Comeback Cuisine Food & Drink


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Comeback Cuisine

Tom Kerridge is joined by fellow Michelin-starred chef Raymond Blanc to cook two dishes using ingredients that have fallen out of flavour.


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This is the age of reinvention. Everything is back...

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..'80s music, platform shoes, flares, tank tops

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and best of all, fantastic food and drink.

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This show is all about bringing back classic food and drink

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too good to be forgotten.

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We're going all out to dig out the best in comeback cuisine.

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'As part of BBC Two's food season,

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'we're cooking up a nostalgia-filled feast,

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'made with great ingredients that deserve a revival.

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'And who better to reminisce with than Raymond Blanc?

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'He always puts good taste above passing fads.'

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Hey, Chef!

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'He's making the case for a souffle,

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'made with a very unfashionable ingredient...'

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Semolina was one of my many fondest memories.

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I am so sorry for you, because obviously you spent your childhood

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having some terrible, bad food, OK?

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THEY LAUGH

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'..and the heat is on, for me to save an old favourite

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'from the history books.'

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It's the flavour of lamb, but more.

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It's a very cheap protein and absolutely delicious.

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'Chef Andy Bates unearths a wartime staple

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'that's fallen out of favour...'

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-Oh, it's very good, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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'..while Joe Wadsack takes us back in time

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'with a crazy drinks match...'

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I think that would go quite well with the brain.

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It's the perfect comeback cuisine, isn't it, really?

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'..before we discover whose creation deserves a second chance.'

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Another four-star Michelin day.

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No less. Absolument.

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Welcome to Food & Drink.

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MUSIC: Superstition by Stevie Wonder

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'Just like with music, clothes and hair styles,

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'food fashions are constantly changing -

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'but style goes in cycles

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'and the old classics are back.'

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Never heard of him.

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'Nostalgia food is big business.

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'Sales of British groceries are growing

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'at twice the rate of their international competitors,

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'with retro brands leading the way.'

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A dozen fresh eggs, please. Thank you.

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Amazing.

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'So tonight, we're reviving old school recipes,

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'as I take on a chef with an OBE for his contribution to food.

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'It's my toughest challenge yet.'

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It's an honour to have the great chef Raymond Blanc in my kitchen.

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What are you cooking?

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What I'm going to do today is a beautiful dish, OK,

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which is really connected with my childhood, with my mum.

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Mum was a great cook and she would do a beautiful souffle of semolina,

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with baked apples within it.

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Wow, that sounds fantastic -

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and you think the Great British apple

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and semolina both need reviving?

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I think so. Most kids have got terrible views of semolina,

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but semolina is absolutely brilliant.

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Takes three minutes of your life to cook - plus, it's tasty.

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We need a revival of the British apple.

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I'm so sad when I go into supermarkets and barely see

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one or two British apples,

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when there's so many of them which are magnificent.

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'So it takes a Frenchman to champion the great British apple,

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'with a semolina souffle.

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'Touche, Monsieur Blanc.

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'This British boy is taking him on his own game,

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'with two classics from across the Channel.

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'Gratin with a turnip twist and a sauce gribiche

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'or posh tartare sauce,

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'to accompany my under-loved butcher's favourite, mutton -

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'and school dinner staple, cabbage.'

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This is a moment I've dreamt of for a very long time.

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I actually remember, there was a period

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when I first started being a chef.

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I was 18 years old and I wrote a letter to the Manoir,

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dreaming one day of being able to work with the great Raymond Blanc

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and I received a letter back from you, saying that

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you're not taking on any new commis chefs for at least 18 months

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and my heart was broken.

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Oh, I'm very, very sorry.

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So, for me, you being here today

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is making up for that letter coming 23 years ago.

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HE LAUGHS

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'But as I get my breadcrumb crust for my mutton ready,

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'I'm starting to realise that I should be careful what I wish for.'

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-OK, I need a bin.

-At the end, at the end here.

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-Tom, can I have a bin, please? Here, Chef!

-God, so slow!

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-There you go, there you go. Sorry, Chef.

-I thought I was your guest.

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Anything you want, I will quite happily fetch for you,

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it's no problem at all.

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'I'm finally Raymond's trainee chef

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'and his passion is inspiring -

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in this case, for obscure varieties of apples.'

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I'm creating an orchard with 2,500 trees.

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All these apples, which are part of our heritage -

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-I should say your heritage...

-You're reviving the British apple for me?

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Absolutely, but I want to show you, when you choose the wrong apple,

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how they will bake.

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They will collapse into a heap

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and you'll be miserable and then you'll be blaming me for it.

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I wouldn't blame you, Chef. Don't worry. We can blame the oven.

