Kent A Taste of Britain


Kent

Food programme exploring specialities from around Britain. Brian Turner and Janet Street-Porter visit one of Janet's favourite places in the country, Kent.


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Transcript


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He's Brian Turner.

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And she's Janet Street-Porter.

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I'm passionate about walking.

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These feet have taken me the length and breadth of Great Britain.

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I've been privileged to cook all round the world,

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but it's Britain that I love. Fabulous produce,

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great ingredients right here on the doorstop.

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We're joining forces to explore Britain's rich heritage.

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And the landscape that's given us such wonderful produce.

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He's in charge of the food.

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And guess what, she's in charge of everything else!

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This is...

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A Taste Of Britain.

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Today we've come to the glorious county of Kent.

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It's in the south-east corner of Britain

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and is a region I know well, having lived here for a number of years.

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It offers the very best of countryside and coastline,

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and I can't wait for Janet to show me around.

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'We'll be getting into the swing of things with a traditional

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'Kentish pub game.'

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Robbed, robbed!

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And learning all about life in the slow lane.

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-Am I going to be brave and eat a whole snail?

-Yeah go on, go on.

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-Delicious.

-'For the cherry on the top.

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'I'll be making a celebratory dish that sums up a real taste of Kent.'

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So there you are, Duchess, my Brogdale cherry slice.

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APPLAUSE

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Brian, I've brought you this week to my neck of the woods.

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It's a part of Kent I know really well.

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We're standing just outside Faversham,

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-which is where that church spire is over there.

-Yeah.

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We're on the junction of Oare Marshes, Faversham Creek,

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and here's the Thames Estuary.

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It's a great bird sanctuary around here.

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They've recorded 130 species this year.

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And that's the Isle of Sheppey

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and if you fancied a trip across there, there used to be

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a very lovely old ferry, the Harty Ferry, which sadly is no more.

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Of course, Kent is considered by many to be "The Garden of England",

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fabulous fruit, fabulous vegetables. I'm looking forward to seeing

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some of your favourite haunts, and we're in the world's best orchards

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and the fruits have just come into season.

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-Shall we start with Faversham?

-Please.

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Kent's atmospheric coastline is dotted with numerous fishing ports,

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many of which date back hundreds of years.

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Top of my list has to be the historic market town of Faversham,

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originally built around an ancient seaport on the Faversham Creek.

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I've heard the port's home to one of Britain's oldest pubs.

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Trust you to know that fact, Brian!

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But before you get any ideas,

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I'm taking you for a stroll around the streets of Faversham,

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and it's best to start up high to get our bearings.

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Brian, we're here right on top of the Guildhall,

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and if you look around Faversham, it's a perfect Medieval town,

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and that's because in the 1960s the council,

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I think, very ahead for their time,

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decreed that there would be no redevelopment

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in the town centre, and that's why you can still see

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so many of these medieval wood-framed houses.

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It's really unique, I think, in this part of England.

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The other thing about Faversham is it was the centre of the wool trade,

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and they used to export wool down the creek.

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But it was also the centre of the gunpowder industry,

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the explosives industry, which was really important in the Industrial Revolution,

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but it all came to an unfortunate end in 1916,

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when there was a massive explosion and 109 people died.

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Oh, dear.

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What I like about these streets is that the houses

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come from different centuries, but they all blend together,

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because they've been very sympathetically restored.

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-Yeah.

-Ancient bell pulls, I don't know what date that is, but look how

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low the doorways are, because the street itself, 300 years ago,

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would have been lower, but the houses also have cellars,

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and I think a lot of them were merchants' houses

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because they back onto the creek.

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-Yeah.

-And they would have stored stuff in the cellars.

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So, Brian, here we are at the creek, and it's a shame really,

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this is all that's left of what must have been a really bustling port.

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-They've still got some of the old boats here.

-Yeah.

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But they are in the process of restoring it.

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And talking about restoration, I need some restoration,

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I'm desperate for something to eat.

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-Are you hungry?

-I could do with a snack.

-OK, let's eat.

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Kent's fertile soil means there's a host of local producers,

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large and small, farming a rich mix of ingredients.

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There's one thing no food grower likes to see amongst their crop...

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..the common garden snail.

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But in Littlebourne, near Canterbury,

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there's a woman who loves having them in her garden.

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So much so, she farms them.

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Helen Hudson is Britain's biggest supplier of live snails

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to restaurants countrywide.

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I must say that your plot looks

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completely different to everybody else's.

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Yes, it does, doesn't it?

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The pens look as if they're designed to keep the snails in,

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but they're actually designed to keep everything else out.

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-How many snails are in here?

-About 840.

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What do you mean "about", you must have been up early counting them. How can you count them?

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They don't run very fast. You just count them, don't you?

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I counted them as I put them in.

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When they're tiny they live at home with me,

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and then I bring them here when they're about six weeks old.

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-So what age are these we're looking at?

-About two months.

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About two months old, and these are...what are these,

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-what's this food in here, these plants?

-It's perpetual spinach.

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-Oh, right.

-So if they chew one leaf, it grows some more.

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-Oh, yeah.

-Well, these to me are my enemy

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because if I see any on my vegetable patch, I'm afraid...

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-Put into salt water or...

-No, I flick them over the fence for the birds to eat them.

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-They just come back again.

-To the garden, to the neighbours.

-How far can snails travel?

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Well, certainly from next door's garden. They have a homing instinct.

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Helen supplies an incredible 50,000 of these gastropods to gastro-pubs

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and restaurants every year.

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How would you describe the taste, as a snail connoisseur?

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I'd describe them as being like mushrooms to people

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who haven't tasted them before, and if they're cooked properly,

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long and slow, then you get a texture like mushrooms, too.

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And how old are they when they go to their slaughter?

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-It's about six months old.

-Six months?

-Yeah.

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-Well, they've had quite a good life in their pens.

-They have.

