Edinburgh 14 Bargain Hunt


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Edinburgh 14

The teams descend on the Edinburgh Antiques and Collectors Fair. A professional swimmer and his grandmother team up with expert Nick Hall and bump into a past team.


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Gosh! Is it that time of day already? Let's go bargain hunting!

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It's a generation game today

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here at the Edinburgh Antiques and Collectors Fair.

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I just hope we're not teaching a grandmother how to suck eggs.

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'Yes, today we're in Scotland

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'and raring to sniff out the best bargains in Edinburgh are a grandson and grandma.'

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-It suits you, Jean.

-And it matches the sparkle in your eye.

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'A mother and a daughter team.'

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-Oh, that's lovely!

-Are you a fan?

-Oh, yes.

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'Then we head west to Glasgow. But will either team find their fortune under the hammer of Anita Manning?'

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Any advance on £60? If you can't afford diamonds,

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this is the nearest you'll get to it.

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'But before we do all that, let's meet the teams.'

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Hi, everybody. Lovely to see you.

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So, we have got here Billy and Jean.

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The grandson-grandma combo from heaven. I love them.

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-So why did you decide, Billy, to link up with your grandma?

-Well, we live quite close together

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so we spend a lot of time with each other.

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I think with my youthful spirit and her wisdom, we make a good team.

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Ah. So this is a tactical alliance.

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-Yeah.

-Across the generations.

-Definitely.

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-Billy, you're a student, but you've got an additional passion.

-Yeah, swimming.

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I was a competitive swimmer for about ten years and gave up last year and now I'm coaching.

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You're very modest about our achievements as a professional swimmer.

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So give us some statistics.

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I was ranked top 50 in the world for a number of events so, yeah, it was good.

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-Well, that's pretty cool.

-Yeah, it's good fun.

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-But it involves, presumably, endless training.

-Yeah.

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That was a problem, 28 hours a week at peak time.

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-It's just really too much to fit everything else in.

-Yes.

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-It takes up a bit of the social life.

-Cuts down on the drinking time.

-Exactly.

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And when you're a student, you've got to enjoy that side life.

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When you spend so much time in the water... If I spend more than eight minutes in the bath, to go crinkly.

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How does it work for you guys doing all this practising in the pool?

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You just turn into a prune pretty much, yeah.

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I think you'll do swimmingly today. Jean, do you have an interest in antiques?

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-It says here that you like your Royal Crown Derby.

-Yes, I do. And Royal Doulton and Wedgewood.

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Will you two be able to agree what you're going to buy today, Jean?

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-We'll compromise, put it that way.

-Will you?

-Yeah.

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-We never argue, do we?

-No, never argue. I'll just follow her lead.

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Would you be going for more of the Victorian ornament

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and you perhaps something modern or what?

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Actually, I prefer Victorian stuff, as well.

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A bit that's got something hidden inside it.

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So if there's any items like that, definitely go for them.

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A box with a sovereign hidden inside?

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-Exactly. That sort of thing, yeah.

-I think they're going to be cunning enough.

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-Now for the Blues, Shona and Eileen. Welcome.

-Thank you.

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-Tell us about your family, Shona.

-Well, we're kind of opposites

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but we're all very creative.

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My eldest daughter and my ex-husband are very clever

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and Eileen and I are more creative.

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But they're more into music and we're more into the art and design side of things.

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-So would you say you're quite practical in your creativity?

-Yes.

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I like to do landscapes and I do still lifes

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and at the moment I'm doing a portrait, a double portrait

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-of my girlfriend's grandchildren.

-Lovely.

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-So, Eileen, you're also artistic.

-Yes.

-Do you paint, too?

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No, no. I have done jewellery classes, jewellery-making classes.

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When I was younger, I used to make my own clothes.

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-Yes.

-And I really love gourmet cooking. I think my creative side comes out in that

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-cos you get the pleasure of eating it, as well.

-Well, quite!

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-And give so much pleasure to others!

-Exactly! It's a win-win situation.

-Certainly is.

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-But you love a bit of live music.

-Yes, I do. I love going to live gigs.

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Glasgow's a great place to go and see them.

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-I did say if I won the lottery, I would go to live music every night if I could.

-Oh.

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What I love about coming to Scotland is that you get this great divide between the Glaswegians

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-and the Edinburgh folks.

-We have an east and west divide!

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We're shopping in Edinburgh but we're selling in Glasgow.

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And the Reds come from Edinburgh

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but you're going to have to go to Glasgow to do your selling, all of which is absolutely fascinating.

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Anyway, now the money moment. Here's your £300.

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You know the rules. Your experts await. And off you go! And very, very, very good luck.

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Ooh, I say, Glasgow meets Edinburgh.

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A battle royal.

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'And which experts will be guiding our teams today?

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'Well, Reds Billy and Jean

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'are being led by their very own man in the mirror, Nick Hall.'

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-What are the tactics today?

-Well, I think, if we would buy it, hopefully someone else would buy it.

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-Something unusual, quirky?

-Yeah.

-Unusual and quirky works well.

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Let's get stuck in. Come on.

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'Hoping to bowl over the Blues is the one and only Jeremy Lamond.'

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-Ceramics.

-Ceramics.

-Art Deco. Glass.

-Art Deco.

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I can see a lot of Art Deco and ceramics over there

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-so shall we go that way?

-Yep.

-OK.

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'So, both teams have a plan of sorts.

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'Let's see if they stick to it. Yeah, right.

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'Start those stopwatches, crew.'

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-What about this large forklift?

-Oh, yeah!

-If you get that for 50, it'd be all right.

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That's a spoon and a half, isn't it?

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-Goodness me, look at that.

-You'd need a big mouth.

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-Do people drink in Scotland at all?

-No, not really.

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I'm not very keen on buying stuff if it's not got a price on it.

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You want the profit. Show me the money. I know.

