:32:470:32:53

How much profit is there in this bonus buy?

0:32:530:32:57

-Well, at the right sale at the right time of year...

-See what I mean?

0:32:570:33:01

Trying to squeeze an honest answer out of the boy, I'm getting nowhere. How much profit?

0:33:010:33:07

I'm in fear that I might lose money on this, Tim.

0:33:070:33:09

In these unusual circumstances, I am going to have to make the decision for the team in their absence.

0:33:090:33:15

So I'll be standing by and I'll see their first three items sell

0:33:150:33:20

and then I'll have a value judgement as to whether I go with your £150 bonus buy

0:33:200:33:26

-in the form of a Japanese skull.

-OK.

0:33:260:33:28

For the audience at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Jonathan's skull.

0:33:280:33:33

Now, here's something to jolly you up, Jeffrey. A skull and cross bones. Arrr!

0:33:330:33:38

-How do you rate that?

-I think it's got a quirky appeal.

-Yeah.

0:33:380:33:42

-I can see that doing quite well.

-The netsuke is often very strangely carved,

0:33:420:33:47

for showing off your skills as a carver. How old do you think it is?

0:33:470:33:52

I would think possibly 20th century.

0:33:520:33:54

-No 21st century.

-Not 21st century.

-That's a relief.

0:33:540:33:57

-How much?

-£40 to £60.

-£150 paid.

0:33:570:34:02

Jonathan has seriously pushed the boat out.

0:34:020:34:06

-That could be a bit challenging.

-You don't mind a challenge.

-No. Auctioneers thrive on a challenge.

0:34:060:34:12

Well, I think the best thing to do is keep taking the tablets.

0:34:120:34:16

Thank you very much.

0:34:160:34:18

Lex and Sue, you got any regrets? Anything you wish you hadn't bought?

0:34:240:34:28

We're a little bit worried about a certain item. The bed.

0:34:280:34:32

-The bed?

-The bed.

0:34:320:34:35

-Mm. Well, £55 you paid for it.

-Yes.

0:34:350:34:39

The auctioneer's put £30 to £40 on it.

0:34:390:34:41

Now, that's pretty hopeful, I think.

0:34:410:34:44

But, to me, this lot look pretty hard-bitten. Here it comes.

0:34:440:34:48

There we are. Nice little Edwardian brass single bedstead.

0:34:480:34:51

Right in the middle of the room. How do you see that one? £50?

0:34:510:34:54

£30 then for a brass bedstead.

0:34:540:34:57

£20 and up we go, then. Come along. £20 I'm bid, standing at 20.

0:34:570:35:01

At £20 I'm bid. At 20 on the maiden bid.

0:35:010:35:05

20 only and selling away.

0:35:050:35:07

-Oh, no!

-I loved that bed.

0:35:070:35:11

-It was a steal!

-That's minus £35. That's not good. Here comes Asprey.

0:35:110:35:15

Super quality lot. The silver sauce boat by Asprey and co.

0:35:150:35:19

Birmingham 1916. How do you see that one? Put me in at 50.

0:35:190:35:23

30 to go, then. 30 I'm bid. At £30 I'm bid.

0:35:230:35:27

2 in front. 32. 35. 38. 40.

0:35:270:35:30

5. 50.

0:35:300:35:33

-In the doorway at 50.

-We're just in profit.

0:35:330:35:36

And other bids? At 50.

0:35:360:35:38

£50 equals plus 2.

0:35:380:35:42

Which means, overall, you're minus 33

0:35:420:35:46

The Edwardian brass telescopic standard lamp,

0:35:460:35:48

right in the middle of the room. How do you see that one? 30?

0:35:480:35:52

10 to go, surely. 10 he says.

0:35:520:35:56

Only £10. At 10 I'm bid. 12 to the lady. 14. 16.

0:35:560:36:00

-Yes.

-Not dear. 18.

0:36:000:36:03

20. And 2.

0:36:030:36:06

-25. 28.

-You're in profit.

-Wiped its face.

0:36:060:36:11

No, it's better than that.

0:36:110:36:13

£28. Are we all done, then?

0:36:130:36:16

Plus £3, which is eroding your losses to only minus £30 overall.

0:36:160:36:23

Minus 30 is the score. What are you going to do about the little deer?

0:36:230:36:26

-We're going to go for it.

-You'll have to. But you want to, though.