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It's like free-range chickens.

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Yeah, free-range snails, sloping about, eating this spinach.

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You say they taste like mushrooms, but if you give them different feed,

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do they actually taste different?

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Well, certainly the chefs like it if I feed them on fruit.

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I think it certainly affects the texture.

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-Shall I show you one that's finished growing?

-Yeah.

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One that's due for the plate.

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How do you know that that's finished growing?

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If you look at the edge of the shell, you can see it's turned

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up like the brim of a hat.

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-Oh, yeah, this bit here?

-Yeah.

-It's curled back.

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Yes, it means it's stopped growing.

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-And that's only about six months old?

-Yes. Yeah.

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I'm really getting tempted by all this. The snails look fantastic,

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so we must try and put it together now and come up with a dish.

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I've sampled some unusual ingredients in my time,

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but I've yet to be tempted by these local delicacies.

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I think Brian's going to have to do something pretty special

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with Helen's snails to win me over.

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What I've done, I've got some pre-cooked new potatoes here,

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a bit of rapeseed oil, like we Brits do these days.

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I've got some garlic here, and I'm going to incorporate the snails,

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some local bacon, some fresh peas and some of the local eggs.

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I'm going to make like a frittata, like an omelette.

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But one that you can really make bigger and everybody can share.

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How do the snails get cooked?

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Very slowly in a cider, with a bit of stock and a few vegetables

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and herbs. They are so tender.

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-Cooked for about two hours.

-I won't look at it.

-That's it, close your eyes, you're fine.

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So, I've got the garlic in there, I don't need to colour it,

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-just want to...

-They taste really good.

-They're good, aren't they, eh?

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And I want to chop them up a little bit.

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You're chopping them up,

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which I think is good news for people like me

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who are a little bit squeamish about seeing the whole thing.

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What I thought, we'd chop some of them up

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and then put whole ones in as well.

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So all I'm going to do is just quickly put those in here.

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I think that garlic smells wonderful.

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We'll put all this into a bowl.

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Some fresh peas, we'll put all of those in.

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Fresh local bacon which is wonderful.

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I like just to chop a bit of parsley,

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just gives it that little bit of extra colour.

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So you can see, there's no real recipe to this and you can put

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as much or as little as you want in there to make it work for you.

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Lovely eggs.

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Because frittata's quite nice lukewarm, isn't it?

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It's not one of those things you eat hot?

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Absolutely, you just turn it out.

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I'm going to put a little salad at the side of it. Salt and pepper in there.

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-And don't forget, now, we can put in as many...

-Not too many.

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-How many? Oh, that'll do.

-Oh, no!

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Oh, no!

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Look at that, that's filled that pan up nice and large.

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Do you think it's better to have it thicker than thin?

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I think for this kind of dish it's nice to have it nice and thick.

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Remember, everything else is cooked in here, so it only just

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needs to be hot, and cook the eggs through that's holding it together.

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Brian, you're doing something that I never thought of,

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-which is you're moving your fork around in it...

-Yeah.

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..to make sure the egg cooks.

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Well, that's it, so you can see the cooked bits. And the trick,

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of course, is to realise if you take it out too quickly...

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-It slurps.

-..it goes all over the place, you're quite right.

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I don't want to keep turning it too much,

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cos I want the eggs to set together and bind the whole thing together.

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Now, the next trick is to make sure

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we get a lovely golden brown colour on the top,

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so when you show it, people say, "That's wonderful."

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Take that fork, have a quick look round the edge.

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The edge is solid.

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-It's starting to set that lovely golden colour.

-Yeah.

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-I'm going to sort of do it the idiot's way.

-Which is?

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I'm going to turn it onto there,

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-but I've got to get back in a bit.

-You're going to slide it?

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I think that's dangerous. So I'm going to then turn that one again.

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-You're just showing off.

-No, I'm not.

-You're just doing two flips?

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I am, yes. OK, so now what we do is we put the plate here.

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And we go like that.

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-Say those magic words...

-Hey presto.

-..I love Janet Street-Porter.

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-Hey presto. I've got it, I've got it.

-Yeah, lovely.

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Oh, I love that!

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-Now, are you ready?

-Yeah.

-One, two, three, go.

-Yes!

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Easy peasy.

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In fact it hardly needs any more cooking.

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It's got that lovely colour, so I'm going to turn that off

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and just leave it on the heat to set now, OK.

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Just want to make a little bit of dressing quickly.

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I'm just going to take a bit of shallot.

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And shred it.

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We just want something to serve with it, it's sort of a bit...

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nude by itself. So those go in there.

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And a spoon of mustard.

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A squeeze of lemon juice.

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A bit of rapeseed oil.

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Salt and pepper.

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And I see some dill there, just like...

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You be strong, just go like that and just do it!

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You're being very macho today, Brian.

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HE LAUGHS

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Two plates this time.

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Oh, am I getting half?

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No, no, what I'm going to do, look, I'm going to turn it over.

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I'm happy with that, in fact, I'm going to serve it that side up.

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-That looks good.

-That looks excellent, does that.

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And here's a little top tip that I think works extremely well.

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Just take a little bit of oil... look at that shine.

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-Oh, yeah, that looks good.

-That little bit of attractiveness.

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There you've got it, that's a frittata with snails, huh?

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-Brian, it looks amazing.

-Lots of lovely colours, don't you think?

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-Right, I need to taste it.

-OK, let me give you a nice slice.

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There we go!

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Right.

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-Try and get a bit of snail, dear, a bit of snail, there, look.

-Hm.

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Very good frittata.

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Am I going to be brave and eat a whole snail?

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Yeah, go on, go on, go on.

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-It works.

-You are quite brave, you know, I have to say.

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It works!

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-Helen's got to taste...

-Absolutely right.

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-Are you ready for this?

-Definitely. That looks lovely.

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A little bit of salad.

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Cos I love making frittatas and I just thought, "Snail, hmm."

