Episode 37 Inside Out


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Episode 37

The week's strongest stories from the BBC's Inside Out teams.


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Now on BBC News, the week's

strongest stories from

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the BBC's Inside Out teams.

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Welcome to a very cold

Inside Out West Midlands.

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Tonight, the conman

peddling dreams of breaking

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into the entertainment business.

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I am not a potential customer.

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I'm a BBC journalist and I have

been investigating your

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business and you're conning

people, aren't you?

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You're conning people out

of thousands of pounds at a time.

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And the hunt for an

historic shipwreck, lost

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for almost a century.

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It was just the most exciting moment

in life, to have found it.

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We were hugging each other,

dancing around the prop.

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And above a very ordinary shopping

parade in Birmingham,

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an almost mythical music venue,

The Who played here,

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Led Zepplin, Black Sabbath,

Fleetwood Mac, Jethro Tull,

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Elton John played here

the night before it closed.

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I am Ayo Akinwolere

and this is Inside Out.

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Tonight, we are in Birmingham,

and later on, we will be finding out

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about a festival celebrating some

of the extraordinary

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things that happened

in the city 50 years ago,

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in 1968, but first, being a voice

artist and doing things

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like computer games,

adverts and audio books can be

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lucrative, but one serial conman has

been cashing in on the dreams

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of those trying to break

into the business.

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Simon Hare has been

finding out more.

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Hi, nice to meet you.

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Come and have a sit down and we'll

go through everything with you.

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Ed Harwell says he's a voice actor

who can get you into the business.

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You are just where I was,

sort of ten years ago.

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But ten years ago, Inside Out

was exposing his Nottingham

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company Broadcast Support.

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Back then, he was using his real

name, Carl Mould, and claiming

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he could help people become TV

presenters but all he did was charge

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thousands for poor quality

showreels and websites.

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Five years ago he was jailed

for conning pensioners out

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of thousands for mobility aids.

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Carl Mould likes telling stories

and creating characters.

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Even one for himself,

Edward C Harwell, filmed

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here at the Custard Factory

in Birmingham, a hub

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of creative businesses,

including his own firm,

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Sun King Media.

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You are following me, aren't you?

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If I give you a story,

will you go away?

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Mould is full of tall stories.

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This is a promotional

video on his website.

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10,000-20,000 a month is achievable.

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My advice, get up early, work hard,

and join Sun King Studios.

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Now it is my full-time profession,

I have absolutely no hesitation

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in recommending Sun King Media.

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Glowing testimonials,

but who are they and how

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accurate are those figures?

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Similar tales of high earnings have

enticed dozens of victims,

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many of them pensioners.

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David Taylor is a former

president of his local

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rugby club in Manchester.

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In his retirement, he has taken up

acting and he gave Ed Harwell

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or Carl Mould £1,500 to help him

become an audio book narrator.

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For 35 years I was in the prison

service, and the last 20

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of which I was a prison governor.

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You're probably going to say

I should have known better,

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but we are all human, after all.

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The secret is, you play

on people's desires,

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and that is the bit

that

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I am really ashamed of,

that I should have seen

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through it, really.

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I just feel a fool.

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All David got for his money

was of foam-lined box described

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as a "home recording studio",

a cheap microphone, and one

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audio recording uploaded

to two free websites.

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I have come to see two

voice-over industry experts.

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Hugh Edwards is a casting director,

and Peter Dixon one of the UK's

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best-known performers.

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I work in all the genres

of voice-overs from commercials

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to big entertainment shows

like X Factor and Britain's

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Got Talent, of course.

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It's time to face the music.

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It is a skill that you need

to learn, and it takes

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time and practice.

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So what is their verdict

on what David got for his money?

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That did not sound particularly

professionally well done,

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the levels were too low,

I was straining to hear it.

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You can do that yourself

by recording yourself or paying

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maybe £100 to go into a studio

and have some and press record,

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put it on YouTube yourself for free.

