Australia 4 Bargain Hunt


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Australia 4

Tim Wonnacott and the Bargain Hunt team head down under for this Australian special. The red and blue teams hunt for bargains at an eclectic antique centre in Melbourne.


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Transcript


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For the first time in the history of mankind,

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we have come down under to Australia.

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So let's go bargain hunting, yeah!

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In our quest to track down the very best bargains,

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we've travelled 10,500 miles to Australia.

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Just a short tram ride away from central Melbourne is the bustling suburb of Prahran.

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And it's here that we find the fun and eclectic Chapel Street Bazaar.

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Here's a quick peek at what's bizarre up at the bazaar.

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Red team sisters, Ariel and Melanie,

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won't take no for an answer.

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Really, the most we can pay is 200. That's our bottom line.

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We really need that for 200.

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-That's my bottom line. I'm not going any higher.

-40, and we've got a deal.

-No.

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And the Blues, Sydney-based friends, Rod and Drew, know what they like...

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He's kitsch, he's orange, he's flamboyant. He's us.

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-..and will do anything to get it.

-Oh, deary dear! My children!

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That's all still to come.

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But because we're in Oz, we've swapped pounds for dollars.

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500 of them. But otherwise, the rules remain the same.

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Each team has one hour to shop for three items,

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which they sell later at auction

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and the team wins that makes the most profit.

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You got all that? Strewth! Anyway, let's go and meet today's teams.

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-Ariel and Melanie. Welcome, girls.

-Hello.

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You have a great interest in Bargain Hunt,

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as I can see from your rather cheeky knitted bowtie.

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-Yes.

-Both of you?

-We love Bargain Hunt.

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We love Bargain Hunt. We watch it pretty much every day,

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so when I was sitting on the couch and you suddenly came on

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and said, "We're coming to Australia," I started to scream.

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-Did you?

-In excitement, yes.

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And Melanie looked at me like I was going completely over the top.

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I applied right away and luckily, we got on. So we're very excited.

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Well, we're very, very excited to have you both with us.

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Ariel, what do you do for a living, darling?

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Well, I'm currently studying to be a teacher.

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I graduate at the end of this year.

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-Mel, what do you do for a living, darling?

-I'm a librarian.

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And I really love books and I love that it's a chilled out

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and peaceful environment that the library gives you.

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What sort of books do you like?

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I like the Count Of Monte Cristo and old 18th-century books.

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-And what do you enjoy collecting?

-We collect strange clothes.

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We have a passion for Japan, so we've got maid costumes,

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bear costumes, anime costumes.

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Have you ever been to Japan?

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-No, I haven't, but Ariel has a couple of times.

-Have you?

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-And was it absolutely fab, Ariel?

-Mind blowing.

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So different from Australia, but it's absolutely fantastic.

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Maybe you can fund your tickets from your Bargain Hunt winnings!

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-Hopefully! Hopefully!

-Yeah. Well, that would be fun.

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Great to meet you, girls.

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Rod, how did you first meet Drew?

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I met Drew in an Op Shop, actually.

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It's like a second-hand store in Australia.

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-We've been friends ever since.

-That's brilliant.

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Do you go to these Op Shops because you like a bargain? Is that it?

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Oh, I'm such a bargain hunter, Tim. I'm just shocking.

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I can't even walk past a skip without looking inside.

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So what do you do, seriously, to earn a dollar?

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I'm a food service supervisor at St Luke's Hospital in Sydney

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I serve all the food and look after all the patients,

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cleaning up, sterilisation.

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-Now, you also have a passion for art?

-Oh, yes.

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I do optical art, which is like geometric art in really kind of swirly,

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wild kind of '60s and '70s psychedelic colours.

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And much to my surprise...

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much to my surprise,

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I've, erm, sold a few.

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Well then, you must be pretty good. Drew, what do you do for a living?

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I work at the passport office in Sydney.

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I've worked there for a few years.

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It's great, I get to talk and chat to customers about their travel plans.

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I know you enjoy collecting. What sort of things interest you?

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I like 1920s, 1930s trinket things, glass things.

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Mainly, though, my huge focus is on anything to do with Cluedo.

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Cluedo, the board game. Love it.

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I've got about 30 to 40 different editions of the actual game.

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I also have the Cluedo umbrella, Cluedo Christmas bonbons.

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-You also like horror films?

-Exactly. Cluedo, horror, hand-in-hand.

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I love watching a horror film, freaking myself out,

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and not being able to sleep the next night.

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Then wake up the next morning and want to watch it again!

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On that happy note, I'm going to give you some money.

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AU500, there you go. 500 each.

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You know the rules, your experts await, and off you go!

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And very, very, very good luck!

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What fun this is!

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So, in unfamiliar Australian territory,

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we thought we'd bring along a taste of British expertise.

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Hoping to make a good return for the Reds is super Scotsman, Paul Laidlaw.

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And English gent and globetrotter, David Barby, will be in charge of the Blues.

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-Best of luck. Best of luck. Good luck.

-All right, teams.

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You're on the clock, enough hugging. Time to get shopping!

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-This is it, girls. How are you feeling?

-Fantastic! Excited!

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-500 bucks, is it burning a hole in our collective pocket?

-Yes, certainly is!

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Scan the store. The clock is ticking away.

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Looks like the Blues are feeling the heat of the Barby!

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And they're only just off the starting block.

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-Look at that for a bracelet!

-Oh, yeah!

-That's interesting, isn't it?

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-What's that made out of?

-Agates.

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-Polished hard stones, and typically Scottish.

-OK.