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'So, it's two bad apples up against two good ones -

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'a Blenheim Orange and Raymond's favourite.'

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The Chivers Delight - what a beautiful name.

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1920 heritage British variety.

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'To stop them exploding, he cuts a steam vent in the top,

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'coats them in butter and rolls them in sugar.'

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So, is this a method you learned to cook from grandmother, or... ?

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-My mum. My mum would put it directly like that.

-It looks beautiful.

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It almost looks like a Christmas tree decoration.

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Tres bien.

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What are you doing, Tom? You never tell me what you're doing.

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Yes, so these are mutton chops - like lamb chops, but mutton.

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-Are you a mutton fan?

-Yes, it's very, very good.

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It's the flavour of lamb, but more - it's more intense,

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it's bigger, punchier...

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For home, we should use much more mutton,

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because it's a very cheap protein and absolutely delicious,

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so I'm very much looking forward to your dish.

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'No pressure, then!

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'Whilst my mutton chops rest in the fridge,

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'Raymond gets his apples in for their first bake

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'and he's heating milk to make his semolina,

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'but with two British blokes in their '40s tasting,

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'this could just be his downfall.'

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In this country, at my age,

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you associate semolina with school dinners -

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and that's not always the fondest memories,

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I have to be honest with you.

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I know. I'm so sorry for you, because obviously,

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you spent your childhood having some terrible, bad food, OK?

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For me, semolina was one of my many fondest memories.

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My mum would put raisins inside,

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she would break egg yolk inside and she was absolutely amazing.

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I have to be honest,

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-Mama Blanc sounds like she was an amazing chef.

-An amazing woman, yes.

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'And in keeping with his mum's recipe,

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'Raymond is adding some lovely, rich egg yolks

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'and soaking his raisins in Calvados...'

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Voila - and one for the pot.

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'..classic French apple brandy.'

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Of course, I should've used British apple brandy.

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-Are we any good at making apple brandy?

-Yeah, yeah.

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There's some excellent...

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-Especially in Kent, Sussex...

-Somerset?

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-Somerset is absolutely amazing.

-But you have to say it like...

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-WEST COUNTRY ACCENT:

-Somerset.

-Ah! Go away, you!

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Somerset and cider -

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otherwise no-one will understand what you're saying, Chef.

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40 years I've been here and still, people just manage

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to understand what I'm talking about.

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But I will never get that accent.

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'It just takes practice, Chef -

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'and few pints of cider helps, too.

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'Raymond's might be a recipe handed down from his mum,

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'but to go with my mutton,

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'I'm reviving a vegetable that fell out of fashion

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'way back in the 18th century,

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'when the potato arrived and stole the limelight.'

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Turnip's got that wonderful kind of peppery kick to it as well,

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-hasn't it?

-Delicious.

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Actually, you know creamed horseradish -

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-when you get the jars of creamed horseradish?

-Yeah?

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Most of the substance in that jar is actually turnip, not horseradish.

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It works very, very well with those strong, British flavours.

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'And it works perfectly with some lovely, rich double cream too.

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'Time to get my gratin into the oven and it's a straight swap,

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'as after just 20 minutes' baking,

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'Raymond's apples are ready to come out.'

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Got to be honest, they look lush.

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-The best one, of course...

-They look incredible.

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-Those two are definitely the best.

-That is the Chivers Delight.

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Absolutely amazing, perfect for baking and it's still firm - feel it.

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-Yes.

-And the flavour is amazing.

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That one is completely out.

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Yeah, completely destroyed.

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This is definitely not a good baking apple, is it?

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From looking at this, I've learnt today, Chef. Thank you.

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'Whilst I get au fait with Raymond's apples,

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'Oliver Peyton is lifting the lid on an industry

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'where we were once the pick of the bunch,

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'making top-quality spirits.

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'Until recently, craft distilling had all but disappeared.

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'He's determined to find out

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'if it's a revival worth raising a glass to.

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'Inspired by an explosion of artisan spirit producers in the USA,

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'more than 20 new small-scale distilleries opened in 2014 alone.

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'And as with craft brewing,

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'smaller production runs mean a more unique and specialist product.

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'At one of Suffolk's oldest breweries,

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'Jonathan Adnams turns his beer into top-quality spirits.'

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You start off with beer.

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Does that mean every spirit you make tastes of beer?

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No, but our spirits do have a particular flavour,

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because what we're doing here is, we're making our spirits from malt.

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You can call it beer if you like -

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and you're concentrating that alcohol and in fact,

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separating some alcohols out that you don't want.

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'This beer is then pumped into the still...'

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-It got a bit of a Willy Wonka factor about it, hasn't it?

-Sure does.

