Jubilee Royal Recipes


Jubilee

Michael Buerk is joined by chef Anna Haugh to celebrate food created for royal jubilees, including a pudding recipe hidden in the archives for over a hundred years.


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Transcript


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The Royal family are steeped in tradition and, throughout history,

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the Royal tables have showcased culinary excellence.

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In celebration of royal food...

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We know it's the Queen's recipe

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because we've got it in her own hand.

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..from the present and the past...

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That is proper regal.

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..we recreate old family favourites.

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Now, the Queen Mother had this really wicked trick with these.

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What a mess.

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We sample Royal eating alfresco...

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-Oh, wow!

-THAT is what you want.

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..and revisit the most extravagant times.

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Pheasant, stag, turkey, salmon, oysters, and turbot,

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dressed in a lobster champagne sauce.

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Unbelievable!

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This is Royal Recipes.

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Hello, I'm Michael Buerk, and welcome to Royal Recipes.

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This is Audley End, one of Britain's finest stately homes,

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built in the style of a royal palace and once owned by a king.

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In the splendour of the gardens,

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halls and kitchen of this grandest of country houses,

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we'll be recreating the food served at the highest royal tables.

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And it all starts here, with this gem,

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a royal kitchen maid's cookbook -

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the only surviving recipe book of its kind in the Royal archive.

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This is an exact copy of the original,

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which is kept at Windsor Castle.

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Inside, the recipes of Mildred Nicholls,

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who worked at Buckingham Palace in the early 1900s.

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And for the first time in over 100 years,

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we'll be bringing these recipes back to life.

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This time, we're cooking food served to celebrate a jubilee.

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Queen Elizabeth II, Britain's longest reigning monarch,

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knows more than most about how to put on a great show

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for these most special of royal anniversaries.

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Today in the Royal Recipes kitchen,

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chef Anna Haugh tries some unusual 19th-century ingredients...

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And now, our final ingredient, cockscomb.

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MICHAEL LAUGHS

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-What, the bit off its head?

-Yeah.

-Aren't they normally red?

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..as she prepares Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee dish.

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No, you don't like it!

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Historian Polly Russell discovers how Windsor revived

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the Royal Golden Jubilee ox roast.

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I wrote to the Queen and then we received a letter back...

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From Buckingham Palace?

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..from Buckingham Palace.

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And the Queen graciously agreeing to donating an ox for us.

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Sprinkle 'em over.

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And Paul Ainsworth gets creative with a British classic to honour

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the Queen's historic reign.

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And I hope you approve, ma'am.

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In the kitchen wing of this stately home,

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we start with the exquisite dishes

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created for the Queen's Diamond Jubilee celebrations.

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Hello, and here we are in the grand kitchen,

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with top London chef Anna Haugh.

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There is something special, isn't there,

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about living in the reign of Britain's longest-serving monarch?

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Oh, I love a good royal party!

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Well, the Queen has had lots of parties

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because she's had lots of jubilees.

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She's had three jubilees, hasn't she?

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There's Silver for 25, Gold for 50, and the Diamond for 60.

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And this is the menu for her luncheon,

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Diamond Jubilee luncheon, in 2012.

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Just three courses, unlike the eight or nine

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her great-grandfather would have had.

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And you're going to do the middle one.

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-That's right.

-The main course.

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That's right. I'm going to do roast saddle of Welsh lamb with braised shoulder.

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So, two cuts of lamb with Isle of Wight asparagus,

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Jersey Royal potatoes... It sounds great. What do you do first?

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OK. So, the first thing I have in my pan here is some chopped up celery,

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onions, carrot, and a little sneaky star anise.

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-Star anise.

-So, I'm going to put a little bit more oil in here

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and then I'm going to add my lamb shoulder.

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And I think what I like so much about this dish

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is that it's not just focusing on the prime cut,

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it's also giving you the kind of secondary cuts as well.

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Do you get more flavour out of the shoulder of lamb than you would...?

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Ah, absolutely. Absolutely. There's a gelatine that's inside

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your lamb shoulder that, when you cook that slowly,

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you draw that out

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and you get a much better consistency out of your sauce.

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So I'm going to add tomato paste in here as well.

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I'm going to give my rosemary a chop while I let that kind of caramelise up a little bit.

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-So, rosemary and lamb.

-Yeah.

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I think everybody in the universe knows that these two go very well together.

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Why is that, do you think?

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I think it's because where the lambs would be jumping around...

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And having the craic, there's the...

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Rosemary is growing nearby.

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And that they snack on the same herb that is obviously going to taste

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very well with the meat.

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This is amazing, isn't it,

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because this is an absolute celebration,

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-as a lot of these royal meals are, of Britishness?

-Yes.

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You know, Welsh Cambrian Mountain lamb,

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marinated Uist island salmon with Lyme Bay crab.

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It's all...

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It's all a celebration of British,

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whereas two, three generations ago, we were all pretending to be French!

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Absolutely. Like, when I first was learning to be a cook,

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everything was, you know, special because it was French.

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Where now, I think we kind of look around what we have and it's just as

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good as what the French have, you know?

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So, I'm going to add my white wine in now...

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Yeah.

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And there's a lovely kind of acidity that you get from white wine.

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And now we're going to put in our stock.

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-And last but certainly not least...

-Your rosemary.

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Rosemary. So, I'm going to pop a lid on this...

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-Mm-hm.

-..and we'd cook that for about maybe two hours.

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Let that kind of simmer away, like a light bubble, not a heavy boil.

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And it should look like this.

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Oh-ho-ho! Look at the steam coming out.

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Yeah. Terrific.

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I'll get out of your way.

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Our next stage is searing off our saddle of lamb.

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So, this is the prime cut, OK?

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If you go to your butcher and you speak to him nicely...

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-He'll do this.

-He'll rack it up...

-Truss it.

-..for you just nice, yeah.

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So, I'm going to oil it and season it.

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So, what's happening here is you've got the shoulder for the flavour...

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-Yes.

-And you've got this for the texture?

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Yeah. Exactly.

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You know, Everybody likes a kind of little bit of rare meat with...

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You know, if you associate lamb and beef,

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you think of that lovely kind of medium-rare kind of cuisson.

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But the flavour that you get from the braised shoulder, it's like,

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we're greedy, we want both.

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So I'm going to put a little bit of oil in my pan.

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-OK.

-The key is when you're cooking is control.

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Controlling your heat. You need a lovely, smoking hot pan.

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So hot that when I'm at home, my dad does have a fire extinguisher

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in the background, ready to go.

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Oh, the sizzle!

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So, you're trying to sear it. Why?

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You want to get a lovely caramelised flavour off this and

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particularly, I think lamb fat has got a very,

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very good flavour when you get a good brown kind of colour on it.