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-But it's worked.

-Fantastic.

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Very good. I shall definitely do that at home.

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What about your snail, it had a good life, didn't it?

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-It did, yes.

-Ended up in a good home?

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-In a frittata.

-HELEN LAUGHS

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Well done, Brian.

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We need to be on the lookout for tasty ingredients

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to use in our celebratory cook.

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And seeing as you know this area so well, Janet,

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perhaps you've got some ideas?

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Well, Brian, when it comes to my own cooking, somewhere that never fails

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to inspire me is The Goods Shed in the heart of Canterbury.

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Originally opened in 2002 as a farmers' market,

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it's evolved into an amazing food hall,

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packed to the rafters with the very best in fresh local produce.

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So, what do you think, Brian?

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Wow, wow, just look at it, this is great.

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It's amazing, well, this was a disused building,

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it had been used for storing coal and then for engines that

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went up and down the little line between Whitstable and Canterbury.

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And I've been coming here for about ten years.

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It's such a great place, because it's got food from local producers

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and you can get everything in this one small space,

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plus it's got a really good restaurant up the top.

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Fantastic choice of meat. They have a lot of game.

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-Mutton.

-Sausages, hang on, whoa, let's have a look.

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You can always judge a butcher by good-looking sausages.

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Every time I come in here I want to cook something different.

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This is my favourite vegetable stall,

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and what they do is tell you what stuff's been sprayed,

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where the stuff comes from, even what farms.

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And look, there's some cherries.

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From Amery Court, wherever that is, you know Amery Court?

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Yeah, just down the road, but that's what I like,

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cos you know that everything's just come from around here.

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We've got spinach, you get mustard, curly parsley -

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-your favourite - sorrel...

-It is! Organic sorrel there.

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-And...

-Ah-ha!

-..the Kentish cheese stall.

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Look at the awards they've won, fantastic.

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-So, isn't this place terrific?

-It's wonderful.

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When people tell you that shopping in places like this

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is expensive, there's the proof on the wall that it isn't.

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Look at that, purple broccoli - £3 here, £8.75 and £9.50 elsewhere,

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-that's scandalous!

-Now, don't get in a lather.

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No, serious, it is nonsense, it shouldn't be allowed.

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There's a really good chef over there, I think you should go

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-and meet him.

-All right, I will...

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-I'm off to mingle with the wildlife.

-I'll go and see him.

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SEAGULLS CRY

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As a keen walker, nothing beats a stroll along the shoreline

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for a breath of fresh sea air.

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And one of my favourite spots in Kent for a seaside amble

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is the South Swale Nature Reserve near Faversham.

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Covering 850 acres of salt marsh,

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the reserve is not only home to a dazzling array of plants

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and wild flowers, but is also a haven for birdlife.

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Joining me on my walk today is warden Kevin Duvall.

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Kevin, you're the area warden for the Kent Wildlife Trust,

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and I've walked along here so many times,

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what makes it so special?

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It's just a beautiful part of Kent, isn't it?

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Wherever you look you get wonderful vistas.

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Got the mudflats here, so important for feeding birds,

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we've got various habitats inland here with the reed beds,

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dykes, fresh water grazing marsh, open areas of water.

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It's all attractive to birds.

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After they've fed on the mudflats they'll very often come back

0:17:320:17:35

onto the reserve to roost and rest, and they're safe there.

0:17:350:17:39

So it's where you've got Faversham at the Creek there,

0:17:390:17:42

and the Isle of Sheppey over here, and then the Thames Estuary

0:17:420:17:46

out there, this is a very sheltered mooring, isn't it?

0:17:460:17:49

It is, yes, this channel divides the north Kent coast from Sheppey,

0:17:490:17:52

it is very important, there's a vast amount of food out there

0:17:520:17:55

for birds and all sorts of other animals as well.

0:17:550:17:57

In fact, we have common seals out on the sands at low tide very often.

0:17:570:18:01

I've swum and seen a seal.

0:18:010:18:03

Yeah, I thought it was an old rubber tyre

0:18:030:18:05

-and then I realised it was a seal!

-Yeah, it's a fantastic sight.

-Yeah.

0:18:050:18:08

How many species have been recorded this year?

0:18:110:18:13

Well, so far this year about 135, but most years,

0:18:130:18:17

throughout the year, we get about 170 to 180.

0:18:170:18:19

It varies from year to year, but it's

0:18:190:18:21

a particularly good area for wading birds,

0:18:210:18:23

especially on migration in the autumn,

0:18:230:18:25

all sorts of things turn up here.

0:18:250:18:27

When I walk along this section along here from the power station

0:18:280:18:32

opposite Sheppey, I always imagine Charles Dickens, cos he walked

0:18:320:18:36

a lot on Sheppey, and around here, that it's not changed that much.

0:18:360:18:40

No, I'm sure it inspired him, yes.

0:18:400:18:42

So we're approaching the sea wall hide now,

0:18:540:18:56

this is on the extreme end of the eastern end of the reserve

0:18:560:18:59

where Faversham Creek meets the Swale.

0:18:590:19:01

-It's a particularly good hide for watching seabirds.

-Right.

0:19:010:19:05

Right, so if we take a seat here.

0:19:060:19:08

And see what sort of view we've got in front of us.

0:19:100:19:12

Wow.

0:19:120:19:14

The tide's quite low at the moment, so there's quite a bit of

0:19:160:19:19

inter-tidal mudflat exposed,

0:19:190:19:20

and we can see quite a few birds are feeding out there,

0:19:200:19:23

and oystercatchers to our left and a few gulls in front of us too.

0:19:230:19:26

Now, Kevin, what qualities do you need to be a bird-watcher?

0:19:280:19:32

Enthusiasm, patience and a willingness to learn really,

0:19:320:19:35

cos there's an awful lot to learn,

0:19:350:19:36

birds can look different at different times of the year.