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I've got to be honest with you, I can see the price tag from here,

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it's not going to happen for us today.

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But that is about as sexy a piece as I've seen in many a moon.

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Expensive taste, ladies! What about those Blues?

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-A bear bottle.

-Oh!

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-I'll put it back.

-38.

-It's a steal.

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If you got it for a five, it would be.

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Remember, you have 500, guys. Don't think cheap!

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We want something more upmarket.

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Oh, gosh, that's rather nice. With a very elegant gentleman.

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Oh, look at that. That is a good piece of poker ware.

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-That's beautiful.

-I love these fruits here.

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What year is that, David?

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1920s, 1930s.

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-But this is typical... This is good quality poker work.

-Yes.

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And that would have been used purely for decoration.

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You wouldn't put flowers in it. or only dried flowers.

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It's not nouveau, is it?

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It's very elegant, and it's in very good condition.

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-A lot of work has gone into it.

-It's very flamboyant.

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-As soon as I saw it, I thought of you.

-It's beautiful, David.

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No damage on it. It's been turned.

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-What's the very best you can do on that? 100?

-120, maybe?

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No, I'd go 100. 90.

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THEY LAUGH No?

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-Well, I think 100 will do it.

-Yes, please.

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-Thank you very much.

-Pleasure.

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-Lovely to meet you.

-And nice to meet you as well.

-Thanks a lot.

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-Enjoy it. You've done well.

-Thank you.

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Oh, let's have a shake on it.

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So, that's one in the old bag for the Blues.

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At 100, that's a very good price. Well done.

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Meanwhile, our ladies in red have spotted some Aussie bling.

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How do we feel about the feather form brooch?

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It's peacock feather, isn't it?

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It doesn't have the eye, it's not peacock. I'll tell you what I can.

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Charles Horner is Macclesfield, which is north-west of England.

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-OK.

-Close to my home.

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He is renowned, the firm is renowned for enamelled silver jewellery.

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Given that we can date this almost certainly to the tail end of the 19th century,

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I think that's a surprisingly modern looking brooch.

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Yes, it is, isn't it?

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If I said to you that was contemporary, would you find that plausible?

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I definitely would buy that. You could imagine buying that in a store.

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-We've got a brand here, we've got a name.

-Yeah.

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How is it close up?

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-I think it's even nicer close up.

-I love the colour.

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-It's surprisingly modern.

-It's got a hallmark.

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You have a good set of marks there.

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Sheaves is the assay mark for Chester, if it was assayed there.

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-CH?

-CH, 1911, I think.

-1911!

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Could you believe that? 100 years old.

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-It doesn't look it.

-You'd think it's contemporary. Fantastic.

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Sounds promising, Reds. How are those Blues getting on?

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-Japanese dolls. Pottery.

-Those boys don't look impressed!

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-Is this in your line?

-No, not really.

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Keep looking, guys!

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Undecided on the feather brooch, Ariel and Melanie want to check out a second piece of jewellery.

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-That would be gold, wouldn't it?

-That is so sweet. 14 carat, frosted gold.

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Is there something wrong with the tail?

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I think that is just a little natural pearl, probably freshwater.

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-Beautiful.

-Baroque pearl. I mean, it just oozes it.

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-That is divine.

-It's lovely, it's lovely.

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On a bad day, that stops at 150.

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Yes.

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So I think you've got to buy it at 150, and no more.

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It looks like the girls are going to make an offer for both pieces.

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-You do that one.

-No, you do them both, because they're from the same cabinet.

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-Go for 100. Just ask. Just ask!

-Oh, I'll ask.

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I love a feisty redhead!

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Excuse me, do you think you could do a deal on the both of these?

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-150 for the two?

-150 for the two.

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All right, if you just wait one moment, I'll just check for you.

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Those Aussie girls are pretty shrewd!

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-Suspiria!

-We're shopping for the show, not for your personal...

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-I know.

-Come on, Blues, we need focus here!

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-The best we could do would be 250.

-200?

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-Really, the most we can pay is 200.

-Yes, 200.

-That's our bottom line.

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We really need that for 200.

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-So if we can get both for 200, it's guaranteed, it's cash.

-Yeah, yeah.

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-But we can't do 250.

-I'll just have to check with you again, sorry.

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It's OK. Thank you.

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-That's Australian straight talking!

-I am loving your work!

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Me too!

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Leaving the Reds to haggle, the Blues have spotted a potential buy.

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-How retro is it?

-It's definitely 1950s, I'd say.

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Is that silver round the rim?

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It's silver round the rim, yeah.

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-Very smart.

-It's smart. Are we going to sell that at auction and make a profit?

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-Oh, I don't think so. Not at that price.

-I don't think so.

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So, what's the latest on the jewellery deal?

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They're stretching it, 220.

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-Mm.

-No.

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It really has to be 200, you know, we've got a few other options.

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Otherwise, we won't able to have it.

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The best we could do would be 220.

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Well look, why don't we compromise? Could it be 210, cash, job done?

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-210, cash.

-Fantastic.

-Thank you.

-That's a deal, then.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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Well done. 105 each that equates to, for two good brooches. Excellent.

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Well done, Reds. And a deal as sharp as any brooch pin.

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With 30 minutes gone, we're halfway through the shopping,

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and the Reds are 21 up on the Blues.

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That's Rosenthal porcelain.

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The designer is an artist called Bjorn Wiinblad. Quite nice. Period.

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1970s, 1980s. Do you like it?

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-I'm not really sure about smoking things.

-OK.

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Melanie doesn't mind this oriental one, which is a 1930s' cigarette box.