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'..where it's heated until the alcohol evaporates,

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'condenses and is collected as a nearly pure spirit.'

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And we're going to separate out the heads and the tails

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-and the hearts...

-Whoa, whoa, whoa! "Heads and tails"? "Hearts?"

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Stop, stop! Keep it simple for me.

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Well, the heads and the tails are the alcohols

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that we don't want in our final spirit drink.

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What we want is the hearts,

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which in the case of vodka is virtually pure ethanol.

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-Happy days!

-Would you like to try some?

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Ah, well... OK, then.

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HE LAUGHS

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OK, so what we've got here is ethanol at 96%,

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which we really don't want to drink, so I'm going to cut that...

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Speak for yourself.

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..with some water.

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Whoa-ho!

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-That'll put hairs on your chest.

-It will indeed.

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'And by making small changes to the distilling process,

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'Jonathan can make everything from vodka and gin, whisky,

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'absinthe and even orange liqueur.

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'Impressive, but does this variety mean

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'he risks compromising on each drink's individual taste?

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'I guess there's only one way to find out.

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'It's a hard life.'

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I'm sweating already.

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This looks very dangerous to me.

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'First up, the vodka.'

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48% alcohol, so that's quite a strong vodka.

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Yeah, really?

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After you get over the strength, it's quite creamy,

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there's quite a smoothness to it there. So yeah, I really like that.

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-Good.

-'Next, a prize-winning gin.'

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This has got an amazing sense of balance to it. Loads of very...

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I think, quite delicate flavours.

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I could definitely knock a few of those back.

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Ha-ha!

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'And finally, red absinthe, coloured with hibiscus leaves.'

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I'm slightly concerned here.

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I'm going to start hallucinating after I drink this. Cheers.

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Cheers, anyway.

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Wow, that's bursting with flavour.

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It's a much more rounded flavour than I'm used to from absinthe, you know?

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A lot of absinthe is a little bit rougher, isn't it?

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Yeah. We don't have a rule book to be governed by

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and so, we've been trying to walk our own path.

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'And that's where craft distilling really comes into its own.

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'The freedom to be creative with flavours and balance

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'gives distillers like Jonathan an edge

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'over their big commercial competitors.'

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MUSIC: It's Not Unusual by Tom Jones

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'From one top-quality tipple to our very own whirlwind of wine.

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'Bring it on, Joe!'

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There's nothing cooler than retro, don't forget.

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Nothing cooler than retro.

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'Today, he's digging out a selection of classic drinks

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'to see if they really should be revived.'

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HE LAUGHS

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-A Blue Nun?

-Can I just point out that you have Chef Raymond Blanc here

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and you've just put...

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That is the worst possible wine ever created in the world, ever -

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and in the '70s, that one used to be the most popular in Great Britain.

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-Is it a different wine now?

-It's a different wine.

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It's nearly 100 years old. So this is 30% Riesling now,

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which is a major step up to where it was back in the day -

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and it's a lot less sweet.

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For me, I don't like it.

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-To me, a great taste is sour-sweet...

-There's a tension...

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There's a tension. I feel I'm not warming up to it.

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There are three words here - fresh, crisp and fruity -

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and it is all of those things.

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It's fresh, crisp and fruity.

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For 5.99, it's very hard to find

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any dry whites that are any more interesting than that.

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I think this is a better drink than it used to be.

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-The bottle is nice.

-You're a sweet guy, Tom.

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THEY LAUGH

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'That one might not make a comeback, then.

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'So Joe's going even more retro.'

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-Asti.

-Asti, yeah?

-Asti.

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I remember this being sold as a classy drink -

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as an alternative to champagne, I suppose?

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I think it was, back in the day, to be honest.

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Have a little taste of that.

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Now, it's only 7.5% alcohol,

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-which is actually the trick to why I think it's very nice.

-Oh, really?

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It comes from Piedmont,

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which is the most high production region in Italy

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and 75% of the entire production

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is run by Germans.

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So they send Blue Nun across the world

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-and then import Asti?

-Yeah!

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I think it drinks very well. It's got this lovely Muscat grape behind.

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-It is there, that's what I like.

-I'm not a massive fan.

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It's almost like an elderflower cordial,

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with lemonade and added sugar and it's very, very sweet.

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The thing is, at 7.99, it's extremely high-quality winemaking.

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It actually goes really well with desserts, like fruit puddings,

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-fruitcakes...

-Yeah, it could go.

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That kind of thing, it works terrifically well.

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In a nutshell, if you had to bring one back,

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make it really, really popular again - which one would it be?

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I would go for that one, definitely. Not the Blue Nun.

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I would go Blue Nun, because the bottle is cool.

