Episode 2 of 6 Dilyn y Don


Episode 2 of 6

Yn y bennod hon clywn hanes Gorsaf Bad Achub Moelfre, Ynys Môn ac mae plant ysgol yn ymweld â Gorsaf Porthdinllaen. Local school children visit the Porthdinllaen lifeboat station.


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-Anglesey's Moelfre lifeboat is one

-of the most famous in Britain.

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-The island's north coast

-is very hazardous.

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-It can be dangerous here.

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-If a strong wind

-blows from the north...

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-..the sea gets very rough

-between here and Point Lynas.

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-There's a strong tide there,

-for one thing.

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-When the wind blows against

-the tide, it creates a heavy swell.

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-A new boat has arrived today.

-It's an inshore boat.

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-A woman from Colchester,

-Mrs Claydon, paid for it.

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-It cost 12,000.

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-These are useful boats. You can

-take them into shallow waters.

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-If someone falls on the rocks...

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-..you can take this boat

-close to the shore.

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-Many visitors come here to sail

-in the summer.

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-Sometimes, it's quite windy and

-their engines are not up to scratch.

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-They break down out in the bay.

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-They're then at the mercy

-of the wind and the tide.

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-This boat is called 'Kingsand'.

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-That name was chosen

-by the woman who bought it for us.

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-The name sounds good in Welsh too.

-It's a fine name.

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-The big lifeboat

-answers the more serious calls.

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-Tales of the bravery of past Moelfre

-crews have spread far and wide.

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-How aware of that tradition

-is the present crew?

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-Tradition is very important.

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-My great-uncle, Richard Evans,

-was a coxswain here for 40 years.

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-When you're a boy, you look forward

-to being old enough to help...

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-..not necessarily on the boat

-but helping to get the boat out...

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-..and back in again safely.

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-Today, lifeboat crew members

-need specialist skills.

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-This mobile unit visits lifeboat

-stations to provide training.

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-Moelfre's crew

-can gain experience...

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-..in using a modern

-satellite navigation system.

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-This unit enables crew members...

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-..to become familiar

-with using these new systems.

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-They did use charts,

-a pencil and rules.

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-Now, they use

-these state-of-the art computers.

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-They've been specially developed

-for use by sailors.

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-There's the GPS,

-the plotter and the radar.

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-Crews can learn

-how to use them here...

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-..rather than on a shifting boat,

-which can be difficult.

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-Then they know how to use them

-when a call comes.

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-This laser plotter

-comes from the Netherlands.

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-That cross represents the lifeboat.

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-As you move around the bay -

-we're going towards Liverpool...

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-..the chart changes

-as you move along.

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-On we go and up the River Mersey.

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-As the lifeboat moves up the river,

-the picture enlarges.

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-This is the enlarged chart

-of the marina and the dock.

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-The system can pinpoint

-where you are at any time.

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-It can also take the tide

-and the wind into account.

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-The machines work it all out.

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-They must apply their new skills in

-the confined space of the lifeboat.

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-It's more difficult,

-as the boat rolls over the waves.

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-The RNLI uses seven different types

-of large lifeboat.

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-The fastest is the Tyne,

-which is housed above a slipway.

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-It's the same type

-as the Porthdinllaen lifeboat.

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-It requires a crew of six.

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-The Tyne has been in use

-for 18 years.

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-They're regarded as efficient and

-can attain a speed of 18 knots.

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-They're equipped with

-state-of-the-art navigation tools.

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-The plotter

-didn't work as it should...

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-..so it's important we carry on

-using the charts and a pencil.

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-It provides a back-up.

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-Christmas Eve is a big day

-for Porthdinllaen.

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-The 'Good Shepherd', which is on

-loan, sets out for the last time.

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-The 'Hetty Rampton',

-their usual boat, is coming home.

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-They must sail to Holyhead

-to fetch her.

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-Many lifeboats from the north

-of England and north Wales...

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-..come to Holyhead to be repaired.

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-The 'Hetty Rampton'

-has had a complete overhaul.

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-The inspectors are satisfied she's

-ready to return to Porthdinllaen.

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-She's been fitted with new engines

-and the latest technology.

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-Porthdinllaen's lifeboat

-is number 15.

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-As it happens, number 14

-is coming in for repairs.

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-She's from Barrow-in-Furness,

-a whole day's journey away.

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-She shows signs of wear

-and needs repainting.

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-A large part of the RNLI's budget

-is spent on renovating lifeboats.

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-Maintaining the service

-costs nearly 80 million per year.

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-Every time a lifeboat

-is launched

-it costs 5,000.

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-The 'Good Shepherd' was our temporary

-replacement for the 'Hetty Rampton'.