0:19:360:19:40

-Probably an ability to keep quiet.

-Yes, that will certainly help.

0:19:400:19:43

HE CHUCKLES

0:19:430:19:45

Not a lot of qualities I've got.

0:19:450:19:46

I don't think Brian will believe how peaceful and quiet I've been, Kevin.

0:19:560:20:00

You've had a very calming influence on me. Unlike him.

0:20:000:20:04

As they say, Janet, silence is golden,

0:20:050:20:08

and long may it last.

0:20:080:20:09

When putting a menu together,

0:20:140:20:16

a chef couldn't be better placed for ingredients than Rafael Lopez,

0:20:160:20:19

whose restaurant sits right inside The Good Shed food market.

0:20:190:20:24

-Hi, Chef, nice to meet you.

-Brian.

0:20:240:20:26

'He's Spanish, but has chosen to make his home here

0:20:260:20:28

'and is preparing us a dish that showcases

0:20:280:20:31

'some of the very best of Kent's local flavours.'

0:20:310:20:33

OK, Chef, what are you going to cook for us?

0:20:370:20:39

-Today we've got spring lamb.

-Yeah.

0:20:390:20:41

And so we're going to do the bacon, the braised belly

0:20:410:20:44

and the lamb cutlets, and we're going to add the bacon for flavour.

0:20:440:20:48

It's interesting, in modern cooking,

0:20:480:20:50

-lots of restaurants do a trio of something.

-Yeah.

0:20:500:20:53

Three of something, it's nice, isn't it, nice contrast?

0:20:530:20:56

It's a nice contrast and it's a good way of utilising

0:20:560:20:59

the whole part of the animal instead of just going for the prime cut.

0:20:590:21:04

-Yeah, yeah.

-We have got the belly.

0:21:040:21:06

I trimmed a little bit of the back

0:21:060:21:08

and we salted that like if it was bacon.

0:21:080:21:11

-How long is that cured for?

-Erm, just a few hours, maybe a day.

-OK.

0:21:110:21:15

We're going to start by tidying this up.

0:21:150:21:18

-OK, so you just roll it up like a Swiss roll...

-Yeah.

0:21:180:21:20

-..nice and tight.

-Yeah.

-How long will you cook it for?

0:21:200:21:23

Erm, a piece that size, 40 minutes, maybe an hour.

0:21:230:21:26

Nice and gently.

0:21:260:21:29

Then we're going to sear the end slightly.

0:21:290:21:32

And then we're just going to brown off,

0:21:320:21:34

basically just to render some of the fat away.

0:21:340:21:37

-Your belly's a lovely colour.

-The belly is a lovely colour,

0:21:370:21:40

what we're going to do is just pop it in the oven and...

0:21:400:21:43

like, pot roast it really.

0:21:430:21:45

Next job, I'm going to start prepping a rack of lamb.

0:21:450:21:48

Spring lamb, not a lot of fat,

0:21:480:21:50

plenty of flavour, and the most important thing,

0:21:500:21:52

it'll be really, really tender.

0:21:520:21:55

I'm going to just score the skin

0:21:550:21:56

-and make sure we've got a nice kind of crunchy finish.

-Yeah.

0:21:560:22:01

We've got a hot pan in there.

0:22:030:22:04

Considering all the good lamb,

0:22:060:22:08

I think this could be one of the best in the world.

0:22:080:22:12

We're just going to finish it off,

0:22:130:22:15

we put the skin side down for the time being,

0:22:150:22:18

and then in about five minutes we're going to flip it over.

0:22:180:22:22

-OK.

-Back in there.

0:22:220:22:24

-The gentler you are with it, the better it cooks.

-Yeah.

0:22:260:22:29

So I'm going to...

0:22:290:22:31

cut a little bit of this lamb bacon.

0:22:310:22:33

This is the part of the belly that doesn't really get used.

0:22:330:22:37

It's a bit of a shame, because it's dark meat.

0:22:370:22:41

And normally dark meat is a little bit sweeter.

0:22:410:22:44

So there is a lot of flavour.

0:22:440:22:46

Oh, right, so you're dicing it up?

0:22:460:22:48

We're just going to do it like if it was like lardons for bacon.

0:22:480:22:51

Perfect, OK, right, yeah.

0:22:510:22:53

We got this courgette, aubergine...

0:22:530:22:57

we're going to start by grilling some of this veg, the lamb bacon.

0:22:570:23:01

Right, now we've got this lamb bacon

0:23:040:23:06

starting to get a little bit of colour,

0:23:060:23:09

going to turn the heat right down.

0:23:090:23:11

We're going to put the new potatoes.

0:23:110:23:14

-So all the flavour from the lamb there...

-Exactly.

0:23:140:23:17

..is going into the potatoes.

0:23:170:23:18

And we got those mangetout, garden peas,

0:23:180:23:22

we've got a little bit of that roasted garlic,

0:23:220:23:25

we're going to put some of these green beans.

0:23:250:23:27

Those were just blanched and then cut in lengths?

0:23:270:23:30

Yeah. We kind of just want the flavours to marry together.

0:23:300:23:34

So that pan now has lots of textures, lots of flavours

0:23:340:23:37

-and wonderful colours.

-Exactly.

0:23:370:23:40

And we got a little bit of the lamb fat in there,

0:23:400:23:42

which is going to help to flavour them up.

0:23:420:23:44

-Some of those as well.

-Everything in there.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:23:440:23:46

Now we're going to finish it with a little bit of the herbs.

0:23:460:23:50

And do you notice? The heat is not even there,

0:23:500:23:53

it's just with the residual heat.

0:23:530:23:55

And then we're just going to finish a little bit with some butter

0:23:550:23:59

just to give it that kind of creaminess.

0:23:590:24:02

-We like butter.

-Yeah, we do like butter.

0:24:020:24:05

So now, I suppose, you've not got a lot left to do

0:24:050:24:08

-but just to plate up?

