Episode 5 of 6 Dilyn y Don


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Episode 5 of 6

Yn y rhifyn hwn o 2001, gwelwn sut mae criw'r bad achub yn cyd-weithio â chriw gwylwyr y glannau. This week we see how the lifeboat crew co-operate with the coast guards.


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Transcript


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-Most of us associate the port of

-Holyhead with crossing to Ireland...

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-..on large ferries

-bound for Dublin or Dun Laoghaire.

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-But merchant vessels

-and pleasure boats use the port too.

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-The Coastguards

-have their headquarters here.

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-They're responsible for safety

-along the north and west coasts.

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-Emergency calls to lifeboats

-are sent from this control room.

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-When we get a message

-that someone's in danger...

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-..we ask the caller

-what they've seen, where and when.

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-Someone will then phone the lifeboat

-secretary with all the details.

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-He tells us

-to page the lifeboat crew.

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-They then take the boat out

-on the rescue.

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-Holyhead Coastguard. You're allowed

-to clear channel zero.

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-Coastguards have no authority over

-lifeboats, as the RNLI is a charity.

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-Holyhead must make

-a formal request...

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-..for the 'Hetty Rampton'

-to be launched.

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-As a matter of courtesy,

-the crew notify the Coastguards...

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-..when they're

-on training exercises.

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-It's midsummer at Porthdinllaen,

-and the beach is busy.

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-Jetskis are roaring around swimmers

-- there's an obvious danger.

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-An auxiliary Coastguard officer

-keeps on eye on things...

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-..as he carries out his duties

-around Nefyn.

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-When the lifeboat goes out...

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-..either we go or the Llandwrog

-Coastguard goes too.

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-It depends on where the call is.

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-We often deal with sailing boats...

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-..that haven't returned

-when they were due.

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-They may have stopped somewhere

-on the way without telling anyone.

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-Most calls involve pleasure boats,

-wind surfers or jetskis.

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-We rarely see a local fishing boat

-getting into difficulties...

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-..they're familiar with the sea

-and the weather.

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-It's outsiders

-who usually get into trouble.

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-There's one full-time Coastguard

-in this area, based in Criccieth.

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-He deals mostly with paperwork.

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-Auxiliary work

-involves cliff rescue...

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-..and looking out for people

-who may be in danger.

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-We have binoculars,

-including ones for use at night...

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-..and pyrotechnics,

-parachute flares and so on.

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-We have ropes for cliff rescues.

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-We help to direct the lifeboat.

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-If a boat's in serious trouble,

-a helicopter is called out.

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-We all work as a team, although

-we're not based in the same place.

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-When the Porthdinllaen lifeboat

-is called out...

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-..they are directed

-by the Coastguards.

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-The lifeboat has a crew of 17

-but only six are needed at one time.

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-The coxswain, Robert or Pete,

-chooses the crew.

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-They try to ensure

-that everyone gains experience.

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-Huw Williams

-is the youngest crewman.

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-Today, Gareth and Dylan

-accompany him on an exercise.

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-Robert

-tests the navigation equipment.

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-Pete and Mike Dean are steering.

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-Robert has been visiting this

-boat yard on the Isle of Wight.

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-Lifeboats are built here in Cowes.

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-The aim is to upgrade the fleet

-regularly.

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-RNLI specialists design the boats...

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-..in consultation

-with lifeboat crews.

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-It's the crews who get to know the

-boats' strengths and weaknesses...

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-..in real working conditions.

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-Not all lifeboats are the same.

-Stations have various requirements.

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-In a few weeks,

-this shell will look like this.

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-This is a Severn class boat.

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-It's the largest type,

-costing about 1.5 million.

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-Its size means it must be

-permanently moored on the water.

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-This boat is going to Ireland.

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-Robert had a chance

-to take a look at it...

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-..and admire its design

-and technology.

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-I'm sitting in the helmsman's

-or coxswain's seat.

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-That's a VHF direction finder.

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-It tells you

-where a signal's coming from.

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-There are cameras in the engine room

-and in the stern.

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-This boat has a bow thruster,

-a small propeller in the hull.

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-It's used to move the boat sideways,

-because it's so large and heavy.

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-There's a radar set,

-electronic charts and a plotter.

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-The differential GPS

-works off a satellite.

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-It's accurate to within a few feet.

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-We only had a radar set

-on the old boat...

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-..and it wasn't very good.

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-Today we have all kinds

-of electronic gadgets.

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-We have regular training,

-so the crew know how to use them.

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-They make the work easier. It's

-a matter of getting used to them.

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-Crews receive thorough training

-at the RNLI headquarters in Poole...