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'Now, Shona wanted some Art Deco glass.'

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-These are nice.

-What have you found?

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-Now, that's nice.

-There's three of them.

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-There's four of them.

-Oh, they're gorgeous.

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They are chromium-plate, not silver.

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-There's no silver mark on there.

-But that's engine-turned, is it not?

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-Enamel...

-This is foil-back Guilloche enamel.

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-I love that design and the colour and the different shapes are beautiful, as well.

-Isn't it, yeah?

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This one's got a wee bit of a crack at the top.

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If you've got any problems with the enamel, it's really a no-no in terms of sale.

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We could ask how much they are, so that we know.

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-What's the price?

-The price is £75 but I'll do it for 45.

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40? Please?

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Well, I suppose that makes it £10 a piece.

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-And they are damaged, so yes.

-Oh, thank you very much! That's wonderful!

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-Thank you!

-Just don't make too much money.

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'Blimey! You don't waste any time, girls!'

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-Thank you.

-Well done, ladies. Four minutes in. All to play for.

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-OK, then.

-So we'll finish after 10, do you think?

-THEY LAUGH

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'And Shona's stuck to her plan of buying some Art Deco glass with item number one.

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'Now, Jean said she was looking for something quirky.'

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This is something that's quite in vogue at the minute.

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Post-war Scandinavian design. And this is a Danish dish.

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It's Royal Copenhagen

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-and it's from their Fajance range. This'll be 1970s.

-OK.

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I mean, that's sort of fashionable at the moment.

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Very much so, yeah. I mean, at £60, I don't know if there's much profit left in it.

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I think it's the sort of thing at auction you'd see with a £40 to £60 estimate.

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I mean, there's a whole load of this sort of stuff on the stall.

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It might be that we can find something else with more of a profit margin left in it.

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'Nice try, Nick. I think you talked yourself out of that one.'

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Aw, that's quite cute!

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-The pussycat in the mirror.

-90.

-90?

-A bit dear.

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-9 is more like it.

-SHE LAUGHS

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A bit of Carlton Ware for £15.

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-Frae Dunbar?

-Here's to ye. £15?

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-With a Scottish theme at a Scottish saleroom?

-I don't know.

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It could be rare, that. If you don't like it, you don't like it.

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I'd rather leave it. But I'll think about it.

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That £200 goes back on the shelf.

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'You wish, Jeremy. The Reds have spotted another unusual-looking item.'

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-That's a nice piece of decorative art.

-It is nice.

-Yeah.

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-Ceramic. I suspect this is Amphora, is it?

-Yes, it is. It's Austrian Amphora.

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Very typical of these 1920s ceramics.

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It's erring towards the Art Deco period

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with these lovely enamels on there.

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And then they're sat next to this very matted glaze, as well,

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-so it's a nice contradiction.

-Nice contrast.

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-For me, having this stork on there is nice.

-I think that's something you could see someone buying.

-Yeah.

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-It looks to be in good condition. I can't see...

-There's no nicks on it.

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-Is these any restoration?

-Nope.

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-Why are you biting it?

-I'm just checking for restoration.

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When ceramics are restored and they're reglazed, you get a softness

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and it's hard to pick up with your fingertips,

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but you'll get a grittiness and the softness will pick up on your teeth.

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-But that seems to be all right, I think.

-Uh-huh.

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-What sort of money?

-45.

-45?

-45, yeah.

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-£45, it's not...

-You can't go too wrong with that.

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Is there any movement?

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-I'll do it for 40.

-£40. That's fantastic.

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-40 quid.

-Oh, great!

-I think, for your first buy, we like it

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-and you were saying if we like it, someone else will buy it.

-Yeah.

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I think for 40 quid, you've got a chance with that.

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-Definitely.

-Yeah.

-Can you give the man the money.

-Yep.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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'And the Reds have a bird in the hand with their first buy.'

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-We've only used eight minutes. We're well on track.

-Plenty of time to browse.

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'Famous last words.'

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These are from the Great Exhibition in Glasgow.

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Without knowing anything about it, what would you pay for it?

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Probably about £20.

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-OK. So how much is it?

-70 for the pair.

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You might get another knowledgeable dealer that will buy it but that's the risk you take.

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'So, lessons in bargain hunting from Mr Lamond.

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-'I hope you were listening at the back there.'

-Clever tactics.

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'OK, class over. Let's see if you can put that into practise.'

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-Oh, that's lovely!

-Are you a fan?

-Oh, yes! THEY LAUGH

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-That's gorgeous.

-You're a gardener, though, aren't you?

-Oh, I think it's beautiful!

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It's different, isn't it? It's very difficult to know whether it's particularly old,

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but it's following the Japanese aesthetic movement. And you like it. That's the point.

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-You like it.

-I think it's wonderful.

-You like the fans.

-Yeah.

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-And it's practical, as well.

-It is practical. You can imagine three pots of beautiful geraniums on that.

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-Yeah, it's wonderful.

-How much is that?

-60.

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-It's a possibility, isn't it?

-Would you take 40 for it?

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-All right, I'll take 40.

-Thank you! That's wonderful! Thank you very much!

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'So, no messing about there. Shona knows what she likes and that's two items in the bag.'

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You just never know when you come to these places

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exactly what you're going to find.

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Did I think this morning when I walked into this hall

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that I was going to find a grand piano?

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"Where?" you might ask.

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"Here," I would say. Look at that.

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Isn't that the most perfect miniature grand piano you ever did see?

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All made out of filigree work.

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Now, filigree work is simply

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extremely fine little curlicues of solid silver wire

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wrought expertly into all sorts of shapes and objects.

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If you look at the detail on this grand piano,

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it is extraordinary.

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And that cover, effectively the cover on the top of the grand piano,

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hinges open like that.

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Apart from being very decorative,

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I think this thing had a possible practical purpose.

