Episode 16 The Graham Norton Show


Episode 16

On Graham's sofa are Annette Bening, Andrew Garfield, Harriet Harman and Asa Butterfield. Elbow perform their new single Magnificent (She Says).


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Transcript


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Graham Norton!

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Hear, hear!

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Thank you, thank you, Mr Speaker.

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On tonight's show,

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in addition to some luminescent stars of stage and screen...

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Hear, hear!

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..stage and screen, we will also be welcoming our longest-serving

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female Member of Parliament.

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-Hear, hear!

-Order! Order!

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I put it to the House - let's start the show!

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CHEERING

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APPLAUSE AND CHEERING

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APPLAUSE AND CHEERING Oh! Oh!

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Hello!

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Hello! Hello!

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Welcome, welcome. Welcome, all.

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Yes, yes, there's a definite whiff of politics in the air tonight.

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And why not? It's been another rollercoaster week.

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The big news - Prime Minister Theresa May

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went to Washington. Yeah!

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The first world leader to meet with President Trump.

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Here she is holding Trump's hand.

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Still, so long as she's grabbing that, it's not grabbing something else.

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It was a very tender moment when they held hands,

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and I think we've got a picture of Theresa May just afterwards.

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HE GROANS AND RETCHES

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President Trump has been signing a flurry of executive orders.

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Now, I don't want to get TOO political with Trump's

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immigration policy, but if there are any Mexican Muslims watching,

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I wouldn't promise the kids Disney World this year.

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Meanwhile, nearly two million people have now signed an online petition

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to cancel Trump's planned state visit to Britain.

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Apparently, you can register your disapproval just by clicking

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a button on your iPad.

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Let's get some guests on.

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APPLAUSE AND CHEERING

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Later, we'll have music from the mighty Elbow.

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APPLAUSE AND CHEERING

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But first, since the age of eight, this young British star

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has worked with the likes of Martin Scorsese and Tim Burton,

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and now he's taking on his first adult role in The Space Between Us.

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Please welcome Asa Butterfield!

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APPLAUSE AND CHEERING

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Hello, Asa Butterfield!

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-Lovely to see you! Have a seat.

-Thank you.

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She has been at the heart of Labour politics for over 30 years,

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and is the UK's longest-serving female MP.

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Her new memoir is called A Woman's Work. Please welcome Harriet Harman.

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APPLAUSE AND CHEERING Yes!

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Look at you! Hello!

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-I've realised you should be Prime Minister!

-Sit, sit, sit!

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She's a four-time Oscar nominee who's starred in classic films

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such as American Beauty, The Grifters, The American President

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and The Kids Are All Right.

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Now she gives another stellar performance in the comedy drama

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20th Century Women.

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It's the great Annette Bening, everybody.

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APPLAUSE AND CHEERING

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Oh, showbiz shoulder!

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-Hello, hi! Come in!

-Hi!

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And this British actor has appeared in films like The Social Network,

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The Amazing Spider-Man and Martin Scorsese's Silence.

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He's just been Oscar nominated for his performance in Hacksaw Ridge.

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Now returning to the stage with Angels In America - welcome back, Andrew Garfield!

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APPLAUSE AND CHEERING

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Hello! Oh, a hug! Come in, sit down.

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Whoo!

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Yep, in for the wine!

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-As quick as possible!

-It's welcome back to Andrew, first time for Asa, Miss Bening.

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Now, Asa, people turning on the television...

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because you do look much younger than your actual years.

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-I do.

-How old are you, actually?

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-I'm 19.

-You can drink and swear, all sorts, it's good.

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I wanted to clarify, cos I would turn on the television, going,

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"But there's a very young person on the couch -

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"what are they talking about?!"

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-Now, Harriet Harman, you've never done a show like this before.

-No.

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But when I saw you doing Prime Minister's Questions, I had

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a moment of revelation, I realised that you should be Prime Minister.

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CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

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-I think that a lot!

-This is what we've been waiting for.

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You know?

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Next time there's a vacancy in Tower Hamlets, I'm in.

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Annette, have I seen you on a British talk show before?

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-I'm not sure that you have.

-But in America, you must do.

-I do, yeah.

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-Yeah?

-Yeah, I do. I'm just shy, that's all.

-OK. Get that down you!

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I find it a bit of a cure-all.

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And, Andrew Garfield, how lovely to have you at this time.

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-So happy to be here.

-A big congratulations on your Oscar nomination.

-Thank you.

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CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

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Oscars this month, I have heard you -

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you have threatened to recreate your beautiful Golden Globes moment,

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which you must be so regretting cos you have to talk about it

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everywhere you go. I'm sure you guys saw this.

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-Ryan Gosling was on the show a couple of weeks ago.

-Yes.

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Ryan Gosling is getting his award. Annette, you're here somewhere.

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-Oh, there you are. Is that you?

-Oh, yeah.

-I think you're over there.

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Over here, stealing the thunder is Andrew Garfield and Ryan Reynolds.

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Are you going to do it at the Oscars?

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No! No!

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It was a ridiculous thing. It was ridiculous.

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I said to Ryan Reynolds, "If you win, kiss me instead of your wife."

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And he said, "Yeah, that's great!"

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And the plan was that he would kind of move towards his wife and

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then kind of last-minute move towards me.

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And then he didn't win, much to our disappointment, and I said,

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"We could still just do it!"

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And he was game.

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And I love the fact it was so deep in the background

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so you kind of have to look to see if it was actually...

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-Ryan Gosling was unaware of it.

-I know.

-Were you aware of it, Annette?

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No!

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That night,

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the big moment was Meryl making her amazing speech that night.

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-And I presume that the Oscars are going to be similar.

-I imagine so.

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I'd imagine so.

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-Annette, you are famously a long-time Democrat.

-Yes.

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Democrat supporter. But I heard, before the inauguration, you were kind of saying,

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"Calm down, everyone..."