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Erm..

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And yeah, it's just going to enhance the whole flavour of the meat on

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the inside. So, we get a lovely golden brown colour,

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evenly, all around.

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Takes roughly about maybe about five, ten minutes.

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A little bit of patience.

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And then you're going to pop it into the oven...

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Mm-hm.

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-..for me, Michael.

-Mm-hm.

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190 degrees, for about 20 minutes or so.

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And when you go to the oven, will you grab one there?

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I've already got it resting.

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OK. I'll be back in two ticks.

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Look at this little beauty.

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Lovely.

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So, this lamb has been resting for about ten minutes.

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It's really important that when you cook a piece of meat, that roughly

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about half the length of time it takes to cook, you rest it.

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That's what us amateur eaters never do. Because we're too greedy.

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-No patience.

-Mm-hm.

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OK, so, I think it's time to carve.

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What is...?

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Oh, look at that!

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-I love it.

-Be-autiful.

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Pink in the middle. And a bit of juice.

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As you're cutting it, you can see it... Oh, yes.

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Speaking of juice, maybe we might put a little bit of gravy with this.

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Mm-hm.

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What we serve this with is some beautiful British asparagus...

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From the Isle of Wight, I think, on the original menu.

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That's it. And we have our lovely braised shoulder.

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It is two dishes in one, isn't it?

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It is. It is. And I think it is really important

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to kind of note that the idea of using the shoulder means

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that more people get to eat the saddle,

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because obviously, little lambs, they're not so big to share around.

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-Oh, yeah.

-Fabulous. And just one little star anise.

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This one little fella...

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-Can really flavour it.

-Yeah.

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But it's the rosemary that's so lovely, isn't it?

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Mm, mm.

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Yeah. Ohh!

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-OK.

-I love the saddle.

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Look at that. The lovely, succulent fat around it.

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And then the last thing that we're just going to add

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is a little bit of sauce.

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So, in here I've infused

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a bit of mint in with reduced-down lamb stock...

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You can't have lamb without mint.

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And there's a little knob of butter in here as well.

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Yeah, yeah. But not too rich.

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Not too rich. But...

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..enough so that you do feel this is a special meal.

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Yeah.

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And that's it. Finish it with a little bit of gravy.

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Just around.

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There you go.

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-Yeah.

-That's your braised shoulder of lamb and rolled saddle.

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Beautiful. There's your knife and fork.

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Which piece are you going to go for first?

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Oh, the top one.

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-OK, you go.

-Here we go.

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I'm going to try the saddle first, because that does look great.

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With a bit of the asparagus.

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I'm going to have the top end of the asparagus.

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-Come on, Michael!

-All right, all right, all right.

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-Come on.

-All right. Ooh!

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Get in there for the braised shoulder because that's what I want.

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Mm!

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Mm!

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That's lovely. It's so succulent...

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..and the fat around it...

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I love lamb actually.

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Yeah, but it's fantastic lamb.

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-Now the braised bit, this is where the flavour is.

-Mm!

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Oh!

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Oh, I see what you mean.

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The mint is lovely in it.

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Mm, yeah.

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And what's great about it, I think, is that it's

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a completely, totally British celebration in food

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of our longest-reigning monarch.

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Fantastic.

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A celebration of lamb, and a worthy way to celebrate a Diamond Jubilee.

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The original dish was created for the Queen

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by one of the Royal family's favourite chefs.

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Michelin-starred Anton Mosimann

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has cooked for four generations of royals.

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It all started when the Queen Mother enjoyed his food

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at London's Dorchester Hotel.

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I came to the Dorchester in 1975.

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It was one of THE best hotels.

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I mean, just everybody who had a name, a reputation,

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came in and out of the Dorchester.

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It was like a film sometimes.

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I was so excited to meet the Royal family and cook for them.

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Princess Margaret, she came often,

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and Her Majesty the Queen came for banquets and of course,

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the Queen Mother.

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It was just an incredible experience for me.

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Incredible experience.

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Anton was invited to cook at not one but two grand events

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to celebrate the Queen's Diamond Jubilee.

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As well as serving lamb, he prepared fish courses.

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My first dish today is a steamed sea bass, with a sauce vierge.

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This fish I cooked on different occasions,

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including for the Royal family,

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and has been very much appreciated and well received.

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A bit of salt.

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Pepper.

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I love steaming because what you put in, that's what you get out.

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A few leaves of basil.

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The lid.

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And very quickly to cook.

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It's almost cooked.

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It's less than two minutes

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and this wonderful, beautiful fish is actually cooked.

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I make my sauce vierge, which is a reduction of sherry vinegar,

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a few shallots, finely chopped.

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Add a bit of honey, just as a contrast.

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And once it's cooked down, then it's olive oil

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and spring onions,

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I use a bit of chives and of course tomatoes.

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I have some spinach here,

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with broccoli and a bit of colour, a few carrots.

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Fish and spinach, broccoli, go very well together.

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A few new potatoes.

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And the dressing.

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Out of the steam, on the plate and off it goes.

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At the Jubilee Lunch at Westminster Hall, it was food like this.

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We served almost 1,000 people.

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Some of Anton's dishes have become

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long-standing favourites with the Windsors,

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passing from Queen Mother to daughter.

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Recipes such as cheese and spinach souffle.

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Her Majesty the Queen Mother, she loved her food,

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was really into her food.

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And when she came to the Dorchester for lunch, very often...

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..she enjoyed it so much

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and she went back to Clarence House

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and asked her chef to write to me for the recipes.

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And one of the dishes I remember was the cheese and spinach souffle.

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He starts with a traditional roux sauce, made from butter,

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flour and cold milk.

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A bit of nutmeg.

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Some cheese.

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Mix very carefully.

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Smells already delicious.

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Now to put my spinach...

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..blanched first of all, then finely chopped

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and mix that together with the cheese mixture.

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Mm! Delicious.

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Then, Anton cools the mix and adds egg yolks.

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Now I'm going to fold the egg whites into the mix.

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Folding very gentle because I want to keep the air bubbles

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in the egg whites. That makes the souffle rising.

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The mix goes into individual moulds and into the oven for eight minutes.

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Smell great.

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Anton serves it with a fromage frais, yoghurt and chive sauce.

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So light, beautiful.

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So, here we are.

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But during the Jubilee year,

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I had the pleasure of cooking this dish on one or two occasions.

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It's light, nice sauce and people loved it.

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Royal jubilees are few and far between and when they happen,

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they are an excuse for a great celebration.

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I've got the menu card for the banquet

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for Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee at Buckingham Palace. Look at it!

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-They're all in French, of course.

-Yeah.