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Within the hinged cover, you could've secured a solid piece of scent

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and this thing, with its perforations all over,

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would've had the effect of a room freshener.

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Dating from the 1860s to 1880s.

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What's it worth? Well, you can buy it here in the fair for £35,

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which is not expensive.

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I mean, just look at all the work that's been involved in making it.

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What would I expect it to make in a specialist sale?

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Something like £150 to £200

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should strike the right note.

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-These are quite fun.

-Oh, they're nice.

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-Snuff boxes.

-Very smart.

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These were made in the Georgian period.

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The top will lift up. The snuff would go in there

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and the gentleman would take a pinch, as you do about your daily business.

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What's the best that could be?

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58 would be my best price.

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I quite like it. I just think it's whether it'll make a profit or not. That could be the difficult bit.

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'Billy's got his thinking cap on, or should I say swimming cap?'

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-Oh, I love that tea set.

-That's very nice.

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-What's the maker?

-George Logan is the designer.

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-A Scottish designer.

-See, I love that.

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-Do you like that?

-That's the Glasgow rose.

-Yeah. How much is this?

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-I've got £150 on it.

-No. It's lovely, though.

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Now, this is pretty.

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-It's very pretty.

-Isn't that nice?

-Lovely.

-Really nice.

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-Stands out a lot.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

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-Very stylish, isn't it?

-It is, it's lovely.

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It's made of glass, but it's what they call malachite glass.

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-It's meant to simulate the stone malachite.

-Yeah.

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-It's very Art Deco.

-Beautiful.

-Yeah.

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How much do you think a piece like this could go at auction for?

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With Art Deco collectors, the market is quite buoyant at the minute

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and that's a really stylish thing.

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That would be comfortable at somewhere in the £50 to £80 mark.

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-How much is it?

-Er, 75.

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-Right, 75.

-It's the high end of that.

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At the moment it is, yeah, but maybe we could work some magic on the stall holders.

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-What's your best price?

-The very best price I can do is 60.

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-60?

-I can't come down any lower than that.

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I think you've got a chance with that, cos that would appeal to a lot of buyers.

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And if you both like it...

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-And you can afford it, we've got plenty of money left.

-Right.

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It's a sweet little thing. But it's up to you two.

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I think people would buy that at auction. I think people would go and buy that. Do you want to go for it?

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-We'll go for this, thank you.

-Yep, go for it.

-Thank you.

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'A considered approach there by Billy and Jean

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'who both fancy their chances on their second purchase.

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'Now, who's this?'

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-We've been on Bargain Hunt, my friend Effie and I.

-Yes.

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-And we've just met Tim.

-So have you come to give us some pearls of wisdom?

-Yes!

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-Yes!

-How did you get on when you did it?

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-Well...

-We won... BOTH: £252!

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We could do with some of your luck, I think.

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-Do you want to rub me for luck?

-Ohh, there we go!

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'Yes, rub some luck off those lovely ladies! It can't do any harm.'

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-It's topaz, isn't it?

-Is it not amber?

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-It is amber, you're right.

-It's nice. The silver detail's lovely.

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£45. A wee bit dear.

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19th century, Indian, hand-engraved. A spice container.

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-British Army shell in the Days of the Raj.

-That's pretty cool.

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The damage is bothering me.

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It's a big old lump all right, isn't it?

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These are plate and they're modern reproductions.

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All right to use at home, but you ain't going to get a bean in the saleroom.

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'It seems their borrowed luck isn't helping the Reds track down that third elusive item.

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'Time is ticking by. There's only 15 minutes left, Blues.'

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-This is Royal Crown Derby.

-Yes.

-Butter dish.

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-It's in the Imari palette.

-Oh, right.

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-Which is a Japanese design, underglazed blue, iron red and gilding.

-Right.

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It's taken from a Japanese design shipped from the port of Imari

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and it was copied by British potters in the 18th and 19th century

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and was taken on in a big way by Royal Crown Derby.

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-And that's what you've got here.

-Uh-huh.

-You do know it's damaged just at the end there?

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-Oh, so it is.

-Yeah.

-That could be easily glued in.

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-Yeah, but once you start with damaged porcelain...

-It's only £23.

-Is it?

-Mm-hm.

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If we had it for 15, that would be worth a go.

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-Cos you've got the little box.

-Yeah, I like it. I think it's lovely.

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-Right.

-But it is a bit damaged, so...

-Shall we try to get some money off it?

-You want a bit of money off it.

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'It's time to step up the plate, Eileen.'

0:17:560:17:59

-It is damaged. What would be your best price?

-I could come down to 15.

0:17:590:18:03

Thank you very much. That's great. Thank you. That's lovely.

0:18:030:18:06

'And with only a few minutes left, that completes the buys for the Blues. Well done, team!

0:18:060:18:12

'Come on, Reds, you're running out of time.'

0:18:140:18:17

-This is elegant, isn't it? Look at that.

-That's lovely, yeah.

0:18:180:18:21

-Very much in the Art Deco style.

-It's two separate things.

0:18:210:18:26

-Yeah, you've got a bracelet and a necklace.

-I quite like that.

0:18:260:18:30

The thing that makes it very special is the fact that it is an absolutely matching set.

0:18:300:18:34

-What sort of money are they?

-It's 110 for the set.

0:18:340:18:38

So many people have a beautiful necklace and they match it up with something

0:18:380:18:43

and it never quite comes off.

0:18:430:18:45

But to have a set like that is fantastic.

0:18:450:18:47

The nice thing is that they've stayed together all their life.

0:18:470:18:51

If we could get it under the 100 mark...

0:18:510:18:54

The lowest I could possibly go on it would be 95.

0:18:540:18:57

-It does sit so well there, doesn't it? Beautiful.

-It suits you, Jean.

0:18:570:19:02

-And it matches the sparkle in your eye, doesn't it?