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'One vote each for Joe's drinks,

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'but I've got a meaty taste test

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'that pushes "comeback" to its limits.'

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Let me just go to the pantry. I have something for you.

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It may just be of interest.

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We have here three foods

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that have fallen out of fashion.

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'Nose to tail is to be a key part of our diets,

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'but will offal ever really be popular again?'

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Can you tell me what it is?

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-It's ox heart?

-Not ox heart, but lamb's heart.

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Absolutely delicious. Really delicious.

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Heart is popular in France?

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Yeah, we've eaten heart.

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As you know, the French have eaten about everything on Earth.

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THEY LAUGH

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That's true.

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-OK, Chef Raymond's gone for the second piece.

-OK...

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Have a little bit.

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Tastes a little bit like kidney?

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-Lungs?

-No, not lungs.

-Is it...

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It is further south than that.

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Am I eating a testicle?

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You are eating a testicle. Yeah, this came from a lamb.

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This is the first time I've tasted the testicles of a lamb.

0:14:430:14:47

-They are delicious.

-Well, I'm surprised.

0:14:470:14:49

OK, and the last piece. Breadcrumbs, deep-fried...

0:14:490:14:53

-The brains.

-It is the brain, it's lamb's brain.

0:14:530:14:55

-Completely stunning, yeah.

-Really?

-Yeah, lamb's brain.

0:14:550:14:58

Soft in the middle and then crunchy on the outside. Very tasty.

0:14:580:15:01

-Well, I never!

-Voila.

-I've always been nervous about eating brain, never tried it before.

0:15:010:15:05

They're all delicious. I'm really surprised. I can't believe

0:15:050:15:07

how much flavour there is on the plate of food.

0:15:070:15:09

-So you're a big fan of bringing these back?

-Yeah, bring them back.

0:15:090:15:12

So maybe we shouldn't say what it is, really. Just enjoy it.

0:15:120:15:15

It's the perfect comeback cuisine, isn't it, really?

0:15:150:15:17

I would prefer my apple souffle.

0:15:170:15:19

'I think I'm with you there, Chef.

0:15:190:15:21

'And Raymond's whipping up a frenzy to get air into his eggs,

0:15:210:15:24

'so his souffle rises perfectly.

0:15:240:15:26

'Not sure why he's trying to bring back manual labour, though.'

0:15:260:15:29

I have got a machine, if you need it, Chef.

0:15:290:15:32

I find everything so magical, you know?

0:15:330:15:35

To see this egg white form up

0:15:350:15:38

and bring these billions of bubbles of air inside...

0:15:380:15:40

I think it's beautiful and I like a bit of exercise as well,

0:15:400:15:44

-to keep me fit.

-Yeah, to keep you fit.

0:15:440:15:46

A little bit of egg white exercise.

0:15:460:15:49

'And once the eggs reach the right consistency...'

0:15:490:15:51

Voila.

0:15:510:15:53

Yes, that's beautiful.

0:15:530:15:54

'..Raymond combines it with his semolina.'

0:15:540:15:57

That whole souffle takes about one third to lighten the base.

0:15:580:16:02

If you try to put all of them together,

0:16:020:16:04

you will lose a lot of lifting power.

0:16:040:16:06

'Before you know it, he's ready to throw his apples into the mix -

0:16:090:16:12

'not literally, obviously.'

0:16:120:16:13

So, just a little bit of icing sugar,

0:16:150:16:17

to create a crust on both the apples and the souffle.

0:16:170:16:21

Amazing. Well, this is a dream come true for me,

0:16:210:16:23

seeing a master at work.

0:16:230:16:25

'Time for my sauce gribiche, which is kind of like tartare sauce,

0:16:260:16:30

'but for meat - and starts with a base of grated duck eggs.'

0:16:300:16:33

That's a great, classic sauce really.

0:16:360:16:38

Wonderful textures inside the capers, the gherkins, the vinegar, you know?

0:16:380:16:42

All that is so alive.

0:16:420:16:43

'Then it's just finished off with mustard powder,

0:16:430:16:46

'paprika and olive oil.

0:16:460:16:48

'We've been in love with French cooking for years,

0:16:480:16:50

'but finally, we're starting to get some affection back.'

0:16:500:16:53

The French now are discovering new British dishes, like crumble.

0:16:530:16:56

-The whole of France is crumbling at the moment.

-Really?

0:16:560:16:58

The whole of France is crumbling? In a good way?

0:16:580:17:01

-I think it's quite lovely, as well...

-For me,

0:17:010:17:03

crumble is one of the greatest British childhood favourites -

0:17:030:17:06

something that we absolutely love.