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But I don't mind the walnut one.

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For my money, you killed it with "cigarette".

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If you've got a strong feeling, it's all about price.

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I think we can do better. We're on a roll at the moment.

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-I think we can aim higher.

-Fair enough.

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It seems smoking items have the thumbs down.

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So why are we looking at this?

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It's very art deco. It's a German little figure.

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It's orange, I do have a fetish for orange.

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-Art Deco, orange marriage made in heaven.

-You know what it is? It's for cigarettes.

-Oh!

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It's something which happened in the 1920s,

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it doesn't mean to say you've got to use it.

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-It's a decorative item, as a collector's piece.

-It's very cute.

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-Could we have a look at it?

-Yes.

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You put cigarettes here, and matches there,

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strike it on the front and light your cigarette.

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-So, what's the condition like?

-Condition's OK, it's not rubbed.

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A little bit of rubbing there. But no cracks, no breaks.

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-What year is that, David?

-Oh, this would be 1930s.

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-Think in terms of Cabaret.

-Oh, Weimar Republic?

-Yes.

-Oh, wow.

-That sort of period.

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What's the very best you can do?

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How about 270?

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No, no.

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That has got to be well under 100.

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-100?

-It's got to be well under 100.

-That's quite a reduction.

-It is.

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Those, back home, would sell for something in the region of £50.

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But, David, we're not in England!

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The Australian market is completely different.

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Is there anything you could on that?

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The best we can do is 150.

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-150.

-THEY SIGH

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120? Could you stretch to that?

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Well, I said 150, you said 120. I'll meet you halfway at 135.

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-What do you think, Drew?

-Oh, it's too much for me.

-Let's stick by 120.

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-120.

-120.

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-You're killing me!

-120.

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-All right, 120.

-Whooooh! Yes! Yes!

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So, that's item number two, and our Blues sure are happy.

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He's kitsch, he's orange, he's flamboyant. He's us.

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What do you think of these vases?

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-What can you tell us about them?

-These are cloisonne enamelled.

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Japanese, Chinese in origin.

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It's ubiquitous. There's tons of it out there.

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-I don't think it's us.

-OK, that's cool.

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-You don't mind me being so honest?

-No, we want honest opinions, it's what we're looking for.

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Good old straight talking again.

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The ones I like are those there with the art nouveau painted designs on.

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How much are they?

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Oh, I think they're very expensive.

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-900.

-900! That's just too much.

-What?!

-It's too much.

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Even in dollars, that's expensive.

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-What's this?

-Well, I'm staring at that as you pointed it out.

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We know it's an aviation-themed piece.

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-But do you see a transfer decal down below there?

-Yeah.

-Can you read it?

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-Yeah. RAAF.

-Which is?

-Which is the Royal Air Force.

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Royal Australian Air Force.

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-Royal Australian Air Force!

-I'll wager, the best air force in Australia.

-Definitely in Australia!

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So, what do we have? Period-wise, no earlier than the '40s,

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and perhaps '50s. So immediate post-war. And what is it?

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A little desk piece, a retirement presentation piece,

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something like that. Lovely quality.

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The propeller is laminated which means it's made of layers of mahogany.

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The clock - the label, importantly, tells us working order. Good news.

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I like the RAAF thing. It's got that military heritage behind it.

0:16:020:16:07

Um, I don't mind that. I can see appeal from a number of quarters.

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-I don't mind that either.

-Are you liking it?

-Yeah, I do.

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That's more probably the male thing. Would you buy it?

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I would buy something similar to it, yes!

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-Um, price wise?

-I reckon 45.

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-I reckon 20. Try 20.

-I wouldn't try that.

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We're talking about trying.

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-I think we need to see what the bottom line is.

-Definitely.

-OK. Cool.

0:16:320:16:36

This girl's good.

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-"Hand-painted cups, saucers, plates. One cup as is."

-That means damaged.

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And the hunt goes on for the Blues. The Reds have found a stallholder.

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But I don't think he knows what he's up against.

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-50, bottom.

-50.

-I don't know. Because this is my last item,

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I don't want to pay that much.

0:16:580:17:00

So my maximum that I would pay for that is 30.

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-That's my bottom line, I'm not going any higher.

-40 and we've got a deal.

-No, 30, that's the bottom line.

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-You tell him, girl.

-30 cash then.

-Yeah, deal.

-OK.

-Thank you.

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Wow, Ariel, that's amazing!

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-We nailed that with almost 15 minutes to spare.

-Of course.

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-Which leaves us time for a coffee.

-Sounds good, let's go!

-Celebratory coffee!

0:17:230:17:30

With shopping over for the Reds, the Blues are feeling the pressure.

0:17:300:17:35

Wasn't there something up here that we particularly liked and we bypassed it?

0:17:350:17:40

The clock's ticking, gents.

0:17:400:17:42

-Quick, we haven't got much time!

-You're absolutely right.

0:17:420:17:45

Oh... I love that.

0:17:500:17:54

-What is it?

-Well, it's got it down as a Bosley South Australian bread bin.

0:17:540:17:59

Oh, wow! It's huge.

0:17:590:18:03

-Don't.

-How old?

-Why don't you like it?

0:18:030:18:07

-It's...

-It's pottery. Yeah, no...

0:18:070:18:11

-It's a bin.

-I think that... has a multiplicity of uses.

0:18:110:18:17

It could be a jardiniere. The very fact it's got the lid to it as well.

0:18:170:18:22

And it's sort of what we call a lead glaze,

0:18:220:18:24

a majolica glaze. I think that's quite clever.

0:18:240:18:27

What's the price? 295.