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How are you feeling now?

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I don't remember saying, "Calm down, everyone."

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Well, I am... I respect very much the public servants, like you,

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people who put themselves up to help run our country,

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especially the Democrats, I am a Democrat.

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And I also very much right now applaud the Republicans

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who are standing up to Trump.

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We very much need them and so his attack on the press,

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I think is very unfortunate, I think we need the press, obviously.

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Harriet's going, "Do we, do we really? Are you sure we need the press?"

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I am feeling sorry for them in the States,

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I mean, they are really important.

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-Incredibly important.

-And his spokespeople have said

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and he has said they are the opposition party, the press.

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-Yeah.

-It takes a while for things to sort themselves out.

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I wonder, though, Harriet Harman, Theresa May

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went to Washington and is getting a lot of flak for that.

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I feel for her because we can't sever all ties with America,

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we need America.

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I suppose it's an easy question for you because you don't have to do it,

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but what WOULD be your approach to it?

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Well, I think that she's got to look

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as though she's a strong Prime Minister

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of a strong, self-confident country and not look as though

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she's going there begging for a trade deal on any terms whatsoever.

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That is why that handholding thing was so disastrous

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because it looked like he was sort of leading her along.

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And isn't that a particular problem for a female politician,

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cos he couldn't have done that to a man, robbing her of her power?

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Definitely.

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There's all sorts of rumours about why he did it,

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but she should have had in her briefing,

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"This man is an identified groper, stand well away!"

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-APPLAUSE

-That should have been in her briefing.

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Harriet, in your time you have also encountered the problems

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of body language.

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There's that famous picture of you with Ed Balls.

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You don't look like you were inviting a kiss there!

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Actually, I absolutely love Ed Balls.

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You do appear to have eaten your own lips!

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I think... It's like politicians kissing in public.

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But Trump said apparently that he has got this thing called bathmophobia

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which is like, he is saying, I had to hold her hand

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because I've got this phobia, which is a fear of slopes.

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Now, I know men seize various parts of women's bodies for all sorts

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of reasons, but that is the first time I have heard bathmophobia!

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It's like, "I'm sorry, I've got to grab your bum

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"because I really feel giddy on this slope!"

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No!

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Anyway, he might have that phobia, but certainly I have got

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Trumpaphobia and I think lots of other people have as well.

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APPLAUSE Listen to that.

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It's like Question Time, it's good. I'm loving it. Yes!

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Man in the pink tie. Yes.

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Very good.

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Now, we mentioned already the Oscar nomination,

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but it is currently in UK cinemas, Hacksaw Ridge,

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directed by Mel Gibson, and it is an extraordinary true story.

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I love when films do this - they pick up a story that fell through the cracks of history.

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Tell us about who you play.

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Desmond Doss is the guy's name.

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And he was a real person.

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And he served in World War II

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as an army medic.

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But the difference is that he was a pacifist.

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And all medics had to be armed, but he refused.

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He refused to even go near a weapon.

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That unto itself, what a beautiful act,

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but legally he was obligated to carry one, so his own army

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tried to get him kicked out and railroaded and put in prison

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and he managed to finally find a legal loophole

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and ultimately serve, but he was ostracised by his own men.

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But then he did these miraculous things on the battlefield.

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He didn't only treat and save the lives of his own men -

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75 in one night, lowered down off a 400ft tall ridge.

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One man as skinny as me, carrying men the size of Vince Vaughn,

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but he also treated members of the opposition.

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He treated "the enemy".

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He didn't see skin colour, he saw...a man in need,

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only ever a man in need, he understood the sanctity of life.

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He...

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The values in him, the virtues in him that

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he embodied are incredible for us to look to now, and very awe-inspiring.

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Our clip is exactly that, our clip is during the horrific battle -

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those sequences are extraordinary -

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the battle at Hacksaw Ridge, and this is you rescuing your sergeant,

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played by Vince Vaughn.

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-You're like gum on a shoe.

-Give me this.

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It's a bit late for target practice now, don't you think?

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Jump on it.

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-You're kidding.

-No, I'm going to drag you.

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MAN SPEAKS IN JAPANESE

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Let's do it!

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HE GROANS

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-Ready?

-Yeah.

-Let's go.

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GUNFIRE, SHOUTING

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-We've got company!

-Come on!

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GRUNTING

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APPLAUSE AND CHEERING Wow.

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It has been really well-received, this film.

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I mean, you got the Oscar nod,

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but how does it happen, were you watching telly,

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did you watch the announcement live?

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I couldn't, I was across the street from the studio,

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I'm rehearsing a play at the National Theatre right now.

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And I was in rehearsals

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for Angels In America, and we had just broken for lunch and

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they were doing the announcement on LA time.

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And I had bought a tuna salad in the National Theatre canteen.

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God is in the details.

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And I was eating said tuna salad...

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while drinking sparkling water,

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alone in the National Theatre canteen,

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terrified of doing a play again cos I'm a terrible actor...

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-AUDIENCE MEMBER:

-Aw!

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-No, no, no...

-No, let him.

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It was ironic, theatre rehearsals are tricky -

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it's a fumbling, failing process where you are trying to figure out

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what the hell you're doing, so you feel terrible, mostly.

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And then, to find out in that moment that you are nominated for such

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a prestigious award, it felt very ironic.

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It felt very strange. I didn't quite believe it.

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You must have gone back into the afternoon rehearsal thinking, "Hey, I've got this!"

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I was a bit like, "Oh, maybe I was wrong about that!"

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If anyone knows what it's like, it's Annette Bening.

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-You've been nominated, is it four times?

-Yes.

-Four times!

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Never won, obviously, but four times!

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-LAUGHTER

-You would have to bring that up!

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-There's still time!

-There's loads of time!

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So, what is it like being nominated?

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-What's the evening like?