0:17:060:17:07

MUSIC: Superfly by Curtis Mayfield

0:17:070:17:09

'And finally, it's time to get

0:17:090:17:11

'Raymond's apple and semolina souffle in the oven to bake.'

0:17:110:17:15

My mama, she used to do a tiny dash of butter on the top of the apples.

0:17:150:17:20

Voila. C'est bien.

0:17:200:17:22

So, when we actually eat this, Chef,

0:17:220:17:24

will you be 100% honest with me

0:17:240:17:27

and tell me if it was as good as your mum's?

0:17:270:17:29

No food never tastes better than it is when it's cooked at home.

0:17:290:17:32

-Remember that, Tom.

-Nothing as good as your mum's roast dinner, is it?

0:17:320:17:36

'And Mama Blanc's passionate about one meet in particular,

0:17:360:17:39

'that we Brits are fallen out of love with.'

0:17:390:17:42

I kept rabbits in cages...

0:17:420:17:46

and every Sunday, we would have rabbit.

0:17:460:17:48

I know, because I was the one to kill it...

0:17:480:17:51

and peel it, chop it and give it to my mum, who would cook it.

0:17:510:17:55

And I remember, my mum, still today, sitting at the table,

0:17:550:17:59

still having tears in her eyes

0:17:590:18:01

and a smile on her face,

0:18:010:18:03

because she hated the idea of killing the rabbit,

0:18:030:18:06

but she also loved the rabbit flesh.

0:18:060:18:09

-Typical French story.

-Yeah, yeah -

0:18:090:18:11

hated the idea of killing it, but loved the idea of cooking it!

0:18:110:18:15

'We used to eat rabbit like we now eat chicken in this country -

0:18:150:18:18

'and Chef Andy Bates wants to get to the bottom of where

0:18:180:18:21

'it all went wrong for the British bunny.'

0:18:210:18:23

There's an abundant supply of fresh, wild meat

0:18:230:18:26

that's just not being used...

0:18:260:18:28

..rabbit.

0:18:290:18:30

They're everywhere

0:18:300:18:32

and those bunnies, they just keep on breeding.

0:18:320:18:34

We couldn't get enough of rabbit during the war.

0:18:350:18:38

It wasn't rationed and it was delicious,

0:18:380:18:41

but when life got back to normal,

0:18:410:18:42

rabbit was a reminder of hard times and our tastes changed.

0:18:420:18:46

Chef Tim Adams has been shooting and cooking wild rabbit for years -

0:18:460:18:49

and he's determined to see it back on our dinner plates.

0:18:490:18:52

What is it that's so good about eating rabbit?

0:18:520:18:55

Well, in a nutshell - very, very, very tasty,

0:18:550:18:58

very healthy food to eat - very low in fat, high in vitamins...

0:18:580:19:01

What could be better than that?

0:19:010:19:02

There's no shortage of rabbit in the UK, that's for sure.

0:19:020:19:05

A conservative estimate would be about 40 million individuals.

0:19:050:19:08

People are paying money to control rabbits as pests.

0:19:080:19:11

That meat should be used - it's criminal to waste it.

0:19:110:19:14

Before you get too excited,

0:19:150:19:17

I'm not suggesting you go out there and shoot your own rabbits.

0:19:170:19:20

Butchers and supermarkets stock it

0:19:200:19:22

and Tim is determined to show me what I've been missing out on.

0:19:220:19:25

Rabbit - lagomorph - four-legged animal, same as a lamb,

0:19:270:19:30

same as a cow, same as a pig, so it has all those same body parts.

0:19:300:19:33

You can treat it in a similar way.

0:19:330:19:35

So there's actually quite a lot of meat on it, isn't there?

0:19:350:19:38

Yeah, I mean, there's no reason that a medium-sized rabbit

0:19:380:19:40

shouldn't feed two to three people. And it's cheap, too.

0:19:400:19:43

Three or four pounds,

0:19:430:19:44

even for an oven-ready rabbit from the butcher's shop.

0:19:440:19:47

Tim, what are we going to cook today?

0:19:470:19:48

Very, very quick little pasta dish.

0:19:480:19:50

Tim, I think you're showing a really good method of just...

0:19:500:19:53

no fuss, simple, delicious cooking, mate.

0:19:530:19:56

Start with good ingredients,

0:19:560:19:58

you're in a winning situation straightaway, aren't you?

0:19:580:20:00

A few chilli flakes...

0:20:000:20:01

They're quite brutal, these ones, so I won't go too mad.

0:20:010:20:04

And then, a little bit of that smoked paprika.

0:20:040:20:06

So, a good tip if you're buying rabbits -

0:20:060:20:08

don't necessarily go for the biggest one.