-You're right.

0:24:080:24:10

Just going to cut a little bit of the edge.

0:24:100:24:13

Just give it a little bit of colour.

0:24:130:24:16

-Now, that's a lovely plate.

-Right, that is my favourite plate.

0:24:160:24:19

We can put some of the bigger veg at the bottom.

0:24:190:24:23

It is quite amazing what you've actually done.

0:24:230:24:25

There's no two ways in my mind, you've used all British,

0:24:260:24:30

-very local products...

-Yeah.

0:24:300:24:33

-..but you've now made it look Spanish.

-Like it's Spanish, well...

0:24:330:24:37

Tremendous.

0:24:370:24:38

-For the nice tender pieces of belly...

-Lovely.

0:24:380:24:41

-We're going to take that lamb out now.

-Yeah.

0:24:410:24:44

It's normally a little bit paler, but it'll be so tender.

0:24:450:24:51

And a little bit of vinegar, just going to add...

0:24:530:24:55

..a tiny element that is going to want you ask for more.

0:24:570:25:01

I found the best accompaniment for these vegetables is this

0:25:010:25:05

local Kentish honey, will go just like a dream with this dish.

0:25:050:25:09

So tell us what you call that dish?

0:25:090:25:11

I'm going to call it the best of lamb.

0:25:110:25:14

It looks fantastic.

0:25:140:25:15

-Let's take it and see what our lady thinks of it.

-Let's have a look.

0:25:260:25:29

With his clever combination of some

0:25:310:25:33

of Janet's favourite local ingredients,

0:25:330:25:35

I'm confident Rafael's dish will leave her wanting seconds.

0:25:350:25:38

So, erm, this is your best of lamb, I hope you enjoy it.

0:25:400:25:43

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much. Cheers.

0:25:430:25:45

What he's got, he's got lamb cutlets,

0:25:450:25:47

which obviously you can see, and underneath there

0:25:470:25:49

-there's rolled breast of lamb...

-I love that.

0:25:490:25:52

..braised, and then these little lardons, I call them lambons.

0:25:520:25:55

He's cured it like bacon and then pan-fried it.

0:25:550:25:59

Right, what shall I start?

0:25:590:26:00

Well, I'd start with the bit you like best.

0:26:000:26:02

I can't speak, I'm so happy.

0:26:080:26:10

If that was the answer to shutting you up...

0:26:130:26:16

Breast of lamb is the answer to shutting me up.

0:26:160:26:18

It's fantastic. It's really tasty.

0:26:180:26:20

If you were going to visit this part of England, to my mind, this is

0:26:210:26:26

what you want to eat, cos this is all the local ingredients.

0:26:260:26:30

Put together in a really interesting way.

0:26:300:26:32

And it shut you up. Yes!

0:26:320:26:34

Rafael's delicious lamb and vegetable dish

0:26:390:26:42

has certainly captured a flavour of Kent.

0:26:420:26:44

Time to work off our meal with a unique Kentish pastime, and Brian,

0:26:540:26:58

you're going to be pleased to know it entails a visit to the local pub.

0:26:580:27:02

-Right, Brian.

-Yes, why are we here?

0:27:020:27:04

We're here because I play tennis down the end of the road,

0:27:040:27:08

but I've heard there's a local game called bat and trap.

0:27:080:27:11

-Yeah, yeah.

-We're going to play it here.

0:27:110:27:13

Bat and trap is a traditional Kent pub game played between

0:27:200:27:24

two teams of up to eight members using a special wooden trap box.

0:27:240:27:28

It's an ancestor of cricket,

0:27:310:27:33

and the local league have been playing here since 1921.

0:27:330:27:36

Team member Sue Potts has invited us to join them for a game.

0:27:370:27:41

SPECTATORS: Yay!

0:27:410:27:43

-Hello there.

-Hello there.

0:27:450:27:47

-Hi, Sue.

-Welcome to the Market Inn.

0:27:470:27:50

Right, I want to know the history of bat and trap.

0:27:500:27:54

It's mainly a Kentish game.

0:27:540:27:56

-It's been going for over 100 years.

-How many teams in the league?

0:27:560:28:00

-In the men's there's four divisions.

-Four divisions?!

0:28:000:28:04

And there's two divisions in the ladies, yeah.

0:28:040:28:06

So that's more popular than cricket round here.

0:28:060:28:08

BRIAN LAUGHS

0:28:080:28:09

It is a very popular summer game, yeah.

0:28:090:28:12

And is it always played in pubs?

0:28:120:28:13

There are some social clubs that have it,

0:28:130:28:16

-but it's mainly a pub game, yeah.

-How long does the game last?

0:28:160:28:21

Er, well it depends how drunk you get really.

0:28:210:28:23

Some games here, they start at eight o'clock,

0:28:250:28:28

we're playing at midnight.

0:28:280:28:29

How are we going to pick teams?

0:28:310:28:32

Let's have men versus women, cos I can sense the women are very good.

0:28:320:28:36

You are so competitive, do you know that?

0:28:360:28:39

-I will do...

-You're desperate to show that you're equal.

0:28:390:28:41

-But anyway, moving on.

-Brian, we're not equal, we're superior.

0:28:410:28:45

-Equality would be a backward step.

-Well, exactly, right, let's do this.

0:28:450:28:50

To play the game, a batter strikes a lever

0:28:500:28:52

to propel a ball into the air and hits it towards two high posts

0:28:520:28:56

at the other end of the pitch.

0:28:560:28:58

A fielder then returns the ball, attempting to bowl the batsman out

0:28:580:29:02

by knocking over a small square at the front of the trap.

0:29:020:29:05

I'm going to go first, right, just one second.

0:29:070:29:09

-Right.

-Team talk, team talk...

0:29:090:29:11

THEY TALK IN HUSHED TONES

0:29:110:29:13

Get on with it!

0:29:130:29:15

Ah! Useless.