-Oh, it's very exciting.

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The first time I was nominated was 26 years ago.

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The five of us who were nominated got together in the audience before

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the show went on the air, and we all agreed, secretly, just amongst us,

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that we would have dinner the next week, and whoever won would pay.

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So Whoopi Goldberg won. The next day I was working on a movie,

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the next day in my trailer,

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I got a beautiful big bouquet of flowers with a little note saying,

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"Meet at such and such a restaurant next week."

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We all met, and Whoopi gave us each a gardenia

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and a chocolate Oscar.

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Aw! So, look at it this way, if you lose, Andrew,

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there might be a free dinner in it!

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It's swings and roundabouts.

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When you were really young, you were in Hugo and

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The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas.

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Were you around all the awards shows and things,

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-were you wheeled out?

-I did some.

-"Were you wheeled out"?!

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If there's a child in a movie, they LOVE bringing the child up onstage,

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going, "Look, it's a child!"

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I had my mum. She would get me in and it was all right.

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When you're that age,

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you don't really know what the hell's going on.

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I don't either! And I'm 66!

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Do they put you in a tiny tuxedo?

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They do!

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And usher you onto the carpet, and there's flashing lights,

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and you sort of stand and smile and look cute.

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It's fun.

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You know the way when you put on weight, you keep your suits,

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do you have a tiny tuxedo in the back of your wardrobe, thinking,

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"That might come in handy for something"?

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I do, and my mum wears it!

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Now, Andrew, we've mentioned already you're currently rehearsing

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Angels In America,

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which opens at the National Theatre on the 11th of April.

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It's unbelievable to me, the play is 25 years old.

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But for this anniversary production they have put together an extraordinary team.

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-Tell us who you've got.

-Marianne Elliott is directing the play.

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-Who did The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-time.

-And War Horse.

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Which has 10,000 touring productions happening across the world right now.

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She's brilliant and the cast is incredible.

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Nathan Lane is playing Roy Cohn, the famous New York lawyer,

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one of Donald Trump's mentors, actually.

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-It all comes back!

-It's set in the '80s in New York City.

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It's set in the AIDS crisis, where AIDS was at its peak

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and no-one really knew where it had come from or how to stop it.

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It was spreading like an awful wildfire that was just taking lives.

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And it's actually a comedy, we're discovering in rehearsals.

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It's weird, it's a very, very funny play that Tony has written.

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It's incredibly tragic but incredibly funny.

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It's basically about how the six or seven main characters

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are attempting to make sense of this modern plague.

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-There's massive excitement about this production.

-Yeah.

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If you don't live in London, can't get to London,

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it is going to be beamed to cinemas around the world through one

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of those NT Live things.

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20th of July, so you've got plenty of time to get ready.

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And then a week later, 27th of July is the second part.

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Not to put people off, but altogether, it's about seven hours long, you think?

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-I don't know how long it is.

-Speak quicker!

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They're going to cut a lot!

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It's absolutely going to be worth your time.

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Wait! I take that back, I'm not sure if it is yet!

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Oh, say it is! Sell, sell, sell!

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You're Oscar nominated, how bad can you be?!

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The play itself is absolutely worth your time, I swear to you,

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it's a life-changing experience in the theatre.

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Annette, you must have seen this the first time around?

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Indeed. In fact, it was done the first time in Los Angeles.

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It was the first time I had been in LA

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when a theatre piece really became an event.

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So it was done at the Mark Taper Forum, downtown. You would go for the day.

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You would go to the matinee, just like I'm sure people will do here.

0:18:510:18:54

You would go to the matinee, you have a bite to eat

0:18:540:18:57

and then you see the evening performance.

0:18:570:18:59

Then it went to New York, it was a huge event. Yes, it's incredible.

0:18:590:19:04

Yeah. Now, it's a chat show, so I'm very excited to tell you

0:19:040:19:08

that on our couch tonight we have a record holder. Yes, we do.

0:19:080:19:13

That record holder is Asa Butterfield.

0:19:130:19:16

No, you ARE a record holder, aren't you?!

0:19:160:19:18

Yeah, I guess.

0:19:180:19:20

-That's what I've been told!

-I hold a record, yeah.

0:19:200:19:24

He's very fast at doing something. Any guesses, Andrew?

0:19:240:19:27

How old are you?

0:19:280:19:30

He's 19!

0:19:300:19:31

I'll stop you!

0:19:340:19:36

What are the things you're very fast at?

0:19:360:19:38

Neither of them are at all useful.

0:19:380:19:41

I can clap very fast.

0:19:420:19:44

Take that, audience!

0:19:440:19:47

Somebody on the couch has said, "I'm better at clapping than the audience!"

0:19:470:19:51

And then I can type the alphabet very fast as well.

0:19:510:19:55

It came about, really weirdly.

0:19:550:19:57

But when you say very fast, tell us, what is your best time?

0:19:570:20:01

-My best time for typing the alphabet is 1.97 seconds.

-Wow!

0:20:010:20:05

-And what's the world record?

-I think it's under one second.

0:20:070:20:10

Oh, is it? Oh, so you're NOT a record holder at all?

0:20:100:20:12

No.

0:20:120:20:14

What a waste of time this has been!

0:20:150:20:17

Oh, I know! It's a record ATTEMPT, we're going for a record attempt!

0:20:170:20:22

They have set, there's a website, they've set this up where there is

0:20:220:20:27

a clock, the alphabet,

0:20:270:20:29

and as you type the thing, the alphabet lights up.

0:20:290:20:32

-I had one, my brother showed me it.

-Can you show us on this?

-I can.

0:20:320:20:36

-Is it the same one?

-I don't know.

0:20:360:20:39

I like that you're bringing your drink with you!

0:20:390:20:42

-Type the alphabet.

-It's all there.

0:20:420:20:45

OK. So, basically, you start typing and the clock starts, OK?

