18/02/2018 Saturday Kitchen Best Bites


18/02/2018

Matt Tebbutt takes a look back at some of his favourite recipes and best moments from Saturday Kitchen.


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Transcript


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Good morning. We've got a jam-packed show for you today,

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with a posh breakfast, an Italian classic,

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and a Cornish tradition all brought together

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with a sprinkle of celebrity guests and top chefs.

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So, forget about the chores, make yourself comfy

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and enjoy another serving of Saturday Kitchen Best Bites.

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Welcome to the show.

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Now, don't go anywhere because for the next 90 minutes

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we've been digging through the Saturday Kitchen archives

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to bring you some of the best moments from years gone by.

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Coming up, comedian Katherine Ryan enjoys the mix of sweet and savoury

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as she tucks into a fig tarte Tatin with honey-glazed duck

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and Puy lentils.

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Adriana Trigiani is cooking up a storm in the kitchen

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with a classic Italian dish of braciole.

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She makes a paste of parsley, basil, breadcrumbs, garlic

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and Parmesan, spreads it over rump steak

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before rolling and cooking in tomato sauce -

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served alongside a blood orange salad.

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Tristan Welch is here with a twist on a traditional Cornish dish,

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as he makes his version of a stargazy pie.

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He makes a pie filling of sardines, quails' eggs, bacon and onions

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covered in a mustard sauce and puff pastry lid -

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finishing off the dish with the heads and the tails of the sardines.

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And then it's time for the Saturday Kitchen omelette challenge

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as Michael Caines takes on Stuart Gillies

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to try and knock him off the top spot.

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And then Swedish chef Niklas Ekstedt is here

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with a spectacular Scandinavian dish.

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He's causing alarm in the studio as he sets fire to juniper wood,

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before smoking cured cod fillets,

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and serves with potato, apple and frisee salad

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and an anchovy mustard dipping sauce.

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And finally, I have the pleasure of making Alistair McGowan

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face his food heaven or his food hell.

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Will he get food heaven - lemon cake with lemon curd, meringue,

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lemon cream and popcorn dust,

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or his food hell - pork chop with Thai red cabbage?

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Two comforting winter warmers, but which one did he get?

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You're going to have to wait till the end of the show to find out.

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Plus, we've been digging through the BBC archives to bring you

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some classic moments from Rick Stein and Keith Floyd.

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But, before all that, it's over to Jason Atherton

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who's making bacon and eggs.

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But as we all know with Jason, it won't be a simple fry up.

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First up is one of the country's most innovative chefs.

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He's brought with us one of his favourite gadgets this morning.

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-It's the brilliant Jason Atherton.

-Morning, James.

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-And the gadget is set over there.

-It is.

-That's a water bath.

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It's a water bath, yeah.

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So we're going to be cooking the egg in there nice and slow.

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They're in every kitchen nowadays but you can actually buy those

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-domestically now.

-This is a home one, yeah.

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Apparently it's the fastest selling home gadget

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-for cooks on the planet at the moment.

-Is it? There we go.

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And what are you going to do with it, then?

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So we're going to take the normal egg, we're going to put it in.

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-If you think about how you'd make a hard-boiled egg...

-Yeah.

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..we're doing that but at a lot slower temperature,

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so it cooks from the inside out.

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-Now, the key to this thing is the temperature, though.

-Yeah.

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-So this is on 62 degrees. 61.9, in fact.

-Right.

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-Have you got that?

-Yeah.

-Right.

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So in goes the egg and we leave that there for an hour and 15 minutes.

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-Seriously?

-So, if you want to come back after you've had coffee

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and your chicken curry and chips, then we'll have it ready for you.

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THEY LAUGH

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An hour and 15 minutes.

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So, James, you're going to make the tomato compote.

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I'm presuming that's hard-boiled after an hour and 15 minutes, is it?

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-Soft-boiled.

-No, it's very, very soft-boiled.

-Is it?

-Yeah.

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-Soft-boiled.

-I could do that in three.

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THEY LAUGH

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-Right.

-So, I'm going to make the mushroom puree

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-for the middle of the plate.

-Yep.

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You're going to make the tomato compote.

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So we've just got some de-seeded tomatoes.

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-We've blanched them and taken the skins off.

-Yeah.

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But the idea behind this slow-cooking

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at a particular lower temperature -

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it doesn't cook any more with the egg yolk.

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You can leave it in there slightly longer as well, can't you?

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Once you've gone past that, you can hold it for another 20 minutes

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after that, and then after that it starts to go a little bit over.

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But it has this really unusual texture, which is fantastic.

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And that's the whole point of it.

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-So we've got two sauces going with this, then.

-Yeah.

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We've got the tomato one here with a little bit of garlic and shallot.

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-What have you got?

-I've got mushrooms - so just your standard

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field mushrooms, I've got some more shallots,

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just a little bit of garlic.

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and we're just going to get these in the pan

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and get these cooked down quite quick

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with a little bit of fresh cream.

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Then we're just going to blend it and that'll be ready to go.

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-Is a field mushroom a mushroom?

-Yes.

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I know it's a mushroom, but is it just a mushroom?

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Are all mushrooms field mushrooms?

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-Are all mushrooms what, sorry?

-Are all mushrooms field mushrooms?

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What's the difference between a field mushroom and a mushroom, is what I'm asking.

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-Some obviously grow in forests as well but they're wild mushrooms.

-Oh.

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And this one grows in a field, so it's a field mushroom.

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-JAMES LAUGHS

-Thanks for that.

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-Right.

-So in go the mushrooms.

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So is this the kind of dish that you've got on your menu now?

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Yeah, this is on our tasting menu

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and also on our a la carte menu at the moment.

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And it's turned into one of our signature dishes.

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So it's doing really well.

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And it's something I invented.

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I like to play on words -

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so at the restaurant I just call it an English breakfast

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and let people be surprised by what we give them, you know?

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But you've still got the bacon, the mushrooms and everything else?

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Yeah, yeah. The bacon's going to go in now.

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-The fried bread I'm assuming is the croutons.

-Yeah.

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So if you can do the croutons for me when you've done that.

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-I'll do that.

-Just standard white bread, dice it into nice cubes.

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We'll fry it like we would do normally

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-if we're doing fried bread at home.

-Right.

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And then with the bacon we're just using cured-dried streaky bacon.

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Sliced nice and thin. We're going to stick it in the oven

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on a low temperature just so it cooks. Probably about 110 degrees.

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-Now you do this...

-Nice and crispy.

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Now, you've mentioned this machine being one of the biggest

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sellers around at the moment. This is the domestic version.

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The commercial ones were about £1,000 when they first started off.

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-But every kitchen's got one of these now.

-Yeah.

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But the difference is you can cook eggs in there,

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but also a lot of people cook fish and lamb...

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-Pork belly, everything.

-Yeah.

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You know, you can cook anything you like in it.

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-The idea is it just keeps things more moist.

-Yeah.

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In the UK we seem to call it this boil-in-the-bag thing,

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but the actual technique of it... The French call it sous-vide.

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-That's right.

-It's actually a very clever technique, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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I mean, we do pork belly at the restaurant...

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It doesn't work for everything.

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I'm not a big fan of fish in it but some chefs like to put fish in it.

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I find the texture unpleasant.

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But when you do pork belly with a little bit of duck fat inside it,

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-it's so tender...

-Yeah.

-..that it's just fantastic.

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And it just saves time. It helps in a professional environment.

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It helps to speed things up. So it's got to be a good thing.

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-You must use one as well, don't you?

-Yeah, a few, actually.

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There you go. So we're going to add cream to that.

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Right, we've got our tomatoes here. Run through what we've got in there.

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So all we've got in - we've got a little bit of shallot,

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our wild mushrooms... Sorry, field mushrooms.

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-We're cooking those down.

-Can I just ask a question about that thing?

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-What, sorry?

-That think you're banging on about over there.

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-Yeah?

-It just hot water in a tub?

-Yes.

-Yeah.

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-This is all the rage, is it, in cooking?

-This is it.

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However, a member of my family... I will not name them.

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..did actually phone up when I mentioned doing this in one...

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In my restaurant they came in and I've got one of these

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and they turned round and said they had a go in their footbath.

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A foot spa doesn't have the same effect as that, right?

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The idea of this is that it's constantly at that temperature

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and you can alter the temperature, but the idea is you cook it at

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-that temperature bang on, isn't it, really?

-Yes, absolutely.

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It holds it at the perfect temperature.

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-That temperature will never, ever change.

-Right.

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A bit like putting a pan of water on the hob and just leaving

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the gas where it is.

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THEY LAUGH

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-Except you're 1,000 quid down, yeah?

-Exactly!

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-Similar to that.

-Yeah, similar.

-I get it, I get it now.

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-I see the appeal now.

-Yep.

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-Right.

-Right, so...

-Mushrooms.

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-We've got trompettes.

-Have you washed these, there?

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I've watched them. It's the only mushroom I wash.

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Normally I just spray them with water and then brush them

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but black trompettes get all the dust and the dirt inside,

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-so it's good to give them a good wash, you know?

-Yeah.

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So, they've gone in.

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Trompette de la mort meaning the mushroom of death, aren't they?

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-That's it, mushroom of death.

-You're selling this.

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-They're the mushrooms of death.

-Yeah.

-Are they?

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Yeah, and you're the first one...

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Should you be the cooking with those?

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Right, the croutons are happening over here.

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You want, in this tomato mixture, you want the mustard

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-and some vinegar.

-Yeah.

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And then, just to sharpen it up, yeah?

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Give it a little bit more flavour.

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Sorry, James, I'm just going to put my mushroom puree in here.

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I'll season this up as well.

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There you go.

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Now, tell us about your restaurant, then,

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because it's got the restaurant,

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but then you've got function rooms and all manner of stuff.

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But this is your own new venture, isn't it, really?

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Well, we've been open ten months now, and it's been a lifelong...

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-Is the egg done yet?

-No, no, we've got another hour and 17...

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No, an hour and ten minutes, yeah.

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I thought in ten months you were opening.

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All right, so that's on.

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Yeah, and it's just been a lifelong dream to have my own restaurant.

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And after 25 years of working for other chefs, I've finally

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got my own establishment where I can sort of express myself.

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-Do your own thing.

-Yeah.

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-I'll do that, you can do the sauce.

-OK.

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-That's it.

-Have you got that?

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-Do you want to show us this egg, then?

-Yeah.

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Do you want to get those out?

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I'll get this lot ready for you.

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So I'll put this back onto...