0:29:170:29:20

Oh, that's looking good,

0:29:200:29:22

that's looking good... Oh!

0:29:220:29:24

-So, do we get a run?

-Yeah, that's one run.

0:29:240:29:26

I think we should stop now.

0:29:260:29:28

..me other leg.

0:29:280:29:31

Oh, it's a good shot, is that, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah...

0:29:310:29:34

Oh!

0:29:340:29:35

Robbed, robbed!

0:29:350:29:38

LAUGHTER

0:29:420:29:45

Out, out, out, out!

0:29:450:29:48

-Ohhhh....

-Yes, yes, yes!

0:29:540:29:59

-Right.

-Change ends.

-Change ends.

0:30:010:30:03

So, we got 24 points, yeah?

0:30:030:30:05

JANET SCOFFS

0:30:050:30:06

Agh!

0:30:130:30:14

Oh, that was rubbish, absolute rubbish.

0:30:160:30:19

No.

0:30:270:30:29

Oh, no! Oh, that is so sad(!)

0:30:310:30:34

'With the score at level pegging,

0:30:460:30:48

'it's all down to the final throw from the men's team.'

0:30:480:30:52

Yes, that's the man, well done, that man.

0:30:540:30:58

-Well played, team, huh?

-That's it.

0:30:580:31:01

I didn't understand the scoring, but I thought we had a moral victory.

0:31:010:31:04

LAUGHTER

0:31:040:31:05

But well done, girls, sorry about that,

0:31:070:31:09

-can we buy you a drink, please?

-Don't patronise me.

0:31:090:31:11

-Would you like...?

-You might have won,

0:31:110:31:14

but it wasn't much of a victory.

0:31:140:31:15

-I missed that, what did you say?

-Threadbare.

0:31:150:31:17

-What did you say? Ladies, can we buy you a drink, please?

-Yes, certainly.

0:31:170:31:20

Let's go in the pub, we'll follow you, you know

0:31:200:31:22

-where it is. Let's go then, come on, guys.

-I'm not happy.

0:31:220:31:25

Milk the audience, milk the audience, milk the audience.

0:31:250:31:28

-I'm not happy, you were rubbish, Brian.

-Thank you very much.

0:31:280:31:31

Well, well done, team, thanks very much. Good game, good game.

0:31:320:31:35

-Congratulations.

-Cheers, Janet.

0:31:350:31:37

You're still rubbish.

0:31:380:31:40

I still have to decide what to cook for my celebratory taste of Kent.

0:31:470:31:51

The climate and rich soil here has helped the county have

0:31:520:31:55

a long heritage of producing top-quality cherries.

0:31:550:31:58

So we've come to Brogdale Farm in Faversham.

0:31:580:32:01

Its home to the National Fruits Collection,

0:32:010:32:04

the largest collection of fruit trees in the world.

0:32:040:32:08

And guide Mike Austin is going to show us around.

0:32:080:32:11

Mike, how many varieties of fruit have you got here altogether?

0:32:110:32:15

On the whole collection, there's over 4,000 varieties.

0:32:150:32:18

-My goodness, so what about cherries?

-Cherries, about 320 varieties.

0:32:180:32:21

We don't see that many varieties of cherries in the shops.

0:32:250:32:28

-No, you certainly don't.

-So it's a bit like a living museum?

0:32:280:32:31

It is, yeah, we try to conserve the varieties

0:32:310:32:34

and stop them from dying out. We have two of each variety.

0:32:340:32:37

And that's really a bit of a safety valve

0:32:370:32:39

in case one gets a bit sick, we can propagate another one.

0:32:390:32:42

If there's any gaps in the orchard, there'll be another one

0:32:420:32:45

in the nursery, so there's always two trees all the time.

0:32:450:32:48

There's plenty out here to try, some of the very old varieties

0:32:500:32:52

are very small, and as you sort of go to the Victorian era,

0:32:520:32:57

they get twice as big, and then to the 20th century,

0:32:570:33:00

they get bigger still.

0:33:000:33:01

-Well, let's go up in the orchard and try some.

-OK.

0:33:010:33:03

-So what's this one?

-This is great bigarreau.

0:33:060:33:09

-Great bigarreau, that's a French name, is it?

-Yeah.

0:33:090:33:12

Yeah, "bigarreau" tends to mean a firm cherry,

0:33:120:33:15

-so it's got a bit of crunch to it.

-It's got lovely flavour.

0:33:150:33:18

-Mmm.

-That's very nice and sweet, that.

0:33:180:33:21

So this is going to be more like the modern varieties,

0:33:210:33:24

more commercial size.

0:33:240:33:26

Well, I have to cook this dish, a celebration dish,

0:33:270:33:32

and I have to say, cherries are now figuring big in this.

0:33:320:33:35

This looks to me like the kind of cherry that I want to cook

0:33:350:33:38

a dessert, so is there any way we can pick plenty of these?

0:33:380:33:41

-Well, if we go to the commercial block.

-Right.

0:33:410:33:44

Where we've got more modern varieties, they'll be very similar

0:33:440:33:47

in size, maybe a little bit bigger than these

0:33:470:33:49

and, er, good flavour as well.

0:33:490:33:51

-Perfect.

-So we can try those.

-Lead on, sir.

-Right.

0:33:510:33:54

Come on then, girl. Go.

0:34:020:34:04

The cherry picking Queen.

0:34:060:34:09

Right.

0:34:090:34:11

Don't bounce them in there, I'm going to use them!

0:34:110:34:13

(LAUGHING) I've got half a tree here.

0:34:160:34:18

Did you ever do this when you were a kid for not a lot of money?

0:34:180:34:21

No, I picked blackberries with my mum.

0:34:210:34:24

I've got a history of picking, we just picked every day.

0:34:240:34:27

We would go out...

0:34:270:34:29

Was that cos of economics or just cos it was easy to do?