0:20:450:20:50

Jeez. When I did this, the game was called Finger Frenzy.

0:20:500:20:54

OK!

0:20:540:20:56

LAUGHTER

0:20:560:20:57

Maybe that's what you were googling when you found it!

0:20:580:21:02

-I'm going to give it a go.

-Honestly, this is good. Watch this, watch this.

0:21:040:21:08

Come on, come on!

0:21:080:21:10

For the record! CHEERING

0:21:100:21:12

Here we go, here we go...

0:21:120:21:14

-Oh! Try it again! Reset!

-Where's the mouse?

-Reset.

0:21:190:21:23

-Reset. The first try.

-OK. It was nerves!

0:21:230:21:27

-It's a different keyboard layout.

-It's the best of 20!

0:21:270:21:32

Yes, yes...

0:21:350:21:36

It's this game! I need Finger Frenzy!

0:21:360:21:40

-APPLAUSE

-I need Finger Frenzy!

0:21:400:21:42

-Anybody else want a go?

-No!

0:21:450:21:47

-Harriet Harman, no?

-No!

0:21:470:21:49

All right, well, let's try fast clapping, then!

0:21:510:21:53

LAUGHTER DROWNS OUT SPEECH

0:21:550:21:57

I have no idea what this is...

0:21:570:21:59

I watched a video on YouTube of someone who holds the world record.

0:21:590:22:03

I'm getting all of these things off YouTube, it's amazing.

0:22:030:22:05

So, there's a technique. Most people clap like this.

0:22:050:22:08

It's the usual thing.

0:22:080:22:10

But if you sort of flex like this,

0:22:100:22:14

then it starts to speed up.

0:22:140:22:17

Wow, that's very impressive!

0:22:190:22:21

I would just say, enjoy this time, because now you can legally drink,

0:22:270:22:30

these games are over for you!

0:22:300:22:32

There will be far less time on YouTube learning how to clap fast,

0:22:330:22:36

I promise you! Very impressive.

0:22:360:22:38

Right, Annette Bening, you bring us a fabulous film -

0:22:380:22:42

20th Century Women - it opens next Friday.

0:22:420:22:45

I LOVE films like this.

0:22:450:22:47

-Thank you.

-It's just got a great ensemble cast, and it's

0:22:470:22:51

a particular sort of American film that you guys are so good at making.

0:22:510:22:55

Tell us about it.

0:22:550:22:56

Mike Mills wrote and directed it, it's 1979, Santa Barbara,

0:22:560:23:00

so this is pre-digital, which is kind of an interesting thing now,

0:23:000:23:04

to look back at a time before we had the digital age.

0:23:040:23:07

And I'm playing the mom who's trying to figure out

0:23:070:23:12

my own life and raise my son,

0:23:120:23:15

and I've got the son and he's trying to grow up and figure out me.

0:23:150:23:18

And we've got a group of people living in the house,

0:23:180:23:21

we've got Greta Gerwig, who's a punk artist, kind of wild woman,

0:23:210:23:25

but who also has problems and has an illness. And we have

0:23:250:23:29

Elle Fanning, who plays his friend,

0:23:290:23:32

who is a bad-ass teenage girl, amazing.

0:23:320:23:35

And Billy Crudup.

0:23:350:23:36

And it's based on the director's mother.

0:23:360:23:40

-Own life, yes.

-I found her a really sympathetic character.

0:23:400:23:43

Cos she's trying SO hard to be the best mother she can be.

0:23:430:23:47

Right, but I like her because she's not an idealised mom,

0:23:470:23:51

she just is a real human being.

0:23:510:23:53

-Oh, no, she's failing constantly!

-Exactly!

-We've got a clip.

0:23:530:23:57

This is your character presiding,

0:23:570:23:59

you know, you're trying to be liberal, lovely mom.

0:23:590:24:03

-Yes.

-At a dinner party.

0:24:030:24:05

Jamie, would you please wake up Abbie?

0:24:050:24:07

-Er, Abbie?

-Stop it, I'm menstruating.

0:24:090:24:12

Abbie, you know what, you're menstruating, OK,

0:24:140:24:17

but do you have to say it?

0:24:170:24:19

And do we really need to know everything that's going on with you?

0:24:190:24:22

What? I'm menstruating!

0:24:220:24:25

-Why is that a big deal?

-We don't need to hear about that,

0:24:250:24:28

thank you.

0:24:280:24:29

If you ever want to have an adult relationship with a woman,

0:24:290:24:33

like if you want to have sex with a woman's vagina, you need to

0:24:330:24:36

be comfortable with the fact that the vagina menstruates.

0:24:360:24:40

Just say menstruation, it's not a big deal.

0:24:400:24:42

So start saying it now. Menstruation.

0:24:420:24:45

-No.

-Yes. Menstruation.

0:24:460:24:49

-Menstr...uation.

-Jamie, no, you don't have to.

0:24:500:24:53

-You're saying it like you're scared.

-Abbie.

0:24:530:24:56

Say it like it's normal.

0:24:560:24:57

-Menstruation.

-Menstruation. Not bad.

0:24:570:25:00

APPLAUSE AND CHEERING

0:25:000:25:02

Asa nearly did his quick clapping there, he liked it so much!

0:25:080:25:11

Next time!

0:25:110:25:13

-You've got... Is it four children you've got?

-I do.

0:25:130:25:18

I mean, those scenes must have resonated with you?

0:25:180:25:21

And she ad-libbed a lot of that scene. It was very, very funny.

0:25:210:25:26

And then Billy at the end says, you know,

0:25:260:25:29

"You can't have sex with just part of the woman and just the vagina,

0:25:290:25:35

"you have to have sex with the whole woman."

0:25:350:25:38

And Greta says, "Yes, but that's slightly off topic!"

0:25:380:25:41

-And that was all improvised.