0:18:270:18:30

-Do you like that? It's Australian.

-It is a bit of Australiana.

-It is.

0:18:300:18:34

-Nice and heavy, chunky.

-I think it's chunky.

-We like chunky.

0:18:340:18:38

-Yeah, chunky's good.

-How can I help?

0:18:380:18:39

-This particular piece...

-Right.

-What date is it?

0:18:390:18:43

It's a gorgeous 1920s-30s' piece.

0:18:430:18:47

Made in South Australia.

0:18:470:18:49

Very rare to get it all in one piece without a large crack through it.

0:18:490:18:54

And, um, the best I can do on it is 125.

0:18:540:18:59

Could we say 100, please?

0:18:590:19:02

-100, please?

-Hands and knees?

0:19:050:19:08

Oh, yes!

0:19:080:19:10

Oh dear, oh dear! My children.

0:19:100:19:13

LAUGHTER

0:19:130:19:15

All right, 100.

0:19:150:19:17

Well, the Blue boys' prayers have been answered just with five minutes to go.

0:19:180:19:23

God, strewth, what's up? Time's up!

0:19:230:19:27

Let's remind ourselves what the Red team bought.

0:19:270:19:31

The girls first spotted an early 20th century enamelled brooch.

0:19:310:19:35

-I definitely would buy that.

-And then they did, for 105.

0:19:350:19:41

Another 105 was spent on this leaf-shaped enamelled gold brooch.

0:19:410:19:47

-It's gorgeous.

-That is divine.

0:19:470:19:49

And with plain talking negotiating skills...

0:19:490:19:53

I don't want to pay that much for it.

0:19:530:19:55

..Ariel made sure they picked up this mantle clock for 30.

0:19:550:19:59

-So, how much did you spend all through?

-240.

-240.

0:19:590:20:03

-That's 260 of leftover lolly, please.

-No worries.

0:20:030:20:07

Thank you, Ariel, that's great.

0:20:070:20:09

Which goes straight across to the legend. There you go, man. What you going to do with that?

0:20:090:20:14

I think I spied something out of the corner of my eye,

0:20:140:20:17

that I think it is complementary but contrasting well with our purchases in hand.

0:20:170:20:23

-Ah!

-We have faith in you.

-We all have faith in you.

0:20:230:20:26

And he's so coy sometimes. He's not going to tell us what it is.

0:20:260:20:29

Anyway, we'll find out when we get to the bonus buy reveal.

0:20:290:20:33

But right now, why don't we remind ourselves what the Blue team bought?

0:20:330:20:37

The Blues paid 100 for a 1930s' Australian pokerware vase.

0:20:370:20:42

It's very flamboyant. As soon as I saw that, I thought of you chaps.

0:20:420:20:45

And they took a shine to this art deco cigarette dispenser

0:20:450:20:49

and picked it up for a shocking 120.

0:20:490:20:53

And finally, they fell on their knees, literally,

0:20:530:20:57

to plead to buy a South Australian bread bin with 100 of dough.

0:20:570:21:01

-How much did you spend all through then?

-320.

0:21:010:21:05

-I'd like 180 of leftover lolly, please.

-Here's the money.

-180.

0:21:050:21:09

He does the housekeeping, OK. 180 goes straight to the Barby.

0:21:090:21:14

So what are you going to find with that, David?

0:21:140:21:17

There's got to be something exciting, maybe musical.

0:21:170:21:20

-Yes.

-Drew's very much into musicals.

0:21:200:21:22

Did you realise, Tim, we were both in the same production,

0:21:220:21:25

-obviously not the same year, called The Boyfriend?

-Get away!

0:21:250:21:28

-I played Tony and he played...

-Bobby.

-Can you remember any tunes?

0:21:280:21:34

# Won't you Charleston with me?

0:21:340:21:37

# Won't you Charleston with me? #

0:21:370:21:41

That's enough of that, thank you! We've got a whole programme to get on with.

0:21:410:21:45

Anyway, you go and find your bonus buy. He was a choir boy, you know. You have a nice cup of tea, boys.

0:21:450:21:49

Meanwhile, we're going to shove off to a marvellous property

0:21:490:21:53

called The Briars. Where is it? You are about to find out.

0:21:530:21:58

So, we leave the city of Melbourne behind and head out south

0:21:580:22:02

for just over an hour's drive to the Mornington Peninsula, where,

0:22:020:22:05

tucked away in a beautiful rural setting, is this colonial homestead, The Briars.

0:22:050:22:12

Once home to the Balcombe family, it's now one of the oldest properties on the peninsula.

0:22:120:22:18

But inside this classic Australian building

0:22:180:22:22

are treasures relating to the Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte,

0:22:220:22:26

which are of great importance to French national history.

0:22:260:22:31

Welcome to the Dame Mabel Brooks Napoleonic collection.

0:22:310:22:35

In 1815, Napoleon was exiled to the island of St Helena

0:22:360:22:41

where he was initially a guest at The Briars,

0:22:410:22:44

the home of Dame Mabel's great grandfather, William Balcombe.

0:22:440:22:47

Napoleon gave Balcombe and his family a number of gifts,

0:22:470:22:51

which ultimately came to Australia at a later date.

0:22:510:22:56

And what I have been surprised at is the number of pieces here in the Australian house, The Briars,

0:22:560:23:05

that have got a connection with Napoleon's hair.

0:23:050:23:07

Because here we've got a ring,

0:23:070:23:11

a delightful Georgian gold ring.

0:23:110:23:13

In the centre, it has a little panel filled with Napoleon's hair.