0:34:290:34:32

No, because we had no money. Brian, I can't hear you getting any.

0:34:320:34:35

Cos I'm doing it silently.

0:34:350:34:38

-Agh!

-Don't fall.

0:34:390:34:41

No, it's not me, it's the cherries.

0:34:410:34:43

If you fall, can you just throw the cherries to me?

0:34:430:34:46

-Right, I've got loads.

-Yeah, I've got enough, let's go.

0:34:460:34:50

Got enough for a cake for me anyway.

0:34:500:34:52

Oh, you got a lot more than me, look.

0:34:540:34:57

Mine look riper, by the way... Those are rubbish!

0:34:570:35:00

-You haven't picked ripe ones!

-I have, I have.

0:35:000:35:02

-I've selected dark ones.

-Come on, they'll be fine,

0:35:020:35:05

-I'm going to colour them up.

-Just cook mine separately.

0:35:050:35:08

Now Brian's found the perfect star ingredient for our

0:35:110:35:14

celebratory dish, it's time for him

0:35:140:35:16

to impress us with his taste of Kent.

0:35:160:35:19

I've rounded up some locals we've met on our journey

0:35:190:35:22

to give us their verdict.

0:35:220:35:24

A beautiful day here in Kent.

0:35:240:35:26

All these lovely people who we met on our trip,

0:35:260:35:29

and our cherries, Mike, that we picked very carefully.

0:35:290:35:32

-Look at that.

-Local honey.

-Local Kent honey.

0:35:320:35:35

And we've got this, this is a cherry liqueur made by our chef

0:35:350:35:39

over here for the last six years. This is wonderful.

0:35:390:35:42

Well, what are you making for us?

0:35:420:35:44

What I'm going to make is a very simple cherry dessert.

0:35:440:35:47

It's like a mille-feuille, but we call it a cream slice.

0:35:470:35:51

-All right, OK, so it's a posh cream slice.

-That's it.

0:35:510:35:55

Well, to get everyone through the waiting period

0:35:550:35:57

I've got Woolly Pig local cider.

0:35:570:36:00

I know it looks like tractor fuel.

0:36:000:36:02

And some, for the teetotallers, a local apple juice.

0:36:020:36:06

So, Brian, I'm going to be a waitress while you get your burners.

0:36:060:36:09

Right, you know what this is, don't you?

0:36:090:36:11

Seen one of these before?

0:36:110:36:13

I don't know. Oh, it's a cherry thing.

0:36:130:36:15

-That's it, it's a cherry stoner, you're quite right.

-Right, OK.

0:36:150:36:19

Oh, no, waitressing is not my first skill.

0:36:190:36:24

Cider! Right, can I hand you the bottle to pass around?

0:36:240:36:28

-You come over here.

-All right, OK.

0:36:280:36:30

-So I can show you what we're doing.

-Right.

0:36:300:36:32

-So we got all the stones out of the cherries.

-How did you do it?

0:36:320:36:35

I did it very quickly.

0:36:350:36:36

-You take the stalk off, the string...

-Yeah.

0:36:360:36:39

..and you just push it like that...

0:36:390:36:41

-and it comes out the bottom.

-Goodness, that's amazing.

0:36:410:36:44

Good, isn't it, eh?

0:36:440:36:46

Right, so I've got these here. Into the pan they go.

0:36:460:36:49

Put some of our liqueur in there, not too much.

0:36:490:36:52

And a little bit of local Kent honey.

0:36:520:36:56

That's all you need, delicious.

0:36:580:36:59

It'll take a little while to cool down,

0:37:020:37:05

so all I do is just get the juice out.

0:37:050:37:08

Over here, see, they're still holding nicely together.

0:37:080:37:11

Then I'm going to put this back in the pan.

0:37:110:37:14

And bring it back up to the boil.

0:37:140:37:17

Right, OK, I'm going to slightly thicken it with some cornflour

0:37:170:37:21

just so it's got that little bit of...what's the word?

0:37:210:37:24

-Sex appeal.

-Fantastic, so it's got that lovely moveability

0:37:240:37:26

about it all.

0:37:260:37:28

The trick is to make plenty of it, but be careful how much you use.

0:37:300:37:35

A bit of water in there.

0:37:350:37:38

And what I'm going to do now is take an orange,

0:37:380:37:42

just to get a little bit of that orange oil.

0:37:420:37:44

-You can smell it as that moves.

-Yeah.

0:37:440:37:46

That oil that's released, it's really delicious.

0:37:460:37:48

And then all you do is just very carefully tip this in.

0:37:480:37:50

Just bring it back to the boil, don't boil it too much

0:37:500:37:53

cos it'll thicken too much and it'll just be...

0:37:530:37:55

-Oh, tastes like glue then.

-It'll look like glue as well.

0:37:550:37:58

Just a little drop in there.

0:37:580:38:00

And it just changes consistency.

0:38:010:38:04

That's all you want, and all we do now, it goes in there.

0:38:050:38:08

Just make it that little bit of nice jammy consistency.

0:38:100:38:13

OK, that's looking good. What we're going to do,

0:38:150:38:18

we're going to mix these with a lovely bit of local double cream.

0:38:180:38:22

-Now...

-A bit?! A gallon of double cream!

0:38:220:38:25

That's not a gallon at all, dear lady.

0:38:250:38:27

Slightly whipped, I'm going to take a little bit of this cream out.

0:38:270:38:30

Cos I want to save a little bit just for going round

0:38:300:38:33

the sides of my little cake.

0:38:330:38:35

So, that, we can use over there.

0:38:350:38:37

And I'm going to mix these together.

0:38:370:38:39

Doesn't that look lovely already?

0:38:430:38:45

OK, so now what we're going to do,

0:38:450:38:48

we've baked some puff pastry here - bought puff pastry.

0:38:480:38:51

So we've got three pieces here now,

0:38:510:38:53

and the idea is we're going to make three layers.