0:36:260:36:30

-This is it, the big moment.

-You know that this is a peach.

0:36:300:36:34

-Here it comes.

-Art Deco style sculpture

0:36:340:36:37

with the deer all in a row there.

0:36:370:36:39

Handsome little lot. 50 to start surely.

0:36:390:36:43

Well, 30 and up we go. Come along, do.

0:36:430:36:45

£30, in the front row at 30. At £30, a cheap little lot at 30.

0:36:450:36:49

5. 40. Still cheap at 40. Do you want 5, sir? 45.

0:36:490:36:55

At 45. 50.

0:36:550:36:58

5. In the front row at 55 only.

0:36:580:37:02

At 55 only seated.

0:37:020:37:04

-Are we all done at 55?

-One more, come on! Come on!

-One more.

0:37:040:37:09

At 55.

0:37:090:37:11

£55. That is such bad luck, cos that's plus 25,

0:37:110:37:15

which means, overall, you're still minus £5.

0:37:150:37:18

That is so close, though. I honestly thought that thing was going to make £100.

0:37:180:37:23

And I would've loved it to. Anyway, there it is.

0:37:230:37:27

Minus 5 is not a shameful score on this programme, I can tell you.

0:37:270:37:30

-Still, there we go. Don't tell the Blues a thing.

-Wouldn't dream of it.

0:37:300:37:35

Go out looking as if you've just made 300.

0:37:350:37:38

Are we all done?

0:37:410:37:43

-You're June and Brenda wrapped into one.

-Yes.

0:37:480:37:52

-This is exciting. It doesn't happen much, this.

-What, snow?

0:37:520:37:55

-No, I mean missing contestants in snow drifts.

-Mm.

0:37:550:37:59

Not an easy one for us but, still, there we go.

0:37:590:38:01

-We have to struggle on manfully.

-Exactly. It might soften the blow for me.

-Quite.

0:38:010:38:05

First lot up is June's jug.

0:38:050:38:08

There we are, a pretty little lot,

0:38:080:38:10

the Victorian baluster ruby flash cream jug. Put me in at £20.

0:38:100:38:15

10 to go then, surely. Will look nice on the dining table.

0:38:150:38:19

-10 to start, surely.

-He's trying hard.

0:38:190:38:21

Well, 5 and up we go, then. At 5 I'm bid. Only at 5. 6.

0:38:210:38:26

At 6. 8 is seated in the middle. At 8. Do I see 10 anywhere?

0:38:260:38:30

-At £8 only, then.

-Good auctioneer.

-At £8.

0:38:300:38:33

Are we all done at 8?

0:38:330:38:35

-That's plus 3.

-That's fair enough.

0:38:350:38:37

Well done, June, you've done very well with your jug.

0:38:370:38:40

Now, next is your tea set.

0:38:400:38:42

Royal Doulton stoneware three-piece tea set.

0:38:420:38:45

Harvestware design. Very durable lot.

0:38:450:38:48

Put me in at £20 to start, surely.

0:38:480:38:51

20. Well, 10 and up we go, then.

0:38:510:38:53

Anyone start me 10? Cheap little lot, surely.

0:38:530:38:56

10 I'm bid only for a Doulton tea set.

0:38:560:38:59

12. 14.

0:38:590:39:01

16. 18.

0:39:010:39:05

20. 22.

0:39:050:39:07

The break point will be 25, you wait and see.

0:39:070:39:11

24, he's back in. 5 I'll take, sir. 25.

0:39:110:39:15

-It's got to the break point.

-No, it hasn't.

-26.

-Oh, it's going.

0:39:150:39:19

28.

0:39:190:39:21

Still cheap at £28. On my left here at 28.

0:39:210:39:24

Are we all done, then, and I sell away at 28?

0:39:240:39:27

£28 is 2 shy of 30. That is minus 17.

0:39:270:39:31

The Victorian silver buckle, Chester 1897.

0:39:310:39:35

Little silver belt buckle there. How do you see that? Put me in at 40.

0:39:350:39:39

40 to start, surely, for the belt buckle. 30 and up we go, then.

0:39:390:39:43

-Come along, do.

-Come on.

-20 and up we go.

0:39:430:39:46

£20 is in the middle. 25.

0:39:460:39:48

-They're after a bargain today.

-30. 5.

0:39:480:39:52

-40.

-You're in profit.