-Yeah.

0:19:020:19:06

'You old charmer, Nick.'

0:19:060:19:08

-You know these aren't diamonds, don't you?

-Yeah.

0:19:080:19:10

We're looking at paste. That's why it's under 100 quid.

0:19:100:19:14

It's probably suited well for eveningwear, cocktail events.

0:19:140:19:19

'Cut to the chase, Billy!'

0:19:190:19:22

-Do you think it'll sell at auction?

-Oh, there'll always be buyers for something as beautiful as this.

0:19:220:19:27

-We'll go for it, I think.

-Are you sue?

0:19:270:19:30

-Yeah, let's go for it.

-Both in agreement?

-Yeah.

0:19:300:19:33

-There is one piece each, of course.

-THEY LAUGH

0:19:330:19:36

Very fetching you'll look, too.

0:19:360:19:38

'Just don't wear it in the pool, Billy.

0:19:380:19:41

-'And with that...'

-CANNON FIRES

0:19:430:19:45

Boom, boom. Well, that's Edinburgh's way of saying time's up.

0:19:450:19:50

'So, let's see how the Red Team got on.

0:19:500:19:53

'Their first purchase was the stork pattern ceramic vase.

0:19:530:19:57

'But will it deliver some profit at £40?

0:19:570:20:01

'They both loved the malachite vase at £60.

0:20:010:20:04

'And they handed over a sparkling £95

0:20:060:20:09

'for the costume necklace and matching bracelet.'

0:20:090:20:12

-Hi, guys.

-Hi.

-How did you get on, Jean? All right?

0:20:140:20:17

-Oh, very well, thank you.

-You were a bit nervy to start off with.

0:20:170:20:21

-A wee bit.

-A wee bit. But you settled down very nicely.

0:20:210:20:24

Of course, having such an athletic teammate helps, doesn't it?

0:20:240:20:29

-Is that me you're talking about?

-Oh, yes.

0:20:290:20:31

Anyway, you've spent up. How much did you spend in the end?

0:20:310:20:35

-Er...

-195.

-195. Can I have £105 of leftover lolly, please?

0:20:350:20:41

Thank you very much. 105.

0:20:410:20:44

So, Nick, what are you going to spend that on, old fruit?

0:20:440:20:47

I'm going to spend it very carefully. That's a lot of money to spend and there's a lot of good buys

0:20:470:20:51

so I'm very buoyed up with this. I think we could do well for you.

0:20:510:20:55

Well, that's quite the right sentiment. Good luck with it all.

0:20:550:20:58

Meanwhile, why don't we check out how the Blues got on, eh?

0:20:580:21:01

'Shona and Eileen steamed out of the blocks, buying dressing table jars

0:21:020:21:06

'for £40.

0:21:060:21:09

'Gardener Shona was a big fan of this metal plant stand,

0:21:090:21:12

'handing over another 40 notes.

0:21:120:21:15

'And Eileen negotiated the Imari butter dish and knife

0:21:160:21:19

'down to £15 for their final purchase.'

0:21:190:21:22

-How much did you spend all round?

-£95.

0:21:240:21:26

-What, on the whole lot?

-Yes.

-That's pathetic.

-I know.

0:21:260:21:29

So who's got the £205 of leftover lolly?

0:21:290:21:32

-I do.

-OK. Thank you very much, Eileen, that's lovely. I won't count it.

0:21:320:21:36

I'll trust you. I'll hand that wodge over.

0:21:360:21:39

-There's enough here to buy...

-A quality item that's going to bring a big profit.

0:21:390:21:43

Very good luck, teams. Meanwhile, we're heading off to the Borders

0:21:430:21:46

to Traquair House.

0:21:460:21:49

'Situated near Peebles on the Scottish Borders,

0:21:540:21:57

'Traquair House is heaped in history.

0:21:570:22:00

'The country residence has played host to no fewer than 27 Scottish kings and queens,

0:22:000:22:07

'one of whom was Mary Queen of Scots, who visited in 1566.

0:22:070:22:11

'This is the King's Room, where she was said to have stayed with her husband, Lord Darnley,

0:22:120:22:18

'and her baby son, who was to become James VI of Scotland

0:22:180:22:22

'and James I of England.

0:22:220:22:24

'Someone who knows all about the royal connections is Catherine Maxwell Stuart,

0:22:240:22:29

'the 21st Lady of Traquair.'

0:22:290:22:33

-Morning.

-Very nice to meet you. Now, your family name is, of course, synonymous with this house.

0:22:330:22:38

Yes, the Stuarts of Traquair have been here since 1491,

0:22:380:22:41

so that's over 500 years,

0:22:410:22:44

and the line started when the Earl of Buchan gave a house to his second son, who was James Stuart,

0:22:440:22:51

and he became the first Laird of Traquair,

0:22:510:22:54

and 21 generations later, here I am.

0:22:540:22:56

-Quite something, I have to say.

-Yes.

0:22:560:22:59

So what does history relate about Mary Queen of Scots' visit?

0:22:590:23:03

She came here in 1566, probably because the second Laird was the captain of her bodyguard.

0:23:030:23:08

And she was quite well recorded when she came and she was with her husband, Darnley,

0:23:080:23:14

and she brought her very newly-born son, who was later to be James VI of Scotland and James I of England.

0:23:140:23:20

And do you think the babe went a-bed in this very crib?

0:23:200:23:25

Yes, absolutely. Because the second laird was actually the captain of Mary's bodyguard,

0:23:250:23:30

-we had these very strong associations with Mary.

-Mm.

0:23:300:23:34

While she was here, unfortunately, herself and her husband had a strong disagreement

0:23:340:23:39

and apparently she felt she may have been pregnant again

0:23:390:23:42

and over dinner she whispered to her husband,

0:23:420:23:44

could she be excused going on the hunting expedition the next day?