0:20:080:20:10

A general rule of thumb - the younger the rabbit,

0:20:100:20:12

the more tender and sweeter and then, as you go up,

0:20:120:20:14

they get bigger and older,

0:20:140:20:16

the tougher they become and the more flavoursome.

0:20:160:20:18

So, this is from the leg? So, does it cook like a chicken thigh?

0:20:180:20:21

Yeah, it's a really good comparison to draw, actually.

0:20:210:20:23

The only difference is, there's hardly any fat.

0:20:230:20:26

-In with the mushrooms?

-Definitely.

-Look at them.

0:20:280:20:30

So, the rabbit's been rested and it's just cooked now, isn't it?

0:20:300:20:33

Yeah, right on the brink, but that's perfect,

0:20:330:20:35

because when we toss it through the hot dish with the mushrooms and the pasta,

0:20:350:20:38

-that's going to finish off beautifully.

-God, it smells so good.

0:20:380:20:41

And the great thing with simple food like this is, there's no faffing about, is there?

0:20:410:20:45

We can just chuck it straight in the bowl, easy-peasy.

0:20:450:20:47

'So, rabbit pasta - it's a new one on me. Time to taste.'

0:20:470:20:50

Tim, bon appetit.

0:20:500:20:51

-Oh, it's very good, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:20:540:20:57

As long as you're happy, I'm happy.

0:20:570:20:59

You've absolutely nailed it.

0:20:590:21:00

This whole perception that wild rabbit is tough,

0:21:000:21:03

overpoweringly-strong...

0:21:030:21:05

Not at all, when you cook it like this.

0:21:050:21:08

-And none of this is going to waste, right?

-No, no! Tuck in!

0:21:080:21:10

'While Raymond's souffle is gently rising in the oven,

0:21:130:21:16

'it's time I got my breaded mutton chops on to fry.

0:21:160:21:19

'But cooking isn't usually a spectator sport.'

0:21:190:21:22

It's not easy dish, and I feel a little bit more under pressure

0:21:220:21:25

with the fact that you're stood opposite and looking at me.

0:21:250:21:28

What you're doing is very tricky.

0:21:280:21:30

Because of course, breadcrumbs are going to colour.

0:21:300:21:33

Will they colour before the mutton is cooked?

0:21:330:21:35

And you're doing it exactly right, because it feels right.

0:21:350:21:38

You can hear it, it's just right.

0:21:380:21:40

It's a gentle, gentle searing, not fast.

0:21:400:21:44

Ah, the softening of the butter...

0:21:440:21:46

You could be French, you know, Tom?

0:21:460:21:48

-I know, yeah!

-There's a bit of French in you.

0:21:480:21:50

I think you must come from Normandy.

0:21:500:21:53

-Just a cross...

-I will go for Normandy. I'm quite happy with that.

0:21:530:21:57

For me, French cuisine is the greatest in the world -

0:21:570:22:00

and I'm not just saying that because you're there. So, I'm almost ready.

0:22:000:22:03

Your souffle's almost ready?

0:22:030:22:04

Yeah, ready in exactly 1 minute and 47 seconds.

0:22:040:22:08

'Who said cooking isn't an exact science?

0:22:080:22:11

'Time to get my cabbage going -

0:22:110:22:12

'and to take it away from

0:22:120:22:14

'the overcooked school dinner mush I remember,

0:22:140:22:16

'I'm frying mine off in onions, garlic and some modern trimmings.

0:22:160:22:20

-'And just in time, too.'

-If it's undercooked, it will collapse.

0:22:200:22:23

If it's overcooked, it will collapse.

0:22:230:22:25

If it's perfectly cooked, it will stay at least five minutes.

0:22:250:22:28

OK, so we have five minutes to get this served up?

0:22:280:22:31

-OK.

-I'm showing off a bit here.

0:22:310:22:33

Allez, Monsieur!

0:22:330:22:34

That looks amazing.

0:22:340:22:36

Lovely. Mama Blanc would be proud.

0:22:360:22:38

Mama Blanc would be proud.

0:22:380:22:40

My mum is 92 years of age and still, today she is very active.

0:22:400:22:44

Actually, in the kitchen, that's her kitchen and I know it.

0:22:440:22:48

-I think it looks fantastic.

-Thank you, Tom. Thank you very much.

0:22:480:22:50

I'll pass that on to my mum, definitely.

0:22:500:22:53

'Time to serve up.

0:22:530:22:55

'My comeback dish revives three classic foods -

0:22:550:22:57

'mutton, cabbage and turnips -

0:22:570:22:59

'and all that's left is to

0:22:590:23:01

'put a spoonful of my sauce gribiche on the side and I'm ready.