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You can put it on Amazon for free,

you do not need to pay

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anyone to do this for you.

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That is appalling value for money

that he's got there,

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it is saddening and sickening.

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I was always told...

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And what about those claims

of big money in return?

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10,000-20,000 a month is achievable.

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There are voices artists

in the world who do earn that,

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but you're talking about the top two

or three percent.

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We all know in the industry

that the audio book sector

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of the industry is low-paid.

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The sooner that this man who's

running this company can

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be stopped the better.

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People need to be

protected from him, soon.

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I want to see the sales

pitch for myself.

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Hello, I have got an

appointment with Sun King.

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I have come to meet

Ed Harwell for what is billed

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as a free assessment

of my voice-over potential.

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Hi, nice to meet you.

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Nice to meet you.

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Sit down and we will go

through everything with you.

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Right.

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What the Amazon group require from

us is an audio book or a showreel

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that someone has worked on before.

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Right.

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Our work area within the Amazon

group looks like this.

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But it is just Sun King Media's

YouTube channel, and talk of links

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to Amazon keep coming.

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We are affiliated

with the Amazon group.

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We are approved content providers

and work in conjunction with them.

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It is not long before there

are claims of how much I could earn.

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I have people doing

pretty well out of it.

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I will show you.

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That is you, Edward C Harwell?

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That is you?

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Yeah.

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And you got £11,000?

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Dollars.

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That is for one month?

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Blimey.

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It's not too shabby.

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After a bit of prompting, Harwell

or Mould finally records my voice

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for his professional assessment.

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I am a broadcaster, but no actor.

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Daughters of a deeply

royalistic man convinced

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he was doing the King's work.

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Brilliant.

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Nothing wrong with that at all.

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Oh, right.

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Absolutely bang on.

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You are just where

I was ten years ago.

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I like to think I am leaving

some kind of legacy.

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I wouldn't know what else to do now.

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I have found my niche.

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It has been a lucrative niche.

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Inside Out estimates he has

taken more than £100,000

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over the last 18 months.

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The Custard Factory says

it was completely unaware

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of what Mould was doing.

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It is grateful to Inside Out

for bringing the matter

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to its attention, and it has

terminated his lease.

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And the people in the video,

we tracked them down

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to the website fivesquid.com,

offering video testimonials

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for just £10 or £20.

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They and the website expressed

concern but said such testimonials

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are provided on condition

they are clearly labelled

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as a paid-for promotion,

something which Mould did not do.

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The audio book company

within the Amazon group,

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Audible, says narrators

are at the heart of its work.

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It takes this misrepresentation very

seriously and its lawyers

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are contacting Sun King Media.

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It is time to confront Mould.

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I have arranged to meet him outside

a bank in Birmingham.

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I am not a potential customer.

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I am a BBC journalist and I have

been investigating your

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business and you're conning

people, aren't you?

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You're conning people out

of thousands of pounds a time?

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Really?

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Yeah, you are.

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You're uploading poor quality audio

to free to use websites,

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you're making false claims about how

much money people can earn.

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You're making false claims

about your relationship with Amazon.

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You're not Ed Harwell, are you?

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You are Carl Mould, serial conman.

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Do you want to say sorry?

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Sorry for what?

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Sorry for what?

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For conning people?

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It is just rubbish.

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Did you write all these

stories in prison?

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Because you were on a creative

writing course in prison last time.

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Is that the end of this interview?

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How long is it going to go on for?

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As long as you stand there.

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Are you sorry?

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Are you sorry for what you've done?

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I am not sorry for anything,

I have not done anything wrong.

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So you do not think you've

done anything wrong?

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Absolutely not, no.

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Inside Out understands he has

since left his offices

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at the Custard Factory

but in a letter he told us that

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if anyone was not happy

with the service he provided,

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they could come back

and record it again.

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We recorded a special

message for him.