0:23:440:23:48

And apparently, Darnley turn around to all the assembled company and said,

0:23:480:23:52

"But ought not we to work a mare well when she's in full?"

0:23:520:23:55

which was considered a very un-Christian-like thing to say

0:23:550:23:58

-and he was rebuked strongly by the Earl of Traquair.

-I bet he was!

0:23:580:24:02

I very much liked the look of the gates when I drove in on the left-hand side.

0:24:020:24:06

-Tell me about those.

-Those are very famous gates

0:24:060:24:09

because those gates have been closed since 1745, when Bonny Prince Charlie was reported to have come here.

0:24:090:24:15

And this was as things were going well and he was on his campaign to regain the Scottish throne,

0:24:150:24:20

and the Earl gave him his support, and as he left through the gates,

0:24:200:24:24

the Earl closed the gates behind him and promised they would never be opened

0:24:240:24:28

until a Stuart king returned to the throne,

0:24:280:24:31

thinking this was a nice gesture and they'd be opened again in a few months' time,

0:24:310:24:35

but sadly that never came to pass, so the gates have remained closed every since.

0:24:350:24:40

-And the drive you came down today is still referred to as the temporary drive.

-How sweet.

0:24:400:24:44

Of course, Culloden happened and that was the cause smashed forever.

0:24:440:24:49

Yes, it certainly was. Sadly, that was the end of Jacobite hopes.

0:24:490:24:52

'Traquair also has some fragile glass which has survived from the Jacobite era.

0:24:520:24:58

'Keeping their allegiance secret, the flowers on this glass

0:24:580:25:03

'spell "Charles" in code,

0:25:030:25:05

'beginning with a chrysanthemum for C.

0:25:050:25:08

'But catching my eye is this rare Amen glass

0:25:080:25:12

'which dates to the early 1700s.'

0:25:120:25:15

This is a precious glass because it's been diamond engraved, hasn't it?

0:25:150:25:19

-Yes.

-With this incredible script.

0:25:190:25:22

Literally thousands of little dents into the surface

0:25:220:25:25

join up the indentations and make the script and so forth

0:25:250:25:31

and what I think is extraordinary is, one bad move, one heavy hammer tap on the diamond point,

0:25:310:25:37

-and you'd have broken the glass.

-Yes.

0:25:370:25:40

-But it's beautifully done, isn't it?

-The verse here is, "And God bless the Prince of Wales,

0:25:400:25:45

"the true-born Prince of Wales, send us by thee,

0:25:450:25:49

"send him soon over and kick out Hanover

0:25:490:25:52

"and then we'll recover our old liberty."

0:25:520:25:54

-THEY LAUGH

-Isn't that marvellous?

-We're still waiting.

-Yes, absolutely.

0:25:540:25:58

'Now, I wonder if our teams will be left waiting for profits over at the auction.'

0:26:000:26:05

How lovely is this? We've nipped across Scotland to Glasgow.

0:26:140:26:17

Great Western Auctions is where we're at

0:26:170:26:19

with the lovely Anita Manning. Morning, Anita.

0:26:190:26:22

-Good morning and welcome.

-Thank you.

0:26:220:26:24

Now, for the Reds, the Amphora vase with the old bird on the front. How do you rate that?

0:26:240:26:30

Well, these are very popular.

0:26:300:26:32

This factory only produced wares over 30, 40 years.

0:26:320:26:37

And their items were designed by students

0:26:370:26:42

from the Imperial School of Ceramic Design in Austria,

0:26:420:26:46

so we always have good design and it is quite popular.

0:26:460:26:50

-And how much?

-30 to 40.

0:26:500:26:53

-£40 they paid.

-Well...

-So that might be a bit of a struggle.

0:26:530:26:56

The next item I think is absolutely fabulous, this malachite glass pot.

0:26:560:27:01

-Yes.

-That, to me, has style, there's real quality to the material,

0:27:010:27:05

-fantastic colour.

-I think it's a lovely thing, as well.

0:27:050:27:08

Designed by Heinrich Hoffmann, who was one of the master glass makers.

0:27:080:27:14

-How much?

-£60 to £100.

-OK, fine. They paid £60.

-Yes.

0:27:140:27:17

-And their last item, a bit of bling.

-Mm-hm.

0:27:170:27:20

Your necklace and bracelet, all in the Deco style.

0:27:200:27:24

-Pity they're not diamonds, hey?

-THEY LAUGH

0:27:240:27:27

A big pity. But I think this is a wonderful piece of sparkly fun.

0:27:270:27:34

Now, I'm finding that period costume jewellery is doing very well in the saleroom.

0:27:340:27:40

So this might just appeal to those buyers.

0:27:400:27:45

-So how much, then?

-45 to 70.

0:27:450:27:48

That's a bit of a come on. They paid 95.

0:27:480:27:50

-OK.

-So they paid a good old whack for it.

0:27:500:27:53

It's a wee bit dear, but I wouldn't be surprised

0:27:530:27:58

if it went there or even if they made a little profit.

0:27:580:28:01

Well, if the bracelet doesn't do so well, they're going to need their bonus buy.

0:28:010:28:05

So let's go and have a look at it.

0:28:050:28:08

So, Billy and Jean, you gave Nick £105 of leftover lolly. What did you spend it on, Nick?

0:28:080:28:14

-There we go.

-Oh.

-Oh, I love it.

-A nice Georgian tea caddy.

0:28:140:28:19

-You like that?

-Oh, I do.

-How much did you spend on it?

-I spent £80.

0:28:190:28:23

-£80?

-Yeah.

-That's good.

0:28:230:28:26

It's not in perfect condition, but it's a genuine Georgian tea caddy.

0:28:260:28:30

-Nice shape, bit of inlay.

-How much do you think it'll make?

