Alex Jones The TV That Made Me


Alex Jones

Celebrities choose the TV moments that have shaped their lives. Alex Jones reminisces about her happy childhood and the whole family's love of classic 80s candid camera.


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Transcript


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TV - the magic box of delights.

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As kids, it showed us a million different worlds,

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all from our living rooms.

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-This takes me right back.

-That's so embarrassing!

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I am genuinely shocked!

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Each day I'm going to journey through the wonderful

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world of telly with one of our favourite celebrities...

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It's just so silly!

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-SHE LAUGHS

-I love it!

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Is it Mr Benn?

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Shut it!

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..as they select the iconic TV moments...

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Oh, hello!

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..that tell us the stories of their lives.

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Oh, my God!

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Cheers!

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-Some will make you laugh...

-WUUURGH!

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..some will surprise...

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-SQUEAKING

-Oh!

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..many will inspire...

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-Oooh!

-Look at this!

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Why wouldn't you want to watch this?

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..and others will move us.

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Seeing that there made a huge impact on me.

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BABY CRIES

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Got a handkerchief?

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So come watch with us as we rewind to the classic telly that shaped

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those wide-eyed youngsters into the much-loved stars they are today.

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Welcome to The TV That Made Me.

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My guest today is on our screens every day fronting the one show

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we love to watch,

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it's the gorgeous, the wonderful Alex Jones!

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CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

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-Hello, Brian! Are you well?

-I'm very well. I hope you are too.

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-It's lovely to be here.

-Come and sit down.

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-Well! I love this sofa.

-Do you?

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-Yeah!

-Are you comfy?

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Having swapped her Welsh homeland for a spot on The One Show sofa,

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Alex is fast becoming one of the best known faces on the BBC.

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-Thanks for tuning in to The One Show with Alex Jones...

-And Chris Evans.

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Coming up from our top team tonight...

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In the last few years, there has been no stopping her.

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Shows like Tumble...

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..and a run on Strictly Come Dancing, where she reached

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the semifinals, have all helped turn her into a household name.

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And amongst the TV that made her,

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comedy in the best possible taste from one comedian who

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-dominated our screens in the '80s...

-You've found the secret of life!

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..to another whose Canned Carrot

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was a staple in many homes during the early '90s.

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Spread your legs and your arms.

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As well as close encounters with kids and animals on S4C.

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This is a celebration of television that you know and love

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and that you've grown-up with. Are you excited about that?

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Really excited.

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Because actually, when you think back, you can

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remember different eras by what you were watching at the time.

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I've always been a huge telly fan.

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Today, we're going to watch some classic TV shows,

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but before we do that we going to rewind the clock

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and have a look at a very young Alex Jones.

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Alex grew up in Ammanford, Carmarthenshire, with her mum,

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a bank clerk, dad, an engineer,

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and Jenny, her younger sister by three years.

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She was seen chatting away in her native tongue

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after attending the local Welsh speaking school.

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Giving up childhood dreams to be a ballet dancer,

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she headed off to university to study theatre, film and TV.

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After working briefly behind the cameras it wasn't long

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before she found herself on screen and starting her TV career

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presenting the Welsh language channel S4C.

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-So what about nostalgia? Are you one for nostalgia?

-Yeah, I am, yeah.

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Um, you know, when we were thinking about shows we used to watch,

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it brings back really happy memories,

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especially of watching television as a family.

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And I think back when we were young

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it was more of an appointment to view, then.

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People would sit down as their family - nine o'clock on a Friday,

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so-and-so is on, get the fish and chips in, and we'd all be there.

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And I don't think that happens as much any more

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because you can watch things on catch-up.

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I dunno, when I look back it reminds me of really happy,

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comforting, cosy times.

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And we want to make you comfy, we want to make you happy today.

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Did you have any TV snacks?

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TV snacks would be mostly, well, tea and biscuits.

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-Tea and biscuits. Don't go anywhere.

-Well, it's great service here!

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I'm going in the kitchen now.

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-I hope you like builder's tea.

-Oh, I love builder's tea.

-There you go.

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Drop of milk, that's all you need.

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We have a small selection here - do you want to take any?

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Well, I'm spoiled for choice here. I think I'll have a custard cream.

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-Oh, custard cream!

-Do you mind if I dunk?

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Oh, I'm going to have a dunk as well.

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-The good thing with a custard cream is they're robust.

-Very robust, yes.

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What you don't want is a biscuit and you dunk it

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and then it goes pathetic.

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-Yes.

-Custard cream, nice and chunky. It can withstand the tea.

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Yeah, see, you've learned something today, haven't you, ladies and gentlemen?

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LAUGHTER

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A custard cream is robust!

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Good for dunking. So not a digestive, then?

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I'm not opposed, I love a digestive.

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I like Rich Tea, and I'll tell you why.

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Because they're so thin you can eat loads of them.

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LAUGHTER

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It's time for your first choice now, Alex.

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Let's take a look at an early TV memory. Here it is.

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# Sunny day... #

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Sesame Street!

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This takes me right back

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to being probably four or five.

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Really?

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With over 4,000 episodes over the last 47 years, Sesame Street

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has become an institution on both sides of The Pond.

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It was originally created for nursery-aged children

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to prepare them for school.

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The educational content of the series was delivered by children

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and adults interacting with puppets provided by the then relatively

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unknown Jim Henson.

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# Can you tell me how to get, how to get to Sesame Street? #

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It reminds me of school holidays, especially summer holidays.

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We'd get up really early, Jen and I - Jen is my sister -

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and first thing we do, Mum would bring us some cereal,

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turn the telly on and Sesame Street would be on.

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I used to absolutely love it.

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It's one of the most vivid memories, you know, as a child.

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Sesame Street was a big...

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On our street, we lived on a sort of cul-de-sac,

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and all the parents bought houses at about the same time

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because they were new houses then, back in the early '80s or whatever.

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And so all the children were around the same age

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and we were all friends.

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And we'd all watch that in the morning and then we go out

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and play our own version of Sesame Street. So we were all big fans.

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What sort of games would you play that stemmed from watching Sesame Street?

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Well, we had a tree in the field that was near this

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cul-de-sac where we lived, and the big tree would be Big Bird's nest.