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Carl Mould, it's time

to stop conning the public!

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Next tonight, an underwater

detective story.

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It all started off with one man's

dream to find an historic wreck lost

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for decades in a remote location.

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Behind the doors of

the National Maritime

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Museum in London lie

a

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thousand stories of the sea.

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During the Great War of 1914-1918,

Britain lost more than 5,000

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ships across the globe.

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There were tales of glory,

there were tales of tragedy.

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There are some incredible naval war

stories that are remembered

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and honoured in here today,

but there is one tale

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you will not find in here,

about the first merchant ship to be

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sunk during World War I.

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The City Of Winchester.

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A 6,000 tonne cargo ship

that was sunk by a German cruiser

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in 1914, somewhere in the Arabian

Sea.

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Its whereabouts remained a mystery

for more than 80 years,

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until one man changed all of that

and found more than he could ever

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have imagined possible lurking

at the bottom of the sea.

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Steve Dover from Warwickshire heard

whispers of a World War I wreck

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around the coast of Oman

in the 1980s.

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It began a 12 year obsession

which started with him tracking down

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which ship it could be,

buying it from the British

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government for a pound,

and ended with him convincing a team

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of divers to follow him

to the Hallaniyat Islands.

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They are remote, the seas

are dangerous between the mainland

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and the islands.

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We got there, 35 divers,

in three boats, on-site,

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and I pretty much knew that

I would find that wreck

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on the first dive.

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I was really, really confident.

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But confidence on land can quickly

turn to doubt when you're

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30 metres underwater.

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I was so confident.

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I had been organising and raising

funds for two and a half years,

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12 years of research,

this was the moment.

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Down the anchor line we went,

hit the bottom, nothing.

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So we went along for a bit,

I got my compass out,

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pretending I knew the way,

which I didn't.

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And Pete was right by my side.

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He points down to my

buoyancy compensator,

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the jacket that you wear,

and underneath the flap

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of the jacket was a tiny little fish

that had yellow and silver stripes

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on it, it is called

a sergeant major fish.

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What he knew as a marine biologist

was that this is a reef fish,

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so he is signalling to me follow

this thing, follow this fish,

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and the two of us were following it.

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It was like a scene

from Finding Nemo and the fish put

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on a final spurt and disappeared

into the blue, and this shadow

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appeared in front of my eyes,

and that was the stern

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of the City Of Winchester,

the wreck.

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And it was just the most exciting

moment in life to have found it

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and we were dancing,

we were hugging each other,

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dancing around the prop,

the propeller at the bottom

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of the rudder.

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Not only was Steve's discovery

important for historians,

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they caused ripples

through the scientific

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community as well.

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So what we have is this wreck

which over the course of 70 or 80

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years has become a real haven

for marine life, and

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because it is a metal hull,

and it is a very long metal hull,

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all sorts of marine life is attached

to it that would not necessarily

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want to attach to rocks.

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One of the exciting things

about having a range of colourful

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fishes is it attracts other life

as well, and that is why

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we were recording pods

of dolphins every day.

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What had begun with looking

for a 100-year-old shipwreck had

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now opened up a whole

new world to explore.

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The City Of Winchester was once

forgotten, but unlike all these

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relics of sunken warships that now

are in a museum, it has

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a new lease of life,

not just about the past

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but supporting life for the future.

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With quite literally the biggest

finding imaginable.

I have film of

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humpback whales on the surface, of

one humpback whale actually giving

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birth, and within the same time

period, we have got film of them

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feeding. Humpback whales do not feed

and breed at the same time in the

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same place.

This caused confusion.

Why were these humpback whales

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acting so out of character? Could it

be that this was an altogether new

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species?

Further studies were made

by the Ministry of foreign

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environment in the country. It was

all followed up and in 2014, they

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declared a brand-new species of

humpback whale as a consequence of

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what I found, the Arabian Sea

humpback.