0:28:300:28:34

Well, that's the million-dollar question. It's hard to say. They used to make a lot more than that.

0:28:340:28:40

The market's not what it was, but it's a good example and it's got a fighting chance.

0:28:400:28:44

After the sale of the first three items, you get your chance to have a go with it or not,

0:28:440:28:48

but right now, for the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Nick's box.

0:28:480:28:54

-Well, this is the quintessentially standard piece of tea caddy, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:28:540:29:00

And probably more popular ten years ago.

0:29:000:29:03

But this is quite a nice example.

0:29:030:29:07

-We have handles missing here, which is really a wee bit of a shame.

-Oh, yes.

0:29:070:29:11

-So they just plugged them with a bit of timber.

-Yes.

0:29:110:29:16

The inside in not complete

0:29:160:29:19

and they've reupholstered it

0:29:190:29:22

-in this brown velvet.

-THEY LAUGH

0:29:220:29:24

A bit of Dralon in the roof. That's not Georgian Dralon.

0:29:240:29:27

-It's not.

-And then we would've had three tea containers,

0:29:270:29:31

silver or shagreen or something, in those at one time.

0:29:310:29:36

But I do like the little bracket feet here, little Georgian item.

0:29:360:29:41

Nice little brass escutcheon and this chequered banding here. So it's not bad.

0:29:410:29:47

-So how much?

-50 to 70.

0:29:470:29:49

OK. £80 was paid by Nick Hall.

0:29:490:29:53

He's got great expectations set in that box. We'll have to see what happens.

0:29:530:29:57

Anyway, that's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues.

0:29:570:30:00

First of all, the dressing table jars, which I have to say I think are hideous.

0:30:000:30:06

They're chipped enamel and it's only chromium-plated mounts. How do you rate them?

0:30:060:30:10

-We have to be positive if we're going to sell them.

-Of course.

0:30:100:30:14

And I like the enamelling and I like the colour of the enamelling.

0:30:140:30:18

And I think they would look rather nice on a lady's dressing table.

0:30:180:30:22

-So what's your estimate on the four?

-30 to 50.

0:30:220:30:25

They paid £40. So that's slap-bang in the middle.

0:30:250:30:28

-If you do that, Anita, you've done very well for chipped examples.

-Yes.

0:30:280:30:32

Next is the cast-iron plant stand.

0:30:320:30:36

Not my favourite again, I'm afraid.

0:30:360:30:38

-I mean, it's black, it's slightly rusty and it's repro.

-It is.

0:30:380:30:43

-But it is functional.

-Yes.

-It would look rather nice in a conservatory

0:30:430:30:47

with spider plants on it or ivy or whatever.

0:30:470:30:52

So it will appeal to the gardeners.

0:30:520:30:55

-Functional is the best that I can say for it.

-Yes.

0:30:550:30:58

-How much, please?

-40 to 60.

-OK, £40 paid.

0:30:580:31:01

So they paid the right price, that's the important thing, like it or loathe it.

0:31:010:31:05

And lastly is this little cased set-up which is a butter dish and knife

0:31:050:31:11

in its cardboard box. Any good?

0:31:110:31:14

Royal Crown Derby, wonderful, wonderful factory.

0:31:140:31:17

This is quite a late piece, probably from the 1940s or 1950s.

0:31:170:31:22

Little crescent-shaped butter dish, which is quite sweet.

0:31:220:31:26

But the little knife has some damage here. There's something missing

0:31:260:31:31

which will affect the price of it.

0:31:310:31:33

-Your estimate is £15 to £25.

-Mm-hm.

-They paid £15, so they paid the right price.

0:31:330:31:39

Overall, depending on what happens with their plant stand, they may or may not need the bonus buy,

0:31:390:31:44

but let's have a look at it anyway.

0:31:440:31:46

Well, girls, you spent a miserable £95.

0:31:460:31:49

£205, a fortune, went to Jeremy. What did you spend it on, Jeremy?

0:31:490:31:54

I'm afraid I've bought junk. Sorry about that.

0:31:540:31:57

-Ooh!

-Ahh!

-Here it is! It's a Chinese junk.

0:31:570:32:00

-Oh, that's gorgeous!

-That's lovely, yeah.

0:32:000:32:03

So this is a little Chinese white-metal junk

0:32:030:32:07

made probably in the late 19th, early 20th century.

0:32:070:32:11

It's got characters on the back.

0:32:110:32:13

It's got all the little features, cannon, figures, it's ready to sail away into profit.

0:32:130:32:18

-Oh, that's lovely. Really good.

-What would you pay for that?

0:32:180:32:22

-40 quid.

-Oh.

0:32:220:32:24

It really is junk, then. THEY LAUGH

0:32:240:32:28

-65.

-That's good.

-That's OK.

-How much profit do you think it'll make?

0:32:280:32:34

I think you could get £80 to £100 on a good day.

0:32:340:32:37

-Happy, girls?

-BOTH: Yes.

-You don't pick now, you pick later,

0:32:370:32:42

but let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Jeremy's bit of junk, I mean junk.

0:32:420:32:47

So, Anita, junk by name, junk by nature?

0:32:470:32:50

-SHE LAUGHS

-Give us the lowdown.

-I know.

0:32:500:32:53

I mean, there is a lot of detail in this little object

0:32:530:32:58

and I particularly like the little oars, the little Chinese script on the stern here.

0:32:580:33:04

But I quite like the wee cannons.

0:33:040:33:06

And you don't often see that sort of detail on this type of item.

0:33:060:33:13

This is not the best of quality but it has a certain appeal.

0:33:130:33:19

-What is your estimate?

-£50 to £80.

0:33:190:33:21

OK, £65 was paid by Jeremy. He clearly thinks that it's going to do well,

0:33:210:33:27

in the troubled waters that are ahead for his team.

0:33:270:33:31

And we'll find out what happens in a minute. Thank you very much.