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I can use that pan again, James, to put the mushroom puree.

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Do you know, James, you know

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when you were tossing things when those flames happened?

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-What's that?

-You know when you were tossing and those flames came out?

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I always get quite excited when I see that. How do you actually do it?

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-I've never managed to do that.

-How do you do what?

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-Get the fire to come out, the flames and stuff.

-Well, you just do that.

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Yeah, but with the flames.

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-I can do that, that's doing it without the flame.

-Right.

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It's the flames that's impressing me, not just the...

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All right, I'll show you in a minute.

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I'm going to do these pancakes in about ten minutes, all right?

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And I'll show you that.

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We've got Crepes Suzette, so that kind of stuff.

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-I need about five of those, just pick the nice ones out.

-OK.

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Right, we're going to do the egg. Where's my water? Here we go.

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-So the bacon's here.

-Yeah.

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In we go like that, so we're going to take the eggs out.

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We'll crack a couple, see how we get on.

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That's it.

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-Right.

-In we go, like so.

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Moment of truth.

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Grab me the other one, James.

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That's it, that's the one. We've got one.

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Right, so now we're ready to plate. So we take the tomato compote.

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-I'll season this up for you.

-Yeah.

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-Pass me a spoon, James.

-Yeah.

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-Thank you.

-There you go.

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So, the tomato compote goes in the middle.

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-Full of questions this morning.

-Like so.

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I thought you were doing those eggs in the other thing.

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Yeah, the eggs, they've been in. They've cooked in there.

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Why have you put other eggs in there, then?

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THEY LAUGH

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Is that a special 800 quid bowl you've got there, is it?

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-These are the ones that went in an hour ago.

-Are they?

-Yeah.

-Oh.

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-So these are the ones we did earlier.

-I see.

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On goes the mushroom puree, like so.

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And we're going to take out our egg.

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So we just... You see how softly poached that is?

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Yeah.

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-That costs you £1,000.

-Very softly poached, that.

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A little bit of pepper and salt on top like so.

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-Just put a bit of parsley on for me, James.

-Yeah.

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Then we add the trompettes of death.

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-There you go, for you.

-Why are they called trompettes of death?

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-I missed that.

-Because they're special for you.

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-So, a few little croutons around like so.

-A bit of parsley.

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And now it's starting to look like a full English breakfast.

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Not a Welsh breakfast, a full English breakfast.

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-And that is our...

-No, it's not yet.

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Sorry, no, no, we forgot the white truffle.

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And then on goes the white truffle for the last bit.

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This is a spring truffle, isn't it?

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Yeah, these are in season for about four or five weeks

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this time of year and they just taste magnificent.

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So it's a spring white truffle. On they go like so.

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And that is our full English breakfast.

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So, a promising social star.

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Have a go at that at home.

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You get to try it.

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-One between four, is it?

-Yes.

0:12:270:12:29

-Dive into that, then.

-Shall I pass it on?

0:12:290:12:33

-No! You've got to try it.

-Really? All right, OK.

0:12:330:12:37

Tell us what you think. This is on your tasting menu as well.

0:12:370:12:40

-It's on the tasting menu, a smaller version.

-Yeah, right.

0:12:400:12:43

-Oh, that's incredibly softly poached.

-Yeah.

0:12:430:12:46

These are becoming more and more popular, I have to say,

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but people have got to know what to do with them,

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-that's the problem.

-Yeah.

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-Is that a good egg?

-It's a good egg.

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Worth £1,000?

0:12:570:12:59

-I'd pay a grand for that.

-There you go, OK!

0:12:590:13:02

Even though he said he'd play a grand for it,

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I'm not sure Rhod's convinced on Jason's egg.

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But what an incredible breakfast and a great start to the show.

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Coming up, Katherine Ryan is served an unusual mix of sweet and savoury

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as she tucks into fig tarte Tatin with confit honeyed duck.

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But first, it's over to Rick Stein, who's in Croatia sampling the

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local lamb before giving his take on a traditional Croatian pot roast.

0:13:240:13:28

Not very far from Split, up in the mountains,

0:13:320:13:34

there's a village called Zrnovnica. I hope I've said that right.

0:13:340:13:38

It's a very special place because there's a little

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tavern there that's renowned for its roast lamb.

0:13:410:13:44

What I've discovered about this restaurant right up

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in the mountains, a bit of a local secret where they do fantastic lamb.

0:13:490:13:53

Apparently, if you haven't tasted the lamb, you haven't lived.

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Now, the thing is that the guy that owns the restaurant

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doesn't want us to be there.

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He's got 26 lambs to roast today, so the last thing

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he wants is a blinking camera crew getting in the way.

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But we really want to see this being cooked and he does it in two ways,

0:14:120:14:16

first of all on a spit, but the way that really

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interests me is under a lid called a peka,

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a steel lid which he covers in coal,

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and apparently that makes the lamb really crisp and golden.

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I can't wait.

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-Hi.

-This is my father, Dondo.

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-Very nice to meet you. Dondo.

-Yes.

-Good, let's have a look.

0:14:430:14:46

THEY SPEAK CROATIAN

0:14:460:14:49

Good Lord!

0:14:530:14:54

God, that is fantastic.

0:14:560:14:57

I've just been thinking about this ever since I got off the boat.

0:14:570:15:00

Gosh, it's making me...

0:15:000:15:02

For me, the more rugged the cooking, the better a lamb,

0:15:030:15:06

and this is sensational. It's going to be absolutely lovely.

0:15:060:15:11

I can't talk any more, I can't see!

0:15:120:15:15

It's simply cooked with onion, carrots, salt aplenty, pepper

0:15:170:15:22

and potatoes, a lot of those well seasoned, plus lard, and that's it.

0:15:220:15:27

And then, well, words fail me, largely because of the smoke intake.

0:15:300:15:34

But, look, anyone who likes a good pot roast will love this.

0:15:340:15:38

He's just put the... Excuse me.

0:15:420:15:44

He's just put the dish on the hot surface there,

0:15:440:15:47

covered it with a lid and then he's putting hot coals all over the top.

0:15:470:15:53

So this is what's going to give it this lovely crisp finish,

0:15:550:15:58

golden crisp finish.

0:15:580:15:59

I love cooking this at home.

0:16:080:16:10

People say, "How do you cook that, Rick?"

0:16:100:16:12

I say, "Well, I discovered a secret from the shepherds

0:16:120:16:15

"of the Mosor Mountains in Croatia."

0:16:150:16:18

It's timeless.

0:16:180:16:19

Thank you very much.

0:16:220:16:24

-Is that all for me?

-Yeah. It is.

0:16:240:16:27

No, it's not, it's for the crew, too.

0:16:270:16:31

But I get the best bits.

0:16:310:16:33

Well, here we go.

0:16:330:16:34

I've been watching this being prepared

0:16:340:16:36

and the bit I love the best is the skin.

0:16:360:16:39

That's simply the best piece of roast lamb I've ever tasted.

0:16:450:16:49

I mean, it's not just about the quality of the lamb,

0:16:490:16:51

it's very young lamb, so it's sweet, it's very nicely seasoned.

0:16:510:16:55

But it's the smoke, it just tastes of wood. It is sensational.

0:16:550:17:01

And they serve the lamb with these lovely spring onions which

0:17:010:17:03

you dip in salt, eat some of the lamb and then eat a bit of onion.

0:17:030:17:07

Mm.

0:17:090:17:10

This is pasticada, pot-roasted beef with prunes and a few figs.

0:17:170:17:23

Pasticada, it's Croatia's favourite dish.

0:17:260:17:30

It's their national dish,

0:17:300:17:31

it's their homesick dish, you know, the one you sort of think,

0:17:310:17:34

"What would I give for some roast beef or some fish and chips?"

0:17:340:17:38

Well, if you're Croatian, "What would I give for a nice pasticada?"

0:17:380:17:42

Well, I'm larding this piece of beef with garlic for flavour

0:17:440:17:48

and bacon for fat because as it cooks,

0:17:480:17:51

it cooks over a long time, I don't want it to dry out.

0:17:510:17:54

I'm pleased that larding is over.

0:17:590:18:01

I'm now adding about 60ml of red wine vinegar

0:18:010:18:05

and I'm going to leave that to marinade for a couple of hours.

0:18:050:18:09

Then, in a hot pan, a really hot pan with olive oil,

0:18:090:18:12

I'm searing the beef to give it a bit of colour,

0:18:120:18:15

and I think searing meat enhances the flavour, too.

0:18:150:18:18

That beef has got a lovely colour on it now.

0:18:210:18:23

And you can see my larding there,

0:18:230:18:26

so in there, with all these lovely vegetables -

0:18:260:18:28

tomato, carrot, onion, celery -

0:18:280:18:32

and I'll just get some herbs,

0:18:320:18:34

some rosemary and bay leaf to put on the top there, that will

0:18:340:18:38

smell really nice as it's cooking, and a deep, dark Greek red wine.

0:18:380:18:43

If I was in Croatia I'd be using Dingac, which is really dark red,

0:18:430:18:49

that's very important in this dish, and lots of it.

0:18:490:18:52

So, now into a moderate oven, about 170, 180 degrees,

0:18:560:19:01

for about one hour. And then I'm going to take the lid off

0:19:010:19:05

and add the fruit. There we go.

0:19:050:19:07

That's looking quite nice. Now to add the fruit.

0:19:080:19:11

So, apple, prunes and figs.

0:19:110:19:13

This is a dish, I think, where east meets west.

0:19:180:19:21

Using meat and sweet things together,

0:19:210:19:24

it goes back centuries, and pasticada is sweet, fruity stew.

0:19:240:19:30

Actually, it just means "stew from the pastures".

0:19:300:19:33

I'm back in the oven now for about another 45 minutes.

0:19:390:19:42

Well, this is a bit tense for me

0:19:540:19:56

because I have had not much luck with these long slow-cooked

0:19:560:19:59

pieces of beef, they've always been a bit dry.

0:19:590:20:02

Actually, this one's looking not too bad.

0:20:030:20:06

I'm pleased that I chose the chuck joint.

0:20:060:20:09

Yes, I like the look of that.

0:20:090:20:11

And this is a lot better.

0:20:180:20:19

I mean, this looks absolutely lovely - the juice, the fruit,

0:20:190:20:23

you can see the figs, the prunes, the apple, the onion.

0:20:230:20:26

And now some gnocchi just to complete the dish.

0:20:280:20:30

Fab.

0:20:330:20:34

Great stuff, and that dish looked really interesting.