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-..before they use a new boat. This

-includes training with a helicopter.

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-This is the most exciting part

-of training.

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-The crew also learn how to use the

-new technology on board the boat.

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-In a few days' time, the crew

-will sail the boat to Ballyglass...

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-..on the west coast of Ireland.

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-The RNLI operates

-around the Irish coast as well.

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-The 'Bryan and Gordon' may well

-deal with calls like this.

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-A small sailing boat, the 'Pelican'

-has capsized off Lleyn.

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-It has lost its mast.

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-Another boat has picked up

-the two on board...

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-..and they're heading back

-to the harbour.

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-Although no lives are at risk...

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-..the Coastguards have asked

-the Porthdinllaen lifeboat...

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-..to escort the two boats.

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-So far this year...

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-..lifeboats have helped nearly

-4,500 people to reach dry land.

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-In 1,200 cases,

-their lives were at risk.

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-Most of the calls, over 3,000

-of them, are similar to this one...

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-..a pleasure boat in difficulty

-but no lives at risk.

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-This is child's play

-for the 'Hetty Rampton'.

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-Calls like this

-don't warrant such a powerful boat.

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-But they must prepare for the worst.

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-The Porthdinllaen lifeboat

-has had some serious calls.

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-The next call could really test

-each crew member's skills...

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-..and the lifeboat's resources.

-That's the reality for the RNLI.

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-

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-There hasn't been a call

-for two weeks...

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-..so RNLI regulations require them

-to hold a training exercise...

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-..to make sure the boat and

-the equipment work satisfactorily.

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-It's a chance

-to get used to the new technology.

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-Each crewman has had training

-in all aspects of their work.

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-The coxswain, Peter Jones,

-knows his crew's strengths.

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-A lot of the training takes place

-in RNLI House in Morfa Nefyn.

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-Tonight is a big night

-for one crew member.

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-The recovery position.

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-The recovery position.

-

-Fine. We'll move the casualty

-out of the way.

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-She can't go into recovery position!

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-Emyr Williams

-is sitting a first aid exam.

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-He feels rather apprehensive.

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-I'm quite nervous.

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-I'd done another RNLI course

-but this one's different.

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-You're dealing with people in this

-course. You have to be on the ball.

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-The other course was a radio course.

-It was quite easy.

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-This course is very different.

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-That's fine.

-Once I'm in the recovery position...

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-..what else can you do?

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-Not going to go out for a cigarette,

-are you?

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-Can't remember!

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-The airway?

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-The RNLI has different levels

-of first aid qualifications.

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-Regular progress

-is expected of the crew members.

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-The training is geared towards

-situations which could arise at sea.

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-Pretend that's my mouth.

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-Push it in like that...

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-..then turn it round

-and push it in.

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-Good. Airway's now in.

-What other equipment could help?

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-Good. Airway's now in.

-What other equipment could help?

-

-Oxygen.

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-Well done. That's very good.

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-I thought it would be

-more difficult.

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-I hope I've been successful.

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-I just hope I've passed.

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-After his exam success...

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-..Emyr can relax with the rest

-of the crew and their families.

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-This is a fundraising evening.

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-They hope to make a decent profit.

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-There's great excitement

-in Morfa Nefyn!

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-Some try to cheat but the little

-horses are a great success!

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-Steering a lifeboat is easier than

-steering these in a straight line!

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-No fortunes were won or lost -

-not tonight, anyway.

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-The raffle and other activities

-have raised about 2,000.

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-The people of Morfa Nefyn

-are very resourceful.

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-Tonight, there's yet another

-fundraising event for the lifeboat.

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-It's a big event

-in the Porthdinllaen calendar.

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-Administration officer Tom Morris

-has high hopes.

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-Ready for tonight?

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-Ready for tonight?

-

-Yes. Dewi's

-supposed to prepare everything.

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-The boat's alright?

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-The boat's alright?

-

-Yes, it is.

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-Fishing lines ready?

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-Fishing lines ready?

-

-Yes.

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-And a lifejacket?

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-And a lifejacket?

-

-Of course.

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-And a lifejacket?

-

-Of course.

-

-Good.

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-Let's hope the weather stays fine.

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-Let's hope the weather stays fine.

-

-See you this evening!

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-Mike Dean and his family

-are setting off early.

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-Mike needs to find a partner.

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-Here's the attraction -

-the annual mackerel race.

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-Nia has finished her shift

-at the shop.

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-Did you get everything ready?

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-Did you get everything ready?

-

-Yes, except a reel.

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-Dewi has organised a boat,

-so the family can compete.

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-Mike's here early

-because he wants to find a boat.