0:23:010:23:05

'Let's hope Judge Joe has brought his appetite with him.'

0:23:050:23:08

Voila.

0:23:080:23:10

Looks stunning, stunning.

0:23:100:23:11

I think we're going to go with dessert first,

0:23:110:23:14

just because it's a souffle and its Mama Blanc's souffle.

0:23:140:23:16

The smell coming from that is fantastic.

0:23:160:23:19

Voila. That's for you.

0:23:190:23:22

Look at me. Look at me, look at you.

0:23:220:23:24

So who needs the big one, who needs the small one?

0:23:240:23:27

Wow, that apple is phenomenal.

0:23:270:23:29

The Chivers Delight, for me, is the best.

0:23:290:23:31

-You know what is missing here, guys?

-Custard?

-Give me some custard.

0:23:310:23:35

Where's your custard, Tom? Can't believe it!

0:23:350:23:38

Sorry, Chef.

0:23:380:23:39

Well, I think that's fantastic.

0:23:390:23:41

The way the souffle and the apple almost become the same texture.

0:23:410:23:44

But it's amazing - inside the apple,

0:23:440:23:45

it's got a sweet, tangy succulence.

0:23:450:23:48

Look at these colours, look at these colours...

0:23:480:23:50

-It's like a tequila sunrise.

-..how beautiful it is.

0:23:500:23:53

Now, I've got something interesting to go this.

0:23:530:23:55

In keeping with the whole retro kind of feel of the show,

0:23:550:23:58

I'm hoping a can of Merrydown cider.

0:23:580:24:01

Principally, the most important reason why I've chosen it today -

0:24:010:24:04

apart from the fact it was

0:24:040:24:05

what I drank with my girlfriend at university -

0:24:050:24:08

is it's made from English eating apples.

0:24:080:24:10

It's not made from cider apples, so it has that taste.

0:24:100:24:13

We invite Raymond Blanc over to our pad

0:24:130:24:15

and you give him Blue Nun, Asti and a can of cider?

0:24:150:24:18

A can of Merrydown!

0:24:180:24:19

I'm not easily offended, OK? So just drink your cider.

0:24:190:24:22

-How much do you pay for that?

-This is £2 a can.

0:24:240:24:27

It's a lot of money for me, for very little flavour.

0:24:270:24:31

Well, I think this is much, much better

0:24:310:24:32

than your average session-drinking cider. And actually,

0:24:320:24:35

there's a nice story behind this. It came from East Sussex.

0:24:350:24:37

It was three guys who learnt to make wine

0:24:370:24:39

when they were prisoners of war in the Second World War.

0:24:390:24:42

In 1946, they came back and they started to make apple wine.

0:24:420:24:45

So, this was one of the first ciders in England

0:24:450:24:47

that was slightly stronger than the others -

0:24:470:24:50

-there were trying to make something a bit special.

-What strength is it?

0:24:500:24:53

No, no, I love your cider. The story is amazing, I'm buying into it...

0:24:530:24:56

THEY LAUGH

0:24:560:24:57

Let's all drink to those three blokes, OK?

0:24:570:24:59

-It's 6%, so it's a little bit stronger.

-Three lovely old men.

0:24:590:25:02

'A good story saves the day. Nice work, Joe.

0:25:020:25:05

'Next, my breaded mutton, cabbage and turnip gratin.

0:25:050:25:08

'Anyone know a good turnip story?'

0:25:080:25:10

Am I allowed to pick it up and eat it by the stick?

0:25:100:25:12

-Of course you are, like a caveman.

-Well, kind of.

0:25:120:25:15

-Oh, wow.

-The turnips are amazing.

0:25:150:25:18

Really, the turnip gives a lovely bittersweet flavour.

0:25:180:25:20

-It's really stunning.

-We used to think the turnips aren't nice.

0:25:200:25:23

When you went to school, it was all horribly over-stewed.

0:25:230:25:26

This is so far away from all of that. It's beautiful and velvety.

0:25:260:25:30

Oh, no. Here is the main... A piece de resistance.

0:25:300:25:34

Let's see if you like the mutton.

0:25:340:25:35

That's perfectly cooked, OK? You don't want something medium rare.

0:25:380:25:41

No, mutton mustn't be overcooked.

0:25:410:25:43

-It's lovely. It's very lovely.

-Can you taste the difference?

0:25:450:25:48

-Does it taste like lamb, but more?

-In a really good way, I think.

0:25:480:25:51

I mean, I've always been a bit scared of really strong-tasting lamb.

0:25:510:25:54

The one thing I would say - lamb, beautiful spring lamb

0:25:540:25:57

is fantastic, but in terms of flavour-wise,

0:25:570:25:59

this is bigger and stronger.