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Of course, of course.

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-You've just got imagination when you're little, haven't you?

-Yeah.

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And we'd sing the same songs and... I don't know, it just seemed...

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Because I think it was filmed in New York, wasn't it? I'm not sure.

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I believe so, yeah.

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Yeah, and to us, who lived in South Wales,

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that seems the ultimate glamour.

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-Did you have a favourite character?

-Big Bird.

-Oh, really?

-Mm.

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And Groucho in the bin.

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(Bert is it!)

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-Oh, Bert and Ernie!

-Yeah.

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The very first Muppets to appear were Bert and Ernie

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Henson himself performed as Ernie.

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Fellow puppeteer Frank Oz played Bert.

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-You're it, Bert!

-Aaaagh!

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I'LL GET YOU! I'LL GET YOU!

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I'M GOING TO GET YOU!

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It's been claimed that Bert's irritation at Ernie's endless

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harebrained schemes bore a strong similarity

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to their real-life friendship.

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I'm going to get you!

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-BERT PUFFS

-Oh, you got me, Bert.

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Actually watching it as an adult, you think, this is weird!

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Do you think it was exciting because it came from America?

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-Yeah, probably.

-Do you think there was something about that, as well?

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I suppose. You know, we were all, as children, I suppose, um...

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obsessed with anything American. It seemed quite exotic, didn't it?

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Especially in Wales.

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And of course it was educational.

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It was, yeah, because every day and have a different letter

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and a different number, one or the other. Definitely.

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So yeah, I suppose it was educational, you know.

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-It won over 150 Emmys.

-Did it? Sesame Street?

-Mm-hm.

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-150 Emmys?

-Yeah.

-That's incredible, isn't it?

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Yeah, yeah, yeah.

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Sesame Street's 47 years on our screens is impressive,

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but with shows like Playschool,

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some of our home-grown educational

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children's shows

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have had record-breaking runs.

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Playschool, starting five years earlier than Sesame Street,

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in 1964, was the first programme

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to air on BBC Two.

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It ran on the BBC for the next 24 years.

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Next up, Newsround.

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It began in 1972, presented by

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John Craven for the first 17 years.

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It's the world's first

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and longest running news magazine

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programme aimed specifically

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at children.

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But the granddaddy of them all and still going strong is Blue Peter.

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Dating back to 1958,

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it's the longest-running

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children's TV show in the world.

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Originally created to cater for five to eight-year-olds, its appeal soon

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extended to older viewers as it quickly became a BBC classic.

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So, Alex, tell me about where you lived.

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So, yeah, it was a little cul-de-sac in South Wales.

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Well, in Carmarthenshire. That's the house we've always lived in.

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-Oh, right, even to this day?

-Mum and Dad still live in the same house.

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Where was the telly, in the lounge?

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-So our lounge, the cat used to sleep on top of the telly.

-No!

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But then the telly...

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well, it sort of exploded, for want of a better word...

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Not with the cat on top of it?

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-No, thankfully. But all her fur had gone into the telly...

-No!

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Yeah, and had blocked it.

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She used to love it because it was hot on top of the telly.

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And she lived until she was 24.

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So she was doing something right.

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I mean, I googled it and I wondered if she was the oldest cat ever,

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but, damn it all, there was a cat called Cream Puff that lived to 38.

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Yeah?

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But anyway, so I used to have... Do you remember...

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Sony televisions, and there was a fashion of having white televisions?

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-Ooh! Very state of the art!

-We had it for so long it was yellow.

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LAUGHTER

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-By the time it exploded due to cat hair.

-What was the cat named?

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-Medi, which is Welsh for September.

-September.

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She was born in September.

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Has he got a cat?

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LAUGHTER

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-I shall place the cat...

-Awwww! Well, now it's perfect.

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-I feel right at home now.

-Yeah. Happy with that, are we?

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There she is.

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-Perfect! See, it adds something, doesn't it?

-Yeah.

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Well, I think it brings us all nicely on to your next choice,

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which is Must See TV.

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DRUMBEAT AND ANIMAL CALLS

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On Safari, with Christopher Biggins.

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This is when we were a little bit older watching this.

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It would be on when we got home from school.

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Aw, look at Christopher Biggins!

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-Do you member the catchphrase when he shouted "Safari"?

-No!

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"Safari!" And then the audience used to say, "So Goodie!"

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-Safari!

-ALL: So Goodie!

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Well done! Hi, Biggins here.

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Have we got a fun show for you!

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-You think Biggins was a good children's presenter?

-I do.

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Well, I used to like him.

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That was one of my favourite shows.

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This fun-filled, messy children's game show was set in a studio

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jungle filled with pools of gunge.

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It ran on ITV from 1982 for two years.

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The host was Christopher Biggins

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and you might recognise his young female co-presenter.

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CHEERING

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-Gillian Taylforth is the host!

-Look!

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Yup, a pre-Eastenders Gillian Taylforth kept track of the scores,

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as well as keeping her co-host in order.

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I heard you insured your voice for a million dollars.

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-Yes.

-What did you do with the money?

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-What's her name on EastEnders now? Kathy?

-Kathy, yeah.

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Here we are, through the gunge.

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We used to recreate this in our bedroom.

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We used to share a bedroom, me and my sister Jenny,

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and I'd have my bed there

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and she'd have her bed there, and we used to play this.

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So we used to put pillows

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and cushions across to get from one bed to the other.

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CHEERING

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They always had to cross from one path to the other without

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-getting in the swamp.

-Yeah.

-This was my favourite bit, over the water.

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-Oh, he's in!

-SHE LAUGHS

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I wonder if health and safety would allow that these days,

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let's be honest. "Oh, no, you can't do that with kids."

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-It's like where shows like Wipeout came from.

-Mm-hm.

-Isn't it?

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You used to watch this with your sister?

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-Yeah.

-Is there still a strong bond between you and your sister?

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Very, very, very.

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We used to live next door to each other for a good few years

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in Cardiff, before I came to do The One Show, yeah.

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She's the sensible one.

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She's younger, but she's the one that was, you know,

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when they were sharing out the genes, she got the commonsense gene.

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-But Jen is just lovely.

-Yeah?

-Quietly just...

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Oh, supportive... Amazing.