0:23:130:23:18

And if you look at the back, inscribed in the gold band, it says,

0:23:180:23:23

"The hair of Napoleon Bonaparte."

0:23:230:23:27

This was given to Dr Elliott, his physician,

0:23:270:23:32

quite early on in 1816.

0:23:320:23:34

The next character in our hair-related Napoleon story

0:23:340:23:39

is a fellow called Denzil Ibbetson.

0:23:390:23:42

He came over with Napoleon in 1815 on HMS Northumberland,

0:23:420:23:48

and they became friendly.

0:23:480:23:50

Ultimately, Ibbetson became the supplier of goods

0:23:500:23:54

to Napoleon's household at Longwood.

0:23:540:23:58

And here, we've got a shard of hair that Napoleon presented to his friend, Ibbetson,

0:23:580:24:04

and as Ibbetson was an amateur artist,

0:24:040:24:07

he created this delightful pen and ink and watercolour image,

0:24:070:24:11

almost a cartoon, of Napoleon, from behind,

0:24:110:24:14

with his hand tucked characteristically underneath his tailcoat.

0:24:140:24:20

But the most amusing piece of hair is pasted into this scrapbook.

0:24:200:24:27

Here we've got an original letter from the period,

0:24:270:24:30

from a Captain Poppleton, part of the military garrison on St Helena.

0:24:300:24:35

His job was to trail Napoleon wherever he went when exercising around the island.

0:24:350:24:42

But Poppleton liked Napoleon and Napoleon like Poppleton.

0:24:420:24:46

And inevitably, a bit of Napoleon's hair went Poppleton's way.

0:24:460:24:50

There you can see it, stapled to the letter that he sent back to Britain.

0:24:500:24:57

But I guess the most valuable and precious

0:24:570:25:01

of Dame Maple's collected pieces of Napoleana

0:25:010:25:05

is this solid silver ink well.

0:25:050:25:08

What's unusual about it is that around the concave-sided base,

0:25:080:25:13

we've got three solid gold Napoleonic coins,

0:25:130:25:17

and it says on the inscription,

0:25:170:25:19

"These Napoleons", that's the gold coins,

0:25:190:25:22

"presented to Mrs Egerton by Sir Thomas Reade,

0:25:220:25:27

"Lieutenant Governor of St Helena."

0:25:270:25:30

"They were found in the pockets of Napoleon Bonaparte

0:25:300:25:35

"after his death on the 5th of May 1821."

0:25:350:25:38

So Reade, the Deputy Governor,

0:25:380:25:41

somehow half-inched the three gold coins in Napoleon's pockets.

0:25:410:25:46

By the following year, the gold coins are back in London

0:25:460:25:49

and silversmiths have mounted them in this splendid inkwell,

0:25:490:25:55

which goes to make it very, very precious.

0:25:550:25:58

But not half as precious as this.

0:25:580:26:01

MILITARY STYLE DRUM BEAT

0:26:010:26:03

Spooky, isn't it?

0:26:080:26:10

The day after Napoleon's death,

0:26:100:26:12

an autopsy was prepared by the British naval authorities

0:26:120:26:18

and Napoleon's physician, Corsican Antommarchi.

0:26:180:26:21

And this is his death mask.

0:26:210:26:25

Literally, a cast taken from his face in wax and then translated into plaster and bronze.

0:26:250:26:33

After that, Napoleon was interred in a tomb at the head of the Seine Valley.

0:26:330:26:39

Perhaps most movingly out of Dame Maple's collection, we have this,

0:26:390:26:46

a spray of dried foliage from the willow tree planted at the head of the tomb.

0:26:460:26:52

Still, before we all burst into tears about this, perhaps we should head off to the auction

0:26:530:26:58

and find out today whether it's going to be tears or smiles for our teams.

0:26:580:27:03

Leaving Melbourne behind, it's time to hit the dramatic sites of Sydney and find Lawsons sale room.

0:27:050:27:11

Luckily, we're in the safe hands of auctioneer Shauna Farren-Price.

0:27:110:27:15

-Shauna, good morning.

-Good morning.

0:27:150:27:17

First up, this little enamel and silver broach.

0:27:170:27:20

Is Charles Horner a name much in Australia in jewellery collecting terms?

0:27:200:27:25

Not very huge, not bandied about that often.

0:27:250:27:28

Obviously in England it would be much more collectible than over here.

0:27:280:27:33

-So, how much?

-15, 20, something like that.

0:27:330:27:36

Oh, dear! They paid 105 for this thing.

0:27:360:27:39

-It could get up there. We just hope.

-Yes.

-A lot of hope.

0:27:390:27:43

OK. Next up is the very pretty pearl and gold brooch.

0:27:430:27:48

-Do you fancy that one?

-I think it's a very sweet little brooch, actually.

0:27:480:27:52

-It's fantastic quality.

-It is. It's very well made.

0:27:520:27:56

-We've been conservative again.

-You haven't!

-We have.

-Oh, no.

0:27:560:28:00

-We have put an estimate of 30-40 on it.

-How much?!

-30-40.

0:28:000:28:05

-They paid 105 again.

-Again.

-Well, I will cross my legs.

0:28:050:28:11

And the last item can only really be of Australian interest,

0:28:110:28:15

at least for the Royal Australian Airforce collectors.

0:28:150:28:19

-It's a handsome object.

-It is.

0:28:190:28:21

It would grace any desk or mantelpiece and, you know,

0:28:210:28:24

-it's useful as well as beautiful.

-How much?

-20-30.

-OK, 30 paid.