-Oh, good.

0:39:520:39:55

£40 only seated. Seated at £40.

0:39:550:39:57

Are we all done at 40? I shall sell at 40.

0:39:570:40:02

You're minus £12 overall. No shame in that, I tell you,

0:40:020:40:05

cos it could've been a lot worse, June and Brenda.

0:40:050:40:08

June and Brenda, what are you going to do?

0:40:080:40:10

-Are you going to take your bonus buy?

-I'm definitely not going with the bonus buy.

-Come on.

0:40:100:40:15

-Even penny would help. Come on, June.

-No, I'm not doing it.

0:40:150:40:18

-Sorry about that. No bonus buy.

-I know.

0:40:180:40:21

I can now tell you, because I've talked to the auctioneer,

0:40:210:40:24

-he very generously put £40 to £60 on that.

-Yeah.

0:40:240:40:27

-I suppose it's not really...

-He says he gets them coming in the post from somewhere to his auction house.

0:40:270:40:33

-Does he really? I don't.

-Do you not?

-No.

0:40:330:40:35

-You want to get on his...

-I'm not on his mailing list.

0:40:350:40:38

The mammoth ivory Japanese netsuke modelled as a skull.

0:40:380:40:42

There we are. Has created interest on the book

0:40:420:40:45

and I open the bidding at £50.

0:40:450:40:47

-There we go.

-50 with him.

0:40:470:40:51

At 50 an opening bid. 60.

0:40:510:40:52

70. 80. 90. 100.

0:40:520:40:56

-Look at this.

-And 10. 120.

0:40:560:40:59

-In the room now at 120. On my left.

-Keep going.

-Go on!

0:40:590:41:03

-This is unbelievable.

-Are we all done at 120? Selling here at £120.

0:41:030:41:08

-I sell.

-I'm going to have to eat humble pie.

-Well...

0:41:080:41:11

-Well done!

-It clawed itself back to some extent.

0:41:110:41:13

They said £30 to £40. I mean, you have got a phenomenal eye.

0:41:130:41:18

When you've got the experience that I have, Tim, you know these things.

0:41:180:41:22

Ooh, you can be so barbed, can't you?

0:41:220:41:25

-It's still a loss.

-I know, but I thought it was going to be a loss of at least £100.

0:41:250:41:30

It's got to be worth 100 quid, it's great craftsmanship.

0:41:300:41:34

Yes, good. Anyway, minus 30

0:41:340:41:36

-means, overall, they are still minus 12.

-OK.

0:41:360:41:41

At this stage in the game, I usually ask the Red Team whether they have been talking to the Blue Team.

0:41:490:41:55

-As we have no Blue Team, you've not been chatting to them, have you?

-No.

-No.

0:41:550:41:59

And I can move very swiftly to the chase here,

0:41:590:42:02

because I have to reveal that the runners-up today just happen to be the Blues, who aren't here.

0:42:020:42:07

So, you are going to have to take the flack here single-handed, Jonathan.

0:42:070:42:13

-Hang on a minute.

-Lots of kissing going on over there.

-You lot!

0:42:130:42:16

OK, fine, well, you made a profit, June, on your jug of £3, which is very good.

0:42:160:42:21

And Jonathan, you made a profit on your buckle of £2, which is very good.

0:42:210:42:25

-But it didn't do terribly well overall, cos you're minus £12.

-Yes.

0:42:250:42:29

And then I selected that you were not going to go with the bonus buy, and that made a loss of £30,

0:42:290:42:34

-but it didn't do as bad...

-As you thought.

-As I thought.

0:42:340:42:37

All right! Super-duper. Lovely to see you, Jonathan. I'll leave you to give the bad news to the team.

0:42:370:42:45

But the victors today, only £7 between you, actually,

0:42:450:42:50

-and you win by only losing £5.

-Excellent.

0:42:500:42:54

-Never, ever, ever buy any more beds.

-THEY LAUGH

0:42:540:42:57

-Anyway, great show! Join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes?

-ALL: Yes!

0:42:570:43:02

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:040:43:08

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:080:43:12

.

0:43:120:43:12

At Norfolk antiques fair, Paul Laidlaw's red team do some tough talking whilst bargaining for a bed. Jonathan Pratt's team gets snowed in so they can't make the auction. Tim Wonnacott explores the Quaker heritage of Peckover house in Wisbech.