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-Yeah?

-Yeah. She's...

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-she's my best friend, yeah.

-Awww.

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Alongside educational programmes,

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there's always been a place in kids'

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TV for sheer outrageous fun.

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Shows like Crackerjack,

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which debuted in 1955

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and ran for nearly 30 years on the BBC, mixed games, jokes,

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music and comedy in front of a live audience of kids.

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We Are The Champions, with Ron Pickering,

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was formatted around a traditional British school sports day,

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with athletics and swimming races.

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Later, in the '70s, Cheggers Plays Pop combined games on huge

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inflatables with pop questions and current chart hits.

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In 1991, Get Your Own Back,

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with Dave Benson Phillips,

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proved that kids still loved crazy game shows,

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gunge-filled and anarchic.

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With parents and teachers dropped in the plop,

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it ran for 13 years until 2004.

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The next clip I want to show you now, Alex, is from a show that your dad used to enjoy.

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Spread your legs and arms.

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HE SPEAKS SPANISH

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What language is he speaking?

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It's French.

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Oh, Canned Carrott!

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Voulez-vous une armoire, maintenant?

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Que?

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What did you say?

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-It is the only bit of French I know.

-What does it mean?

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"Do you want a wardrobe at the moment?"

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From the early '80s, Jasper Carrott wrote and performed in numerous

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comedy sketch shows, including Carrott Confidential

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and Canned Carrott.

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His regular characters,

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hapless detective duo Louis and Briggs, with Robert Powell,

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became so popular that they were

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given their own spin-off series in 1993.

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-Dad was obsessed with - obsessed with - Jasper Carrot.

-Really?

-Yeah.

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This was kind of on quite late at night,

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I think it was about nine o'clock or something.

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So it was the last thing we were allowed to watch

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before we had to go to bed.

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Then you search his jacket.

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What's this? I have found a quantity of drugs?

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Oh! I have been naughty!

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I have got really vivid memories of sitting on Dad's lap,

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and I would get really annoyed because he would be laughing

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so much, he would be jiggling up and down and I would fall off,

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and then I'd get back on and he would laugh again and I'd fall off.

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Weirdly, about, I don't know,

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a couple of weeks ago, a few weeks ago,

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Jasper Carrott presented The One Show with me.

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APPLAUSE

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-Lovely...to see you.

-Love to see you.

0:16:360:16:38

-A1, A1. Really looking forward to this.

-Good!

0:16:380:16:41

Are you ready for all The One Show has to offer?

0:16:410:16:43

-Dad was completely made up.

-Yeah?

0:16:430:16:45

It was...kind of his highlight, I think.

0:16:450:16:48

He said, "Well, there we are.

0:16:480:16:51

"She is sat next to Jasper Carrott, I am a happy man."

0:16:510:16:55

-And that is the only One Show he has ever recorded.

-Really?

0:16:550:16:58

The cheek of it.

0:16:580:17:00

So, was comedy and laughter a big part of the Jones' household?

0:17:000:17:03

It was, looking back, I can remember,

0:17:030:17:06

I mean, that is one of my most vivid memories,

0:17:060:17:09

is of watching television as a family and belly laughing

0:17:090:17:13

at all sorts of things.

0:17:130:17:15

What was it your mum used to enjoy?

0:17:200:17:22

Um, we used to like family sitcoms,

0:17:220:17:26

Sunday night drama, she loves, as well.

0:17:260:17:29

She will watch Downton, you know really enjoyed War And Peace,

0:17:290:17:33

that sort of thing.

0:17:330:17:35

But there is one programme your mum used to watch which should really

0:17:350:17:38

have carried a government health warning.

0:17:380:17:40

-This, of course...

-This, of course, Dynasty.

-Yeah, Dynasty.

0:17:450:17:48

This is the only show that we were allowed to stay up late to watch,

0:17:480:17:52

because Mum was obsessed, and, to be honest,

0:17:520:17:54

when Dynasty was on, nothing else mattered.

0:17:540:17:56

It was the only time Mum would really switch off.

0:17:560:17:59

Never has she been one of those mums to say,

0:17:590:18:01

"Don't talk to me, so-and-so is on,"

0:18:010:18:04

but during this, she was less keen to chat.

0:18:040:18:06

Throughout the '80s, perms and shoulder pads were in abundance.

0:18:130:18:17

Actors in Dynasty, like British-born Emma Samms, commanded

0:18:170:18:21

huge weekly audiences.

0:18:210:18:23

I used to want to be her.

0:18:250:18:28

Spanning nine series and over 200 episodes,

0:18:280:18:31

at its peak it was the number one drama on our screens.

0:18:310:18:35

So, the opening titles of Dynasty, do you remember?

0:18:370:18:40

All of these glamorous ladies used to come down the stairs

0:18:400:18:43

and they would stop and they would turn to the camera like that,

0:18:430:18:45

and they would be, like, windswept,

0:18:450:18:47

and then their name would come up,

0:18:470:18:48

and I thought that was the epitome of glamour.

0:18:480:18:51

So, my sister and I would run upstairs,

0:18:510:18:55

grab the closest thing to glamour we could find,

0:18:550:18:57

which, in South Wales,

0:18:570:18:58

was my mother's thermal dressing gown from M&S,

0:18:580:19:01

and drape that over our shoulders, because it was nice and long.

0:19:010:19:05

And then we would stick on a pair of

0:19:050:19:07

her high-heels and recreate the scene.

0:19:070:19:09

-And come down the stairs. Unfortunately...

-Yes?

0:19:090:19:14

..a child in high heels is never a good combination on stairs,

0:19:140:19:18

and, twice, I ended up in accident and emergency

0:19:180:19:22

-having broken my arm.

-Broken your arm?

-Broken my arm.

-Not once?

0:19:220:19:25

Not once, but twice, thanks to Dynasty. It was worth it.

0:19:250:19:31

-It was worth it?

-Yeah. The lengths girls go to for a bit of glamour!

0:19:310:19:34

Should have carried a health warning!

0:19:340:19:35

I know! Should have a warning!

0:19:350:19:37

When you were rushed to the hospital,

0:19:370:19:39

was it your dad that took you and

0:19:390:19:40

your mum carried on watching the programme?