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But the ecosystem that's

built up around the City

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of Winchester is now in danger.

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When I went back there last year,

after 17 years and dived around,

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it was very clear there'd been

a great depletion

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of fish life and species.

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When I spoke to the islanders they'd

said to me that the fishing

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rights had been sold.

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You can't stop us and it's

on the brink I would

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say of breaking down.

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One day there will be no Arabian Sea

humpback Whales in that area

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because they don't travel around,

they tend to like their home,

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so if there is a threat

they're stuck there.

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Steve's idea is for a conservation

area around the Islands

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and the government of Oman

are considering his proposal.

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There's also a strict 25 mile

no-take zone around the wreck.

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The no-go zone combined will mean

the marine life will bounce back

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to where it was in about 5-10 years.

0:16:130:16:20

This could be the lifeline needed,

to protect not just the whales

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but this whole incredible ecosystem.

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There is such a wealth of research

to do over the next decade and even

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then we will not have found

all of the species and all

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of the many many things that I am

certain dwell in and around

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the waters of those islands.

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So, the amazing tale of The City

of Winchester now has a new chapter

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at the bottom of the sea.

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And I wonder, how many other

stories are out there,

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waiting to be discovered?

0:16:550:16:58

The Birmingham Flatpack Festival

will start soon and this year

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it will feature a series of events

marking things that happened

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in the city 50 years ago.

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So we sent comedian Tom Price

back in time, well,

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sort of, to find out more.

0:17:100:17:17

# If I only had time

0:17:170:17:19

# Only time #.

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It's no secret that we in the media

love an anniversary,

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and they don't get much bigger

than 50 years.

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Well, OK, technically they do,

but let's not get bogged down

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in details because 50 years ago,

1968, to be precise,

0:17:350:17:37

was a pretty big year.

0:17:370:17:47

In fact, there was so much

going on that Ian Francis, founder

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of the Flatpack Film Festival,

held every year in Birmingham,

0:17:500:17:52

is organising a series

of events to mark the year.

0:17:520:17:55

A really interesting

time in the city.

0:17:550:17:56

All sorts of things going on,

new bands, counter culture,

0:17:560:17:59

student protests, so we've got

a whole programme of exhibitions,

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screenings and events all over

the city as the first weekend

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of the festival.

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One of the events will focus

on an almost mythical music venue

0:18:110:18:14

which opened in the north

of Birmingham in 1968,

0:18:140:18:16

right here on Erdington High Street.

0:18:160:18:20

Yep, I know what you're thinking,

it looks like that sort

0:18:200:18:23

of place, doesn't it?

0:18:230:18:26

This is music historian Jez Collins

and we're meeting outside

0:18:260:18:28

what was voted the best club

in the world two years running,

0:18:280:18:32

known simply as Mothers.

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The club was only open three years

but boy did it leave a legacy,

0:18:360:18:39

and I'm not talking about the fact

that it's now a supermarket.

0:18:390:18:45

It's absolutely incredible,

on Erdington High Street,

0:18:450:18:47

not many people know about it,

there's a little sign

0:18:470:18:51

above, but honestly,

this was the home of sounds.

0:18:510:18:54

The Who played here,

Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath,

0:18:540:18:56

Fleetwood Mac, Jethro Tull.

0:18:560:18:57

Elton John played here the night

before it closed and moaned about it

0:18:570:19:01

not having a grand piano.

0:19:010:19:03

John Peel was the resident DJ,

there's a gate behind us and he used

0:19:030:19:06

to park his Winnebago and sleep

there, and he'd DJ.

0:19:060:19:09

So a really important place,

not just in Birmingham but in terms

0:19:090:19:12

of rock music history.

0:19:120:19:15

They had a membership

that reached 45,0000,

0:19:150:19:20

which is just insane for a club that

could hold 300 people.

0:19:200:19:24

45,000 people became members

at the time it closed.

