Pennod 5 Wil ac Aeron


Pennod 5

Ar ddiwedd y daith fythgofiadwy, mae'r ddau'n profi uchafbwynt y daith ac yn gwireddu breuddwyd. On the Isle of Uist, Wil and Aeron fulfil a long-time ambition. Last in series.


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Transcript


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-We're Wil and Aeron,

-farmers from the Dyfi Valley.

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-From the Andean peaks

-to Scandinavian glaciers...

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-..we've experienced rural life

-all over the world.

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-In this series,

-our travels take us to Scotland.

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-Welcome to Scotland. We made it.

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-We're realizing a childhood dream.

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-We're on a road trip...

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-..in a camper van

-rescued from a scrapyard.

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-We're hoping that it will survive

-a trip of over 1,500 miles.

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-We're normally best friends.

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-I'm in the wrong blooming lane.

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-I'm in the wrong blooming lane.

-

-Just go round.

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-A month in each other's pockets

-is asking for trouble.

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-National Park, Highlands!

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-We'll have new experiences...

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-..and challenge each other.

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-We'll see the traditional...

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-..and modern influences.

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-It's nice.

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-Beyond the cities,

-Irn-Bru and haggis...

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-..we'll see huge estates,

-mountains and distant islands.

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-I can't get my head round

-the scale of it.

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-We seek the difference

-between two ways of life.

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-We end our journey

-with the crofters of Uist.

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-It's perfect!

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-At work and at play,

-we hear the island's story...

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-..the romance

-and a vanishing way of life.

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-On Uist, the old know

-and the young suppose.

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-But is that good or bad?

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-The island of North Uist

-is home to 3,000 people.

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-Its peat bogs and moors...

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-..are open to the wildest elements

-of Scotland's west coast.

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-There are some nice pockets.

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-Crofts have dotted the tough terrain

-since time immemorial.

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-I'd take a lot of persuading

-before I came here to live.

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-If someone gave me a choice

-between life in a city or here...

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-..I'd choose this place every time.

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-At least there's scope

-to do something here.

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-I'm sure that, as a farmer...

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-..you could improve

-on a lot of aspects.

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-Could you?

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-Yes.

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-Driving along the narrow roads,

-past the ancient crofts...

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-..is like travelling back in time.

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-It's a fine morning, Wil.

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-It's a fine morning, Wil.

-

-Wonderful.

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-I'm looking forward to today.

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-We're spending three days

-with a family...

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-..that has lived on this croft

-for over a century.

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-Three generations live there today.

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-When you say croft,

-is it like a smallholding?

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-From what I understand, you buy

-the rights to a piece of land.

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-Nothing to do with the house,

-just the land.

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-You don't own anything?

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-You don't own anything?

-

-No.

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-But if you've bought the rights,

-you can pass them on.

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-They're in your family.

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-You can pass them to your children,

-and your children's children.

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-Here they are.

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-Hello!

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-Hello!

-

-You're here.

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-Good morning.

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-How are you? I'm Wil.

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-How are you? I'm Wil.

-

-I'm Michelle.

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-Nice to meet you, Michelle.

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-Nice to meet you, Michelle.

-

-Hiya. I'm Aeron.

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-Aaron?

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-Aaron?

-

-Close enough!

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-This is the Macdonald family,

-and no, we're not making it up.

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-This is Wil.

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-This is Wil.

-

-Hiya. Nice to meet you.

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-Angus, the son, works the croft,

-but his mother, Ena, is the boss!

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-She has lived on this land

-all her life.

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-After travelling so far

-around Scotland...

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-..we finally hear Scots Gaelic

-for the first time.

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-Another thing is going to the bog.

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-Another thing is going to the bog.

-

-Yes, to dig for peat.

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-They would do good work.

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-Two young men, two able young men.

-They have to earn their keep.

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-They have to earn their keep.

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-I couldn't agree more!

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-Welsh-born Ruth is a neighbour

-and a close family friend.

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-She moved here from Snowdonia after

-falling for Uist while on holiday.

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-You speak Gaelic too?

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-You speak Gaelic too?

-

-Yes.

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-SHE SPEAKS GAELIC

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-Oh.

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-You're a dangerous woman.

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-You understand everyone!

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-We face a busy time.

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-Angus explains what we'll be doing

-over the next few days.

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-You can go to South Uist.

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-It's thirty-odd mile away

-where you're going...

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-..to see

-the old traditional ricks...

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-..where everybody used to cut corn

-with the binder prior to...

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-MOBILE PHONE

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-Here we go again! A busy man!

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-The first impression is that Angus

-is a jack of all trades.