0:19:400:19:42

Yeah, "You take her, Al!"

0:19:420:19:44

LAUGHTER

0:19:440:19:47

What brings you here? And why didn't you let us know you were coming?

0:19:470:19:50

It was a last-minute thing, Jeff has to see mother about some business,

0:19:500:19:53

and I thought, "I am going, too,

0:19:530:19:55

"just to see my father's great smile."

0:19:550:19:57

Everybody was in lovely, massive shoulder pads and massive earrings.

0:19:570:20:01

I think it was just an insight into a really glamorous world,

0:20:010:20:04

and nothing else on television really compared to it at that time,

0:20:040:20:09

from what I can remember.

0:20:090:20:10

Excuse me, I thought you were alone, but I see...

0:20:110:20:14

Hello, Fallon.

0:20:170:20:18

My aim in life as a young child was to be Fallon off Dynasty.

0:20:180:20:22

I used to think she was so pretty

0:20:220:20:24

and I thought, "Gosh, she has got everything going for her."

0:20:240:20:27

I know you saved my sister's life, we are all very grateful for that.

0:20:270:20:31

You know, we have had Joan Collins on.

0:20:310:20:33

I couldn't believe it,

0:20:330:20:35

that Alexis was sitting in front of me.

0:20:350:20:37

I think it is people that you watch as a child that really stand...

0:20:370:20:41

You know, I don't get really star-struck any more,

0:20:410:20:44

but when Joan Collins came on, I thought, "Wow, you're amazing."

0:20:440:20:48

-Really?

-Yeah.

-Did she look that good in the flesh?

0:20:480:20:51

Oh, she is flawless, she is literally...

0:20:510:20:55

I looked really close up, I pretended to go in for a kiss,

0:20:550:20:57

but really, I wanted to see how many wrinkles she had.

0:20:570:20:59

LAUGHTER

0:20:590:21:01

There was nothing there. She is amazing.

0:21:010:21:04

-So, Alex, it is now time to move on to your must-see TV.

-Right.

0:21:090:21:13

Oh! Beadle about!

0:21:150:21:17

-BOTH:

-# Watch out, Beadle's about

0:21:170:21:20

# You better watch out

0:21:200:21:22

# Cos Beadle's about! #

0:21:220:21:24

APPLAUSE

0:21:240:21:27

Oh, my gosh, it is funny, isn't it, how a catchy theme tune,

0:21:290:21:33

just, can transport you to a time and a place.

0:21:330:21:36

On Saturday afternoon, you know, pools would be on.

0:21:360:21:39

-Oh, yeah!

-And do you remember the noise of the pools?

0:21:390:21:42

And it was really monotone, wasn't it? It would be like,

0:21:420:21:44

-IN MONOTONE VOICE:

-"Swansea City, one. Bristol...three."

0:21:440:21:49

And it just went on for ages,

0:21:490:21:51

and you were, like, "Oh, come on! Where's the good programmes?

0:21:510:21:54

And Dad would go, "Ssh! Shh!"

0:21:540:21:56

And then, you know, this would come on and we would all sit down.

0:21:560:22:00

We are here at Leigh-on-Sea in Essex to try and pull off...

0:22:000:22:04

-He's got classic '80s hair.

-Yeah.

0:22:040:22:07

And now they are off to enjoy a lovely lunch,

0:22:070:22:10

but they better watch out, because Beadle's about!

0:22:100:22:13

Starting in 1986 on ITV, Jeremy Beadle's hidden camera show

0:22:130:22:17

played practical jokes on members of the public for a whole decade.

0:22:170:22:22

As top Saturday night entertainment,

0:22:220:22:24

it regularly attracted 15 million viewers.

0:22:240:22:27

Even though this was a long time ago,

0:22:270:22:30

-the stunts were...

-Oh, amazing, yeah.

0:22:300:22:32

Amazing, and really big scale, weren't they?

0:22:320:22:35

What did you do that for?!

0:22:360:22:37

I just used to love it when people would get angrier and angrier,

0:22:480:22:52

and then he just, the timing that he had,

0:22:520:22:55

just before it all kicked off badly,

0:22:550:22:58

it was brilliant, wasn't it?

0:22:580:23:01

What do you think of Brian, though?

0:23:010:23:02

I think he is an outright BLEEP!

0:23:020:23:04

I used to love that, and I think it was really forward-thinking.

0:23:060:23:09

It was the first big prank show, wasn't it?

0:23:090:23:12

-It was, and it wasn't small-scale stuff.

-Oh, no.

0:23:120:23:15

I mean, it was huge things.

0:23:150:23:17

I have had a lot of things happened to me where I thought,

0:23:170:23:20

"Is Jeremy Beadle anywhere near here?"

0:23:200:23:22

Any that spring to mind?

0:23:220:23:25

I was a runner at the time.

0:23:250:23:26

-Oh, I see.

-I had just started out in television.

0:23:260:23:28

There was a man who was the first, well, it was Michael Crawford,

0:23:280:23:31

and he was doing a documentary all about

0:23:310:23:33

being the first Phantom Of The Opera,

0:23:330:23:35

and my task that day was to go and collect him from the station

0:23:350:23:39

and take him to the location where we were filming.

0:23:390:23:42

He comes off the train, lovely, lovely man.

0:23:420:23:44

And I said, "I am just going to take you, Michael, now,

0:23:440:23:47

"to the location where we are filming." He said "Yeah, absolutely."

0:23:470:23:50

Anyway, they rang and said, "We are running late,

0:23:500:23:54

"so ask him whether he wants some lunch, and take him if he does."

0:23:540:23:59

Well, at the time, I had no money, because I had only just started out,

0:23:590:24:02

and I thought, "Oh, God, how will I pay for this?"

0:24:020:24:05

I said "Are you hungry, Michael?" And he went,

0:24:050:24:07

"Oh, yeah, I could do with a snack."

0:24:070:24:08

So I took him to McDonald's, to the drive-through.

0:24:080:24:11

Because I thought, well, it is going to be really embarrassing

0:24:130:24:15

if I can't afford to buy him lunch, so I thought, I can shout him

0:24:150:24:19

a burger or something.

0:24:190:24:21

He was happy enough, but they were absolutely horrified.