0:19:240:19:27

Apparently global stars Joan Baez

and Bob Dylan were members.

0:19:270:19:30

Well, I haven't been able to get

them here today, to be honest,

0:19:300:19:33

I didn't actually try,

but I have arranged to meet two

0:19:330:19:36

other former members,

Rob Moore and Syd Wall,

0:19:360:19:39

who are just as A-list

but a bit more local.

0:19:390:19:43

I hardly recognised

it when I walked in.

0:19:430:19:45

I can still remember

where the stage was.

0:19:450:19:48

Where was the stage, then?

0:19:480:19:51

The stage was over there.

0:19:510:19:54

It went from that corner

right over to here.

0:19:540:19:56

I went to most of these.

0:19:560:19:58

There's a couple that I didn't see.

0:19:580:20:01

The one that I wish I had seen

which I couldn't get to

0:20:010:20:04

was this Pink Floyd one.

0:20:040:20:06

Whatever happened to them?

0:20:060:20:07

Where did they go?!

0:20:070:20:08

When Zeppelin first played,

it was the first gig

0:20:080:20:11

of their first UK tour.

0:20:120:20:15

My brother has got

photographs of the gig,

0:20:150:20:17

and they are in the loft,

he said he can't find them.

0:20:170:20:20

Got to get in there!

0:20:200:20:21

Try and find them,

try and find them.

0:20:210:20:24

Syd's brother's photos aside,

regrettably there seems to be very

0:20:240:20:30

little archive of the club,

but, although Mothers closed

0:20:300:20:34

in 1971, in 2016 its name cropped up

in American courts when Led Zeppelin

0:20:340:20:37

were successfully defending

themselves against a charge

0:20:370:20:40

of plagiarism brought

about by the band Spirit,

0:20:400:20:43

who alleged their song

Taurus was the inspiration

0:20:430:20:45

for Stairway To Heaven.

0:20:450:20:50

Well, when Spirit came to play

here at Mothers there were rumours

0:20:500:20:53

that Page and Plant were here,

and part of that evidence

0:20:530:20:58

was that Plant and Page

were here and they would have heard

0:20:580:21:04

Taurus played and that planted that

seed in their minds that that music

0:21:040:21:08

hook turned into Stairway To Heaven.

0:21:080:21:17

Life in late '60s Birmingham

wasn't all glamour and

0:21:170:21:20

rock and roll, though.

0:21:200:21:22

In the south of the city,

American photographer

0:21:220:21:24

Janet Mendelsohn spent much of 1968

documenting Balsall Heath,

0:21:240:21:28

a down on its luck suburb.

0:21:280:21:30

Her pictures will form one

0:21:300:21:31

of the exhibitions in

the Flatpack Festival.

0:21:310:21:36

Why was she drawn to Balsall Heath?

0:21:360:21:38

It was a big subject in the media

0:21:380:21:42

for various reasons, really, to do

with housing, immigration.

0:21:420:21:46

There were lots of

photographers coming here.

0:21:460:21:51

But on the whole, the media covered

it in kind of a sensationalist way

0:21:510:21:55

and Janet's project was much more

about, let's show life,

0:21:550:21:57

the everyday fabric of life.

0:21:570:22:02

You've got pictures of this

crossroads here, so this

0:22:020:22:05

is a butcher's, grocer's here.

0:22:050:22:08

So that is literally that?

0:22:080:22:10

Yeah.

0:22:100:22:11

That corner there is that?

0:22:110:22:12

That corner there.

0:22:120:22:13

That's incredible.

0:22:130:22:14

A number of cafes.

0:22:140:22:15

It was a very busy spot.

0:22:150:22:18

Yeah.

0:22:180:22:19

And this treasure trove

of photographs, we nearly

0:22:190:22:21

lost it, didn't we?

0:22:210:22:22

Yeah, it was hidden

away for many years.

0:22:220:22:26

She went back to America, it ended

up in her attic in Massachusetts.