0:28:240:28:29

So we are seriously going to have to dig deep

0:28:300:28:34

and trust in the Internet and see what happens. But if all goes wrong,

0:28:340:28:38

they're going to need their bonus buy,

0:28:380:28:40

so let's go and have a look at it.

0:28:400:28:42

Now, girls, you spent 240, you gave the Laidlaw 260, what did you buy?

0:28:420:28:48

Well, brooches, apparently, are us.

0:28:480:28:52

-Wow.

-Let me just get my glasses.

0:28:520:28:55

It's not quite a brooch.

0:28:570:28:59

This is a badge.

0:28:590:29:02

It's the badge of the British North Borneo Company,

0:29:020:29:06

who were founded in about 1880.

0:29:060:29:09

They lasted through until the 1940s

0:29:090:29:12

and they governed North Borneo,

0:29:120:29:14

much as the East India Company did a century previous.

0:29:140:29:19

This would be worn, I suspect, by police, perhaps even the military.

0:29:190:29:24

-It's an uncommon badge of high quality. Feel the weight.

-Oh, yes.

0:29:240:29:30

-Scarce badge, good thing.

-Oh, look at this.

-Let's talk numbers.

0:29:300:29:34

-Yes, let's talk numbers.

-25.

-Well, that doesn't seem dear at all.

0:29:340:29:38

-That's great.

-I think it's worth 50 to 80,

0:29:380:29:40

-effortlessly.

-I think it's fantastic, I actually really like it.

0:29:400:29:44

Let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Paul's badge.

0:29:440:29:48

I think it's a splendid little thing, a nice piece of craftsmanship,

0:29:490:29:54

probably a local piece, and very rare.

0:29:540:29:58

I've never seen one before.

0:29:580:30:00

I wouldn't hazard a guess of how many were made and in existence,

0:30:000:30:05

so just how rare it is is difficult to pin down, really.

0:30:050:30:08

I think probably 30-40.

0:30:100:30:12

OK, 25 invested by Mr Laidlaw.

0:30:120:30:17

And, knowing him, that is probably quite a cunning investment.

0:30:170:30:21

Anyway, that's it for the Reds. Now, moving on to the Blues.

0:30:210:30:25

First is the pokerwork turned wood vase.

0:30:250:30:28

There seems to be a lot of this pokerwork knocking about.

0:30:280:30:31

It's very, very popular in Australia.

0:30:310:30:33

The majority of it has sort of gum nut leaves and kangaroos -

0:30:330:30:37

the Australiana themes.

0:30:370:30:38

So with a Georgian dandy on it, it's very different.

0:30:380:30:43

Slightly strange. What sort of estimate?

0:30:430:30:46

-20-30.

-100 paid. So we're a bit off the mark.

0:30:460:30:53

Next up is the Weimar Republic German cigarette dispenser

0:30:540:30:59

in the form of a bellhop!

0:30:590:31:01

A shocked bellhop.

0:31:010:31:03

Yes, as if he's just had his bottom pinched or something.

0:31:030:31:06

-Anyway, a bit of fun.

-A bit of fun indeed.

0:31:060:31:09

In that uranium orange, which has a certain '30s look to it.

0:31:090:31:14

-How much do you think then?

-60-80.

0:31:140:31:16

120 paid, so that's the second disaster.

0:31:160:31:20

Now, moving on to the barrel.

0:31:200:31:23

We have got a bit of a problem here, because the lid,

0:31:230:31:26

the ceramic lid that went with this has unfortunately been damaged,

0:31:260:31:31

irreparably damaged,

0:31:310:31:33

so we're not able to sell it with it.

0:31:330:31:36

When you see these things coming up in the sale room,

0:31:360:31:40

complete with ceramic lids, how much would you estimate on it?

0:31:400:31:43

With a lid, I would say 150-200.

0:31:430:31:47

OK, and what is your estimate as it is?

0:31:470:31:52

As it is, without a lid, 50 to 80?

0:31:520:31:54

So, I think on the basis of being fair to the team,

0:31:540:31:58

if the difference is 100,

0:31:580:32:00

then we should allow the team a credit of 100,

0:32:000:32:03

irrespective of what it actually brings in the auction.

0:32:030:32:07

So if it brings in the auction 50, they'll actually be paid 150,

0:32:070:32:10

and I will explain that to them.

0:32:100:32:12

I think that's very fair.

0:32:120:32:14

And depending on how everything else dishes up,

0:32:140:32:18

they may or may not need their bonus buy,

0:32:180:32:20

but let's go and have a look at it anyway.

0:32:200:32:22

So, you spent 320, quite magnificent, you gave David 180.

0:32:220:32:29

What did you spend it on, David?

0:32:290:32:31

Well, knowing how you guys like retro, anything 1950s, '60s,

0:32:310:32:34

I bought this counter-weighted desk light.

0:32:340:32:39

So that is quite a heavy object.

0:32:390:32:41

It goes on the desk, it sits flat and then you can swing this round

0:32:410:32:44

to whatever angle you want it.

0:32:440:32:46

I think it's absolutely super, I'd have it in my house.

0:32:460:32:49

It's a bit like a Starship Enterprise.

0:32:490:32:51

-Well, you think of a flying saucer or spaceship.

-It's interesting.

0:32:510:32:55

-Be good for my painting.

-Why?

-Well, you swivel the light.

0:32:550:32:58

That's true, but I can imagine this on a nice mahogany or walnut desk.

0:32:580:33:04

-So how much of our money did you spend, David?

-I spent 120 of your money.

0:33:040:33:07

-120.

-What do you think, Drew?