0:24:210:24:25

Oh, and then there was another one, there was an alarm on the building.

0:24:250:24:31

-The alarm had broken. As it does.

-Mm-hm.

0:24:310:24:34

And then, one morning, a man called Mike, who was in a band

0:24:350:24:42

called The Alarm... Have you heard of a band called The Alarm?

0:24:420:24:45

AUDIENCE MUTTERS

0:24:450:24:47

Some of you.

0:24:470:24:48

So, Mike comes to the office, I only hear the word "alarm"

0:24:480:24:51

and I wasn't familiar with the band,

0:24:510:24:53

and he was in something that

0:24:530:24:55

I thought looked a bit like a boiler suit,

0:24:550:24:57

so I gave him a cup of coffee and steered him to the alarm,

0:24:570:25:02

and said, "There we are, it has been awful, it has been playing up,

0:25:020:25:05

"we can't get it to switch off."

0:25:050:25:07

-And I left him there.

-That is lovely!

-And off I went.

0:25:070:25:11

And then my boss said, "Where is Mike?"

0:25:110:25:15

I said, "Well, he is downstairs by the panel."

0:25:160:25:19

And he said, "What Mike is downstairs?"

0:25:190:25:22

I said, "Yes, Mike, you know, the alarm."

0:25:220:25:24

He said, "No, he is in a band called The Alarm!

0:25:240:25:27

Oh, gosh! Right, OK, so they said, "Listen, this isn't working out."

0:25:280:25:34

I was young, Brian, I was 21, straight out of university,

0:25:350:25:39

and so they said, "Do you know what?

0:25:390:25:41

"We might see if you are better off on-camera."

0:25:410:25:45

-And, so, that was that.

-The rest is history?

0:25:460:25:48

They didn't have much choice, they thought,

0:25:480:25:50

"We are not having her back on production, stick her on a show!"

0:25:500:25:53

Alex, we are now going to move on to TV fear.

0:25:580:26:01

-And this is a show...

-Uh-oh...

-Oooh?

0:26:010:26:04

-I know what it is.

-A show that used to scare you witless.

0:26:040:26:08

Hello.

0:26:090:26:11

I am talking to you, yes, you,

0:26:110:26:13

sitting there on your comfortable settee

0:26:130:26:16

and laughing a lot at this great show, feeling comfortable, secure.

0:26:160:26:20

Mortgage paid, happy in your job, pretty wife...

0:26:200:26:23

-What is scary about..

-Well, look at him!

0:26:230:26:26

Fear!

0:26:270:26:28

See?

0:26:290:26:32

I have got really vivid memories of being petrified of this man.

0:26:320:26:36

Of the legend, the comedy legend that is Kenny Everett?

0:26:360:26:40

I know, it is ridiculous, now, obviously,

0:26:400:26:42

having learned about him over the years,

0:26:420:26:45

I can really appreciate how much of a legend he is.

0:26:450:26:48

Saucy and subversive, Kenny Everett's manic comedy sketch show

0:26:480:26:53

moved to BBC One in 1981, after three years on ITV.

0:26:530:26:57

With his wild eyes and outrageous innuendo-heavy humour,

0:26:570:27:02

he kept viewers entertained for most of the decade.

0:27:020:27:05

Fear today, you know it makes sense!

0:27:050:27:08

EVIL LAUGHTER

0:27:100:27:11

-I used to do the warm-ups.

-Did you?

0:27:110:27:14

Yeah, I was Kenny Everett's warm-up man all the time he was at the BBC.

0:27:140:27:17

-And he was charming and...

-Oh, wow!

-..a lovely guy.

0:27:170:27:20

That makes me feel better.

0:27:200:27:22

I am a little bit older than you, obviously you're watching this, what age are you watching this at?

0:27:220:27:26

-Getting petrified.

-I dunno. Eight-ish, maybe?

0:27:260:27:30

I don't know, I just really vividly remember the character he used

0:27:300:27:34

to do, when he had the plastic legs or rubber legs?

0:27:340:27:38

No, those were his own legs

0:27:380:27:40

and he used to go,

0:27:400:27:41

-(IMPERSONATES KENNY EVERETT) "It is all done in the best possible taste!

-Yeah, that's it!

0:27:410:27:45

And, I don't know, for some reason as a child,

0:27:450:27:49

yeah, I wasn't keen on Kenny.

0:27:490:27:51

At all. Mum and dad used to love it.

0:27:510:27:54

Kenny Everett's gallery of bawdy, lampooning characters was boundless.

0:27:550:27:59

From the fastidious Frenchman, moustachioed Marcel Wave,

0:27:590:28:04

to punk caricature Sid Snot.

0:28:040:28:07

Hilarious even in silence, with Morris Mimer,

0:28:070:28:11

to perhaps his most memorable creation, Cupid Stunt,

0:28:110:28:15

the bearded lady movie star, complete with risque name

0:28:150:28:18

and those gravity-defying legs.

0:28:180:28:21

-Alex, it is now time to have a look at your guilty pleasure.

-Oh, right.

0:28:270:28:33

BEVERLY HILLS 90210 THEME PLAYS

0:28:330:28:35

Beverly Hills 90210. Amazing.

0:28:380:28:41

I would still be really happy watching this on a loop.

0:28:410:28:44

With one of the most star-studded postcodes

0:28:440:28:47

in the world, Beverly Hills 90210 chronicled the lives of the

0:28:470:28:51

beautiful and privileged teenagers who lived at this exclusive address.

0:28:510:28:55

-I didn't like him so much.

-No?

0:28:550:28:58

Or her.

0:28:590:29:01

But him, now that is another level.

0:29:020:29:05

Really, you like Luke Perry?

0:29:050:29:06

Yeah. I used to think Luke Perry was future husband material.

0:29:060:29:10

-My husband now looks nothing like him.

-No?

0:29:120:29:14

So, fail.

0:29:140:29:16

But I think, yeah, it was aspiring, wasn't it?

0:29:160:29:20

It's a group of teens who have got too much money, their own cars,

0:29:200:29:23

driving to school in a car! Who did that?

0:29:230:29:26

I know, I know, but they do, in America, don't they?

0:29:260:29:29

But they did, didn't they?