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-Now, you are going to do one of these dishes?

-I am.

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Which one are you going to do?

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Le Poulet a la Financiere.

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Chicken Financiere.

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Is that banker's chicken, or...?

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No, it's actually a chicken stew.

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A chicken stew!

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You know, the French. They want a fancy name for things.

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It is essentially a very delicious chicken stew.

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So, I'm good start of this recipe in here

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with butter, onion, and carrots,

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and they are just sweating down nicely on a good high heat.

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I'm then going to add my mushrooms.

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That will take a couple of minutes to kind of sweat down

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on a high heat.

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A lot of kind of juice and water is going to come out of mushrooms,

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so you need a bit of patience and a bit of time with that.

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So, while that's cooking away,

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I'm going to give the chicken heart and the livers a bit of a chop.

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Now, they loved offal, didn't they?

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Yeah, and I love offal. I don't understand...

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What is it in the recent generations,

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I suppose my generation and right down to yours,

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that have seemed to have gone off things like liver and heart.

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I remember having heart as a kid.

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-I never get it now.

-I loved it.

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Lamb's heart - my mum always prepared lamb's heart as a kid

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and when I lived in Paris,

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I remember calling my mother up saying,

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what do you do with the lamb's heart? How can I make it?

0:17:020:17:05

You'd never just see it in the supermarket.

0:17:050:17:08

But from a chef's point of view, what does offal in a dish like this

0:17:080:17:12

-lend to a stew?

-Depth of flavour.

0:17:120:17:14

I mean, like, you look how small I'm chopping this up, like.

0:17:140:17:17

It's going to give a more complex, interesting notes

0:17:170:17:20

that are going to just be through your stew.

0:17:200:17:22

So, you just give them a good little chop up together there.

0:17:220:17:25

-Yeah.

-Now, I'm going to pop them back on the plate.

0:17:250:17:29

Lovely, rich colour, aren't they?

0:17:290:17:30

Yeah, yeah. These are sweating down kind of nicely now.

0:17:300:17:33

They're coming along. I'm going to put a little bit of flour in there.

0:17:330:17:35

It's funny, thinking yourself back to that day

0:17:370:17:40

and Queen Victoria on the throne for 50 years.

0:17:400:17:43

She started, you know, that day having her breakfast

0:17:430:17:46

as a kind of picnic...

0:17:460:17:47

Completely different meal, picnic under the trees at Frogmore...

0:17:470:17:50

-I know.

-..where her husband, Prince Albert, was buried.

0:17:500:17:54

-So romantic.

-Near his grave.

0:17:540:17:55

I mean, it does, it breaks my heart.

0:17:550:17:57

-You want to believe that they were just madly in love.

-Well, yeah.

0:17:570:18:00

And she seems to really have, you know, been heartbroken,

0:18:000:18:03

once he passed away.

0:18:030:18:05

Gosh, the smell is...

0:18:050:18:06

The wine is reducing down. Yes, it is.

0:18:060:18:09

And, now I'm going to add the chicken stock to it.

0:18:090:18:13

Yeah.

0:18:130:18:14

Oh, it's already looking rather good, isn't it?

0:18:140:18:17

All sorts of delights going into it now.

0:18:170:18:19

Next is going to be.. the olives.

0:18:190:18:23

-Ah, now, olives...

-I know. Just a little twist.

0:18:230:18:26

That's a little unusual, isn't it?

0:18:260:18:27

Yeah. Quite Mediterranean.

0:18:270:18:28

And then I'm going to put in the chicken heart and liver.

0:18:280:18:32

Now, I've already pre-seared the chicken legs and the chicken thighs

0:18:320:18:39

and breasts. I rolled them in a little bit of flour as well.

0:18:390:18:42

Again, as that cooks, that flour will help

0:18:420:18:44

kind of thicken up the sauce a bit more.

0:18:440:18:45

-So I'm going to pop them in now.

-OK.

0:18:450:18:47

Yeah, so you cook them for about a half an hour with the lid off.

0:18:470:18:50

Once you're ready with your dumplings, you roll them.

0:18:500:18:53

We're going to pop them in and cook them for another further 20 minutes.

0:18:530:18:56

So you've got dumplings coming in now.

0:18:560:18:57

I've got dumplings to make now. And I love dumplings.

0:18:570:18:59

No stew is complete without dumplings.

0:18:590:19:01

Exactly. So, in here, these are slightly fancy dumplings

0:19:010:19:05

because they have some freshly chopped tarragon in them.

0:19:050:19:09

Also, I'm going to add one egg and some suet.

0:19:090:19:12

So, first of all, give it a little bit of a stir.

0:19:120:19:16

Add the suet. So, your egg is going to go into the centre there.

0:19:160:19:21

I added a pinch of salt into that as well.

0:19:210:19:24

Just give it a bit of a mix.

0:19:240:19:26

Right, so, I've got to get my hands stuck in here now.

0:19:280:19:30

-Yeah.

-Now, if it is...

0:19:300:19:32

Sometimes the mix might just be a little bit dry.

0:19:320:19:35

You might need to add a small drop of water to it.

0:19:350:19:38

Just like a little small spoon of it,

0:19:380:19:40

just to make sure it all comes together.

0:19:400:19:42

Now, the egg in this makes it much richer...

0:19:420:19:45

-Yeah.

-And also helps it kind of stay together.

0:19:450:19:48

You don't want your dumpling dissolving, do you?

0:19:490:19:51

No, and this will be cooked inside the stew for 20 minutes.

0:19:510:19:56

OK. Right, I think we're ready to go now.

0:19:560:19:58

-That is well kneaded.

-Yeah.

0:19:580:19:59

And then all we're going to do is to shape them into nice kind of little dumplings.

0:19:590:20:04

Give them a little bit of a roll.

0:20:040:20:06

I can just imagine everybody sitting there in Buckingham Palace.

0:20:080:20:11

Extraordinary. Do you know, there were 50 kings and princes

0:20:110:20:15

in this banquet, from all over Europe?

0:20:150:20:18

Imagine cooking for royalty on that scale.

0:20:180:20:21

Like, the pressure must be immense.

0:20:210:20:23

So, now you're going to pop your dumplings in.

0:20:230:20:25

After your chicken has been cooking for about 30 minutes,

0:20:250:20:28

this is when you pop the dumplings in

0:20:280:20:30

and you must put the lid on to cook them. Another further 20 minutes.

0:20:300:20:34

And now our final ingredient, cockscomb.

0:20:340:20:37

MICHAEL LAUGHS

0:20:370:20:38

-What, the bit off its head?

-Yeah.

-Aren't they normally red?

-Yes.

0:20:380:20:40

Well, these have been cooked.