0:25:590:26:01

The cabbage is essential here, isn't it?

0:26:010:26:03

It's crunchy, it's lively, it's full of flavour.

0:26:030:26:06

That's almost my favourite bit.

0:26:060:26:08

Most importantly to me, what do you make of the sauce gribiche?

0:26:080:26:12

Stunning. Absolutely...

0:26:120:26:13

I've done an Escoffier classic for a great French chef

0:26:130:26:16

-and he said "stunning".

-How great is that?

0:26:160:26:18

I can go home with my head held high.

0:26:180:26:20

There's one thing missing though, I reckon, that could improve it.

0:26:200:26:23

-Custard?

-A nice glass of red.

-Ah, a nice glass of red!

0:26:230:26:27

There was a time I remember when I was growing up,

0:26:270:26:29

when the first bottle of wine on any menu - in a bistro,

0:26:290:26:31

in a pub or a restaurant - would be an ordinary claret.

0:26:310:26:34

A Bordeaux red, basically. I found one which I think is amazing.

0:26:340:26:37

Just 7.99 from a wine merchant.

0:26:370:26:39

I wouldn't say it's that easy to find -

0:26:390:26:41

a decent bottle of Bordeaux under a tenner anywhere.

0:26:410:26:44

But what do you think?

0:26:440:26:46

That's a good smell. Good colour, good scent.

0:26:460:26:49

There's a lot going on in there. This wine is now seven years old.

0:26:490:26:52

So, it's got flavour.

0:26:520:26:54

The flavours are nicely rounded.

0:26:540:26:56

It's jammy as well, it's not oakey, it's not... It's nicely made.

0:26:560:26:59

Most cheap Bordeaux is actually Merlot-dominated.

0:26:590:27:02

This is about 80% Merlot and Merlot is a great variety for me.

0:27:020:27:06

When it gets mature, it smells and tastes a bit like lamb.

0:27:060:27:09

There's a lamb-iness to it, there's meatiness to it,

0:27:090:27:12

which works so well with mutton.

0:27:120:27:13

It's a lovely wine.

0:27:130:27:15

It's powerful on the smell, really big nose. It's fantastic.

0:27:150:27:19

So what I've done is, I've put other wines that I've found,

0:27:190:27:21

which I think are very good, that are available all over the country

0:27:210:27:24

on the Food & Drink website.

0:27:240:27:25

'And you can have your say online, by voting for your favourite recipe.

0:27:250:27:30

'And you'll find all the recipes from this series, too.'

0:27:300:27:33

Now, this is the key question, Joe.

0:27:330:27:35

Which are you going to choose?

0:27:350:27:37

Are you going to choose the mutton with the cabbage

0:27:370:27:39

and the sauce gribiche,

0:27:390:27:41

or Mama Blanc's semolina souffle?

0:27:410:27:44

-No pressure!

-With a can of cider?

0:27:440:27:46

Tom, if you're chucking the cider in,

0:27:460:27:48

I might give it to Chef Raymond Blanc.

0:27:480:27:50

It is bathed in history, let's be honest.

0:27:500:27:52

HE LAUGHS

0:27:520:27:53

Chef, congratulations. Congratulations.

0:27:530:27:56

Another four-star Michelin day.

0:27:560:27:58

No less. Absolument.

0:27:580:27:59

Now, there's no such thing as "an unfashionable ingredient" -

0:27:590:28:03

just food that's waiting to be rediscovered.

0:28:030:28:05

If it was once flavour of the month, that's because it's delicious.

0:28:050:28:10

OK, shall we have the cheese now? Where's the cheese?

0:28:100:28:13

THEY LAUGH

0:28:130:28:14

'Next time, it's all about trying something new,

0:28:140:28:17

'but Glynn Purnell nearly loses his mind...'

0:28:170:28:19

Have you seen the size of the brain on this cauliflower?

0:28:190:28:22

'..when he puts his brand-new veggie feast

0:28:220:28:24

'up against my cutting-edge lamb.'

0:28:240:28:26

All right... THEY LAUGH

0:28:260:28:29

'..and our creativity threatens to get out of hand.'

0:28:290:28:32

We've created a monster.

0:28:320:28:34

Tom Kerridge is joined by fellow Michelin-starred chef Raymond Blanc to cook two dishes using ingredients that have fallen out of flavour. Raymond recreates a favourite souffle from his childhood using semolina and heritage apples to rival Tom's old-fashioned mutton chops with cabbage and turnip gratin. Oliver Peyton gets the inside track on a distilling revival that's happening right under our noses, and drinks expert Joe Wadsack is pipped to the post when Raymond brings his own drinks match to the table!