-It's a terrific film, it really is.

0:25:430:25:47

And also we should say, in terms of your own life, congratulations.

0:25:470:25:51

-Next month, is it 25 years you've been married?

-Yes.

-Well done!

0:25:510:25:55

APPLAUSE AND CHEERING

0:25:550:25:56

I suppose 25 years is a huge achievement anywhere.

0:26:010:26:05

But in Hollywood it seems like it's sort of extraordinary.

0:26:050:26:09

I don't know, we're given more credit.

0:26:090:26:10

I don't know if it is more unusual in Hollywood or not.

0:26:100:26:13

I think there is a lot of divorce everywhere.

0:26:130:26:15

I guess we read about yours - that would be the difference!

0:26:150:26:20

I suppose - I don't think I'm...

0:26:200:26:24

But Warren Beatty had a certain reputation before you.

0:26:240:26:28

LAUGHTER

0:26:280:26:29

Was there a lot of, "it will never last, are you out of your mind"?

0:26:290:26:33

I suppose there were people, I guess people didn't say it to me,

0:26:330:26:37

but I suppose people thought that.

0:26:370:26:39

-They said it to your parents!

-Perhaps, yes.

0:26:390:26:42

25 years, can you beat that, Harriet Harman?

0:26:430:26:47

Er, yes!

0:26:470:26:48

Can I just say, though, in 20th Century Women, that face,

0:26:500:26:56

that face - any mum looking at that knows that they've had that face!

0:26:560:27:00

It's all deteriorating all around, and... It's just so brilliant,

0:27:000:27:06

-I can't wait to see it, I can't wait.

-It's a great film.

0:27:060:27:08

30 years, 30 years is contained within Harriet Harman's new book,

0:27:080:27:13

A Woman's Work, here it is.

0:27:130:27:15

And it's sort of...it's your life,

0:27:150:27:19

but it's also a story of the women's movement and your career.

0:27:190:27:23

A solicitor, the longest-serving female MP, Deputy Leader

0:27:230:27:26

of the Labour Party, twice Acting Leader of the Labour Party,

0:27:260:27:29

all of that, it's all in here.

0:27:290:27:31

What is the big thing,

0:27:310:27:34

what's the thing that you're proudest of at this point?

0:27:340:27:37

Well, I guess it's being part of that movement of women.

0:27:370:27:40

I mean, I was born and brought up at a time when the most

0:27:400:27:43

important thing for a woman was to kind of get a man,

0:27:430:27:48

and the summit of your ambition was to get a decent man to marry.

0:27:480:27:54

And then after that, your great honour and privilege was to,

0:27:540:27:58

like, be a housewife and to look after him.

0:27:580:28:01

And we were like, "Well, no, we don't think we are second-class

0:28:010:28:05

"citizens, we don't think we should be subordinate to men.

0:28:050:28:08

"We're just going to get out there and absolutely change everything."

0:28:080:28:11

So it was such a kind of time of transition and

0:28:110:28:15

a feeling of revolution, really.

0:28:150:28:17

So the only problem was that we couldn't do anything unless

0:28:170:28:21

we could change politics.

0:28:210:28:23

So it was like the irresistible force of women's movement and the immovable object of Parliament.

0:28:230:28:28

And we had to kind of batter our way in.

0:28:280:28:31

Thankfully, lots of things have changed over the last 30 years.

0:28:310:28:35

But I do find it extraordinary that STILL women are having to have

0:28:350:28:41

a march - even if they're given rights, they're feeling that they have to protect those rights.

0:28:410:28:45

Are you saddened that things haven't moved further in those 30 years?

0:28:460:28:51

Well, I think we have come a long way,

0:28:510:28:53

but we're not equal yet, there's still a long way to go.

0:28:530:28:56

And I think you should never be complacent about rights

0:28:560:29:00

that have been really hard-won,

0:29:000:29:01

because there's always people who want to turn the clock back,

0:29:010:29:04

whether it's on tackling racism or homophobia, there will be people

0:29:040:29:08

who want to seize the opportunity to turn the clock back to the 1950s.

0:29:080:29:14

So you can't really take those rights for granted, they were hard fought-for.

0:29:140:29:18

And I think we're at that moment now, it's not your fault, Annette,

0:29:180:29:22

but Trump is sending this virus across which is legitimising

0:29:220:29:27

all those kinds of reactions.

0:29:270:29:30

I apologise on behalf of my nation.

0:29:300:29:33

I think we need her as President as well as you Prime Minister.

0:29:330:29:37

Have you ever thought of running for office?

0:29:370:29:40

-I have not.

-OK!

0:29:400:29:42

Maybe once.

0:29:430:29:45

Do it again.

0:29:450:29:47

But in terms of moving things on, in terms of women,

0:29:470:29:50

how disappointed are you that it's the Conservatives who've

0:29:500:29:54

rustled up two female prime ministers?

0:29:540:29:56

This has been a bit of a paradox/torture for us.

0:29:560:30:00

The first woman Prime Minister was Margaret Thatcher

0:30:000:30:05

and we did not feel that that was a good thing to be celebrating,

0:30:050:30:10

that Margaret Thatcher was the Prime Minister,

0:30:100:30:12

so we had to do lots of marching, holding banners,

0:30:120:30:14

saying, "The First Lady puts women last,"

0:30:140:30:17

and that was her, and now we've got another woman Prime Minister

0:30:170:30:21

and once again, it's a Tory.

0:30:210:30:23

We've got more Labour women MPs than all the other parties put together,

0:30:230:30:26

but at the very top level, it seems to be... I have that song in my head,

0:30:260:30:30

It's Raining Men - you know that song, and it does feel like that.

0:30:300:30:33

Oh, I know that song!

0:30:330:30:35

APPLAUSE

0:30:360:30:38

When you write a book like this, is this you saying, "I'm retiring,

0:30:400:30:44

"I'm out of here"?