0:20:400:20:41

I've cooked these were two hours. Because they need a long braising.

0:20:410:20:44

A little bit like pigs' ears or something like that.

0:20:440:20:47

I'm not sure about this.

0:20:470:20:48

Look, they're kind of rubbery.

0:20:480:20:50

What do you think they're going to taste like?

0:20:500:20:52

I don't think they're going to taste of much.

0:20:520:20:54

I think the reason they probably put them into stews was to prove that

0:20:540:20:56

they actually came from the cockerel.

0:20:560:20:58

-And that sense of a stew.

-Mm.

0:20:580:21:00

We've got all the chicken in there,

0:21:000:21:03

including its...cockscomb. I'm not sure. There you go.

0:21:030:21:06

OK.

0:21:080:21:10

It's decoration, I think, isn't it?

0:21:100:21:11

There's something rather funny about you know, the crown, the cockscomb,

0:21:110:21:15

from the chicken, in front of 50 kings and princes at this banquet.

0:21:150:21:21

Can you think of that? All those royal houses,

0:21:210:21:23

all eating cockscombs!

0:21:230:21:26

All I can think about are actually the poor chefs in the kitchen cooking for those people.

0:21:260:21:30

-Yeah.

-The pressure must have been immense.

0:21:300:21:31

Yeah. Half the royalty of Europe. More than half the royalty of Europe,

0:21:310:21:34

-and most of them are relatives, of course.

-Yeah.

0:21:340:21:37

It's rather amusing. In her diary afterwards, she said,

0:21:370:21:39

"The King of Denmark took me in and Willie of Greece

0:21:390:21:42

"sat on my other side.

0:21:420:21:43

"The princes were all in uniform

0:21:430:21:45

"and the princesses were all beautifully dressed.

0:21:450:21:48

"Afterwards, we went into the ballroom, where my band played."

0:21:480:21:52

-That sounds like some party.

-Yeah, come on, what did they eat?

0:21:520:21:56

Let's have a try. Oh, yes.

0:21:560:21:58

Still not sure about those cockscombs.

0:21:590:22:01

I haven't cooked this for no reason at all.

0:22:010:22:03

Oh, I thought you could taste them.

0:22:030:22:05

Let me try to see if I can get a little bit of...

0:22:050:22:07

Oh, look at the juice in that.

0:22:070:22:09

I know, but it's the dumplings that I'm REALLY interested in.

0:22:090:22:12

-Oh, you and your dumplings.

-Yeah. I know. Oops!

0:22:120:22:16

What about the chicken? Come on, come on.

0:22:160:22:18

Mm, yeah. A piece of chicken in there...

0:22:180:22:20

..and Michael's three portions of cockscombs.

0:22:210:22:24

MICHAEL LAUGHS

0:22:240:22:25

No, no, you don't! No, you don't.

0:22:250:22:27

OK, I'll be happy with one little bite.

0:22:270:22:29

OK.

0:22:290:22:31

There we go.

0:22:310:22:33

All right.

0:22:330:22:34

Oh!

0:22:350:22:36

Is it...?

0:22:400:22:42

No, you don't like it!

0:22:420:22:45

Hmm. It tastes all right but it's one of those kind of

0:22:470:22:50

slippery type of things, you know?

0:22:500:22:53

What do you think?

0:22:530:22:55

I mean, it's going to be nothing on the dumpling, actually.

0:22:550:22:58

We're not too convinced about the cockscomb.

0:22:580:23:01

I don't think it adds much to the flavour.

0:23:010:23:03

But the rest...

0:23:030:23:04

You can really get the suet off the dumpling.

0:23:060:23:09

It's so delicious.

0:23:090:23:10

The tarragon in the dumpling... Mm!

0:23:100:23:14

Lovely olives.

0:23:140:23:16

I can do without the cockscomb, but the rest...

0:23:160:23:19

Chicken Financiere, banker's chicken, I'm going to call it.

0:23:190:23:24

-Well, it's a rich dish, isn't it?

-Mm.

0:23:240:23:26

For a Golden Jubilee.

0:23:260:23:27

Lovely.

0:23:290:23:31

'A hearty dish as well for a long- living and long-reigning queen.'

0:23:310:23:35

Celebrating a jubilee is often a chance

0:23:370:23:40

to indulge in a bit of nostalgia

0:23:400:23:42

and what better dish to serve than trifle?

0:23:420:23:46

It's got a long tradition in our national cuisine.

0:23:460:23:49

At his Padstow home in Cornwall, chef Paul Ainsworth has been

0:23:540:23:58

inspired by the jubilee spirit to get creative with a pudding

0:23:580:24:01

that's reigned supreme in Britain for generations.

0:24:010:24:05

For me, when you're celebrating, street party, jubilee,

0:24:060:24:09

great royal occasion, the go-to dish is the trifle.

0:24:090:24:13

I love trifle and in my trifle,

0:24:130:24:15

I'm going to have some beautiful British strawberries,

0:24:150:24:18

some beautiful British raspberries.

0:24:180:24:20

For our jelly, we're going to use Cornish sparkling wine.

0:24:200:24:24

We're going to add the whole bottle to the pan

0:24:240:24:28

and we're going to bring it...

0:24:280:24:30

CORK POPS

0:24:300:24:31

..to the boil.

0:24:310:24:33

I've got this wonderful sparkling wine with just some nice perfume

0:24:330:24:36

with the thyme, little bit of vanilla,

0:24:360:24:38

some star anise and some sugar.

0:24:380:24:39

So here we are - the lovely pile of strawberries,

0:24:390:24:42

just going to pop those into the sparkling wine.

0:24:420:24:44

Now, I'm going to add my raspberries in there like that -

0:24:440:24:47

the soft fruits just lightly poaching.

0:24:470:24:49

The heat's off now. Very gently, pass off that fruit.

0:24:490:24:53

Let your fruit just rest nicely like that.

0:24:550:24:58

And what we want to do, we want to bring that back up to a simmer,

0:24:580:25:01

just very gently, drop our gelatine and as soon as it goes in there,

0:25:010:25:04

pull it off the heat and just keep stirring

0:25:040:25:07

until you see it just all dissolved. And there you have it.

0:25:070:25:10

You've just made a beautiful sparkling wine jelly.

0:25:100:25:13

Now is the exciting part.

0:25:140:25:15

We're going to build our trifle palace.

0:25:150:25:18

So, just take your bowl, I've had it on good authority

0:25:180:25:21

that in the royal household,

0:25:210:25:22

they like it in individual sundae glasses.

0:25:220:25:25

But I think this just makes a great centrepiece,

0:25:250:25:27

in the middle of the table, everyone getting stuck in.

0:25:270:25:30

So, just very gently, we're going to spoon our fruit in.