0:20:390:20:41

Prunes and figs are available all year round, of course,

0:20:410:20:44

and these days there's lots of different recipes

0:20:440:20:46

you can do with them. I'm going to show you a variant

0:20:460:20:48

on a classic, really, a classic tarte Tatin,

0:20:480:20:50

which is a classic apple tart which was invented by the Tatin sisters.

0:20:500:20:55

It was actually invented...

0:20:550:20:56

They made a tart, they brought it out of the oven,

0:20:560:21:00

it fell onto the floor, and ten-second rule, picked it up,

0:21:000:21:03

turned it over, served it,

0:21:030:21:04

and that's where the tarte Tatin was invented.

0:21:040:21:06

An upside-down apple tart, the only one that you can make like that.

0:21:060:21:09

So, I'm going to make it out of figs, really,

0:21:090:21:11

but you start to off with sugar and you make a caramel in a pan,

0:21:110:21:14

and then we're going to add a bit of butter to that

0:21:140:21:17

and make this into a classic little tarte Tatin with puff pastry.

0:21:170:21:20

With this tarte Tatin, I'm going to serve it with a confit of duck,

0:21:200:21:23

which is in here, which is duck legs.

0:21:230:21:25

Confit means a little bit of salt,

0:21:250:21:27

particularly where duck is concerned,

0:21:270:21:29

but then it's then cooked in duck fat, which this is, all right?

0:21:290:21:33

So you basically just immerse it in duck fat,

0:21:330:21:36

that's the confit side of it, and you get this amazing flavour.

0:21:360:21:39

We just drizzle that with some honey and I'm going to roast that

0:21:390:21:41

in the oven and I'm going to serve this with some lentils over the top.

0:21:410:21:45

Now, I don't know where to start, really, about your career.

0:21:450:21:48

But let's talk about the tour first of all,

0:21:480:21:50

because you're about to embark on your third tour.

0:21:500:21:52

-So tell us about that. It's exciting.

-Yeah.

0:21:520:21:54

-Three tours down.

-Oh, it's great.

0:21:540:21:56

So, I love travelling the UK, I think

0:21:560:21:58

comedy is a conversation and I like to meet people

0:21:580:22:01

and chat to them and get to see all kinds of places.

0:22:010:22:05

You have a beautiful country, you really do.

0:22:050:22:07

This one's called Kathbum, which is what my family called me growing up.

0:22:070:22:11

-Right.

-It's also just kind of a cool name, Kathbum.

0:22:110:22:14

So, what's different about this tour than the others, really?

0:22:140:22:17

-People come to this one.

-Right! LAUGHTER

0:22:170:22:20

This one is introspective.

0:22:200:22:22

It's about my life and going back home,

0:22:220:22:25

but it's also the same stuff that I've been

0:22:250:22:28

doing on television in the UK, which is celebrity stuff,

0:22:280:22:31

pop culture references, just jokes, being a little bit mean

0:22:310:22:35

but always on the right side of wrong, I think.

0:22:350:22:38

It seems to me that, as comedians, you do the hard work,

0:22:380:22:41

and you spend a lot of time in the pubs in town, in London.

0:22:410:22:45

Came over, what, ten years ago now?

0:22:450:22:47

I've been in the UK for ten years, nearly.

0:22:470:22:49

So you've done the grounding.

0:22:490:22:50

But what was that like, really, particularly as a female comedian?

0:22:500:22:53

Because the timing was absolutely perfect for you, really.

0:22:530:22:56

You mustn't have known that back then.

0:22:560:22:57

Yeah, I really think if you've been doing comedy,

0:22:570:23:00

especially if you are a lady, at this time it's almost like

0:23:000:23:03

the .com boom where all of a sudden everybody was on the internet.

0:23:030:23:07

All of a sudden, people are like, "Oh, women are funny.

0:23:070:23:10

"Isn't it adorable that they are realising that?"

0:23:100:23:12

But, um... It's great. It's done me a lot of favours too.

0:23:120:23:17

I like being different. I have an accent in this country.

0:23:170:23:20

Did that help you when it comes to do comedy? Does that help at all?

0:23:200:23:25

Maybe. Who knows if I'm funny at all,

0:23:250:23:27

or if I just sound like a monkey.

0:23:270:23:28

-I don't know. I don't care.

-But...

0:23:280:23:31

Is there such a thing, is it as big as it is in Canada,

0:23:310:23:34

where you're from?

0:23:340:23:35

I mean, in my own personal experience,

0:23:350:23:37

which is not great, because I've been away for so long,

0:23:370:23:40

I found that there weren't as many comedy clubs

0:23:400:23:43

for people starting out.

0:23:430:23:44

Here in the UK, it's such a pub culture,

0:23:440:23:47

and people pay to see live music and art,

0:23:470:23:49

and the spoken word and comedy,

0:23:490:23:51

so when you are starting,

0:23:510:23:52

you can do a gig every single night of the week.

0:23:520:23:55

And that's how you get better.

0:23:550:23:56

But do you find the audience is very different?

0:23:560:23:58

Because there is, you know, particularly...

0:23:580:24:01

How do you find that? The North and South? Do you find that?

0:24:010:24:03

-Do you have to adapt and change?

-I love the North. No, I mean...

0:24:030:24:07

My show is my show, and the people who like it kind of find me.

0:24:070:24:10

And they're so friendly in the North. They are more Canadian.

0:24:100:24:14

They're happy to see you.

0:24:140:24:15

They're happy that you have come to see them.

0:24:150:24:18

I love London audiences too. I mean, I just love living over here.

0:24:180:24:22

-I have a British mum.

-Yeah?

0:24:220:24:24

I'm really lucky that I moved here

0:24:240:24:26

and became a British comic, really.

0:24:260:24:28

Because, I mean, when you speak to comedians,

0:24:280:24:30

it's kind of something that they've wanted to do.

0:24:300:24:32

But for you, you did it, I don't suppose you realised that

0:24:320:24:34

because you did a Jack-of-all-trades when you were younger, didn't you?

0:24:340:24:37

-I did.

-Right.

0:24:370:24:39

-I mean, I went to uni because that's a responsible thing to do.

-Yeah.

0:24:390:24:43

And I just grew up in this household where

0:24:430:24:47

I had really cool powerful women. My mum and my grandma and everybody.

0:24:470:24:50

It never even occurred to me that there were things

0:24:500:24:53

that would be more difficult than other things for me to do.

0:24:530:24:56

So for a while, I wanted to be a doctor,

0:24:560:24:58

and I was really academic in school, and then, for a while,

0:24:580:25:01

I was a presenter, and then I worked in restaurants

0:25:010:25:03

and I...

0:25:030:25:04

I just...

0:25:040:25:06

It never occurred to me that I couldn't or shouldn't be a comedian.

0:25:060:25:09

Because you worked in a very...

0:25:090:25:10

You mentioned restaurants,

0:25:100:25:12

you worked in a very famous American restaurant chain.

0:25:120:25:14

-Is it too early to say Hooters?

-No, it's fine.

-I worked at Hooters.

0:25:140:25:19

-I've been there.

-How did you like it?

0:25:190:25:21

I only went 16 times, but it's...

0:25:210:25:23

Yeah.

0:25:230:25:25

-Apparently...

-Just doing research.

-Amazing chicken wings.

0:25:250:25:29

-Great chicken wings.

-Do you know what?

0:25:290:25:31

It is a family restaurant, kids eat free on weekends,

0:25:310:25:33

and I was going to uni, I was doing a ton of things,

0:25:330:25:37

and I met a lot of really cool people working there.

0:25:370:25:39

A lot of really strong women.

0:25:390:25:40

Not the kind that you would think, maybe, stereotypically worked there.

0:25:400:25:43

You say it as well, but I was reading about you last night.

0:25:430:25:46

You owe that place a lot,

0:25:460:25:47

not just in terms of, it must be great,

0:25:470:25:50

because of the stuff that you can pick up in terms of your material

0:25:500:25:53

-for comedy...

-Yeah.

-..but also your health as well.

0:25:530:25:55

One of the girls working there who was studying to be a doctor,

0:25:550:25:58

we were all in uni, she looked at my leg and she was like,

0:25:580:26:01

"Oh, you know, you need to get that mole removed."

0:26:010:26:03

And I was like, "No, I don't." She said, "Yeah, that mole is bad."

0:26:030:26:06

And it turned out to be like stage II melanoma,

0:26:060:26:10

so had I not been in orange hot pants,

0:26:100:26:13

let it be a lesson to everyone who is thinking about orange hot pants.

0:26:130:26:16

-They could save your life.

-Yeah.

0:26:160:26:18

So you are doing the tour, you are about to embark on it now.

0:26:180:26:21

But also, you're about to embark on something very different,

0:26:210:26:24

something that I actually love watching as well, darts.

0:26:240:26:27

So tell us about that. You must be excited about it.

0:26:270:26:29

Well, I love Comic Relief, and Sport Relief,

0:26:290:26:32

this year they asked me to participate in

0:26:320:26:34

Let's Play Darts For Sport Relief.

0:26:340:26:36

It's something that I wanted to learn about

0:26:360:26:38

and get involved in, and I got to meet the professionals

0:26:380:26:41

and some other comedians, and some celebs,

0:26:410:26:43

and it was really competitive.

0:26:430:26:45

-Really, really, really fun.

-But you found yourself...

0:26:450:26:49

-I was watching a little clip of it. You're pretty good at it.

-Yeah.

0:26:490:26:52

-Well, it's not that hard.

-Right. LAUGHTER

0:26:520:26:55

The bull's-eye, straight in the bull's-eye.

0:26:560:26:58

-Yeah, I did that for you.

-Right, OK.

0:26:580:27:01

-How many shots did that take to get right?

-That was my first short.

0:27:010:27:04

-Oh, it was your first shot?

-Went downhill from there.

-Oh, right, OK.

0:27:040:27:07

I think it was cool working with Andy Fordham

0:27:070:27:09

who is the world champion.

0:27:090:27:11

He was so lovely. I mean, these were just the loveliest people.

0:27:110:27:15

You won't remember a show...

0:27:150:27:16

-You won't remember a show called Bullseye, do you?

-No.

0:27:160:27:19

I know, because you're into the technology and your tweeting

0:27:190:27:22

-and everything else.

-I do.

0:27:220:27:23

You need to finish this and Google Bullseye.

0:27:230:27:25

-It was the greatest darts show ever.

-OK.

0:27:250:27:28

-Ever!