0:29:290:29:31

And, you know, I suppose it is when

0:29:310:29:33

you first start getting interested in boys

0:29:330:29:35

and all the rest of it.

0:29:350:29:37

As soon as he heard I talked to Dean Whitmore the guy went crazy.

0:29:370:29:40

Why would he do that?

0:29:400:29:41

With its glamorous, young cast,

0:29:410:29:43

the series became one of the most popular teen dramas of the '90s,

0:29:430:29:47

with many of its stars, like Jason Priestley, becoming huge idols.

0:29:470:29:51

Eckstern? What is that? Finley-speak?

0:29:510:29:54

I liked him as well, Jason Priestley.

0:29:540:29:57

Mind you, he has gone downhill.

0:29:570:29:59

I googled him and it was disappointing, the results.

0:29:590:30:01

LAUGHTER

0:30:010:30:03

For the first time since the fire, thanks to Finley,

0:30:050:30:07

I am feeling strong and clear and unafraid. And you just don't get it.

0:30:070:30:11

You're right, I don't get it.

0:30:110:30:14

For me, that was the ultimate escapism, it was aspiring

0:30:140:30:19

when you are young, isn't it? These teens had it all.

0:30:190:30:24

So, how old were you when you were watching this show?

0:30:240:30:27

Probably, I don't know, maybe 13, 14, or...

0:30:270:30:31

You know, as a crowd of friends at the time,

0:30:310:30:33

that was the thing to watch.

0:30:330:30:35

Now it is TOWIE or whatever, Made In Chelsea,

0:30:350:30:39

which I do watch on the sly, but when I was a teen,

0:30:390:30:42

I mean, I was a complete geek.

0:30:420:30:44

I used to go to school with my little violin, oh, God,

0:30:440:30:48

you know, I didn't come into my own, Brian, until probably 17, 18.

0:30:480:30:53

-Oh, right.

-Yeah, I was quite shy.

0:30:530:30:56

Now, Alex, we are going to look at a clip from a show,

0:31:010:31:04

-and from a presenter that has had a big influence on you.

-Yeah.

0:31:040:31:07

This is the first ever episode of...

0:31:090:31:12

TFI.

0:31:140:31:15

Beginning in 1996, and running for

0:31:180:31:20

four years in its distinctive warehouse set.

0:31:200:31:23

-You know, we all remember this on a Friday night.

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

0:31:230:31:27

The driving force behind TFI Friday was

0:31:270:31:30

TV and radio superstar Chris Evans.

0:31:300:31:33

Good evening and welcome to Friday nights live, here on Channel 4.

0:31:350:31:38

From now on, at six o'clock, this is the place to be

0:31:380:31:41

if you want to hear live music from Skunk Anansie!

0:31:410:31:43

Did you used to watch it before a night out?

0:31:430:31:46

Yes, we did, actually,

0:31:460:31:47

but during those days, probably,

0:31:470:31:49

it would be a night out in Ritzy's in Swansea.

0:31:490:31:52

Aaay.

0:31:520:31:54

Sticky carpets. Not very exciting.

0:31:540:31:58

But, yeah, we did, we used to watch it before a night out.

0:31:580:32:01

I will talk to Dawn French, Kathy Lloyd, I will be in bed with Cher...

0:32:010:32:05

With its anarchic backstage feel and roving camera,

0:32:050:32:09

and the very latest Britpop bands,

0:32:090:32:11

it inspired a whole new style of Friday night entertainment.

0:32:110:32:15

Ocean Colour Scene, The Riverboat Song, the new single out now!

0:32:150:32:20

Ocean Colour Scene, what happened to them?

0:32:200:32:23

-So that was Chris's first TFI, was it?

-Yeah.

-Amazing.

0:32:230:32:27

I used to watch all his shows,

0:32:270:32:29

and I always thought that he was a brilliant broadcaster.

0:32:290:32:33

He has become such a solid friend.

0:32:330:32:35

-Probably my best male friend.

-And work colleague.

0:32:350:32:38

Yeah, I mean, we are an unlikely couple,

0:32:380:32:40

there's no two ways about it.

0:32:400:32:42

He is completely mental.

0:32:420:32:44

People don't really understand that Chris is, yes, he is mad and

0:32:440:32:49

he has got these funny ideas, but underneath all of that he is really

0:32:490:32:54

kind, and when I came to London and I didn't know a single person, and I

0:32:540:32:59

had only met Chris once, and we were never supposed to do a show together

0:32:590:33:02

on Friday. I met him and he said, "Why don't you do Friday with me?"

0:33:020:33:08

I said, "I am all right, thanks, I would like a long weekend,

0:33:080:33:10

"I like going home to Cardiff."

0:33:100:33:12

He said, "Look, if you do the show I promise it will be really,

0:33:120:33:16

"really good fun."

0:33:160:33:18

And I said, "Well..." And he said,

0:33:180:33:21

"Just do it for a couple of weeks, see how you feel."

0:33:210:33:23

-So I did, and then we ended up doing five years together.

-Five years.

0:33:230:33:28

-Do you miss him from the show?

-I do.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

0:33:280:33:30

It is more like...

0:33:300:33:31

Chris Evans was Alex's

0:33:310:33:33

sofa buddy for five years from 2010, they formed a dream partnership

0:33:330:33:38

hosting the Friday edition of The One Show.

0:33:380:33:41

-Alex is single.

-All right, here we go, love.

-Cancelled! It is all over!

0:33:410:33:46

Aww. Lovely couple!

0:33:460:33:47

I used to be a member of the Dennis the Menace club.

0:33:470:33:49

That is all I am looking for.

0:33:490:33:51

Having grown-up watching him

0:33:510:33:53

and then, suddenly, having him as a co-host,

0:33:530:33:57

it is quite bizarre, really.

0:33:570:33:59

But I never felt intimidated at all, because

0:33:590:34:02

he was just so down-to-earth, kind, straightforward

0:34:020:34:07

and generous as a presenter from the word go,

0:34:070:34:09

that we just got on like a house on fire.

0:34:090:34:12

-So, Alex, can we talk about your early TV career?

-Yes.

0:34:160:34:21

How you got into it?

0:34:210:34:22

How it came about, how that spark was ignited?

0:34:220:34:26

Well, because I was such a bad television researcher,

0:34:260:34:29

-they then suggested...