0:30:440:30:45

-You know, "Harman out."

-Not at all.

0:30:450:30:47

Not at all, actually, and it's funny

0:30:470:30:50

because there is a thing about women and your age.

0:30:500:30:54

It's like, when you're much younger, in politics,

0:30:540:30:58

it is like, oh, you know, young, pretty, a bit distracting,

0:30:580:31:03

a bit flaky, not to be taken seriously, whereas a young man

0:31:030:31:06

will be regarded as very thrusting with loads of promise for the future

0:31:060:31:10

and he is in his prime, whereas the woman is a bit ditzy.

0:31:100:31:13

And then, when she's having her family and she has loads of children,

0:31:130:31:17

she is like, she's just a write-off,

0:31:170:31:20

whereas he's regarded as he has got his family, reassuringly virile.

0:31:200:31:24

And then, when they are older, the man is like experienced,

0:31:240:31:29

wise, like George Clooney, attractive,

0:31:290:31:33

silver-fox type of thing and the woman, when she gets older,

0:31:330:31:36

well, she's just past it! And it's like, when is OUR prime?!

0:31:360:31:41

-APPLAUSE

-Bravo!

0:31:410:31:44

That got the quick clap!

0:31:460:31:48

-I'm going to be, like, having my prime NOW.

-Good for you!

0:31:500:31:55

Harriet Harman, well done!

0:31:550:31:56

No mistaking, Asa Butterfield is in his prime. Your life is changing.

0:32:000:32:05

This is the first time you did not have to study during a film,

0:32:050:32:11

there were no chaperones around.

0:32:110:32:12

-It was great!

-I bet it was!

0:32:120:32:14

I was living by myself, I was in Albuquerque...

0:32:140:32:19

Less great.

0:32:190:32:21

Take it or leave it.

0:32:210:32:23

It was funny, we were making a film, part of it's set on Mars,

0:32:250:32:28

and Albuquerque's got a kind of Mars-like look to it.

0:32:280:32:32

It's a bit of a desert. So we made the most of that.

0:32:320:32:35

I didn't have to have a tutor, I wasn't in school,

0:32:350:32:39

I was a real actor.

0:32:390:32:41

-You live in your own flat now.

-Yeah, I've moved out of home, last year.

0:32:420:32:47

Which is cool.

0:32:470:32:49

LAUGHTER

0:32:490:32:50

You've been in films since you were eight! Can you cook?

0:32:500:32:55

How do you know how to do anything?

0:32:550:32:57

I can cook all right.

0:32:570:33:00

Yeah. I do get an unfortunate amount of takeaway.

0:33:000:33:05

I've got this great local food shop opposite, I can walk down the stairs, takes me about 30 seconds,

0:33:060:33:12

and get loads of frozen pizza and tuna and beans, Heinz baked beans.

0:33:120:33:17

Oh, Andrew would love that!

0:33:170:33:19

I've actually become amazing at cooking beans on toast.

0:33:190:33:23

LAUGHTER

0:33:230:33:25

Your first film as an independent young man is

0:33:250:33:28

the science-fiction romance The Space Between Us.

0:33:280:33:31

It opens next Friday and here's a taste of what to expect.

0:33:310:33:34

'My name is Gardner Elliot, I was born on Mars, but I finally

0:33:380:33:42

'found a reason to go to Earth.'

0:33:420:33:44

-I could just see her, you know.

-His heart can't handle our gravity.

0:33:440:33:47

-It's too risky.

-It's worth it.

0:33:470:33:50

You don't realise how far away you are until there's someone you want

0:33:500:33:53

to be near.

0:33:530:33:55

-He's running out of time.

-You have to go back.

0:33:560:34:00

-What is your favourite thing about Earth?

-You are, Gardner.

0:34:060:34:10

APPLAUSE

0:34:100:34:13

They make a lot of these science-fiction movies,

0:34:170:34:21

people living on Mars, but this is a really unusual take on it.

0:34:210:34:25

Explain the germ of the idea and the romance.

0:34:260:34:29

Well, it's a science-fiction film.

0:34:290:34:33

But it's got this backdrop, but I think what really drives it is these

0:34:330:34:37

relationships, and it is about this boy who has grown up on Mars for 16 years

0:34:370:34:41

so he has been totally isolated from just about anything.

0:34:410:34:44

So he's an odd guy, he's kind of weird and he's smart, but I really

0:34:440:34:50

had fun just making the most of what made him different because he comes

0:34:500:34:53

to Earth and he hasn't seen anything before, like dogs, cats...

0:34:530:34:58

Literally anything is interesting to him and he is like

0:34:580:35:02

a kid in this teenager's body.

0:35:020:35:04

One of the big things is gravity, because the gravity of Mars...

0:35:040:35:08

I know, I sound like a scientist!

0:35:080:35:11

LAUGHTER

0:35:110:35:12

But Earth's different, right?

0:35:150:35:17

Yeah, so... One of the things we were playing with, I guess,

0:35:200:35:25

to make him stand out and look like an alien, is this change in gravity,

0:35:250:35:31

so Mars is 38% of the Earth's gravity,

0:35:310:35:34

so when he comes here he feels much heavier and we wanted

0:35:340:35:37

to give him this walk which was a bit Ministry Of Funny Walks-ish,

0:35:370:35:42

but not too far.

0:35:420:35:44

I strapped weights to my ankles and sandbags so I could feel

0:35:440:35:48

what it is like to be heavier and walk around.

0:35:480:35:51

And, yeah, I had someone film me whilst I was doing it

0:35:510:35:55

and I could look at it and just really make it funny.

0:35:550:35:59

And make it good.

0:35:590:36:01

You're so consistent with it because you do heavy running as well, not just heavy walking.

0:36:010:36:06

-That's right, and heavy jumping.

-Yes!

0:36:060:36:08

Everything takes much more effort.