-So it's like, I've heard it's like a quiz, but it's darts.

0:27:280:27:32

It's more than a quiz. It, it...

0:27:320:27:34

It's the greatest,

0:27:340:27:36

I think it's actually the greatest programme ever.

0:27:360:27:38

-Ever?

-Ever. Ever.

0:27:380:27:39

Could you incorporate an element of Bullseye into Saturday Kitchen,

0:27:390:27:43

-do you think?

-I've actually got...

0:27:430:27:45

They have this thing called a Bendy Bully which I've got at home.

0:27:450:27:48

I've got an original Bendy Bully. That was what...

0:27:480:27:52

I think you got it when you didn't win.

0:27:520:27:54

If you did win, it was always something random.

0:27:540:27:57

-Like a boat, and you lived about 300 miles away from the sea.

-Ah-ha.

0:27:570:28:00

It was always something like that, but you'd need to watch it.

0:28:000:28:02

Look, your little tarte Tatin here.

0:28:020:28:04

So this is your little fig tarte Tatin.

0:28:040:28:06

All I've done with that, is you've got the caramel in here,

0:28:060:28:08

the figs, the puff pastry, you encase it like that.

0:28:080:28:10

You can allow those to cool and then cook them from cold.

0:28:100:28:13

And then, basically, just pop them out

0:28:130:28:16

and you've got this amazing little tarte Tatin.

0:28:160:28:19

-So it just goes to show, you can make a mistake, and be a hero.

-Yeah.

0:28:190:28:23

-You drop something on the floor.

-Exactly.

0:28:230:28:25

-Which happens quite a lot on the show.

-Yeah, me too.

0:28:250:28:27

And then you've got the lovely duck here.

0:28:270:28:29

But I've got this sauce, now, this is the lentils I've got in here.

0:28:290:28:32

A little bit of veg. We've got the sauce in there as well.

0:28:320:28:34

-A tiny bit more sauce, we'll put in.

-I love lentils.

0:28:340:28:38

-And then a bit of seasoning.

-Mm-hm.

-Salt.

0:28:380:28:40

When you're doing the lentils, particularly with the duck,

0:28:400:28:43

because the duck has got a little bit of fat in it, you put -

0:28:430:28:45

this is a good tip - sherry vinegar.

0:28:450:28:47

A tiny bit of sherry vinegar.

0:28:470:28:50

And it must be sherry vinegar. Not malt vinegar.

0:28:500:28:52

But you put a little bit of sherry vinegar in it.

0:28:520:28:54

You put the lentils all the way around.

0:28:540:28:56

-On the dessert?!

-It's not a dessert.

0:28:560:28:59

It can be a dessert, if you wish.

0:28:590:29:00

LAUGHTER

0:29:000:29:02

Isn't tarte Tatin like a tart?

0:29:020:29:04

-Yeah, it is.

-It's a duck, sort of sweet and...

0:29:040:29:07

Is this one of those things where you guys put steak in pie

0:29:070:29:09

and all that nonsense?

0:29:090:29:10

-This is exactly that, yeah.

-Oh, good.

-Yeah.

0:29:100:29:13

And then...

0:29:130:29:14

I was thinking that actually, yes,

0:29:140:29:16

-you could actually put just a scoop of ice cream on it.

-Oh, my.

0:29:160:29:19

-But then, this is your duck leg.

-That looks so good.

0:29:190:29:22

This is delicious,

0:29:220:29:23

which is basically anything that is cooked in duck fat for three hours.

0:29:230:29:28

Especially if that duck has never been fed any bread,

0:29:280:29:30

-and he gets really healthy seeds in his life.

-There you go.

0:29:300:29:33

-This is your honey roasted duck confit...

-Thank you.

0:29:330:29:36

With fig tarte Tatin.

0:29:360:29:37

-So I just get to have it?

-Yeah, just you.

-Oh, thanks.

0:29:370:29:40

-OK, I'll try it really quick. Try the lentils.

-Tell us what you think.

0:29:400:29:43

So when does the tour start? Before you take a mouthful.

0:29:430:29:45

I've been on tour, it's started,

0:29:450:29:47

and it's going on until the 21st of May.

0:29:470:29:49

-I am at the Hammersmith Apollo.

-Best of luck with that.

0:29:490:29:52

-So that will be fun.

-Thank you.

0:29:520:29:54

I love lentils. I knew that.

0:29:540:29:57

-Really delicious.

-Try that duck.

0:29:570:29:59

-It basically just melts in the mouth. It's amazing.

-Oh, my gosh.

0:29:590:30:02

You can actually buy that duck already done as well.

0:30:020:30:04

You can actually buy it in jars and tins, which is good stuff,

0:30:040:30:07

-and then you just cook it.

-No.

0:30:070:30:09

-So good.

-Happy with that? There you go.

0:30:090:30:10

The horror on Katherine's face there

0:30:150:30:17

when she saw a duck being put on top of her dessert.

0:30:170:30:19

But thankfully, she was won over in the end.

0:30:190:30:22

Now, it's over to Adriana Trigiani

0:30:220:30:24

who is cooking up an Italian treat

0:30:240:30:26

in the form of braciole.

0:30:260:30:28

Not only has she written seven bestselling novels,

0:30:280:30:31

but she is about to direct her first film.

0:30:310:30:33

And has just released a brand-new cookery book

0:30:330:30:36

full of classic Italian recipes from her New York childhood.

0:30:360:30:40

She has flown in from America especially for us.

0:30:400:30:42

And it's brilliant to have her on Saturday Kitchen.

0:30:420:30:45

-It's Adriana Trig-giani. Trig-giani?

-Tri-jani. Tri-jani.

0:30:450:30:48

OK, first things...

0:30:480:30:49

What are we cooking?

0:30:490:30:51

OK, first, a little safety. I have a four-year-old moved those.

0:30:510:30:54

-Don't hang your handles over. Or the kids...

-OK. Fire away.

0:30:540:30:58

-What are we cooking then?

-We are making braciole,

0:30:580:31:01

and braciole is basically a pesto-infused meat roll

0:31:010:31:05

that we make in a classic tomato sauce. Yeah

0:31:050:31:08

And then we slice it thinly,

0:31:080:31:09

and we're going to make some blood oranges

0:31:090:31:11

and a Venetian salad that my grandmother really served

0:31:110:31:14

-with practically every meal.

-And this is in your book as well?

0:31:140:31:17

This is in my book. First thing, get that meat nice and...

0:31:170:31:21

-What cut of meat is this?

-Well...

-Sirloin.

-I think this is a sirloin.

0:31:210:31:25

-Yeah.

-And we have been hitting it all day. So it's in good shape.

0:31:250:31:29

We just pretend that, you know, it is somebody we don't like.

0:31:290:31:32

All right, now... I'd like you to take these, this is parsley.

0:31:320:31:36

Yeah.

0:31:360:31:37

-And basil. We say bay-sil.

-Well, you know. Basil.

-Basil.

-OK.

0:31:370:31:41

So go ahead, if you would chop that up really fine for me

0:31:410:31:45

-and put that here. And this is breadcrumb.

-Yeah.

0:31:450:31:49

-If you wouldn't mind.

-Fresh breadcrumbs?

0:31:490:31:50

Yeah, fresh breadcrumbs.

0:31:500:31:52

And...

0:31:520:31:53

-Parmesan cheese.

-Yeah.

-It's beautiful.

0:31:530:31:55

-And that goes in here too.

-Lovely.

-You know what? I can help.

0:31:550:31:58

That's all right. I'll keep going. You're all right.

0:31:580:32:00

Really? You're not going so fast. Let me help you.

0:32:000:32:02

LAUGHTER

0:32:020:32:04

-You're a little slow.

-I'm going a quick as I can.

0:32:040:32:06

-Well, it's not fast enough, James.

-All right, OK.

0:32:060:32:08

OK? It's a show. Here we go.

0:32:080:32:10

You know why Italian girls can cook? Why's that?

0:32:100:32:13

Well, they want to keep their men faithful.

0:32:130:32:16

So they really learn how to do this.

0:32:160:32:18

At least we know if we cook well,

0:32:180:32:20

we can keep them home one night a week.

0:32:200:32:22

LAUGHTER

0:32:220:32:23

-You know. Are you married, James?

-I'm not married, no.

-You're not?!

0:32:230:32:26

-No.

-You are such a catch, why aren't you married?

0:32:260:32:29

-Oh, I just run.

-You just run?

-Yeah. I run very quickly.

0:32:290:32:33

In the opposite direction.

0:32:330:32:35

-When somebody mentions marriage, I'm off.

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:32:350:32:37

Well, you should change that because it would be nice to see if you...

0:32:370:32:42

-You should read some of our tabloid newspapers.

-Sh!

-Really?

0:32:420:32:47

A man that can cook?

0:32:470:32:48

It's the greatest thing in the world.

0:32:480:32:50

-OK, what have you got in there? You've got the cheese.

-Yes, cheese.

0:32:500:32:53

-Right, how many cloves of garlic do you want?

-You know what, guys?

0:32:530:32:56

Just put olive oil in. I'm kind of liberal with it, because I love it.

0:32:560:32:58

-Right.

-Then I use my hands. OK, go ahead, you're doing great.

0:32:580:33:01

-Thank you very much.

-OK, now it's like you're in a kitchen.

0:33:010:33:04

OK, take off your wedding rings,

0:33:040:33:05

the world's tiniest handcuffs. And then just get in here.

0:33:050:33:08

LAUGHTER

0:33:080:33:09

-See what I mean?

-I know.

-See what I mean?

0:33:090:33:12

Be very... Folks at home, be very liberal with this.

0:33:130:33:17

I like it really stuffed well, and I also love, as an extra,

0:33:170:33:21

sometimes, if you feel like it, pignole nuts.

0:33:210:33:23

But we did it sort of simply.

0:33:230:33:24

-Then you roll...

-Pignole nuts?

0:33:240:33:26

Yeah, then you roll...

0:33:260:33:27

..these bundles, OK? You roll them like this.

0:33:290:33:32

And then you take two strings...

0:33:320:33:33

Oh.

0:33:360:33:37

LAUGHTER

0:33:370:33:39

It's really fine. It doesn't matter. It doesn't matter.

0:33:390:33:43

But if you're going to do the breadcrumbs like this,

0:33:430:33:45

-then I would do this. If you forget.

-That's all right.

-Just make it wet.

0:33:450:33:49

-OK?

-They'll be fine like that.

-They're going to be delicious.

0:33:490:33:52

It smells great. So then you roll them...