0:25:300:25:34

Nice and clean, so everyone can see those layers.

0:25:340:25:37

Now, I'm going to get my twist on this lovely royal recipe -

0:25:370:25:41

Cornish saffron cake.

0:25:410:25:42

The saffron works amazing with that soft, poached fruit.

0:25:420:25:46

Look at that yellow that's coming from the saffron.

0:25:460:25:49

It's an amazing alternative

0:25:490:25:50

to just those ordinary, boring sponge fingers.

0:25:500:25:54

Right, now, we're going to get the jelly.

0:25:540:25:55

Still liquid, it will start to set once it goes into the fridge.

0:25:550:25:59

Coming up just to the top of the level of the cake

0:25:590:26:01

and the beautiful soft fruit.

0:26:010:26:04

The trifle then sets in the fridge for two to three hours

0:26:040:26:07

while Paul makes a custard, using milk, vanilla and custard powder.

0:26:070:26:12

Once cooled, he adds it to the trifle.

0:26:120:26:14

Look at that. Set beautifully.

0:26:140:26:17

And what you want is about an inch thick.

0:26:170:26:20

Lovely. It just looks delicious already.

0:26:200:26:23

This is why I love using dishes like this as a centrepiece.

0:26:230:26:27

While the trifle goes back in the fridge,

0:26:270:26:29

Paul whips up some double cream with vanilla and icing sugar

0:26:290:26:33

to make the top layer.

0:26:330:26:34

Spooning it on.

0:26:340:26:36

Look at that.

0:26:360:26:38

Lovely. That is proper.

0:26:380:26:40

Palace of Trifle.

0:26:400:26:42

Going to pop out into the fridge and we're going to make some honeycomb.

0:26:420:26:45

And we're just going to boil glucose, sugar,

0:26:450:26:48

and honey on the stove. Now you'll hear the sound of the bubbles.

0:26:480:26:50

They're just clicking, clicking, clicking.

0:26:500:26:52

As the mixture starts to thicken, the bubbles will start to slow down

0:26:520:26:55

and you'll know that you're getting close.

0:26:550:26:58

In with your bicarb.

0:26:580:27:00

Just whisk in that bicarb and let it come up and let it come up.

0:27:000:27:02

And see the honeycomb coming up?

0:27:020:27:04

Fantastic. Let it rise, let it rise.

0:27:040:27:06

Now, pour onto your sheet.

0:27:060:27:07

And THAT is honeycomb.

0:27:070:27:09

Once the honeycomb has cooled and hardened,

0:27:110:27:14

Paul breaks it up and then it's time to decorate.

0:27:140:27:17

Get the little bits, sprinkle them over.

0:27:180:27:22

So you're covering all of that cream.

0:27:220:27:24

Get it all in there.

0:27:240:27:26

Now, if you squint, doesn't that look like the jewels in the crown?

0:27:260:27:29

In fact, that IS the crown.

0:27:290:27:32

Look at that. One more little indulgent treat.

0:27:320:27:35

Take your favourite chocolate bar and just peel it over the top.

0:27:350:27:40

A beautiful British dessert.

0:27:440:27:46

Ma'am, I hope you approve.

0:27:470:27:49

Katie Nicholl here has been a royal correspondent for a decade or more,

0:27:540:27:58

covering several generations of the Royal family

0:27:580:28:00

and what they've been up to.

0:28:000:28:02

How significant is a Jubilee, a diamond jubilee?

0:28:020:28:05

Well, there have only been two monarchs who have ever celebrated

0:28:050:28:08

a Diamond Jubilee. Of course, our monarch, and Queen Victoria.

0:28:080:28:11

So, very rare, very special occasions, and, I mean,

0:28:110:28:15

don't really have to think that far back to 2012,

0:28:150:28:18

but you have to think a long way back to 1897

0:28:180:28:20

when it was a very different type of celebration.

0:28:200:28:22

Queen Victoria made sure that everyone in the streets,

0:28:220:28:26

the very poorest, were still able to celebrate

0:28:260:28:28

and she did that by serving them soup or

0:28:280:28:29

having her courtiers serving them soup in the streets.

0:28:290:28:32

They ate jellied eels and whelks.

0:28:320:28:34

Well, we were doing something very different in 2012

0:28:340:28:36

but it was that sense bringing the community together

0:28:360:28:38

to celebrate the Jubilee.

0:28:380:28:40

We were having soggy sandwiches, I seem to remember.

0:28:400:28:43

Well, the Queen wasn't having soggy sandwiches, I'm sure.

0:28:430:28:46

When you are contrasting that Diamond Jubilee for Victoria in 1897

0:28:460:28:50

and the one we've only recently had,

0:28:500:28:53

what does it tell us about ourselves,

0:28:530:28:56

from what we ate and how the whole thing was staged?

0:28:560:28:58

Just how much tastes have changed.

0:28:580:29:00

I think if you took a peek inside that very luxury jubilee hamper that

0:29:000:29:03

those lucky enough to attend the garden party at Buckingham Palace

0:29:030:29:07

enjoyed, which, I have to say, was all taste-tested by the Queen,

0:29:070:29:11

I mean you had little pots of beautifully prepared crab

0:29:110:29:14

and smoked salmon and cucumber sandwiches and

0:29:140:29:17

beautiful products from the Royal Estates...

0:29:170:29:20

I mean, it was a very, very special hamper.

0:29:200:29:23

But I'm sure in 1897 those bowls of soup were much appreciated by

0:29:230:29:26

the people lucky enough to have them as well.

0:29:260:29:28

But I can definitely say that eels and whelks didn't feature in the 2012 hamper.

0:29:280:29:33

What about the royals themselves?

0:29:330:29:35

By the standards of Queen Victoria and more so her son, Edward VII,

0:29:350:29:39

the Queen's banquet must have been little more than an afternoon snack.

0:29:390:29:43

Absolutely. I think "modest" is the word.

0:29:430:29:45

And I think that really does sum up the Queen's taste when it comes to

0:29:450:29:49

royal recipes and all things culinary.

0:29:490:29:51

She likes very traditional fare.

0:29:510:29:53

She likes very simple food.

0:29:530:29:54

And she's very ahead of her time, really,

0:29:540:29:56

because we're only all starting to eat organic, or have been in the last few years.

0:29:560:29:59

But the Queen's been doing that for ever.

0:29:590:30:01

If she can have her lamb from the Sandringham Estate

0:30:010:30:04

or the Castle of May, that's where she'll have it from.

0:30:040:30:06

Nonetheless, on each occasion, a party to bring the country together.

0:30:060:30:09

Oh, absolutely. It's a moment for unity,

0:30:090:30:11

a time for celebration and for great festivities because, let's face it,

0:30:110:30:15

not many people get to enjoy a Diamond Jubilee.