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-She now has new engines...

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-..and new equipment including

-a satellite navigation system.

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-The laser plotter

-is another new gadget.

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-Charts for the whole country

-are stored on CD ROM.

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-She's now in tip-top condition for

-her next ten years at this station.

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-Lifeboat crew members

-are volunteers.

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-Peter, the coxswain and mechanic,

-is the only full-time employee.

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-The others receive very little

-remuneration for their services.

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-But the crew members

-are always in good spirits.

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-The Porthdinllaen lifeboat is called

-out 20 times a year, on average.

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-They are expected to cope with

-an emergency on the Irish ferry.

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-But most calls are minor ones

-involving pleasure craft.

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-They are required to train

-for major emergencies.

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-The crew occasionally attend courses

-at the RNLI headquarters in Poole.

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-We have regular training.

-We learn first aid...

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-..we also learn

-how to use these new gadgets...

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-..the wireless, the radar

-and so on.

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-We attend some courses

-at the headquarters in Poole.

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-The crew's video.

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-The crew's video.

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-A local fishing boat

-is having engine trouble.

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-Although the weather is fine, the

-tide could drive her on to rocks.

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-This seems to be a routine call.

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-There are fewer call-outs

-to pleasure boats...

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-..as owners

-become more safety-conscious.

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-Well-equipped merchant ships rarely

-get into difficulties these days.

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-Today, they simply had to tow

-the 'Buccaneer' to shore...

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-..because she had started

-drifting towards rocks.

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-Most of us have romantic images

-of brave lifeboat crews...

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-..risking their lives

-in the teeth of a gale.

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-Such occurrences are very rare.

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-Lifeboats are seldom called out

-during storms.

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-Fewer than 4% of calls

-occur in rough weather.

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-Only one call in six

-involves saving lives.

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-Most calls are for boats needing

-assistance to reach the shore...

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-..without any lives being at risk.

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-One of these fishermen is actually

-a member of the lifeboat crew.

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-But there won't be much leg-pulling.

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-Who knows

-who'll be in trouble tomorrow?

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-When people are at the mercy of the

-sea's vagaries, anything can happen.

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-

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-The sea has an obvious

-important influence...

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-..on the communities

-of Porthdinllaen and nearby Nefyn.

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-It has affected

-both work and culture.

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-This rich tradition, with its

-history, tales and shanties...

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-..is a central part of these

-children's local history studies.

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-'The class went to Porthdinllaen

-yesterday.

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-'We walked along the path

-above Nefyn beach.

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-'Mr Williams showed us where

-the last boat was built at Nefyn.'

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-'We arrived at the boathouse

-at 1.00pm, where we met Tom Morris.'

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-Come down these steps

-and sit on the sand.

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-Welcome

-to the Morfa Nefyn lifeboat...

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-..or rather, Porthdinllaen.

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-150 years ago, this little bay

-was called 'Bae Carreg yr Afr'.

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-It's a lovely place

-on a fine summer's day.

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-150 years ago...

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-..there would have been over 20

-sailing ships anchored in the bay.

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-A lot of trading ships

-travelled around the Lleyn coast...

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-..carrying goods and farm produce

-to places like Liverpool and Dublin.

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-Many of these little ships

-got into trouble in bad weather.

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-I'll tell you about one night

-in particular, December 2nd, 1863.

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-The sea became very rough as

-a northerly gale blew across the bay.

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-Over two dozen small ships

-were sheltering in the bay.

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-The wind blew them...

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-The wind blew them...

-

-'One night, a huge storm blew up.

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-'Many ships were sheltering in the

-bay when the wind changed direction'

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-'It blew towards Porthdinllaen.

-The ships were in danger.'

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-'Ships were blown

-against each other.'

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-'The ships were in trouble.

-Waves crashed and the wind roared.'

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-'Some ships tore free from their

-moorings and were broken up.'

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-'Many ships were wrecked...

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-..as captains tried to sail

-to the other side of the headland.'

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-The waves forced them

-towards the shore.

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-Local people were unable to help

-as the sailors clung to their masts.

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-'A man called Robert Rees

-tied a rope around himself.

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-'Four strong men held the rope

-as he entered the water.'

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-'He swam into the waves

-and saved the lives of 28 men.'

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-Robert was awarded a bronze medal by

-the Board of Trade for his actions.

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-Engraved on the edge of the medal...

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-..is 'Robert Rees. Wreck

-of the Bardsey of Caernarfon'.

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-The 'Bardsey' was the name of one

-of the ships whose crew he saved.

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-The new Porthdinllaen lifeboat.

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-'Dinllaen' is an old name

-for this part of Lleyn...