0:33:520:33:54

-Just like so.

-Look at that. Now, this is a very traditional Italian?

0:33:560:34:01

-Or Italian-New York?

-You know what? This is Barese.

0:34:010:34:04

You know, there is all different parts of Italy and lately,

0:34:040:34:07

what has gotten hot, is the area on the Adriatic Puglia.

0:34:070:34:11

And this is, um...

0:34:110:34:14

-This is a traditional peasant dish.

-Yeah.

0:34:150:34:17

But you had this on fancy holidays. You didn't have this...

0:34:170:34:19

-You see, I'm a messy cook. You're not.

-That's all right.

0:34:190:34:22

Look how neat it is here.

0:34:220:34:23

I feel bad, I'm going to have to stay and clean

0:34:230:34:25

-and then repaint the set.

-LAUGHTER

0:34:250:34:27

OK, here we go. You just tie up these bundles.

0:34:270:34:30

-I'll look at that for you.

-OK.

0:34:300:34:31

Now, you are going to cook them with the strings on them.

0:34:310:34:33

-What did you just find?

-Nothing.

-My ring?

0:34:330:34:35

It was just a little bit of Whitby Jet. That is what that was.

0:34:350:34:37

That is the sign of my husband's love, so I'll need that back.

0:34:370:34:40

-OK, now...

-Right.

0:34:400:34:42

We take this out,

0:34:420:34:44

this is a pork bone that we just had to thicken up the sauce, OK?

0:34:440:34:48

Now, the sauce is...

0:34:480:34:49

What we've got here, you've got tomatoes or tom-ay-toes.

0:34:490:34:51

-Tom-ay-toes or tomatoes.

-Puree. A bit of water.

0:34:510:34:53

What are the spices that you've got in here?

0:34:530:34:55

OK, they are Italian seasoning.

0:34:550:34:57

I see black pepper, I see oregano, and some garlic salt.

0:34:570:35:00

And, you know, when we wrote the cook book,

0:35:000:35:02

you know, I grew up in Big Stone Gap, Virginia,

0:35:020:35:05

and we were the only Italians, they called us I-talians.

0:35:050:35:08

So when we were there,

0:35:080:35:10

you couldn't get the New York Italian seasonings.

0:35:100:35:13

-"We" being your sister?

-Yeah.

-You wrote the book with?

0:35:130:35:15

My sisters and my mom.

0:35:150:35:17

-So we used sometimes the dry herbs...

-And the book is called?

0:35:170:35:22

Look how nice and neat. Cooking With My Sisters.

0:35:220:35:24

Cooking With Your Sisters. There we go.

0:35:240:35:25

All right, look, you have a little thing here.

0:35:250:35:27

This will help me a little bit.

0:35:270:35:28

And then just bathe them in there and it cooks through.

0:35:280:35:32

-And you can do variations.

-Yeah.

-OK?

0:35:320:35:35

So if you like raisins,

0:35:350:35:36

the Sicilians will put raisins in this, which is delicious.

0:35:360:35:40

I've had it with aubergine once like that.

0:35:400:35:41

OK, you could, we never ate eggplant in our house,

0:35:410:35:45

which you call aubergine?

0:35:450:35:47

-Yeah.

-Because it made my father sick.

0:35:470:35:49

So we never ever had eggplant. Cos, you know,

0:35:490:35:51

my father was the boss of the whole house.

0:35:510:35:53

Obviously,

0:35:530:35:54

if we didn't eat what he didn't want to eat, it didn't get eaten.

0:35:540:35:57

-OK.

-OK.

-Now over here...

0:35:570:35:59

They are done. They're gorgeous. We can cut them up.

0:36:000:36:02

Now, while you're doing that, I'll prepare the salad.

0:36:020:36:05

While you're doing that, I'll do that.

0:36:050:36:07

-Now, blood oranges?

-Do you understand all this?

-Yeah.

0:36:070:36:10

Because we were talking earlier, yeah, it's very simple.

0:36:100:36:13

-Well, the blood oranges, now, this is a Venetian thing.

-Yeah.

0:36:130:36:16

See, my family is from four parts of Italy.

0:36:160:36:19

Now, the cuisine is very different in those areas, obviously.

0:36:190:36:23

But this blood orange...

0:36:230:36:25

..kind of salad, my grandmother, who's Venetian,

0:36:260:36:29

would serve with everything.

0:36:290:36:31

And it's very simple, but I've never seen it in a restaurant,

0:36:310:36:36

you know, we make it at home all the time. And it's very simple.

0:36:360:36:39

You peel and slice your blood oranges thin,

0:36:390:36:42

-and you can use a regular orange if you want to.

-There you go.

0:36:420:36:45

And then you take a little pepper... I see a little grinder there.

0:36:450:36:49

Pepper there. OK. I'll just dress some leaves for you.

0:36:490:36:52

And really give it a nice dose of pepper, that's important.

0:36:520:36:56

And then you take the best olive oil you've got,

0:36:560:36:59

extra virgin is always good. And then you drizzle

0:36:590:37:02

over the top.

0:37:020:37:04

And you serve it at room temperature. That is important too.

0:37:050:37:08

You know, the Italians don't like anything cold.

0:37:080:37:11

You know, don't refrigerate your tomatoes,

0:37:110:37:12

-don't refrigerate your oranges.

-I'll put that out.

0:37:120:37:15

Now I need to slice your lovely, delicious cooked beef.

0:37:150:37:17

I'll just dress my salad here.

0:37:170:37:20

There we go. A bit of that.

0:37:200:37:22

And all you do, see how the bundles have... They have cooked through.

0:37:240:37:29

-Yeah. They're nice and moist.

-Delicious.

-They look gorgeous.

0:37:290:37:33

And then you're going to snip that string off.

0:37:330:37:36

I think my great-aunt choked on the string once.

0:37:360:37:39

My sister was in charge and really messed it up.

0:37:390:37:43

So how long does that take to cook, roughly?

0:37:440:37:46

You're cooking goes for about, what? 15, 20 minutes?

0:37:460:37:48

That's right, something like that.

0:37:480:37:50

And your sauce, cook it longer. We cook our sauce for hours.

0:37:500:37:53

It could be cooking four hours.

0:37:530:37:55

-Easily.

-So we need to snip off our...

0:37:550:37:57

-Give it a little snip.

-..string.

0:37:570:37:59

-There is two of those on that one.

-Hm-mm.

0:37:590:38:02

And see that cheese and that pesto? It all holds it all together.

0:38:020:38:05

They smell superb, I have to say.

0:38:050:38:08

You know what is so funny?

0:38:080:38:09

When you eat in restaurants, you never realise, really,

0:38:090:38:13

all that goes into this. Right?

0:38:130:38:15

And you do it so well, and you are neat as a pin,

0:38:150:38:17

I can't understand, you're so neat, why you are not married. OK.

0:38:170:38:21

LAUGHTER

0:38:210:38:22

-I mean, you're not the typical sloppy guy.

-Aren't I?

-No!

0:38:220:38:25

Because I'm too busy clearing up after you lot, that is what it is.

0:38:250:38:28

-There you can see it.

-Look at that.

-See that delicious filling there?

0:38:300:38:34

Adriana, that looks fantastic.

0:38:340:38:36

So remind us what that dish is again.

0:38:360:38:38

OK, this is called braciole. And this is the blood orange salad.

0:38:380:38:43

-You're a star.

-Very simple. All the way from New York.

0:38:430:38:46

Lovely, lovely, lovely. A round of applause!

0:38:500:38:52

APPLAUSE

0:38:520:38:53

That's a first. Go on, then. Carry on.

0:38:530:38:56

I think they are just happy that I made it through.

0:38:560:38:58

-Well done, well done.

-Grab a seat.

0:38:580:38:59

-Thank you.

-I'll give you that.

-Thank you.

-You are getting fed today.

0:38:590:39:03

-I am.

-Bet you can't wait till the end of this.

0:39:030:39:06

Dive in and tell us what you think.

0:39:060:39:08

The blood orange. Superb. Bang in season now as well.

0:39:110:39:14

Yeah. Perfect.

0:39:140:39:15

I think, with the orange and the tomato,

0:39:150:39:17

also a buffet is often finished, isn't it?

0:39:170:39:19

-With a little bit of citrus.

-Exactly.

0:39:190:39:21

So the oranges work well with the tomato.

0:39:210:39:23

Mm.

0:39:230:39:24

Is that scrumptious?

0:39:240:39:26

I say, if you are a vegetarian, you just take that filling

0:39:260:39:30

and use a dense pasta like the bowties or the tagliatelle,

0:39:300:39:34

something thick, and you take that and you just make your pasta

0:39:340:39:38

and there is, like, secrets to making the pasta.

0:39:380:39:41

Don't ever rinse it. A lot of people do.

0:39:410:39:43

That ruins it.

0:39:430:39:45

Al dente, don't cook it too long, you sort of learn.

0:39:450:39:48

And you put it in the pan, and you cover it with cheese first...

0:39:480:39:51

Uh-huh.

0:39:510:39:52

So the cheese adheres, and then your olive oil,

0:39:520:39:54

and then put that filling on top of it.

0:39:540:39:57

-People will go crazy.

-There you go. OK.

0:39:570:39:58

An incredible Italian dish there from Adriana,

0:40:020:40:05

but James certainly had his work cut out in the kitchen.

0:40:050:40:08

Now it's time to head over to Keith Floyd,

0:40:080:40:11

who's on his travels again with a trip to San Francisco.

0:40:110:40:14

Apart from the Golden Gate Bridge and Frisco Bay,

0:40:150:40:18

I knew little of the place, so I was anxious to get down to the Fisherman's Wharf

0:40:180:40:21

and see if it was all they've cracked it up to be.

0:40:210:40:23

So, hopping onto a cable car,

0:40:230:40:25

you trundle down the precipitous hills,

0:40:250:40:27

famous for car chases in countless cop movies,

0:40:270:40:30

heading for the Frisco Bay. Sorry, Otis.

0:40:300:40:32

Actually, Fisherman's Wharf was full of wonderful smells

0:40:340:40:37

of shellfish and prawns and clam chowder,

0:40:370:40:39

and the food here was fresh and honest.

0:40:390:40:41

However, I didn't think the authorities

0:40:410:40:43

had showered this historic area

0:40:430:40:44

with a great deal of love and affection.

0:40:440:40:46

It was, quite frankly, a bit tatty,

0:40:460:40:48

but the Dungeness crab was brilliant.