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-He's got a finger in several pies.

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-He farms, he fishes, he sells,

-he's a builder, he does everything.

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-He judges cattle too.

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-His wife knows her stuff as well,

-about everything.

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-The grandmother is prominent too,

-and not short of an opinion.

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-Ruth, the neighbour,

-helps out often too, I'd say.

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-So, we'll see

-what they have to offer.

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-Our first task takes us

-to South Uist, a few miles away.

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-There's corn to gather,

-and no baler in sight!

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-What's going on here?

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-How are you then, boys?

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-You'll have to show us

-how it's done.

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-We haven't done this.

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-I've always been interested

-in the old way of doing things.

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-My grandfather spoke about sheaves,

-but I haven't had the chance before.

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-If it means coming all the way here

-to learn, then here I am.

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-I'm enjoying it.

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-It's the type of work

-that suits the pace of the island.

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-They've got a bit more time

-on their hands, maybe...

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-..even though

-they have enough to do.

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-But it just fits in...

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-..with the pace

-of island life, somehow.

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-At home, it would take too long

-to do a whole field like this.

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-It wouldn't be...

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-..how can I put it...

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-..it wouldn't make financial sense.

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-They have to take it

-round to their side.

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-Carry it round.

-Hold it around the middle.

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-It's nice to hear them

-speaking Gaelic among themselves.

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-The language isn't heard here

-as often as it was.

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-But for these boys,

-Gaelic is their mother tongue.

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-You take heart from hearing it.

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-What's the Gaelic for string?

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-What's the Gaelic for string?

-

-String.

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-String.

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-I learnt one thing

-from those two blokes.

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-They don't do things

-because of the money.

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-They do them

-because they enjoy doing them.

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-That's a lesson for us all.

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-Yes.

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-I feel that a lot of people,

-the way farming has gone...

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-..farm for farming's sake.

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-The enjoyment has almost vanished.

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-It's like a machine.

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-You don't get a chance to switch off

-and grease things between jobs.

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-To enjoy the way of life.

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-At home, you clip the sheep.

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-Once that's done, it's shearing.

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-Once that's done,

-you sort the sheep for the rams.

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-It's never-ending.

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-They get a chance to chat here.

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-They get a chance to chat here.

-

-You're right.

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-This afternoon,

-Ruth has a job for us.

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-Although there is

-mains electricity...

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-..the islanders still use peat

-to heat their crofts.

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-Who will get this peat?

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-This part is for Angus himself.

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-This part is for Angus himself.

-

-All for Angus.

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-But some people

-will go and ask him for some.

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-He does sell it as well.

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-Do they have to pay for it?

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-They pay Angus for the right

-to cut it, then it's theirs.

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-It's up to them to turn it over,

-gather it into heaps...

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-..and carry it to the road.

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-You'll see that some

-keep it in fertilizer bags.

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-What used to happen years ago,

-before these heaps...

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-..people came with trailers,

-gangs of them, children and all.

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-Everyone pitched in together.

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-It was a communal thing to do.

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-It's odd to think that Ruth,

-who isn't the youngest lady...

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-..has moved to a place

-where life is quite hard...

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-..and one of her hobbies

-is stacking peat.

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-Yes, fine.

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-I don't know.

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-I quite enjoyed

-the first three piles.

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-I've got a question for you.

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-How would you describe

-life on this island in one word?

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-Community.

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-Community.

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-Everyone knows each other

-and it's an honest place.

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-You can't get better than that.

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-Angus and Michelle's youngest son

-is Alexander.

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-He'll be the next generation

-on the croft.

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-You've done this before!

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-You've done this before!

-

-Yes, I've done it loads of times.

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-Do you enjoy it?

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-Do you enjoy it?

-

-Yes.

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-What fish is this?

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-What fish is this?

-

-A grey mullet.

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-As in rural Wales...

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-..a lot of young people leave

-to find work in the city.

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-As a result,

-young families are scarce here.

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-What's it like growing up

-as a young fellow by the sea?

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-Um...

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-..it's..

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-It's OK, but...

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-..it's not really a big spot,

-so there's not a lot of people here.

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-It's a bit hard to make friends...

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-Right.

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-..to be honest.

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-What are you going to be

-when you leave school?

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-I'll probably work

-for my dad at first.

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-Yes. Do you like the farming life?

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-Yes. Do you like the farming life?

-

-Yes.

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-Your dad's a busy man.

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-Yes.

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-Do you think

-you'll follow in his footsteps...

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-..and become

-a bit of a businessman?

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-Maybe.

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-Food time.

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-Do you speak Gaelic to your father?