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-..so this is 'the Port of Dinllaen'.

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-If you look at the boat, you can see

-that everything folds down on it.

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-It can't enter the boathouse

-unless everything is folded down.

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-When the weather is rough,

-the crew stay in the cabin.

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-There are six seats,

-one for each crew member.

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-They're strapped in as if they were

-in a plane and they wear helmets.

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-That's because they can be thrown

-about when the sea is rough.

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-The crew

-often have to stand out here.

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-They wear lifejackets

-which have clips on the back.

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-They clip themselves to this wire...

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-..which keeps them safe but also

-allows them to move around.

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-That's the purpose of this wire.

-It goes all the way around the boat.

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-Children are encouraged

-to take an interest.

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-It's been part of the RNLI's policy

-for years.

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-The port of Fishguard

-has benefited from this.

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-There used to be an Arran class

-lifeboat at Fishguard...

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-..larger and faster

-than the one at Porthdinllaen.

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-Then they had an even better

-Trent class boat on loan.

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-It suited their work, so one was

-stationed here on a permanent basis.

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-The TV programme 'Blue Peter'

-raised the money to pay for it.

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-It's one of the best boats in Wales.

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-The RNLI are proud of it

-and the name acknowledges the gift.

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-She's fitted with

-all the most modern equipment...

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-..everything you could think of.

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-We may be called out

-to a boat 40 miles away.

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-If we can pick up just one sounding

-from the vessel...

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-..we can go straight to it. If we

-closed our eyes, we'd run over it!

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-It's so accurate.

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-In my day,

-you were given directions...

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-..that weren't always accurate.

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-Sometimes, the people in trouble

-weren't quite sure where they were.

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-So we'd have to search

-for the vessel...

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-..using a procedure we call

-a search pattern or box pattern.

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-It could take hours.

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-When I started, the boat

-at this station was an open boat.

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-The cabin was tiny. When the sea was

-rough, we'd all be squashed in...

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-..like sheep in a pen,

-trying to shelter from the sea.

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-The boat didn't move over the waves.

-It would cut into them.

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-So we were under water

-a lot of the time.

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-We got wet

-as soon as we left the harbour.

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-These days,

-all the boats are closed in.

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-The cabins on today's boats

-increase the boat's buoyancy.

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-If the boat capsizes...

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-..the cabin's buoyancy

-will turn the boat back up.

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-Here's the proof. Before

-she was sent to Fishguard...

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-..'Blue Peter VII'

-had to undergo the ultimate test.

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-All lifeboats

-have to pass this test.

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-There are now over 150

-women crew members.

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-The first in Wales was in Fishguard.

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-Angela has been fully accepted

-as a crew member.

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-The kind of technology we saw

-at Fishguard didn't exist...

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-..when the Moelfre lifeboat saved

-the crews of two merchant vessels.

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-On two occasions...

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-..Dick Ifans received

-the RNLI's ultimate accolade.

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-The first was in 1959...

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-..when eight members

-of the 'Hindlea' crew were saved.

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-A storm had driven her on to rocks.

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-The Moelfre crew's bravery

-inspired the public.

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-They had risked their lives

-on the stormy sea...

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-..to save the 'Hindlea' crew.

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-Dick Ifans became a symbol

-of RNLI heroism.

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-He received world-wide attention.

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-This incident is still

-one of the great lifeboat legends.

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-With today's technology, the work

-of locating any ship in distress...

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-..is much easier but it doesn't

-make it any less perilous.

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-The first boat I went on

-did about nine knots.

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-Today, they can practically do

-twenty-nine knots.

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-We got this boat

-two or three years ago.

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-There used to be helicopters

-stationed at Brawdy.

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-The Government

-decided to close RAF Brawdy.

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-There was a great outcry

-against losing the helicopters.

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-The RNLI and the Government...

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-..decided to station

-a much faster boat at Fishguard...

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-..so we could perform

-far quicker rescues.

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-That's why we have this boat

-at Fishguard.

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-Fishguard lifeboat boathouse,

-do you read, over?

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-I remember going out on one call,

-it was very rough.

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-The cargo had shifted to one side,

-which caused the ship to break down.

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-It sank,

-about fifteen miles out from here.

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-It's very sad, seeing a ship sink.

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-We saved all the crew...

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-..but it was very sad, watching

-a ship sinking in front of us.

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-Subtitles

-by

-Nia Melville, Elidir

0:24:110:24:14

Yn y bennod hon clywn hanes Gorsaf Bad Achub Moelfre, Ynys Môn ac mae plant ysgol yn ymweld â Gorsaf Porthdinllaen. Local school children visit the Porthdinllaen lifeboat station.


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