0:30:150:30:17

The Diamond Jubilee certainly brought people out onto the streets

0:30:190:30:23

to celebrate in that uniquely British way.

0:30:230:30:25

The nation can't resist a street party.

0:30:310:30:33

In 1977, for the Queen's Silver Jubilee,

0:30:330:30:36

it was all about fancy dress, flag-waving, sandwiches, and squash.

0:30:360:30:41

Historian Dr Polly Russell is in Windsor,

0:30:440:30:46

a royal town with a strong tradition of celebrating jubilees.

0:30:460:30:50

To find out more about how fashions have changed,

0:30:510:30:53

she's heading to a street party hotspot.

0:30:530:30:57

I thought it was the perfect place

0:30:570:30:58

to come and meet some real street party devotees.

0:30:580:31:02

-Hello.

-Hello.

-Oh, this looks nice.

0:31:050:31:08

These Royal Windsor residents

0:31:080:31:10

haven't missed any of the Queen's jubilees.

0:31:100:31:13

Celebrating her Silver in 1977,

0:31:130:31:17

her Golden in 2002,

0:31:170:31:19

and then the Diamond in 2012.

0:31:190:31:22

So, here we are in the Alma pub on Springfield Road and I'm really

0:31:230:31:27

thrilled to be able to talk to you about the street parties

0:31:270:31:29

that you've all been involved with.

0:31:290:31:31

The first one I went to was the coronation.

0:31:310:31:34

Which one?

0:31:340:31:36

-Which one?!

-LAUGHTER

0:31:360:31:38

You went to Victoria's!

0:31:380:31:40

The patriotic jollity that we recognise as street parties today

0:31:400:31:44

date back to the peace teas for children after the First World War

0:31:440:31:48

And were similar to those held for the Queen's coronation in 1953.

0:31:480:31:52

-It was definitely for children.

-Yeah.

0:31:520:31:55

There was a table down the middle of the street for children.

0:31:550:31:58

And the adults served the children.

0:31:580:32:01

The menu was usually sandwiches with fish paste or jam.

0:32:010:32:06

Yes. That's it, yes, quite!

0:32:060:32:08

And then they had blancmange and jelly,

0:32:080:32:10

which was a great treat in 1950-whatever it was.

0:32:100:32:14

Do you remember a feeling of anticipation

0:32:140:32:16

before the street parties?

0:32:160:32:18

Oh, yes, it was exciting.

0:32:180:32:19

Yes, yes, yes, because after the war, I mean, you couldn't get

0:32:190:32:22

butter and you couldn't get very much to eat at all.

0:32:220:32:25

So jelly and blancmange was definitely, er,

0:32:250:32:31

to be looked forward to.

0:32:310:32:33

Two decades on, the enthusiasm for bunting and taking over the streets

0:32:330:32:37

had only grown. And communities everywhere were mucking in.

0:32:370:32:41

So in 1977, do you say that most of the food was cooked from scratch,

0:32:410:32:45

that people were just making it at home?

0:32:450:32:47

Or were they all nipping up?

0:32:470:32:49

Yeah, yeah, mainly made from scratch in '77.

0:32:490:32:51

You didn't have any bought stuff there.

0:32:510:32:53

You made your own pastries.

0:32:530:32:55

In '77, we didn't have the food that we've had today.

0:32:550:32:57

A royal wedding in 2011 and the upcoming Olympics

0:32:570:33:00

saw the enthusiasm for Diamond Jubilee street parties

0:33:000:33:05

reach patriotic fever pitch in 2012.

0:33:050:33:08

Councils in England and Wales received

0:33:080:33:11

almost 9,500 road closure applications.

0:33:110:33:14

The theme was nostalgic,

0:33:140:33:15

with one boozy addition.

0:33:150:33:17

If you go back in time, all the photos you'd see,

0:33:180:33:21

it's either orange squash...

0:33:210:33:23

Orange squash, yeah...

0:33:230:33:24

Or it's tea.

0:33:240:33:25

And of course that has also changed.

0:33:250:33:27

And I think that's quite nice, because people want to celebrate

0:33:270:33:30

and of course, these days, you celebrate

0:33:300:33:32

with champagne or prosecco or whatever.

0:33:320:33:34

Sales of prosecco skyrocketed in 2012.

0:33:340:33:36

It's quite nice when people are walking around

0:33:360:33:39

and you say, "Fancy a glass of wine?"

0:33:390:33:40

You know, or, "Do you fancy a prosecco?"

0:33:400:33:42

-I've never said no to that!

-Well, exactly!

0:33:420:33:45

The modern street party is a sign of growing affluence.

0:33:450:33:48

Historically, it was up to the sovereign to make

0:33:480:33:50

their jubilee go with a swing by giving food to the poor.

0:33:500:33:54

In 1809, to commemorate George III's Golden Jubilee,

0:33:550:33:59

hundreds of oxen were roasted all over the country.

0:33:590:34:03

At Bachelors Acre in Windsor,

0:34:030:34:05

George's Queen, Charlotte, joined in the celebrations with her children.

0:34:050:34:08

She liked the beef so much she even came back for seconds.

0:34:100:34:13

And there's a permanent reminder of that event at the park.

0:34:130:34:16

Polly's meeting Windsor Council's Paul Roach

0:34:180:34:20

to find out how the ox roast was revived for our present queen.

0:34:200:34:24

-Hello.

-Hello!

-Hi.

0:34:250:34:27

Welcome to Bachelors Acre in Windsor.

0:34:270:34:29

Thank you. And what is this?

0:34:290:34:31

This is our obelisk,

0:34:310:34:33

commemorating two of the ox roasts that took place here.

0:34:330:34:35

It took a few months of planning,

0:34:360:34:38

then the consent of Her Majesty

0:34:380:34:40

to make it all happen.

0:34:400:34:41

-I wrote to the Queen and then we received a letter back...

-Oh.

0:34:410:34:45

On the 21st of May, 2012.

0:34:450:34:48

From Buckingham Palace.

0:34:480:34:49

From Buckingham Palace, acknowledging the fact

0:34:490:34:53

that we'd requested an ox

0:34:530:34:54

and the Queen graciously agreeing to donating an ox for us.

0:34:540:34:58

Fantastic. And it says here, "The Queen will be pleased to receive

0:34:580:35:01

"an update of the event, so would you be kind enough to write again?"

0:35:010:35:04

-Did you do that?

-Yes, we did.

0:35:040:35:06

Oh, I'm glad.

0:35:060:35:07

-So, we fed 1,200 people.

-All gathered in this area?

0:35:070:35:10

All gathered in Bachelors Acre.