0:33:310:33:34

-So, Billy and Jean, how you feeling, kids?

-Bit nervous.

-Are you?

0:33:430:33:47

-Jean, are you looking forward to this?

-Very much so, yes.

0:33:470:33:50

Is there any item, darling, that you are at all worried about?

0:33:500:33:53

-Er, no, not really.

-No. Well, I don't think you have got any great worries here.

0:33:530:33:59

First up is the Amphora vase and here it comes.

0:33:590:34:02

Lot 48, ladies and gentlemen.

0:34:020:34:05

It's a superb little piece of Amphora.

0:34:050:34:08

It's Art Deco, it's from the 1960s,

0:34:080:34:11

decorated with the image of a stork.

0:34:110:34:15

Can we say £80? £60?

0:34:150:34:18

Start me at £20. £20 for the Amphora.

0:34:190:34:23

-Oh, dear.

-£20.

0:34:230:34:25

20 bid. 25.

0:34:250:34:27

30. 35. 40.

0:34:270:34:31

-It's creeping. It's agonising, isn't it?

-With the lady at £40.

0:34:310:34:35

45. Fresh bidder at 45. 50.

0:34:350:34:39

-£50.

-Go on!

0:34:400:34:43

With the lady at £50. All done at £50? £50.

0:34:430:34:48

Well done. That's plus 10. Nothing wrong with that.

0:34:480:34:50

-That's all right.

-Good start.

-It's great.

-Now, the malachite vase.

0:34:500:34:54

It's the Heinrich Hoffman Ingrid vase.

0:34:540:34:57

Moulded in relief with six Bacchanalian maidens.

0:34:570:35:02

And I can see a few Bacchanalian maidens on the floor here.

0:35:020:35:07

-We've got one here, Anita.

-And there's a lady over there.

0:35:070:35:10

So this is a rare little piece, ladies and gentlemen.

0:35:100:35:13

Start me at 50 for the malachite glass. £50.

0:35:130:35:16

£30 then.

0:35:160:35:19

30 bid. 40. 50. 60.

0:35:190:35:22

70.

0:35:220:35:25

80. 90. 100. 110.

0:35:250:35:29

Any advance on 110?

0:35:290:35:31

All done at 110? 110.

0:35:310:35:34

-Well done. £50 profit.

-Yeah!

-Nearly doubled your money.

0:35:340:35:37

That's pretty good, isn't it? You must be pleased about that, Jean?

0:35:370:35:41

-Delighted.

-Delighted, yeah. Here we go.

0:35:410:35:43

Are there any ladies in the room

0:35:430:35:47

that like diamonds?

0:35:470:35:49

If you can't afford diamonds, this is the nearest you will get to it.

0:35:490:35:55

Look how they sparkle.

0:35:550:35:58

Will you start me at £50 for the necklace and bracelet set?

0:35:580:36:02

£30. 30 bid.

0:36:020:36:05

40. 50. 60.

0:36:050:36:08

£60. 70. 80.

0:36:080:36:10

-£80. 90.

-We're so close.

0:36:100:36:14

No? With you, sir, at £90.

0:36:140:36:17

All done at £90? £90.

0:36:170:36:20

-Bad luck. £5 off. I mean, nothing really.

-That's not too bad.

0:36:200:36:24

Gosh, she worked hard on that, didn't she?

0:36:240:36:26

So that is £60 you had.

0:36:260:36:28

You've just lost a fiver, so you have plus £55.

0:36:280:36:32

£55 profit, which is lovely. What you going to do about this tea caddy?

0:36:320:36:36

-£80 paid.

-You've got £55, don't forget.

0:36:360:36:39

Do you want to risk losing it?

0:36:390:36:41

-Stick.

-You'd be sad if you lost it, wouldn't you?

-I know.

-Yes.

-We'll just stick.

0:36:410:36:46

OK, you're parking your £55. Let's see what happens with the bonus buy.

0:36:460:36:50

Lot 54 is this superb little Georgian tea caddy.

0:36:500:36:55

I'll start the biding at £30. 40.

0:36:550:36:59

50. 60. £70.

0:36:590:37:03

Any advance on £70?

0:37:030:37:05

75, I'm out. With you, sir, at 75. All done?

0:37:050:37:10

-£75 is minus £5. You made exactly the right decision.

-Well done.

0:37:100:37:14

Anyway, you've preserved your £55 profit, which is absolutely super.

0:37:140:37:19

The big thing now is, don't say a word to the Blues.

0:37:190:37:22

-No, definitely not.

-Definitely not, OK.

0:37:220:37:25

-So, Eileen and Shona, how are you girls?

-We're good.

-Excited.

-Nervous.

0:37:370:37:42

-Do you know how the grandmother and grandson got on?

-No. No idea.

0:37:420:37:45

So this is very interesting, this family show, isn't it?

0:37:450:37:49

How do you predict it's all going to turn out, Eileen?

0:37:490:37:52

Well, no idea, but hopefully well.

0:37:520:37:54

Yeah? You feeling confident, Shona?

0:37:540:37:56

Well, I like all my items but I don't know if they'll make a profit.

0:37:560:38:00

Stand by, then, cross everything. Here we go!

0:38:000:38:02

This set of four very stylish Art Deco dressing jars

0:38:020:38:07

and I can start the bidding at £20.

0:38:070:38:11

With me at 20. 30.

0:38:110:38:15

35 with me. 40.

0:38:150:38:19

-You've wiped your face, Shona.

-Good.

-45. I'll take it in 5s.

0:38:190:38:22

-45.

-45!

-50.

0:38:220:38:24

55. With the lady at 55.

0:38:240:38:27

Any advance on 55?

0:38:270:38:30

All done at 55? 55.

0:38:300:38:33

Well done, girls. Plus £15. That's very good, isn't it?