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-Nia and Dewi are going

-on a friend's boat.

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-Caryl's really looking forward

-to the trip and the fishing.

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-Mike settles his family first.

-The girls prefer to catch crabs.

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-Mike is still hoping for a boat.

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-They're enjoying themselves.

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-There are plenty of boats here.

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-Peter collects

-the competitors' fees.

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-He will be starting the race.

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-The race is on to catch the most

-mackerel in the next two hours.

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-We have 33 boats out there today.

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-Each competitor pays a pound...

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-..so we've made about 150 already.

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-When they return,

-we count the mackerel.

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-The one who catches the most

-gets a prize.

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-Then we sell the mackerel.

-A big crowd comes to watch.

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-Mike is happy to take part.

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-But there aren't many mackerel

-about, for some reason.

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-It's the same for Dewi and Nia -

-no luck so far.

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-Someone gets a bite - it's

-Robert Jones, the second coxswain.

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-Filling these boxes

-will be quite a job.

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-At last, Dewi's caught something

-but it's not a mackerel.

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-Finding the mackerel is difficult.

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-But once you find a large shoal,

-you can catch a lot.

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-Today, those who go out three

-or four miles have the best chance.

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-The weather has been stormy

-this week.

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-Storms scatter

-the mackerel shoals...

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-..making them harder to catch.

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-After two hours,

-it's time to call everyone back.

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-No-one's done very well this year.

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-Very poor this evening.

-We got about 50.

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-Very poor.

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-We should have caught a lot more.

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-How many have you got?

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-That's not bad, considering

-there aren't many around.

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-That's not bad, considering

-there aren't many around.

-

-We did well, I think.

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-This is Michael Massarelli,

-a partner of Mike Dean's.

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-It looks promising. They seem to be

-among the most successful.

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-They hope to be

-in the frame somewhere.

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-How did it go, Mike?

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-How did it go, Mike?

-

-Champion! We got 45.

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-But the fishing was poor,

-I don't know why.

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-How was it out there?

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-How was it out there?

-

-Not bad, but the wind's

-getting up now.

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-Are you satisfied?

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-Are you satisfied?

-

-Yes, on the whole.

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-Will you win?

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-Will you win?

-

-I hope so!

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-Nia and Dewi seem satisfied too.

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-How did they do?

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-How did it go, Nia?

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-We got about 40, I think

-and one gurnard and one cod.

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-Not bad!

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-Not bad!

-

-Pleased?

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-Not bad!

-

-Pleased?

-

-Yes.

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-At first,

-I thought we wouldn't get any.

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-But we went further out

-and we caught a few.

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-But we went further out

-and we caught a few.

-

-How many did you catch, Caryl?

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-Not one!

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-Not one!

-

-None!

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-Did it get better?

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-Did it get better?

-

-Yes, it did.

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-How many are there?

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-How many are there?

-

-About 40, I think.

-It got better towards the end.

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-We got one good cod.

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-It was disappointing

-compared to last year...

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-..with mackerel in short supply.

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-There's usually more than enough

-for everyone...

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-..but no-one's caught more than 50

-tonight, which is unusual.

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-But the number of mackerel

-isn't really important.

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-It's the money raised that counts.

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-A large crowd had gathered

-by the time the boats returned.

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-Many were visitors...

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-..who were happy to support

-the Porthdinllaen lifeboat.

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-There were 33 boats this year -

-that's a record.

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-But they didn't catch

-as many mackerel as usual.

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-Such events make the lifeboat

-an important part of social life.

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-There's no lack of support

-because people enjoy these events.

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-The winners were given

-an enthusiastic reception.

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-Mike Dean and his partners

-came second...

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-..with a fairly respectable haul.

-They had caught 48 mackerel.

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-Michael Massarelli

-is quite satisfied.

0:22:480:22:51

-Who could improve on that?

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-In first place this year,

-one of the crew of the lifeboat...

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-..Dewi Parry Thomas

-and his wife, Nia...

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-..with 49 mackerel.

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-We did count them very carefully!

0:23:160:23:19

-No-one asked for a recount,

-the adjudication was accepted!

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-The few spare mackerel

-were sold quickly to visitors.

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-Everyone enjoyed themselves...

0:23:340:23:37

-..and more funds were raised

-for the Porthdinllaen lifeboat.

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-Subtitles

-by

-Nia Melville, Elidir

0:24:130:24:16

Yn y rhifyn hwn o 2001, gwelwn sut mae criw'r bad achub yn cyd-weithio â chriw gwylwyr y glannau. This week we see how the lifeboat crew co-operate with the coast guards.