0:35:100:35:12

The first slice was ceremonially cut by the Air Marshal, Ian McFadden,

0:35:120:35:18

Governor of the castle, which is also a tradition

0:35:180:35:20

and has been followed through.

0:35:200:35:22

What, they kind of cut the first slice?

0:35:220:35:23

The first slice. It was auctioned.

0:35:230:35:25

So how would an ox have been traditionally roasted?

0:35:250:35:28

In 2002, they dug a huge pit.

0:35:280:35:32

-Right here?

-In the Acre.

0:35:320:35:33

And then what they would do is just tonnes and tonnes of wood,

0:35:330:35:38

-light the wood and then roast the ox...

-On a huge spit?

0:35:380:35:41

..on a spit, which would take about sort of 22 to 30 hours.

0:35:410:35:46

And we had wonderful smells all that evening, which was great, so we were

0:35:460:35:50

serving from about 12 o'clock in the afternoon.

0:35:500:35:52

Amazing. But actually it still takes place here.

0:35:520:35:54

It's not that you wheel it in or anything.

0:35:540:35:57

It actually takes place here, just as it has.

0:35:570:35:59

-All cooked on site.

-Since 1809.

-Yes.

0:35:590:36:02

Fantastic.

0:36:020:36:03

Buckingham Palace kitchen maid Mildred Nicholls

0:36:090:36:11

was too young to remember Victoria's Golden Jubilee.

0:36:110:36:15

The dishes created for that anniversary

0:36:150:36:17

lived on in her recipe book.

0:36:170:36:19

Mildred Nicholls was kitchen maid at Buckingham Palace in the early years

0:36:220:36:26

of the 1900s, and this recipe book - look at this, Anna -

0:36:260:36:29

this recipe book, it's the only one of its kind in the Royal archives.

0:36:290:36:32

Look at the writing.

0:36:320:36:34

Contains details of dishes at great events for three reigns,

0:36:340:36:37

like this one, look.

0:36:370:36:39

You can just about make it out, can't you?

0:36:390:36:41

Cerise Jubilee.

0:36:410:36:43

It was a pudding that was served at the Golden Jubilee of

0:36:430:36:46

Queen Victoria, from some chef called Escoffier,

0:36:460:36:49

-whom even I have heard of.

-Yes, I'd imagine you'd heard of him.

0:36:490:36:51

He was one of the most famous chefs in the world.

0:36:510:36:53

Actually, it just occurred to me -

0:36:530:36:55

do you actually get the word "to scoff" from that?

0:36:550:36:58

I'd imagine he did a lot of scoffing in his time.

0:36:580:37:00

MICHAEL LAUGHS

0:37:000:37:01

But actually he may have been a great chef,

0:37:010:37:03

but this Cerise Jubilee is actually a doddle, isn't it?

0:37:030:37:07

Well, it does look quite simple.

0:37:070:37:08

I think it's probably easy enough for YOU to make.

0:37:080:37:10

HE SCOFFS

0:37:100:37:12

-Is that scoffing?

-Yes!

0:37:120:37:13

THEY LAUGH

0:37:130:37:15

Now, what is it? Hang on.

0:37:150:37:16

We've got cherries, we've got kirsch and we've got ice cream.

0:37:160:37:19

-That's it, is it?

-Yeah. You just bring it up to the boil,

0:37:190:37:21

reduce it a little bit and then pour it over.

0:37:210:37:23

-Sling it on the top.

-Yeah.

0:37:230:37:24

-And set light to it?

-Yeah.

0:37:240:37:25

But today we're not going to flambe it.

0:37:250:37:27

We're just going to pour this over the top.

0:37:270:37:29

-Let's get rid of it.

-It does look good, though, doesn't it?

0:37:290:37:31

-It does look rather good.

-It does look good.

0:37:310:37:33

But it's not up to your standard. You can do better than that.

0:37:330:37:36

I think we can do something.

0:37:360:37:37

Let me take that away. What are YOU going to do?

0:37:370:37:39

OK, so, today I'm going to make chocolate delice,

0:37:390:37:42

and that was served at the current Queen's Diamond Jubilee.

0:37:420:37:45

-Wow.

-Right, so a delice could be any flavour you want.

0:37:450:37:48

It has a custard base where you add a puree or a chocolate to it

0:37:480:37:51

and then you fold in some whipped cream.

0:37:510:37:53

And that's a delice.

0:37:530:37:54

But this is a slightly different delice,

0:37:540:37:56

because I've added a base so it makes it easier to kind of portion

0:37:560:38:00

and serve. And there's cornflakes on it

0:38:000:38:02

to give it that kind of crunch and a bit of an extra texture.

0:38:020:38:06

Do you think the Queen had cornflakes?

0:38:060:38:08

I do not think the Queen had cornflakes,

0:38:080:38:10

but I think she missed out,

0:38:100:38:11

because they think it's a wonderful addition to a delice.

0:38:110:38:13

OK, let's do it.

0:38:130:38:15

So, I'm going to start first with the base.

0:38:150:38:17

So here I've already pureed up some Florentine biscuits,

0:38:170:38:20

kind of created this home-made praline.

0:38:200:38:22

And I'm going to take the cornflakes that I've toasted a little bit

0:38:220:38:25

in the oven to give them a little bit more depth of flavour.

0:38:250:38:27

I know that's a strange thing to say, that cornflakes have depth of flavour!

0:38:270:38:31

They're cornflakes, for goodness' sake!

0:38:310:38:33

But it does. It gives them a toastier flavour.

0:38:330:38:35

And then, on top, I'm just going to put the praline paste

0:38:350:38:38

and pulse it one or two times.

0:38:380:38:40

-You say "prawline".

-Yes.

-I say "praline".

0:38:400:38:42

I know. It's not your fault that you're pronouncing it wrong!

0:38:420:38:44

MICHAEL GUFFAWS

0:38:440:38:46

So I'm just going to pulse this.

0:38:460:38:48

OK, so you just continue to puree that for a few minutes and then you

0:38:490:38:52

just press it into the base of your chocolate delice.

0:38:520:38:57

But it is quite an interesting twist for a base that would work well with

0:38:570:39:01

a cheesecake, as well.

0:39:010:39:02

So I'm going to bring my cream up to boil to make the custard,

0:39:020:39:06

which will become the topping of the cake.

0:39:060:39:09

So I have some sugar here and some eggs

0:39:090:39:11

and I'm going to whisk them in together,

0:39:110:39:13

while I wait for the cream to boil.

0:39:130:39:15

Honestly, this isn't actually that hard.

0:39:200:39:22

I think it looks quite...

0:39:220:39:24

At the end, it is quite a special dessert, at the end,

0:39:240:39:26

but it is quite simple.