0:40:480:40:51

Happily, the Italians have turned this quarter

0:40:510:40:54

into a little Venice full of fish restaurants.

0:40:540:40:56

One of the oldest is Alioto's, where I went to sample that unique

0:40:560:40:59

Sicilian atmosphere, where well-groomed men in dark suits

0:40:590:41:02

talk hard deals in soft voices

0:41:020:41:04

over a plate of cioppino, a great family dish. Get it?

0:41:040:41:08

So, not even pausing for a merry slurp,

0:41:080:41:10

on with the cioppino cooking sketch.

0:41:100:41:12

Cioppino is the signature dish

0:41:120:41:14

of the Italian section of Fisherman's Wharf.

0:41:140:41:17

It is basically a fish stew. So, without further ado...

0:41:170:41:20

Bit difficult here cos it is a busy kitchen and they are working.

0:41:200:41:23

Some freshly made but uncooked tomato sauce,

0:41:230:41:25

some fish stock, finely chopped onions, carrots,

0:41:250:41:29

wonderful Frisco Bay fresh crab, sole fillets, fresh prawns,

0:41:290:41:35

clams, garlic, thyme, basil, red pepper, parsley,

0:41:350:41:40

olive oil, and over here, there is a saucepan.

0:41:400:41:43

So, in we go with a little bit of oil.

0:41:430:41:46

Try and get the gas up to maximum there.

0:41:460:41:50

And we'll put a small handful of carrots in.

0:41:500:41:54

Let them sweat off in the olive oil.

0:41:540:41:57

Followed by a small handful of onions.

0:41:570:42:01

Usual basic trinity of making things -

0:42:010:42:04

you know, onions, garlic, tomatoes.

0:42:040:42:06

We've seen it throughout America - these three important ingredients.

0:42:060:42:09

It's been peppers and leeks and things in other parts.

0:42:090:42:12

Here, it's garlic, onions and carrots.

0:42:120:42:15

Let them soften down and sweat down, OK?

0:42:200:42:23

Then, into that, we'll add some of our fresh tomato,

0:42:230:42:27

but uncooked sauce...

0:42:270:42:29

-..like that.

-Hey, buddy!

-Give it a stir.

0:42:300:42:34

That's Jan working away behind me.

0:42:340:42:35

He's the head chef here and a very accommodating fellow, I must say.

0:42:350:42:39

One side of French fries in the fryer, please!

0:42:390:42:41

OK. Then some fish stock into that.

0:42:410:42:45

Now, I didn't make this fish stock, but you know the deal.

0:42:470:42:49

Up to me for a second, Clive.

0:42:490:42:50

Fish heads, tails, bones, water, bay leaf, onion, carrot,

0:42:500:42:53

clove - stuff like that - simmered away for 20 minutes or so.

0:42:530:42:56

And also, don't forget, always a good tip -

0:42:560:42:58

this is the kind of stuff

0:42:580:42:59

you can freeze in ice cubes in your deepfreeze,

0:42:590:43:01

so that when you want to do this kind of dish,

0:43:010:43:03

the stock is already on hand, OK? Good.

0:43:030:43:05

Right, what did I say we needed next? We need some whitefish next.

0:43:050:43:08

Sole fillets here, chopped up. OK?

0:43:080:43:11

So, we want to make this rich and luxurious

0:43:110:43:13

cos we are in California after all,

0:43:130:43:15

so we're going to whack a lot of that in, OK?

0:43:150:43:18

Then stay with that, Clive, for a second.

0:43:190:43:21

In go my lovely clams.

0:43:230:43:25

-What are you doing here, Jan, just out of interest?

-Savoy stock.

0:43:280:43:31

-Savoy stock?

-We have some fresh rainbow trout,

0:43:310:43:36

and we add this.

0:43:360:43:37

-We serve it with this kind of sauce.

-Beautiful.

0:43:370:43:39

It's made with onions, fresh mushrooms, shallots,

0:43:390:43:42

white wine, lemon juice, and we garnish it with...

0:43:420:43:46

-Lovely.

-..just prawn right on top.

-Had to bring Jan in there

0:43:460:43:49

because there's no point pretending that this is a set-up shot.

0:43:490:43:52

I mean, this is a working kitchen.

0:43:520:43:54

They are serving 400 meals over this lunchtime right now,

0:43:540:43:56

and, as usual, Floyd's in the middle, being a nuisance.

0:43:560:43:59

Anyway, where was I?

0:43:590:44:00

My little spices and herbs can go in now over here.

0:44:000:44:04

Red chilli pepper to make it a little bit spicy.

0:44:040:44:07

Fresh basil to give it that lovely Mediterranean flavour,

0:44:070:44:10

even though we're in California. And some ground thyme.

0:44:100:44:12

I personally would like to use fresh thyme, but there we are.

0:44:120:44:15

Also, a load of lovely, fresh chopped parsley.

0:44:150:44:19

The clams are beginning to open,

0:44:190:44:21

the whitefish is beginning to be cooked,

0:44:210:44:23

so we can now add our prawns, which won't take very long.

0:44:230:44:26

In they go...

0:44:260:44:27

..like so.

0:44:290:44:30

And then I think we should add a little drop of white wine.

0:44:320:44:37

To me, first of all.

0:44:370:44:38

Always check it's good enough to cook with -

0:44:400:44:42

and it is - by drinking it. A drop of that in there. OK.

0:44:420:44:46

And then, ultimately, our crab.

0:44:460:44:50

Fresh Frisco Bay crab claws. In they go.

0:44:500:44:53

Look at that.

0:44:580:45:00

Sole, prawns, crabs, clams - the whole bit.

0:45:000:45:05

That will now simmer away for about 15 to 20 minutes.

0:45:050:45:08

The next time you see it, I'll be conducting one of my brilliant,

0:45:080:45:11

off-the-cuff interviews about fruity passion, love and tenderness,

0:45:110:45:14

about food on the West Coast.

0:45:140:45:16

I so enjoyed my San Francisco mini break

0:45:220:45:25

that I told my chum Barry all about it in the pub,

0:45:250:45:27

and he got so excited, he wants to read you

0:45:270:45:29

-this piece of commentary he's written.

-Thank you.

0:45:290:45:31

Here, Rome, Naples, Milan and Sorrento blend in the mists

0:45:310:45:35

of the Pacific Coast. In the shadow of the Golden Gate,

0:45:350:45:38

the sounds, colours, and scents of Italy

0:45:380:45:40

excite the eye and stimulate the appetite.

0:45:400:45:44

That was really quite good. Couldn't you say a bit more?

0:45:450:45:47

Here, Rome, Naples, Milan and Sorrento

0:45:470:45:50

blend in the mists of the Pacific Coast.

0:45:500:45:52

In the shadow of the Golden Gate,

0:45:520:45:54

the words, sounds, colours and scents of Italy excite the eye

0:45:540:45:57

-and, again, stimulate the appetite.

-That was really good. I'm just sorry you couldn't have been there.

0:45:570:46:02

You'd have really enjoyed it, you know, cos the food WAS good.

0:46:020:46:04

Cor, that looks splendid.

0:46:060:46:08

Thanks, Barry. It was.

0:46:080:46:10

The cioppino turned out wonderfully, and during the cooking,

0:46:100:46:12

I added a few mussels for my very latest chum, Michael Corle...

0:46:120:46:15

-I mean Nunzio Alioto, proprietor.

-That's very good.

0:46:150:46:18

You know, Fisherman's Wharf, it's interesting - in the beginning,

0:46:180:46:22

when Fisherman's Wharf established itself about 60 years ago,

0:46:220:46:25

all of the people that came here

0:46:250:46:26

were primarily from Sicily or from Italy.

0:46:260:46:29

Consequently, the food being very spicy and very flavourful.

0:46:290:46:31

I must say, you did an excellent job.

0:46:310:46:33

It's reminiscent of the old style and the old school of cooking

0:46:330:46:36

with wonderful spices and tomatoey, peasantry food.

0:46:360:46:39

It is extraordinary - walking around here,

0:46:390:46:41

I mean, if you squint your eyes a little bit

0:46:410:46:43

and mute your ears a bit, you could think you were in Italy,

0:46:430:46:46

-couldn't you?

-That's right, yes. Very much so.

0:46:460:46:48

What brought the Italians and the Sicilians here in the first place?

0:46:480:46:51

Well, I think an opportunity in America to do better

0:46:510:46:53

than what they were doing in the old country.

0:46:530:46:55

I know, when my grandfather came here, he was a fisherman.

0:46:550:46:58

Left Sicily, he came over with his brothers.

0:46:580:47:00

The former mayor of San Francisco, who was Joe Alioto,

0:47:000:47:03

his dad sent for him. Came over, started a little fish stand here.

0:47:030:47:06

Family now is four generations down the road,

0:47:060:47:08

60 years in this location,

0:47:080:47:10

and still preparing the foods of our native country.

0:47:100:47:13

-And will your kids take on, you know, when you...?

-I don't know.

0:47:130:47:16

-I hope not!

-THEY LAUGH

0:47:160:47:18

But most likely.

0:47:180:47:20

It's a hard business, it's a lot of hours, but it's fun.

0:47:200:47:23

MUSIC: Burnham Beeches by The Stranglers

0:47:230:47:29

Going flat out here on the home straight are my very,

0:47:290:47:32

very latest chums, Forrest Tancer and his girlfriend,

0:47:320:47:35

Joy Sterling, who are doing a high-speed check on their grapes,

0:47:350:47:37

some of which we made into a sparkling wine

0:47:370:47:40

here at the Iron Horse Winery in the Sonoma Valley.

0:47:400:47:42

Superb. At breakfast time this morning, the director said,

0:47:470:47:50

"We'll do a California barbecue."

0:47:500:47:51

I said, "That's a bit boring, isn't it? Cos they all know what that is."

0:47:510:47:54

You know, over-marinated ribs, greasy hamburgers,

0:47:540:47:56

loads of French-fried onions and stuff like that. But I agreed.

0:47:560:47:59

But look at this lot, Clive.

0:47:590:48:01

I mean, is this a California barbecue, or is this Provence?

0:48:010:48:04

I mean, take the bread for a start. Locally baked around here.

0:48:040:48:08

This is a fougasse. Little lard pieces inside there.

0:48:080:48:10

You get that in Provence.

0:48:100:48:12

I was absolutely amazed to find it here in California.

0:48:120:48:14

Look at these vegetables.

0:48:140:48:16

They could have come from Avignon or Orange, something like that.