-Yeah, next question!

0:33:070:33:11

He's underwhelmed!

0:33:110:33:14

-He's a bit dumbstruck, I think.

-How much extra?

0:33:140:33:18

I think it could do 20 on,

0:33:180:33:21

I think it will do something in the region of about 180.

0:33:210:33:24

Oh, I'm going to keep you to that.

0:33:240:33:26

Well, we watched his lips, we saw the prediction of profit there.

0:33:260:33:30

Let's find out for the audience at home what the auctioneer thinks about David's lamp.

0:33:300:33:35

Well, here we go, there's a futuristic-looking lamp for you.

0:33:350:33:39

-It's fabulous.

-Would you want it on your desk?

-I would, actually.

0:33:390:33:44

-Would you have it on your desk?

-Well, I think it might grow on me too.

0:33:440:33:49

I have great hopes for it.

0:33:490:33:51

How high are your hopes in relation to the estimate?

0:33:510:33:54

Having said that, we've estimated it at 80-120.

0:33:540:33:58

That's not so bad. 120, Mr Barby paid, and he's quite excited by it.

0:33:580:34:04

Anyway, here we go. You're going to be taking the sale.

0:34:040:34:07

We'll look forward to that. Thank you.

0:34:070:34:10

We love you, Tim, and you're a big part of what we love about Bargain Hunt,

0:34:180:34:22

you in your lovely outfits and your wisdom, so we've got you this.

0:34:220:34:26

Oh, look at that! It's a combo! It's a bowtie.

0:34:260:34:30

How clever you are. And what's this? Oh, look, it's the cup of wisdom.

0:34:300:34:36

-Is that me?

-Yes, it is you.

-Who drew this?

-I did.

0:34:360:34:40

You're absolute darlings.

0:34:400:34:42

Thank you very much. Aren't I lucky? A souvenir to take home.

0:34:420:34:46

Now, first up is Charles Horner, and here it comes.

0:34:460:34:49

Lot 93, a silver and enamel feather brooch here. Starting at 50.

0:34:490:34:55

At 50 with absentee, 60, 70, here on my right. At 70 standing. At 70, 80.

0:34:550:35:01

Seated at 80. 90 up back. At 90. 100 here. You can all join in.

0:35:010:35:07

At 100 on my right. 100 only, is that all?

0:35:070:35:11

At 100, any further? 110. 120.

0:35:110:35:15

At 120, are we all done and sure at 120? Once, twice and thrice,

0:35:150:35:20

no more.

0:35:200:35:22

120 bucks, well done, guys. That is plus 15.

0:35:220:35:28

An early 20th-century gold brooch, a very pretty one indeed.

0:35:280:35:32

Couple of hundred for it anywhere? Couple of hundred? 50 for it.

0:35:320:35:36

Give me a start. 50, she says. Thank you, Madam. At 50, at 50 seated.

0:35:360:35:40

At 50, it's only money.

0:35:400:35:42

At 50 only, I must sell, are we done, 50 no further?

0:35:420:35:47

Fair warning at 50.

0:35:470:35:49

-Sold.

-Absolutely crackers. 50.

-Oh, well.

-That's £30.

0:35:490:35:55

That's rubbish.

0:35:550:35:57

So, that is -55.

0:35:570:35:59

Lot 95, a post-World War II mantle clock.

0:35:590:36:03

20 starts me away, and off we go. 20 here, 30 he says. 40 up back. At 40.

0:36:030:36:09

50. 60, 70, 80.

0:36:090:36:12

90. At 90. 100 with the lady, against you, sir.

0:36:120:36:18

100.

0:36:180:36:20

110, he says. At 110.

0:36:200:36:22

120, she says. He shakes his head. All done and sure.

0:36:240:36:29

120 is plus 90 on that.

0:36:290:36:34

You had 15, you lost 55, you were -40, you are now plus 90.

0:36:340:36:40

Which means overall you are plus 50!

0:36:400:36:44

Plus 50, how good is that?

0:36:440:36:46

-So, what are you going to do about the bonus buy?

-Take it?

-Take it.

0:36:460:36:49

-Definitely, not even an issue.

-We're going to go with it.

0:36:490:36:53

Ask us a million times, we'll always say yes. Yes, yes, yes.

0:36:530:36:57

25, you paid. She has estimated 30-40 on it.

0:36:570:37:01

She rates it, she thinks it is a good object.

0:37:010:37:03

Let's hope she is right.

0:37:030:37:05

Lot 99, it's a silver cap badge

0:37:050:37:07

of the British North Borneo Protectorate.

0:37:070:37:10

Very interesting little piece, exquisite craftsmanship there,

0:37:100:37:13

and straightaway 30-40 starts me and off we go.

0:37:130:37:16

At 40, 50, I'm out.

0:37:160:37:19

60, 70 he says. 80, 90, 100, 110.

0:37:190:37:25

At 110 he shakes his head.

0:37:250:37:27

110 on my right, are you done and sure at 110 only?

0:37:270:37:31

110 bucks. That is plus 85 for your bonus buy. He is a maestro.

0:37:310:37:38

Plus the 50 that you already had means that you are plus 135,

0:37:380:37:42

-and that, girls, could be a winning score.

-Yay!

0:37:420:37:46

The old bread bin, I'm afraid, has had a sorry event happen to it.

0:37:530:37:59

In the transportation up from Melbourne,

0:37:590:38:01

the lid has been smashed.

0:38:010:38:03

I mean, we just don't have a lid to sell with it.