-I think we definitely established that.

0:34:290:34:32

..yeah, I might be better on camera, and so,

0:34:320:34:34

for years and years I worked on children's television,

0:34:340:34:37

which really suited me.

0:34:370:34:39

It was brilliant fun, I don't know, have you done children's television?

0:34:390:34:42

You must have done lots of children's television.

0:34:420:34:45

I have done a little bit. I did do Jackanory.

0:34:450:34:47

Aww! Jackanory tells a story!

0:34:470:34:49

I think you learn a lot, and I was lucky because I am bilingual

0:34:490:34:55

and can speak Welsh as well.

0:34:550:34:57

I was really lucky that they have got...

0:34:570:35:00

S4C, is basically the Welsh Channel 4,

0:35:000:35:02

and I learned loads without anybody really knowing who I was.

0:35:020:35:07

So, when I came to The One Show I had a lot of experience,

0:35:070:35:10

but nobody had seen me before, I suppose,

0:35:100:35:14

but children's telly, I think, is the best thing.

0:35:140:35:16

You learn to leave your embarrassment at the door.

0:35:160:35:19

Because I have dressed up as everything,

0:35:190:35:21

from a dolphin to a fire engine, was the best one.

0:35:210:35:25

We've got a little clip of you on S4C.

0:35:250:35:28

COCK CROWS

0:35:280:35:30

We should put a public warning out about clothes, hair, etc,

0:35:330:35:36

because I know it's gonna be bad.

0:35:360:35:37

-You might need to help me out with the name of the programme.

-OK.

0:35:370:35:40

It is called Anifail Am Wythnos, which means animal for a week.

0:35:400:35:45

Oh, look! I'm like Biggins! See? On safari!

0:35:450:35:50

SHE SPEAKS WELSH

0:35:530:35:55

-God, I have got stripy hair.

-I wouldn't recognise you there.

0:35:550:35:58

Oh, no, I've still got that shirt, I think it is in storage in Cardiff.

0:35:580:36:04

SHE SPEAKS WELSH

0:36:040:36:06

So, the concept of this show was families would have an

0:36:120:36:16

animal for a week to see how they got on with it.

0:36:160:36:19

So I would go and deliver a bearded dragon or an alpaca to a family

0:36:190:36:25

and then we would go back at the end of the week to see how

0:36:250:36:27

they got on with it and whether they think

0:36:270:36:29

-they could have it full-time.

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

0:36:290:36:31

SHE SPEAKS WELSH

0:36:310:36:33

GHOSTS WAIL

0:36:370:36:39

Do you miss Welsh TV?

0:36:390:36:41

I do, well, I miss Wales, but to be honest, I get back, I go home loads.

0:36:410:36:46

-I am home at least once a month.

-Yeah.

0:36:460:36:51

When you are at home, do you speak in Welsh?

0:36:510:36:53

To Mum, yeah, and to my sister. Well, you know, English.

0:36:530:36:57

Back and forth. You would be able to pick up the odd phrase in there.

0:36:570:37:03

But I am so pleased, because Mum and Dad spoke English to each other,

0:37:030:37:07

and when I was a young child they spoke English to me,

0:37:070:37:10

but then they put me into a Welsh primary and I might as well

0:37:100:37:13

have been in Spain, because I could not understand a word anybody

0:37:130:37:16

was saying, but at four it only took six weeks before I was fluent.

0:37:160:37:20

-Really?

-When you are little you absorb it, don't you?

0:37:200:37:24

-Yeah.

-I am so glad, because I don't think I would be sitting here

0:37:240:37:27

with you, Brian, if I didn't have Welsh language,

0:37:270:37:30

-because that is where...

-It all started.

0:37:300:37:32

..I sort of had a chance to...

0:37:320:37:33

Yeah, get all the experience that led me to the job I am in now.

0:37:330:37:38

My favourite Welsh word is for microwave.

0:37:380:37:42

Popty ping!

0:37:420:37:43

Isn't that lovely? Popty ping.

0:37:430:37:46

It says what it does, doesn't it?

0:37:460:37:49

-Exactly!

-It sounds like it should, popty ping! It is brilliant.

0:37:490:37:53

And another one we've got, and I think it is, actually,

0:37:530:37:57

yesterday or today was national hug week,

0:37:570:37:59

but in Wales we call it a cwtsh.

0:37:590:38:01

-A cwtsh, yeah. Give us a cwtsh.

-Give us a cwtsh.

0:38:010:38:04

And, you know, it is a nicer word.

0:38:040:38:06

I am trying to campaign to roll that out nationally.

0:38:060:38:10

-Give us a cwtsh.

-A cwtsh.

-Yeah.

-Give me a cwtsh.

0:38:100:38:12

-I used to live in Wales.

-Did you?

-I lived in Tredegar.

-No way!

0:38:120:38:17

-Round near Aberdare and Merthyr.

-Why?

0:38:170:38:20

-I used to be in a band that were based in Wales.

-Did you?

0:38:200:38:24

-It wasn't The Alarm, was it?

-No, it wasn't The Alarm!

0:38:240:38:27

Thank goodness for that!

0:38:270:38:30

LAUGHTER

0:38:300:38:32

-I never knew that.

-So your mum and dad must be very proud of you.

0:38:320:38:35

-They are, but no more proud of me than they are of my sister.

-Jenny.

0:38:350:38:39

Yeah, I mean, all they wanted, like any parents,

0:38:390:38:42

is for their daughters to be happy.

0:38:420:38:45

-Yeah, yes, of course.

-And to be honest,

0:38:450:38:47

if I got any ideas above station,

0:38:470:38:49

they would bring me right back down to Earth like that.

0:38:490:38:52

Mam and Dad are sticklers.

0:38:520:38:54

I say, "I met the Queen today," they are like,

0:38:540:38:58

"Gosh, were you wearing something tidy?" "Yes!"

0:38:580:39:01

You know. But, they... Of course they think it is fantastic, but

0:39:010:39:05

they would be the same regardless of what job I did, I'm sure.

0:39:050:39:10

So, what TV do you enjoy watching now?

0:39:150:39:18

-Now I don't get, it is funny, isn't it?

-Because you're busy.