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-No.

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-No.

-

-Why not?

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-Because I don't like speaking it.

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-A feast awaits us

-in the peat-filled Aga.

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-I think we've earned our keep today.

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-An early night beckons.

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-Tomorrow is the most important day

-of the year for the Macdonald croft.

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-.

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-Subtitles

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-Subtitles

-

-Subtitles

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-It's our last day, Wil.

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-I haven't washed for a while.

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-I'm off to have a wash in the sea.

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-It looks really cold, but I promised

-that I'd go for a swim.

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-The traditional way of bathing.

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-Come on!

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-It's enough

-to turn your stomach first thing!

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-I've never seen anything

-shift that fast!

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-Right then...

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-That's enough playing!

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-Angus has a lot on his plate,

-and he needs help.

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-Since coming here...

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-..we've seen that crofters

-are part of Uist's identity...

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-..and unique

-to the Scottish islands.

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-But Angus has had to diversify.

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-As well as crofting,

-his businesses include building...

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-..fishing, contracting

-and gathering peat.

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-Making a living from a small farm

-isn't easy these days.

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-Without his other businesses,

-Angus couldn't afford to croft.

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-Do you want to stay for a year?!

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-How much are you paying?

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-There's no pay. I'll get you food!

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-We'll live on geese.

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-We'll live on geese.

-

-We don't pay anybody round here.

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-I didn't know that

-before coming over.

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-This grain is called bere.

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-It's the only crop that can survive

-the island's tough conditions.

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-As such, it's crucial

-for crofters like Angus.

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-You obviously

-have a few irons in the fire.

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-Yes, aye.

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-You started off just crofting?

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-You started off just crofting?

-

-Yes, I did.

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-I love crofting.

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-That's my favourite occupation.

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-Crofting is a fantastic way of life.

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-Nothing compares to it,

-any other job you do.

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-It's a good healthy job as well.

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-But, unfortunately, it's difficult

-to make a living out of it.

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-In order to make a living,

-he has had to adapt...

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-..the traditional way of life

-that his mother Ena knows.

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-It must be difficult

-for her to accept.

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-You're successful at what you do,

-so she's bound to be proud of you.

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-Is she accepting the fact now?

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-Is she accepting the fact now?

-

-She probably is, eventually.

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-Ideally, she'd rather stick

-to the corn stacks.

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-That's all very well,

-and I really enjoy doing that.

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-But we couldn't

-make a living out of it.

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-Times have changed

-and you have to move with the times.

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-Ena is a crofter from head to toe.

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-She has been awarded an MBE for her

-contribution to this unique culture.

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-Over a cuppa, we hear

-about the crofting life she knew...

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-..that is fast changing.

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-Tractors must have made

-a big difference.

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-Oh, aye.

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-Is that one of the biggest changes

-you've seen on the island?

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-Tractors and machinery?

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-I suppose so.

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-I used to work with the horses

-with my father.

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-Fill up the cart with seaweed.

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-Do all the harrowing

-when I was a child.

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-I've got a lovely photo.

-I don't know where I've put it.

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-When you see some of the crofts

-that people have moved to...

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-..do you feel they're not crofting

-them as well as they used to?

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-They don't have to.

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-They can go to the shop

-and buy their milk.

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-They're not true crofters,

-in some respects.

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-Well, not how we would

-describe it years ago.

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-The most active crofters

-and well-worked crofts...

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-..are all in their seventies now.

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-Some of them...

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-There's about four good crofts

-not far away.

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-They're all bachelors.

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-It's sad. It really is sad.

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-I think, somehow, we were happier.

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-There was more time for each other.

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-You didn't have to think

-of making so much money, I suppose.

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-You didn't have the bills coming in.

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-You weren't saving up

-for a holiday.

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-We didn't have phones.

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-What else do we have today

-we didn't have then?

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-It wasn't as if Ena

-was yearning for the old methods.

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-What she missed most

-were the people.

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-And the condition of the crofts.

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-She showed the photos.

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-Photos of people

-going about their work.

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-Harvesting, gathering peat.

0:17:490:17:51

-She said that the methods have gone

-and the people have gone.

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-Unfortunately, the modern world

-has had a negative effect.

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-You couldn't live without

-technology, electricity and so on.

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-But it hasn't done

-much good here, really.

0:18:080:18:12

-But maybe we're romanticizing.

0:18:150:18:17

-Maybe they should

-get with the times and move on.

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-Maybe if more of the crofters...

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-..had the same mindset as Angus,

-the situation would be better.

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-But too many exist there

-instead of using the place.

0:18:300:18:33

-Despite the modern influences

-on Angus and his family...