0:38:330:38:37

And I was so rude about them, too. Anyway, there we go.

0:38:370:38:40

-Here comes the stand.

-..the cast iron Japanese plant stand

0:38:400:38:45

with three tiers modelled as fans.

0:38:450:38:49

A romantic piece, ladies and gentlemen. Very sweet piece.

0:38:490:38:52

Start me at £20. £20.

0:38:520:38:56

20 bid. With you, madam, at 20.

0:38:560:38:59

25. 30.

0:38:590:39:01

35. 40.

0:39:010:39:04

45. 50. Oh, 55, fresh bidder.

0:39:040:39:08

Oh, no, I've got another one. Catch you in a wee minute.

0:39:080:39:11

55. 60.

0:39:110:39:14

-70. 80. 90.

-Look at this!

0:39:140:39:17

With the lady at £90.

0:39:170:39:19

Any advance on £90? All done at £90?

0:39:190:39:22

Plus £50 on that. I must say, cast iron is terribly romantic.

0:39:220:39:28

Right, now we go for the Royal Crown Derby.

0:39:280:39:31

We have a little crescent-shaped butter dish and knife.

0:39:310:39:35

It's in the Imari palette

0:39:350:39:38

and it's in its original 1950s box

0:39:380:39:41

which gives it that additional charm. Can we say £50? 50?

0:39:410:39:47

Start me at £20.

0:39:470:39:50

£20? £10, then.

0:39:500:39:52

10 bid.

0:39:520:39:54

15. 20. 25. 30. 35. 40.

0:39:540:39:58

Lady at 40. Any advance on £40?

0:39:580:40:02

-Doubled your money.

-All done at £40? £40.

0:40:020:40:06

You've made £25 on that. That is just extraordinary.

0:40:060:40:09

50, 75, 85, you've made £90.

0:40:090:40:12

-You only spent £95 and you made £90.

-THEY LAUGH

0:40:120:40:15

-I told you, Tim, canny Scots.

-Canny Scots. Well, I'm taking my toupee off to you.

0:40:150:40:20

-You're doing very nicely here.

-Do you need the junk, though? No.

0:40:200:40:24

-I don't think we do. I mean, it's pretty but I don't think so.

-You're not going to go with it?

0:40:240:40:30

-You have a magnificent £90 profit, you're not going with the bonus buy. Is that a decision made?

-Yes.

0:40:300:40:35

OK. Well, let's see what it makes, anyway. Here it comes.

0:40:350:40:38

Lot 73 is a late-19th century Chinese silver model

0:40:380:40:42

of a junk in full sail.

0:40:420:40:44

And it's on a carved hardwood stand. 60?

0:40:440:40:49

£60? Surely. £40 then?

0:40:490:40:52

40 bid. With you, sir, at 40.

0:40:520:40:56

Any advance on 40? 45. 50.

0:40:560:40:59

-55. 60.

-Look out, she's going on.

0:40:590:41:02

-65.

-Yes.

-65.

0:41:020:41:06

With the gentleman at 65. Any advance on 65?

0:41:060:41:09

All done at 65?

0:41:090:41:12

It's done it. 65, it's wiped its face, no profit,

0:41:120:41:14

no loss, no shame and no gain.

0:41:140:41:17

-OK? So that was a wise move, wasn't it?

-Yes.

-Mm.

-Well done, Jeremy, no shame in that.

0:41:170:41:23

Anyway, so overall, girls, you are £90, an unbelievable £90 up.

0:41:230:41:27

Anyway, we'll park that. Don't say a word to the Reds. No point spoiling their day.

0:41:270:41:32

-Well, what an exciting day we've had today. Have you been chatting, you teams?

-ALL: No.

0:41:420:41:48

Well, it should come as no secret that both of you are into monster profit country

0:41:480:41:53

as far as Bargain Hunt is concerned, anyway, which is always exciting.

0:41:530:41:57

To be able to give you substantial wodges of cash gives me great pleasure.

0:41:570:42:01

It's just a question of scale today.

0:42:010:42:03

And the team which are marginally behind in the profit stakes

0:42:030:42:08

-are the Reds.

-Oh, never mind!

0:42:080:42:10

I mean, it's a bad do this, isn't it? To say that you're the runners-up with £55 of profits.

0:42:100:42:16

-That's what you're going to take, £55. Boy, that's very good, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:42:160:42:22

You resisted the bonus buy, which was very, very close, Nick. But nevertheless, you preserved your 55.

0:42:220:42:27

-Have you had a great time?

-Brilliant time.

-Fantastic.

-Very nice to see you both.

0:42:270:42:31

And congratulations, Nick. Now, the victors, who are going to go home with £90...

0:42:310:42:37

£90! Look at that!

0:42:370:42:40

Because you made a profit on all three items,

0:42:400:42:43

which is practically unheard of on Bargain Hunt,

0:42:430:42:46

-you are eligible for the ancient order of the golden gavel.

-Ooh!

0:42:460:42:49

We've run out of golden gavels. So we now lob out these things. And not very many of them.

0:42:490:42:54

So if you take that one, well done. Shona, you take that and pin it on.

0:42:540:42:58

-And the maestro...

-Thank you.

-J, there we go.

0:42:580:43:01

Something you can wear down the people's high street with pride.

0:43:010:43:06

-And we've had a thoroughly good day. In fact, join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes?

-ALL: Yes!

0:43:060:43:11

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:140:43:18

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:180:43:22

.

0:43:220:43:22

The teams descend on the Edinburgh Antiques and Collectors Fair. A professional swimmer and his grandmother team up with expert Nick Hall and bump into a past Bargain Hunt team, who try to pass on their winning luck! Jeremy Lamond takes a mother-and-daughter team under his wing and Tim Wonnacott heads to Traquair House on the Scottish Borders to find out all about the infamous visit of Mary, Queen of Scots.