0:48:160:48:19

Freshly caught salmon, just landed this morning.

0:48:190:48:21

Lamb that would make any farmer in Wales, or even Provence,

0:48:210:48:24

really thrilled. Quail, cheeses. When I first glanced at these...

0:48:240:48:28

Up to me a moment, please, Clive.

0:48:280:48:30

About five minutes ago, I arrived here,

0:48:300:48:31

and I thought, "Hello, I've been had again."

0:48:310:48:33

Because, I mean, you know, the Americans are a bit of

0:48:330:48:35

a cheat race sometimes, aren't they?

0:48:350:48:37

You know, they copy things and all that.

0:48:370:48:39

Naturally, I assumed all the cheeses were imported. Not so. Look at them!

0:48:390:48:42

These are all locally made goat's cheeses.

0:48:420:48:45

Here is a locally made blue cheese. Let's just taste that

0:48:450:48:49

because it's fascinating to find this kind of stuff here.

0:48:490:48:52

And, quite honestly, a Bleu d'Auvergne or a Roquefort

0:48:520:48:55

would come about third if this was judged

0:48:550:48:57

by international panellists like myself. Take a look at this.

0:48:570:49:00

A hard cheese, dried with cocoa around it.

0:49:000:49:03

Very odd. But look at this.

0:49:030:49:05

Are we in the Pyrenees or are we in California?

0:49:050:49:07

Blue oyster mushrooms, cinnamon caps,

0:49:070:49:10

shiitake and blanc puffballs all to be used.

0:49:100:49:14

And what DO I use? I mean, this is true.

0:49:140:49:16

We always beg, borrow and steal kitchens.

0:49:160:49:18

They throw this lot at me and say,

0:49:180:49:20

"Oh, look, the film's expensive, the crew are getting tired.

0:49:200:49:23

"For heaven's sake, cook something inspirational immediately!"

0:49:230:49:25

So, I put on my inspirational jacket.

0:49:250:49:27

Just in case the taxman's watching, I do have to wear these costumes from time to time.

0:49:270:49:30

So, what will we do? We'll do some lamb. Very, very easy.

0:49:300:49:35

This is loin of best California lamb.

0:49:350:49:37

We need a knife, which I've lost.

0:49:370:49:39

And down here a moment, Clive. California, San Francisco -

0:49:390:49:42

all that kind of stuff is to do with wild flowers.

0:49:420:49:44

Remember the old song? "If you're going to San Francisco..."

0:49:440:49:47

Are you still with me? You looked a bit confused.

0:49:470:49:49

"..wear a flower in your ear."

0:49:490:49:50

Well, I'm not going to put them in my ear. I'm going to cook them.

0:49:500:49:53

Anyway, I've marinated some of these little mushrooms

0:49:530:49:56

and some asparagus in wine vinegar.

0:49:560:49:58

Raspberry vinegar, in fact, and olive oil.

0:49:580:50:00

Some little leeks, but most importantly, the lamb here.

0:50:000:50:03

So, I cut these into little escalopes, like that.

0:50:030:50:06

Just dip them into the olive oil to give them a little bit of fat.

0:50:060:50:10

And then, as they go onto the grill, which they will,

0:50:100:50:12

and they're going to cook only for a minute or two on each side,

0:50:120:50:15

you're going to go whizzing round the countryside and look at things,

0:50:150:50:18

and I'm going to prepare a super sauce

0:50:180:50:20

from these little lemons.

0:50:200:50:22

They're called Meyer lemons. Now, I'd never seen these before.

0:50:220:50:25

They're a cross between a tangerine and a lemon.

0:50:250:50:27

You could eat them, make sauces with them, put them into drinks,

0:50:270:50:30

much more importantly. I'm going to create a wonderful sauce.

0:50:300:50:32

So, for the moment, our little bits of lamb go on to here.

0:50:320:50:35

And it's worth noting that this perfect fire...

0:50:350:50:40

If you get a good close-up of that,

0:50:400:50:41

that's exactly how a barbecue fire should be, especially if...

0:50:410:50:44

Now back up to me, please, Clive.

0:50:440:50:46

..if you make them from vine roots. Absolutely superb, right?

0:50:460:50:49

Talking of vine roots, go and have a spin round the Napa Valley

0:50:490:50:51

and the Sonoma Valley here, and see how the Californians

0:50:510:50:54

are coming first in the world with winemaking.

0:50:540:50:57

I was so impressed by the vineyards of Northern California

0:50:590:51:02

that I told my friend Barry about it in the pub when I got back,

0:51:020:51:05

and he was so impressed, too, that he wrote

0:51:050:51:07

this piece of commentary, which he wants to read to you now.

0:51:070:51:09

Thank you. Chardonnay, Pinot Noir - names as resonant as Provence

0:51:090:51:15

with the artistry of the finest winemaking.

0:51:150:51:18

Carefully selected clones from Oregon and California,

0:51:180:51:21

some for sparkling and some for still wines,

0:51:210:51:24

have been brought to Iron Horse

0:51:240:51:25

to increase the complexity of wines nurtured here.

0:51:250:51:28

There's experimentation, too. The variety Viognier...

0:51:280:51:31

That's brilliant, Barry. I think they've got the drift.

0:51:310:51:34

He's really good at commentary, isn't he? Anyway, let's get back to the cooking.

0:51:340:51:37

So, there's a lovely little portrait of California on the grill.

0:51:370:51:41

The leeks - succulent leeks - being grilled. The asparagus.

0:51:410:51:45

My little brochettes of mushrooms, kumquat, sage and garlic.

0:51:450:51:50

I crushed a drop of the old lemon juice.

0:51:500:51:53

Put it into my double saucepan like that.

0:51:530:51:55

Then I put in some eggs -

0:51:550:51:58

little fresh pullets' eggs from around here. Whisk those in.

0:51:580:52:01

And here, melted gently,

0:52:030:52:05

some good California butter, just whisked in.

0:52:050:52:09

Now, this'll take a little second or two to do. Stay with it.

0:52:090:52:13

Cos the gas is... Up to me, Clive.

0:52:130:52:16

The gas on this thing is completely out of control,

0:52:160:52:19

and these refined little sauces need the subtlest of touches.

0:52:190:52:22

And I don't know, after waiting for you lot to go round the wineries

0:52:220:52:25

and the vineyards, I got a little bit grumpy when they came back late.

0:52:250:52:28

Ah, I've got it. I've done it! I've done it! I've done it!

0:52:280:52:31

Right, beautiful consistency.

0:52:310:52:33

Let me just taste that.

0:52:370:52:38

Those Meyer lemons give that a supreme flavour.

0:52:410:52:43

Actually, that is the best egg liaison sauce I've ever made.

0:52:430:52:47

Next time you see this dish, I shall be probably sitting

0:52:470:52:49

in the middle of a field with cornflowers, daffodils in my hair and stuff like that,

0:52:490:52:53

enjoying myself and having a deep and meaningful

0:52:530:52:55

philosophical conversation about California wine.

0:52:550:52:59

-Who did you say this chap was, Keith?

-It's me, you fool.

0:52:590:53:02

-No, the chap on the right.

-Oh, sorry. Forrest Tancer, he is.

0:53:020:53:05

-He's the proprietor.

-Oh, yes?

0:53:050:53:07

-Mm.

-What do you think?

0:53:090:53:10

Well, the fascinating thing is the garlic.

0:53:140:53:16

It's such a wonderful complement to those mushrooms.

0:53:160:53:19

And then getting a little bit of the Meyer lemon in there is just...

0:53:190:53:24

It brings forward this tremendous flavour.

0:53:240:53:27

I mean, it's so fresh and so delicious.

0:53:270:53:30

This really is a springtime dish, isn't it?

0:53:300:53:32

It really is a springtime dish, yeah.

0:53:320:53:34

Listen, you've had some big people drinking

0:53:340:53:37

-this stuff, haven't you?

-Yeah. Yeah, we have.

0:53:370:53:40

And, you know, the way I think about this, you know,

0:53:400:53:44

with the Gorbachev's and Reagan's summits -

0:53:440:53:47

two of them having this same one used at both of those events.

0:53:470:53:51

And, to me, it's, I think, perhaps the...

0:53:510:53:54

You know, it's wonderful to make great wine,

0:53:540:53:56

but the thought of having one that's made to toast world peace

0:53:560:54:00

is beyond comprehension.

0:54:000:54:02

I mean, that is... If it actually...

0:54:020:54:05

If they enjoyed it and they got a little bit of the high

0:54:050:54:10

of the great wine that it is and they said, "Let's shake on it."

0:54:100:54:16

Wonderful stuff from the legendary Keith Floyd there

0:54:200:54:23

as he rounds off his American trip in style.

0:54:230:54:25

Now, don't go anywhere just yet, as there's still plenty more to come

0:54:250:54:28

on today's Saturday Kitchen Best Bites.

0:54:280:54:31

Coming up, it's Michael Caines versus Stuart Gillies

0:54:310:54:33

in the Saturday Kitchen Omelette Challenge,

0:54:330:54:35

as Michael aims to knock Stuart off the top spot.

0:54:350:54:38

Niklas Ekstedt is setting the studio on fire

0:54:380:54:40

with his spectacular Scandinavian dish.

0:54:400:54:42

He burns juniper wood before smoking cured cod fillets

0:54:420:54:46

and serves with potato, apple and frisee salad

0:54:460:54:49

and an anchovy mustard dipping sauce.

0:54:490:54:51

And, finally, impersonator Alistair McGowan

0:54:510:54:53

faces his food heaven or his food hell.

0:54:530:54:55

Will he get his food heaven - lemon cake with lemon curd meringue,

0:54:550:54:59

lemon cream and popcorn dust,

0:54:590:55:01

or his food hell - pork chop with Thai red cabbage?

0:55:010:55:04

You're going to have to keep watching to find out

0:55:040:55:06

if Alistair makes a good or a bad impression

0:55:060:55:09

on the studio guests.

0:55:090:55:10

But before all of that, it's over to Tristan Welch,

0:55:100:55:13

who's given us his take on a traditional Cornish pie.

0:55:130:55:16

-Great to have you on the show again.

-Thank you very much.

0:55:160:55:19

Good to have you on the show. Now, what are we cooking today?

0:55:190:55:21

This stargazy pie from Cornwall, yeah?

0:55:210:55:24

-A real Cornish classic from Mousehole in Cornwall.

-Mousehole?

0:55:240:55:27

-Yeah.

-Mousehole?

-Yeah.

-That's the place? OK, right.