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-..there's one tradition

-that they're determined to keep.

0:18:400:18:44

-Every September, Angus leads

-his cattle to greener pastures.

0:18:440:18:48

-They'll spend winter

-on the enchanting island of Vallay.

0:18:480:18:52

-It's time to move the cattle.

0:18:520:18:54

-To an island, but the tide's out,

-so we won't drown.

0:18:550:18:59

-It's quite a task.

0:18:590:19:00

-Is it two miles?

0:19:000:19:01

-Is it two miles?

-

-A two-mile walk.

0:19:010:19:03

-The tide's out, so we can

-cross the beach to the island.

0:19:030:19:08

-I'm looking forward to this.

0:19:090:19:10

-Proper cowboys!

0:19:110:19:12

-We're driving

-over a hundred Highland cattle...

0:19:170:19:21

-..to the lonely island

-that sits like a crown above Uist.

0:19:210:19:25

-For a few hours each day,

-the tide goes out...

0:19:290:19:33

-..offering a rare opportunity

-to cross to the island.

0:19:330:19:37

-For Angus and his family,

-especially Ena...

0:19:400:19:43

-..this continues

-a very special tradition.

0:19:440:19:47

-I've driven cattle

-on several continents...

0:20:030:20:06

-..but this is a new experience.

0:20:060:20:09

-Seeing them go along the beach...

0:20:120:20:15

-..I love being a part of this.

0:20:150:20:17

-It's incredible.

0:20:180:20:19

-Is this why

-you get up in the morning?

0:20:200:20:23

-Definitely. It's what I love to do.

0:20:230:20:25

-This is a sight

-that's up with the best of them.

0:20:260:20:29

-It's paradise.

0:20:290:20:30

-The island, the expanse,

-the tide, the lovely cattle.

0:20:310:20:35

-It's perfect.

0:20:360:20:37

-If I had a horse, I'd feel like

-Clint Eastwood or John Wayne!

0:20:380:20:42

-Diversification has enabled Angus...

0:21:220:21:25

-..to hold on to the traditions

-that he loves.

0:21:260:21:29

-Who are we to doubt the future?

0:21:290:21:32

-This is an incredible place.

0:21:390:21:41

-It's a 650-acre island.

0:21:420:21:44

-Angus owns it

-and it's almost untouched by man.

0:21:440:21:48

-The plan is

-to renovate the mansion.

0:21:480:21:51

-This will be a paradise.

0:21:520:21:53

-Paradise, Angus.

0:21:540:21:55

-Paradise, yes, you're right.

0:21:550:21:58

-We've seen some sights

-during our trip...

0:21:580:22:01

-..but ending with this,

-crossing those cattle...

0:22:010:22:05

-..with that backdrop

-and this location...

0:22:060:22:09

-..this is the highlight, I think.

0:22:090:22:12

-It won't get better than this.

0:22:120:22:15

-I've really enjoyed it.

0:22:150:22:17

-Thank you.

0:22:200:22:21

-ANGUS SPEAKS GAELIC

0:22:210:22:23

-It has been an unforgettable trip,

-but it's time to go home.

0:22:250:22:30

-If I've learnt

-one thing about Scotland...

0:22:500:22:53

-..it's the scale

-of the terrain, its size.

0:22:530:22:56

-It's huge.

0:22:560:22:57

-As for the people,

-certainly the people we've met...

0:22:580:23:02

-..I can't speak for every Scot...

0:23:030:23:06

-..but they're ready

-to play their part...

0:23:060:23:09

-..in the community and at work...

0:23:090:23:13

-..from the big estates

-to the small islands.

0:23:130:23:16

-They're all prepared to work

-in order to make a living.

0:23:170:23:21

-On any level, they'll work

-for others or for themselves.

0:23:210:23:25

-They all play their part.

0:23:250:23:27

-And the van's still going.

0:23:270:23:28

-And the van's still going.

-

-That may be the biggest shock.

0:23:280:23:31

-The van's still going!

0:23:310:23:33

-And you've coped

-with the smell of my feet.

0:23:330:23:36

-Where can we go next?

0:23:360:23:37

-Where can we go next?

-

-I don't know.

0:23:370:23:38

-Anywhere the van will take us.

0:23:390:23:41

-S4C Subtitles by Testun Cyf.

0:23:580:24:00

-.

0:24:000:24:00

Ar ddiwedd y daith fythgofiadwy, mae'r ddau'n profi uchafbwynt y daith ac yn gwireddu breuddwyd. On the Isle of Uist, Wil and Aeron fulfil a long-time ambition. Last in series.