0:36:080:36:10

-Heavy clapping.

-That's right.

0:36:100:36:14

Talking about preparing for roles, you are in another film at

0:36:140:36:18

the moment, Silence, Martin Scorsese's film,

0:36:180:36:20

and you went to Wales to prepare for that?

0:36:200:36:23

-Yes, Wales.

-Wales.

0:36:230:36:24

-You're a monk in the film.

-A Jesuit priest.

0:36:260:36:30

So part of that preparation was myself and Adam Driver,

0:36:300:36:36

we both played Jesuit priests and... It's set in the 1600s in Japan,

0:36:360:36:41

where Christianity has been outlawed. It is an amazing film,

0:36:410:36:45

it's a Martin Scorsese film - Asa has worked with him,

0:36:450:36:48

and he's made something quite profound.

0:36:480:36:51

But one of the things that we did, we went on a silent retreat

0:36:510:36:55

in Wales, at a place called St Beuno's,

0:36:550:36:57

-which was a beautiful Christian retreat.

-It is very beautiful.

0:36:570:37:01

I haven't done the retreat thing, though. Too early for that.

0:37:010:37:06

We had about eight days together in silence, me and Adam.

0:37:080:37:11

We had met each other once in New York and we had a drink and

0:37:110:37:15

we met each other again in Wales in total silence for seven days.

0:37:150:37:19

Did you say hi as you went in?

0:37:190:37:20

No! It was like a mime! It was all mime and mouthing.

0:37:200:37:24

Did you do lots of...

0:37:240:37:25

-..was there a lot of that?

-Yes. It was...

0:37:270:37:30

Really? I always think a vow of silence, like, do you write notes?

0:37:300:37:35

I mean, you must speak at some point!

0:37:350:37:38

No, you really don't. Has anyone ever done a silent retreat?

0:37:380:37:43

One person!

0:37:430:37:44

They can't tell you about it!

0:37:440:37:46

I found it to be a beautiful experience. Gorgeous.

0:37:480:37:52

I very quickly got used to my own company and not having...

0:37:520:37:57

I don't know, it creates a real intimacy with yourself.

0:37:570:38:01

-What's it like when you get out, then?

-We lost our minds!

0:38:010:38:05

This is the weird thing.

0:38:050:38:08

We got into a car together and we had

0:38:080:38:10

a three-hour car ride to the airport together, and it was just this

0:38:100:38:15

torrent, just this outpouring of the most vile language and imagery...

0:38:150:38:21

It was as if the devil suddenly went,

0:38:210:38:25

"Where have you been for the last seven days, you bastards?!"

0:38:250:38:29

And suddenly it was the most vile... It was really scary.

0:38:290:38:34

It was genuinely frightening.

0:38:340:38:36

And giggling and crying with laughter.

0:38:360:38:39

Anyway, we ended up having the most disgusting, wonderful conversation

0:38:390:38:45

on the way to the airport.

0:38:450:38:47

Very quickly, we are about to have music from Elbow, and we have

0:38:470:38:50

already had some speed clapping from Asa.

0:38:500:38:52

Don't worry, I'm not going to make you do anything else.

0:38:520:38:55

I can't believe I am asking four-time Oscar nominee Annette Bening this,

0:38:550:38:58

but apparently your elbows are pretty...loose?

0:38:580:39:02

It's true. I have a little elbow trick.

0:39:040:39:08

-Would you like to see my elbow trick?

-You know they do!

0:39:080:39:11

APPLAUSE

0:39:110:39:13

May I hand you my bracelet?

0:39:160:39:18

-This is serious.

-Everyone gets to try this.

0:39:180:39:21

CLATTER

0:39:210:39:23

-What?

-Was that your elbow?!

-He doesn't want to try.

0:39:230:39:27

-OK, so your hands go backwards to begin with.

-Hang on.

0:39:270:39:30

So, backwards to begin with.

0:39:300:39:32

And then you bring them underneath

0:39:320:39:36

and then you open them up

0:39:360:39:38

and you put your head through.

0:39:380:39:40

Oh, my... Wow!

0:39:400:39:42

APPLAUSE

0:39:420:39:43

-I couldn't do that. Could you do it?

-I can't.

0:39:460:39:49

-And I've got a flexible body.

-You're 19, you're made of elastic!

0:39:490:39:53

Wow, well done. Very good.

0:39:530:39:55

I don't know if that's very exciting, but there you have it.

0:39:550:39:57

We enjoyed it.

0:39:570:39:59

Right, it is time for music.

0:39:590:40:00

This award-winning British rock band

0:40:000:40:02

are back with their seventh studio album, Little Fictions.

0:40:020:40:06

Here performing Magnificent (She Says), please welcome Elbow!

0:40:060:40:10

# This is where

0:40:180:40:20

# This is where the bottle lands

0:40:210:40:24

# Where all the biggest questions meet

0:40:270:40:31

# With little feet stood in the sand

0:40:320:40:36

# This is where the echoes slow to nothing on the tide

0:40:380:40:45

# And where a tiny pair of hands

0:40:480:40:51

# Finds a sea-worn piece of glass

0:40:530:40:56

# And sets it as a sapphire in her mind

0:40:580:41:01

# And there she stands

0:41:050:41:07

# Throwing both her arms around the world

0:41:080:41:12

# A world that doesn't even know

0:41:160:41:21

# How much it needs this little girl

0:41:210:41:26

# It's all gonna be magnificent, oh

0:41:260:41:33

# She says, it's all gonna be magnificent

0:41:330:41:40

# And my heart, there defrosting in a gaze

0:41:430:41:51

# Wasn't built to be that way

0:41:530:41:58

# Suddenly I understand

0:41:580:42:01

# There on the sand

0:42:040:42:08

# Throwing both her arms around the world

0:42:130:42:18

# A world that doesn't even know

0:42:210:42:25

# How much it needs this little girl

0:42:250:42:31

# It's all gonna be magnificent, oh

0:42:310:42:38

# She says, it's all gonna be magnificent

0:42:380:42:45

# She says, it's all gonna be magnificent

0:42:490:42:57

# She says, it's all gonna be magnificent

0:42:590:43:07

# The echoes slow

0:43:150:43:18

# The bottle lands

0:43:200:43:23

# The echoes slow

0:43:250:43:28

# And there she stands. #

0:43:300:43:33

APPLAUSE

0:43:410:43:45

Elbow, everybody!