0:22:260:22:29

That's amazing to think that great

resource was sitting

0:22:290:22:31

in an attic in Massachusetts.

0:22:310:22:32

Yeah, we has no idea

about any of this.

0:22:320:22:38

A guy at the university got in touch

with her a few years ago

0:22:380:22:41

and she just basically sent two

massive boxes full of

0:22:410:22:44

prints and negatives.

0:22:440:22:45

And suddenly we've got

this incredible document

0:22:450:22:49

of what Balsall Heath

was like in the 1960s.

0:22:490:22:51

It's hardly surprising these

photos have generated such

0:22:510:22:54

interest amongst historians,

but there's also

0:22:540:22:56

a personal side to them.

0:22:560:22:58

Whilst researching the project,

Ian found a photo taken

0:22:580:23:00

in 1968 of the shop Uncles.

0:23:000:23:05

The owner, Mr Singh,

opened it shortly after arriving

0:23:050:23:08

in the UK from India but didn't have

any pictures of it from the time.

0:23:080:23:18

Surinder, tell us, how did

you and your dad feel when Ian found

0:23:180:23:22

this amazing photograph?

0:23:220:23:23

Taken aback, as you can imagine

we've never had a photograph.

0:23:230:23:28

Dad was tearsome, it did

bring tears to his eyes.

0:23:280:23:31

Just overwhelming, really.

0:23:310:23:36

What makes the photo even more

poignant is that the woman

0:23:360:23:38

in the alley is Mr Singh's wife,

Surinder's mother.

0:23:380:23:41

She died in 1977.

0:23:410:23:43

Mr Singh, how did it

feel to see this?

0:23:430:23:48

I was really glad, I was really glad

when I seen this picture.

0:23:480:23:55

I don't know if you know this,

but Ian has been looking

0:23:550:23:58

into the archives, there's

a new exhibition coming up.

0:23:580:24:00

And whilst researching

that new exhibition,

0:24:000:24:06

he's found some other photographs.

0:24:060:24:07

So, Ian, over to you.

0:24:070:24:13

You mentioned that the lady in the

alleyway was your wife, your mum.

0:24:130:24:17

I had a dig around and there

were actually a couple of closer

0:24:170:24:20

shots from the collection.

0:24:200:24:22

There's your mum.

0:24:220:24:24

Is it?

0:24:240:24:25

Fantastic.

0:24:250:24:26

Yeah, that's Mum.

0:24:260:24:29

That is a truly, truly great photo.

0:24:290:24:32

Isn't that gorgeous?

0:24:320:24:33

Look at that.

0:24:330:24:34

I love that.

0:24:340:24:35

And who is the child?

0:24:350:24:36

She's my daughter.

0:24:360:24:38

It's great.

0:24:380:24:41

Very nice.

0:24:410:24:45

We haven't got many pictures of Mum.

0:24:450:24:52

This is really nice.

0:24:520:24:56

Now in her 70s and unlikely

to return to Birmingham again,

0:24:560:24:59

Janet and the Singhs will probably

never meet, but we've sent her this

0:24:590:25:02

footage so she can see for herself

just what an impact her photos

0:25:020:25:05

are still having on people,

half a century after she took them.

0:25:050:25:10

Well, there we are, just a snapshot

of the plethora of things

0:25:100:25:15

going on in Birmingham in 1968,

50 years ago.

0:25:150:25:17

Hope you enjoyed it.

0:25:170:25:19

I'll be back next year with

a special feature looking at 1969.

0:25:190:25:22

That's how this works, right?

0:25:220:25:25

Has anyone got a history

book I can borrow?

0:25:250:25:31

Right, that's your lot for tonight.

0:25:310:25:33

Don't forget, we are on the iPlayer

and also on Twitter at bbciowm.

0:25:330:25:36

We'll see you next

week, have a good one.

0:25:360:25:38

Bye-bye.

0:25:380:25:43