0:39:260:39:28

This is an adaptation of the original recipe,

0:39:280:39:30

so that it's a bit easier for people at home to make.

0:39:300:39:32

So the cream is now boiling, so I'm just going to, first of all,

0:39:320:39:35

pour a little bit on, just to kind of scald the mix.

0:39:350:39:38

Can I hold that for you?

0:39:380:39:39

Yes. You make a wonderful commis!

0:39:390:39:42

-You're my commis chef.

-Oh, right, OK.

0:39:420:39:44

-So I'm going to put this back in the pot...

-OK.

0:39:440:39:46

..and thicken it.

0:39:460:39:48

You don't need to use another pot. You can just use the same pot again.

0:39:480:39:51

So we're just going to thicken this.

0:39:510:39:53

You've got to stir this the whole time.

0:39:530:39:55

OK, so now I'm just going to pour the custard onto the chocolate.

0:39:550:39:58

-Oh, this looks lovely, doesn't it?

-Yeah, it does.

-Oh, wow.

0:39:580:40:00

But the main thing is that

0:40:000:40:02

you don't actually stir that for a few minutes.

0:40:020:40:04

-Why?

-So you give it the opportunity for the chocolate to melt.

0:40:040:40:07

-Ah, right.

-Kind of keeps the heat in it.

0:40:070:40:08

Like I said, you leave that for just a minute or two and then you'll take

0:40:080:40:11

your whisk and just give it a stir and you'll see it all melt.

0:40:110:40:14

See that? All coming together, and it's lovely.

0:40:140:40:17

Into a wonderful gooey mess.

0:40:170:40:18

Yeah. And then you've got to let that chill for a little while,

0:40:180:40:20

because if you add your whipped cream now, it'll just melt.

0:40:200:40:23

And that'll be a hot mess.

0:40:230:40:26

OK, so I actually have a slightly cooled down mix that I made

0:40:260:40:29

earlier on, so I'm going to use that now.

0:40:290:40:31

-Fold the cream through. So this is it here.

-Oh, yeah.

0:40:310:40:34

-It looks nice, yeah?

-It does, doesn't it?

0:40:340:40:35

So if you just passed me the whipped cream there, please.

0:40:350:40:38

There we go. That's the white one, is it?

0:40:380:40:39

That it! You learn fast, don't you?

0:40:390:40:41

I know, I know, I'm a natural, actually.

0:40:410:40:43

Yes. Any time that you're folding in two ingredients,

0:40:430:40:47

you tend to take the lighter ingredient

0:40:470:40:49

and fold it into the heavier one,

0:40:490:40:50

so I take one spoon of it

0:40:500:40:52

and hopefully that will kind of help lighten it up a little bit.

0:40:520:40:54

Rather than the other way around?

0:40:540:40:56

Yeah, because otherwise it would just be lumpy.

0:40:560:40:59

Yeah. OK, so this is folded through quite nicely,

0:40:590:41:01

so all I'm going to do is put it inside the mould, flatten it out.

0:41:010:41:05

Quite delicious.

0:41:050:41:06

It looks absolutely delightful, doesn't it?

0:41:060:41:09

OK, so just...

0:41:090:41:10

This, you'll need to set in the fridge for about two hours or so,

0:41:120:41:15

or, really, as long as you can is better.

0:41:150:41:17

So, yeah, just flatten it down.

0:41:180:41:20

I mean, honestly, I just want to eat this.

0:41:200:41:22

You can smell the chocolate.

0:41:220:41:24

The better the chocolate you use, the...

0:41:240:41:26

Yeah, the happier the results.

0:41:260:41:28

-Yeah.

-That's all nice and flat now.

0:41:280:41:31

-You did that brilliantly.

-I know.

0:41:310:41:32

You made the most wonderful flat top to it.

0:41:320:41:34

You either have it or you don't, Michael!

0:41:340:41:37

So now I'm just going to dust some cocoa on top.

0:41:370:41:39

OK.

0:41:390:41:40

So just a nice little dusting of cocoa on top.

0:41:400:41:44

And then I'm just going to clean the kind of outside so that will be...

0:41:460:41:49

Yes, you've made a bit of a mess there, I've noticed.

0:41:490:41:52

So, you want to be able to put this into the fridge

0:41:540:41:58

for at least two hours, ideally overnight,

0:41:580:42:00

but I would never expect you to wait that long.

0:42:000:42:02

Ah, you know me too well! You have a plan.

0:42:020:42:05

Pop that over there and I'll get the one I made earlier.

0:42:050:42:07

OK, all right.

0:42:070:42:09

Big reveal.

0:42:090:42:10

-May I?

-You may.

0:42:100:42:11

Oh, I like this.

0:42:110:42:13

My big moment.

0:42:130:42:15

Ooh!

0:42:150:42:16

Oh, look at that!

0:42:160:42:19

Don't look at it too long. Cut it.

0:42:190:42:21

Yes. So you need a nice hot knife to cut through your chocolate.

0:42:210:42:25

-Oooh.

-This is the good bit. Ohh!

0:42:280:42:31

MICHAEL LAUGHS

0:42:310:42:32

Oh, yes, I think that's probably about the right size.

0:42:340:42:36

It's like the Grand Canyon.

0:42:380:42:39

Here we go.

0:42:410:42:42

Now...

0:42:420:42:43

Oh, wow.

0:42:430:42:45

My word, look at that.

0:42:460:42:48

After you.

0:42:480:42:50

I'm going to have the... I like the bit at the end.

0:42:510:42:53

Mm!

0:42:530:42:54

Hang on.

0:42:540:42:55

Mm!

0:42:550:42:57

I don't think you like that, Michael, did you?

0:42:570:42:59

No, I hate it, hate it.

0:42:590:43:00

But I might go off...and scoff it.

0:43:000:43:02

ANNA LAUGHS

0:43:020:43:04

Mm. The end of a perfect banquet, I imagine.

0:43:040:43:06

I can't get any of it in.

0:43:060:43:07

-And the end of the programme.

-Mm!

0:43:070:43:10

Mm! Till next time...

0:43:100:43:11

Michael Buerk is joined by top London chef Anna Haugh to celebrate food created for royal jubilees. Anna cooks some unusual 19th-century ingredients used in a royal dish created for Queen Victoria's golden jubilee. Anna then brings the recipe right up to date and prepares a delicious chocolate dessert served at the present Queen's diamond jubilee.Michael unearths a pudding recipe created for a royal jubilee which has been hidden in the Royal Archives for over a hundred years.

Historian Dr Polly Russell discovers how the town of Windsor persuaded the Queen to donate an entire ox so they could revive an ancient jubilee tradition.


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