0:38:030:38:07

So we're going to sell the bread bin bottom,

0:38:070:38:11

give you a 100 compensation package to put into the end total,

0:38:110:38:15

and that's the only way I'm afraid I can deal with it.

0:38:150:38:18

Anyway, first up is your Australian pokerwork vase,

0:38:180:38:21

which is in brilliant original condition!

0:38:210:38:24

Lot 107 is an Australian 1930s' pokerwork treen vase.

0:38:240:38:30

-A lot of interest here, I'll start the bidding at 40, 50, 60.

-60, yes!

0:38:300:38:35

At 60. At 60 only. 70, at 70 in the room.

0:38:350:38:41

80, seated, against you, sir, at 80.

0:38:410:38:44

Are we done and sure at 80 only?

0:38:440:38:46

-Come on!

-80. Once, twice and thrice, sold.

0:38:460:38:52

80 is minus 20. That's a good deal better than she thought. Here we go.

0:38:520:39:00

Lot 108.

0:39:000:39:01

It's a German Weimar Republic ceramic cigarette dispenser.

0:39:010:39:05

Isn't he cute?

0:39:050:39:07

How about 100 to start me? 20, 30 starts me and off we go. At 30, then.

0:39:070:39:13

At 30 only. 40 exhausts my bid.

0:39:130:39:16

-At 50, 50 only.

-Come on, come on!

-50 at 50, sold.

0:39:160:39:23

That is -70. Not looking so good, this. OK, now, the bread bin.

0:39:230:39:30

Remember, you have your credit of 100 in the bank

0:39:300:39:34

before anything happens. Here we go.

0:39:340:39:37

Lot 109 is a South Australian pottery bread crock. 100.

0:39:370:39:44

Start me at 50 if you like. At 20. 30 exhausts my bid. 30.

0:39:440:39:50

-Come on, come on, more!

-40, at 40.

0:39:500:39:54

50, at 50. Are you sure at 50?

0:39:540:39:58

-I'm selling then at 50. Sold.

-50, she sold it for.

0:39:580:40:02

So, with your credit in the bank,

0:40:020:40:04

because of the loss of the top, you will get a plus 50 score for that.

0:40:040:40:11

So overall you were minus 90, you've just won 50,

0:40:110:40:16

so you are -40 at this moment.

0:40:160:40:18

What are you going to do about the swivel desk lamp?

0:40:180:40:20

-Are you going on with it?

-I'm going to go with our expert.

0:40:200:40:23

He said it is worth 180. So I think we should go for it.

0:40:230:40:28

-What do you think, Drew?

-OK!

0:40:280:40:30

The auctioneer's estimate on it is 80-120,

0:40:300:40:33

which is close enough to the 120 purchase price,

0:40:330:40:37

so let's hope for the best there.

0:40:370:40:40

Anyway, you're minus 40, we're going with the bonus.

0:40:400:40:43

Here it comes.

0:40:430:40:44

Lot 113, it's a 1950s' swivel desk lamp and it's a beauty.

0:40:440:40:50

It had a lot of interest during the viewing,

0:40:500:40:52

a lot of interest in this one, I must start the bidding with me at 160.

0:40:520:40:59

At 160. At 160 then. 180,

0:40:590:41:03

200 with me. At 200 against you, sir.

0:41:030:41:06

At 200, 220, 240.

0:41:060:41:09

With the absentee at 240. At 240,

0:41:090:41:14

260, 280. At 280 only. 300, 325 with the auctioneer.

0:41:140:41:22

325, done and sure at 325. Sold.

0:41:220:41:28

That is an amazing 205 profit, which is something else, isn't it?

0:41:280:41:34

You've got minus 40,

0:41:360:41:38

-which means you are plus 165 at this moment.

-You're kidding!

0:41:380:41:46

How lovely is this? To be out in the sunshine enjoying a splendid day.

0:41:530:41:58

-Happy, girls? Happy, boys?

-Yes.

-Been chatting about the scores?

0:41:580:42:01

-No.

-No, not at all!

0:42:010:42:03

Both teams know that they made a substantial profit.

0:42:030:42:07

Both teams know they have made a three figure profit,

0:42:070:42:10

which on Bargain Hunt is practically unheard of!

0:42:100:42:15

One team, sadly, is the runner-up, with a marginally lower score.

0:42:150:42:20

And that team is...

0:42:200:42:22

Reds.

0:42:220:42:24

-Ohh!

-Oh, well.

-Oh, well.

0:42:240:42:27

Sadly, you are runners-up today with a massive score of 135 profit.

0:42:270:42:35

Which is a chunk of cash, I have to tell you.

0:42:350:42:39

Congratulations, we loved having you on the show. It's been tremendous.

0:42:390:42:42

But the winners today are the boys. You're going to go home with 165.

0:42:420:42:47

-165.

-Yes!

-Woo!

0:42:470:42:50

For which you should be entirely grateful to David,

0:42:500:42:54

who brings a 205 profit from his bonus buy,

0:42:540:43:00

which dug you out of a rather awkward situation!

0:43:000:43:04

We had a great show. Join us soon for some more bargain-hunting, yes?

0:43:040:43:08

Yes!

0:43:080:43:10

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:220:43:25

Email [email protected]

0:43:250:43:28

Tim Wonnacott and the Bargain Hunt team head down under for this special programme, as Australian red and blue teams hunt for bargains at an eclectic antique centre in Melbourne. They are guided by British experts David Barby and Paul Laidlaw. Once the antiques are bought, they travel to Sydney to see if they can make a profit at auction. Tim takes time out to visit The Briars, a family homestead housing some fine French Napoleonic treasures in the middle of the Australian countryside.