0:43:450:43:49

Beautiful. Are you coming over?

0:43:490:43:51

Thank you so much.

0:43:540:43:56

Ladies and gentlemen, what of the violinists?

0:43:560:43:59

Thank you. Guy, Asa, Harriet, Annette, Andrew.

0:43:590:44:04

There we go.

0:44:040:44:05

Sit down, you look like you've earned that.

0:44:080:44:11

The rest of the band are thinking they should have come over now.

0:44:110:44:14

I can't believe it. There was a Guinness in it and they said no.

0:44:140:44:19

That is from the album,

0:44:190:44:21

Little Fictions which is out today.

0:44:210:44:24

Look what I've got. I have got it on the vinyl. On the vinyl! I get so

0:44:240:44:28

many of these now. I'm thinking that I might buy a record player...

0:44:280:44:32

..cos I get so many of them. Thank you very much.

0:44:340:44:37

You are touring quite soon, the end of this month?

0:44:370:44:40

We are touring the UK throughout... March.

0:44:400:44:44

LAUGHTER

0:44:440:44:46

-It starts in Dublin in February, doesn't it?

-Yes.

0:44:460:44:50

I'm on this. Then it ends in the UK at the end of March.

0:44:500:44:54

That's right. Thank you for that.

0:44:540:44:57

You'll need about 28 pairs of pants.

0:44:570:44:59

Thank you very much.

0:44:590:45:01

Listen, thank you very much, Guy Garvey and Elbow. Beautiful.

0:45:010:45:04

APPLAUSE

0:45:040:45:06

Right, that's nearly it.

0:45:060:45:09

But before we go, we just have time for a visit to the big red chair.

0:45:090:45:12

-Who is there? Hello.

-Hi, Graham.

0:45:120:45:15

-Hi. How tall are you?

-Six foot two.

0:45:150:45:19

Is that all? You look taller.

0:45:190:45:21

-What is your name, sir?

-Keiron.

-Where are you from?

-Leixlip.

0:45:210:45:25

-Leixlip - it's a lovely part of the world.

-Beautiful.

0:45:250:45:28

-Do you still live there?

-No, I live in London.

0:45:280:45:32

-What do you do?

-Erm, design.

0:45:320:45:35

"Who did that?" "Keiron."

0:45:410:45:44

What do you design, I'm intrigued?

0:45:480:45:50

Shoelaces.

0:45:500:45:51

LAUGHTER

0:45:510:45:54

He's gone, absolutely.

0:45:540:45:56

One more. Let's try one more. Here we go.

0:45:580:46:01

Oh, my God! Hello.

0:46:010:46:03

-Hi.

-We...

0:46:030:46:06

-That's my planet.

-It's your planet, it's all about the Butterfield.

0:46:080:46:13

-What's your name, sir?

-Brad.

0:46:130:46:15

-Where are you from, Brad?

-Seattle.

-He's from Seattle.

-Woo!

0:46:150:46:19

-Are you here on holiday?

-I am.

-Lovely. What do you do in Seattle?

0:46:190:46:22

-I work in software, sales and marketing.

-Lovely.

0:46:220:46:26

Off you go with your story.

0:46:260:46:27

Sure. We were doing a global product roll-out and I was doing

0:46:270:46:30

some training in Reading and about 60 people, men and women in the

0:46:300:46:34

office there and I did some training for those folks and I led the

0:46:340:46:37

whole training exercise.

0:46:370:46:40

One group did a great job, a bunch of guys, who were British

0:46:400:46:44

and I wanted to compliment their presentation, so I said, "Boys,

0:46:440:46:50

"I really like your spunk."

0:46:500:46:52

AUDIENCE GROANS

0:46:520:46:54

I got a big laugh and I didn't quite know what it was all about.

0:46:540:46:57

-Luckily, during a break, one of the guys...

-Yeah.

0:46:570:46:59

We all know what that's about.

0:46:590:47:01

Well done, Brad. Well done, everyone.

0:47:010:47:05

If you'd like to join us on the show and have a go in the red chair,

0:47:050:47:08

you can contact us via our website at this address.

0:47:080:47:11

That's it for tonight.

0:47:110:47:13

Please say thank you to my guests - Elbow!

0:47:130:47:17

Asa Butterfield!

0:47:170:47:19

Harriet Harman!

0:47:190:47:22

Annette Bening!

0:47:220:47:24

And Andrew Garfield!

0:47:240:47:28

Join me next week with musical guest Rag'n'Bone Man,

0:47:280:47:31

Fifty Shades' Jamie Dornan,

0:47:310:47:32

Hollywood star Keanu Reeves,

0:47:320:47:34

Oscar winner Denzel Washington,

0:47:340:47:36

and the one and only Whoopi Goldberg.

0:47:360:47:39

I'll see you then! Goodnight, everybody. Goodbye.

0:47:390:47:42

On Graham's sofa are: four-time Oscar nominee Annette Bening, starring in the critically acclaimed 20th Century Women; former Spiderman Andrew Garfield, appearing in Angels in America at the National Theatre; Britain's longest-serving female MP, Harriet Harman, to discuss her memoir A Woman's Work; and rising British star Asa Butterfield, in new sci-fi The Space Between Us. Plus music from Elbow, who perform their new single Magnificent (She Says).