0:38:530:38:55

We're going to make it square. So that's one piece there.

0:38:550:38:59

So we'll try and make this look now...

0:38:590:39:02

-about the same shape.

-Yeah.

0:39:020:39:04

Lots of us that love cream think,

0:39:040:39:06

"Oh, yeah I'm going to put bags in there,

0:39:060:39:07

"it really is going to be excellent."

0:39:070:39:10

-But if you put too much in there, it won't hold together.

-Yeah.

0:39:100:39:13

-On here. Why are you laughing?

-It's like building a building.

0:39:150:39:18

Well, you're an architect, you should know what skills

0:39:180:39:21

-are going into this then?

-Yeah, at the moment it's a bungalow.

-Yeah.

0:39:210:39:24

-All right, yeah.

-And this goes...

0:39:240:39:28

..goes on top.

0:39:310:39:33

I'm just going to take some of this cream now,

0:39:330:39:35

just to coat in-between there, just to fill it.

0:39:350:39:37

Well, you know what it's like when you're building a wall.

0:39:370:39:40

Right, now. Chef, can I borrow you a second?

0:39:400:39:42

Would you like to come and stand here?

0:39:420:39:44

This wind is blowing up this way, so will you come

0:39:440:39:46

and stand by my side here please, Chef?

0:39:460:39:47

-Will you come and stand over here by me?

-What am I, a human...?

0:39:470:39:50

Yeah, I know, we are humans. This is icing sugar.

0:39:500:39:52

-Yeah, you don't want it to blow.

-And I don't want it to go all over

0:39:520:39:55

these people over here. It's all right you people laughing, eh?

0:39:550:39:57

If someone knows how to stop that wind. Right, just pull in.

0:39:570:40:01

Are you ready? Here we go.

0:40:010:40:03

-Agh!

-See what I mean?

0:40:030:40:06

I mean, it's going to be OK, we're there, we're there.

0:40:060:40:09

Ladies and gentlemen, weren't they great?

0:40:100:40:11

Give them a round of applause,

0:40:110:40:13

they've done a great job. Thank you, Chef.

0:40:130:40:15

So, now what I'm going to do is just use this over here now...

0:40:150:40:19

to just gently score across there, that nice little...

0:40:190:40:23

bit of a pattern.

0:40:230:40:25

So now all we need to do is to put this cherry slice together.

0:40:280:40:33

-Need a doyley.

-A doyley?!

0:40:330:40:36

-Where's your doyley?

-When was the last time you...?

0:40:360:40:39

..your doyley?!

0:40:390:40:41

So all we do is put those, a pile of cherries on there,

0:40:410:40:47

so no-one has to say, "What's in that, missus?

0:40:470:40:51

"What's in there?"

0:40:510:40:53

And I'm going to just take a little bit of juice here,

0:40:530:40:55

if I can find some.

0:40:550:40:57

So there you are, duchess, you have it, my Brogdale cherry slice.

0:40:570:41:01

APPLAUSE

0:41:010:41:02

-Thank you.

-Have you got a spoon?

0:41:100:41:11

No, I'll just do it with my fingers.

0:41:110:41:13

-Oh! Just missed your shirt.

-Hm, hm.

0:41:160:41:20

-What do you think?

-Beautiful, delicious.

0:41:210:41:24

Thank you very much.

0:41:240:41:26

Right, may I invite all of you to come and have a slice?

0:41:260:41:30

Get in there. Right, there you go.

0:41:300:41:33

-Mike, that's your cherry...

-Thank you very much.

0:41:360:41:38

What I like about it is it hasn't got a load of sugar.

0:41:400:41:44

So you've got the hint of the honey, you've got the natural sugars

0:41:440:41:47

from the fruit and you got that little burned sugar taste

0:41:470:41:51

from the icing sugar, so all in all, it's a very lovely pudding.

0:41:510:41:55

A very lovely pudding. You'll make his ears burn.

0:41:550:41:58

Now, cherry man, what do you reckon?

0:41:580:42:01

Really delicious. Brings out the full flavour of the cherry.

0:42:010:42:05

-Yeah?

-Mixed with the cream... delicious.

0:42:050:42:07

So, we've had great weather and a great trip

0:42:120:42:15

round this part of Kent.

0:42:150:42:17

We started off on the estuary, the junction, Faversham Creek

0:42:170:42:21

and the Thames Estuary, I showed you Faversham.

0:42:210:42:24

What a fantastically historical town.

0:42:240:42:26

It's got a unique history, it's also unique that

0:42:260:42:28

there's a lady producing snails in this part, it's fantastic.

0:42:280:42:32

-And of course, here at Brogdale, the cherries.

-Yeah.

0:42:320:42:35

And there's nowhere else like this in the country

0:42:350:42:38

with this amount of fruit all grown in one spot.

0:42:380:42:41

The only downside...

0:42:410:42:44

of the whole visit was that moment with that game that

0:42:440:42:48

I can't even bring myself to say, will you just stop gloating?

0:42:480:42:53

Oh, has anyone ever told you how unattractive gloating is?

0:42:530:42:57

I never said a word, cos all I'd like to say is -

0:42:570:42:59

cherries, Brogdale, a taste of Kent.

0:42:590:43:03

This episode sees Taste of Britain in one of Janet's favourite places in the country - Kent. Starting on the Oare Marshes, Janet takes Brian on a tour of the ancient town of Faversham before visiting one of the UK's only snail farms. Inspired by the gastropods, Brian cooks a snail frittata before Janet takes Brian to the Goods Shed in Canterbury.

A walk through the South Swale nature reserve is Janet's treat before she joins Brian back at the Goods Shed, where chef Rafael Lopez uses local ingredients to create a lunch of lamb cutlets with vegetables.

A quick game of bat and trap sees Brian victorious before heading off to Brogdale at peak cherry season. Inspired, Brian bakes a stunning cherry pastry cake.