0:39:180:39:22

We work in telly but I don't really get to watch it an awful lot.

0:39:220:39:25

-I must say, I do love Strictly.

-Yes, of course, you were in that.

0:39:250:39:30

Having been on it you watch it in a slightly different way,

0:39:300:39:33

because you know the ins and outs.

0:39:330:39:35

-What are the ins and outs, then?

-The ins and outs are,

0:39:350:39:39

you know how difficult a dance...

0:39:390:39:42

So, something can look really simple, but believe me,

0:39:420:39:46

doing a rumba on telly is the most embarrassing thing you will ever do.

0:39:460:39:51

I mean, I was dying inside.

0:39:510:39:54

Cha-cha-cha isn't, either,

0:39:540:39:55

to be honest, anything Latin I was not very good at.

0:39:550:39:58

-I like the ballroom stuff, which is a bit more elegant.

-Graceful.

-Yeah.

0:39:580:40:02

To the untrained eye,

0:40:020:40:04

some dancers can look a bit rough around the edges

0:40:040:40:07

and a bit ropey, but, honestly, believe me,

0:40:070:40:09

-to get to that point is really hard.

-Yeah.

0:40:090:40:12

So you know the ins and outs, but I still watch it as a viewer and

0:40:120:40:17

really enjoy it,

0:40:170:40:18

-and I would do it every year if that was allowed.

-Really?

0:40:180:40:21

Yeah, I absolutely loved it, because the thing is, you are not going

0:40:210:40:25

to end up a professional dancer, so you just enjoy it for what it is.

0:40:250:40:29

I mean, I was hopeless.

0:40:290:40:30

My mother, my own mother said, after the first show,

0:40:300:40:34

she said, "Well, how long is this going to go on now, Al?

0:40:340:40:36

"Because you are spoiling it for me, to be honest.

0:40:360:40:39

LAUGHTER

0:40:390:40:41

So I stuck it out till the semifinal.

0:40:410:40:44

There you are, Mary, have that!

0:40:440:40:46

-Well done, yeah.

-But it was brilliant fun.

0:40:460:40:49

I do still enjoy watching that,

0:40:490:40:50

and I like dramas, like, recently, I really liked

0:40:500:40:53

Doctor Foster with Suranne Jones.

0:40:530:40:56

I thought that was excellent.

0:40:560:40:58

I loved The Missing with Jimmy Nesbitt in it, I thought

0:40:580:41:01

that was excellent.

0:41:010:41:04

I'll normally now watch something that is kind of a short drama

0:41:040:41:07

or something. I can't commit to something long term.

0:41:070:41:11

Because everybody is busy, aren't they?

0:41:110:41:13

But, um, yeah, a bit of everything, documentaries I find really interesting.

0:41:130:41:17

I love nature programmes.

0:41:170:41:19

Um... And we are lucky that we meet all of these wonderful people

0:41:190:41:23

on them because they come on and talk about them on our sofa!

0:41:230:41:27

So, how important is The One Show to you?

0:41:270:41:29

Oh, Brian, if I had my way they would be pushing me

0:41:290:41:34

out of there with a Zimmer frame.

0:41:340:41:36

I absolutely love it, Matt and I have such a nice time. Every day.

0:41:360:41:40

And every day is different, as you know.

0:41:400:41:43

And I just love live television,

0:41:430:41:45

but the show I find interesting,

0:41:450:41:47

because there is all sorts, history, nature, all sorts of things.

0:41:470:41:51

And, normally, a lovely guest as well.

0:41:510:41:55

At this moment, Alex, I give my guests the opportunity

0:41:550:41:58

to pick a theme tune for us to play out on.

0:41:580:42:00

What is it going to be?

0:42:000:42:03

Well, I did think long and hard,

0:42:030:42:05

and, over the summer holidays, my sister and I used to love watching

0:42:050:42:10

-a show called Going For Gold.

-Yeah!

0:42:100:42:14

Do you remember it? And they used to go,

0:42:140:42:16

"Today, on the show, we have duh-duh-duh from duh-duh-duh"

0:42:160:42:18

and they would wave to the camera.

0:42:180:42:20

All different nationalities, weren't they?

0:42:200:42:22

From Finland! From Switzerland!

0:42:220:42:24

And it was just like a quiz show, wasn't it?

0:42:240:42:26

And I used to think the theme tune was just brilliant.

0:42:260:42:29

My thanks to you for being here. Have you enjoyed it?

0:42:290:42:31

It has been a pleasure, I have really enjoyed it, Brian,

0:42:310:42:33

-Thank you very much. Aww.

-Oh, two.

-I never know, in Wales it was one

0:42:330:42:38

and now in London it's two, I am confused.

0:42:380:42:40

We could also have a cwtsh.

0:42:400:42:42

-We could have a cwtsh.

-Let's have a cwtsh.

-Aww.

-There you go.

0:42:420:42:45

My thanks to you, Alex.

0:42:450:42:46

-I have loved it, thank you.

-APPLAUSE

0:42:460:42:49

Thank you. And my thanks to you for watching The TV That Made Me.

0:42:490:42:52

-See you next time. Bye-bye!

-Bye!

0:42:520:42:54

# Going for gold!

0:42:540:42:57

# The heat is on The time is right

0:42:570:43:01

# It's time for you For you to play your game

0:43:010:43:04

# Cos people are coming Everyone's trying

0:43:040:43:07

# Trying to be the best that they can

0:43:070:43:10

# So reach for the sky Cos this space is so high

0:43:100:43:13

# When they're going for going for gold!

0:43:130:43:16

# Go for it, for gold!

0:43:190:43:22

# Go for it, only the best survive

0:43:220:43:25

# Go for it, for gold!

0:43:250:43:28

# Go for it And you can take your prize

0:43:280:43:32

# Going for gold! #

0:43:320:43:35

The One Show presenter Alex Jones joins Brian on the sofa to take a look back at the classic television that made her the person she is today.

Alex reminisces about her happy childhood, re-enacting scenes from her favourite kids' TV show, the whole family's love of classic 80s candid camera, and her terror at the sight of one of our most talented comedians. Along the way we learn how the family cat made the telly explode, how a mix-up led to her big break, and exactly what to look out for in a dunking biscuit.


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