0:55:270:55:30

Was it named after a fisherman or something or...?

0:55:300:55:32

No, it's kind of to celebrate this fisherman

0:55:320:55:35

who went out in stormy weather

0:55:350:55:37

and got fish for the whole village

0:55:370:55:39

-and managed to feed the village when they couldn't go out.

-OK.

0:55:390:55:42

So, what's the fundamental base of this thing?

0:55:420:55:44

We've got sardines. You can use pilchards.

0:55:440:55:45

They're in the traditional recipe, but we're using sardines.

0:55:450:55:48

-Look how fresh they are there.

-They are fantastic.

0:55:480:55:50

The thing about oily fish - it's got to be absolutely fresh as a daisy.

0:55:500:55:53

Got to be. Absolutely. And then a little bacon, quail eggs,

0:55:530:55:56

and some onions to go in there,

0:55:560:55:57

and then a mustard sauce to finish it off.

0:55:570:55:59

-And I'm rolling out puff pastry for the top.

-If you wouldn't mind.

0:55:590:56:02

-Cos this a pie that the top is cooked separately?

-Yeah.

-OK.

0:56:020:56:05

Well, the idea behind it, I suppose, is we want to get all the elements

0:56:050:56:08

of the pie absolutely perfect, so we kind of split it apart

0:56:080:56:11

and then concentrate on each individual element

0:56:110:56:13

to make sure the fish is perfectly cooked and stuff like that.

0:56:130:56:16

So, is this the type of food that you've got in your restaurant?

0:56:160:56:19

-This is actually on my starter menu right now.

-Right.

0:56:190:56:24

Congratulations, by the way,

0:56:240:56:25

cos you're now, what, three-star AA award?

0:56:250:56:28

Yeah. Thank you very much. We're very proud of that.

0:56:280:56:32

It's a great achievement for us and the whole team.

0:56:320:56:35

-Bit of olive oil on there.

-Right, so, we've got puff pastry here.

0:56:350:56:37

It's important, when you're buying puff pastry,

0:56:370:56:39

-to get the all-butter puff pastry, isn't it?

-Yeah, definitely.

0:56:390:56:42

-There's so much difference.

-Full-on flavour.

0:56:420:56:44

-Yeah, absolutely.

-OK.

0:56:440:56:46

So, what are we doing with these sardines?

0:56:460:56:48

So, as you see, I've got a J-Cloth here

0:56:480:56:50

because it's just keeping my sardine nice and steady

0:56:500:56:53

when I'm cutting it. It allows a little bit more control.

0:56:530:56:56

I've taken the head and tail off cos they're going to be poking out

0:56:560:56:59

-and gazing to the stars.

-Right.

0:56:590:57:01

-Hence the name, stargazy.

-Stargazy - there you go.

0:57:010:57:03

There we are. So, I'm just going to fillet it gently here, like so.

0:57:030:57:07

-Is that the fish saying, "God help me"?

-Yes!

0:57:070:57:10

LAUGHTER Bit late now!

0:57:100:57:12

-LAUGHTER

-Cyrus, you shouldn't say that

0:57:120:57:14

-about my food, honestly!

-LAUGHTER

0:57:140:57:17

Anyway, you just keep these...

0:57:170:57:19

-These are for the bits that point out.

-Yeah.

0:57:190:57:21

-But this is for the filling.

-Yeah, this is for the actual filling.

0:57:210:57:24

Along with the bacon, which we'll cook in a second, and onions.

0:57:240:57:27

Now, if you can't get sardines,

0:57:270:57:29

-I suppose you could use mackerel for this.

-Yeah, definitely.

0:57:290:57:32

Like you say, traditionally with pilchards, but...

0:57:320:57:35

If you can't get sardines, you need to work harder, I think.

0:57:350:57:38

They're everywhere.

0:57:380:57:39

-Yeah, in a tin, normally.

-Yeah. Oh, yeah.

0:57:390:57:41

They look a bit limp when they're gazing at the stars...

0:57:410:57:44

LAUGHTER Out of a tin, yeah.

0:57:440:57:46

You could just maybe serve it in the tin, actually,

0:57:460:57:48

-put a puff pastry lid on top.

-Yeah.

0:57:480:57:50

Not recommended. We don't do that in my restaurant, of course.

0:57:500:57:53

This is slightly different, the way you prepare this.

0:57:530:57:55

-Normally, you'd just put a lid on, but what you're doing is just trimming this off here.

-Yeah.

0:57:550:57:59

So, it's got a little room there for the heads and tails to poke out.

0:57:590:58:02

There you go.

0:58:020:58:03

Right, so, I'm just going to put these all on a tray here,

0:58:030:58:06

put them under this grill and grill them for a couple of minutes.

0:58:060:58:09

OK. Keep your eye on them cos the last time I grilled sardines,

0:58:100:58:13

-it was on fire.

-Yeah, I heard that.

-OK.

-Crikey!

0:58:130:58:17

-I'll move that for you.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:58:170:58:19

-There's a sink in the back if you want...

-Wash my hands

0:58:190:58:21

cos I know what it's like.

0:58:210:58:23

Right, we've got this puff pastry here.

0:58:230:58:25

Now, the secret of this is just rest it in the fridge,

0:58:250:58:27

-before you cook it?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:58:270:58:29

You have to let the pastry relax, definitely.

0:58:290:58:32

Otherwise, you'd just get a shrunken puff pastry lid

0:58:320:58:35

which won't fit your actual pie case or whatever.

0:58:350:58:38

So, this is smoked bacon here.

0:58:380:58:40

I've blanched it for about 20 minutes or so.

0:58:400:58:42

I'm just cutting it into, as we say, lardons or just little bacon pieces.

0:58:420:58:46

It doesn't have to be perfect, I suppose,

0:58:460:58:48

but I kind of like it that way.

0:58:480:58:50

But the sauce is actually quite quick, isn't it, this one?

0:58:500:58:53

-It's quite simple.

-Yeah. Oh, the sauce is dead simple. Mustard sauce.

0:58:530:58:56

You'll never make mustard sauce any other way

0:58:560:58:58

when you've done it this way.

0:58:580:58:59

So, it's just chicken stock boiling there,

0:58:590:59:02

and in a minute, we're going to add creme fraiche and mustard.

0:59:020:59:05

-It's dead simple.

-Now, even though we're using fish,

0:59:050:59:07

you still use chicken stock for this?

0:59:070:59:09

Yeah, because, remember, there's bacon in it, as well,

0:59:090:59:11

so we want that little nod to the old meat side of things...

0:59:110:59:16

-Yeah.

-..and that richness.

0:59:160:59:17

I think mustard lends itself to meatier flavours,

0:59:170:59:20

and the sardines are very rich, as well.

0:59:200:59:22

We'll let the bacon and onions colour off there gently.

0:59:220:59:24

While that's cooking, that pastry then goes in the fridge, of course.

0:59:240:59:27

Then you can cook that... We've got one in the oven.

0:59:270:59:29

It's about sort of 15 minutes. Quite a high oven.

0:59:290:59:31

-About 200, 210 - something like that?

-Yeah, definitely.

0:59:310:59:34

That's about right. I'm going to poach some quail eggs now,

0:59:340:59:36

and this is how you make perfect poached quail eggs.

0:59:360:59:40

Keep that moving. So, ice water,

0:59:400:59:42

-and I've just poured a little bit of ice water in there.

-Right.

0:59:420:59:45

And I'm just cracking open these quail eggs gently

0:59:450:59:47

straight into the ice water. And what that does,

0:59:470:59:49

that encourages the looser egg white to expel into the cold water,

0:59:490:59:53

and it leaves that little dense egg white

0:59:530:59:55

that coats the egg yolk around the outside of it.

0:59:550:59:58

So, basically, when you pour it into our boiling water

0:59:581:00:01

with a touch of vinegar, you're left with a perfect, hopefully...

1:00:011:00:03

Would that work with all eggs or just particularly quail ones?

1:00:031:00:06

I don't know. I've never done it with a chicken egg.

1:00:061:00:08

You'd need a lot of water, though, wouldn't you?

1:00:081:00:10

You'd need a lot of water! An awful lot of water.

1:00:101:00:13

You'd be there a long time.

1:00:131:00:14

But it is - egg whites are split into two,

1:00:141:00:16

and the longer they're kept, the more the whites mix in together,

1:00:161:00:19

so that's why you need to get...

1:00:191:00:20

That's why a fried egg, when you fry it and it's old,

1:00:201:00:22

-it splits all over the pan.

-Definitely. Absolutely.

1:00:221:00:24

-So, I mean, the key is to use super-fresh eggs.

-OK.

1:00:241:00:27

Would that separate in the water or stay as a lump?

1:00:271:00:30

-You're going to find out in a minute.

-Yeah, exactly.

1:00:301:00:32

Watch this space, Cyrus.

1:00:321:00:33

Just going to pour a little bit of that water off.

1:00:331:00:35

-There's a touch too much cold water in there.

-So, that's ice-cold water?

1:00:351:00:38

That's freezing, ice-cold water.

1:00:381:00:40

-Then we've got boiling water here with a touch of vinegar.

-OK.

1:00:401:00:43

Give it a nice old spin, and pop them in like so.

1:00:431:00:46

The whole lot go in - water, the lot?

1:00:461:00:48

-Yeah, water, the lot.

-Right.

-How did you not get any shell in it?

1:00:481:00:51

That's what I want to know. That's the trick for me.

1:00:511:00:53

-Years of practice.

-Is that all it is? Practice?

1:00:531:00:56

Cos I've never had an omelette...

1:00:561:00:57

He has got a little bit of shell in there, anyway.

1:00:571:00:59

-Has he?

-Shh!

-Good lad. Good lad!

-LAUGHTER

1:00:591:01:02

That's what I want to see. I feel better now.

1:01:021:01:04

That's your spoonful, that one there.

1:01:041:01:06

So, this mustard sauce - it's so easy.

1:01:061:01:08

-Yeah.

-Thank you very much.

1:01:081:01:10

-Fire away. Keep going.

-So, creme fraiche.

1:01:101:01:13

-English mustard.

-Yeah.

1:01:151:01:16

The runny kind, and then the mustard powder, as well.

1:01:161:01:22

Pop that in, like so.

1:01:221:01:23

Then we're just going to whisk that in

1:01:231:01:27

to make sure it's nicely emulsified. Where's the whisk?

1:01:271:01:30

-Whisk is there. There you go.

-Perfect. Thank you very much.

1:01:301:01:34

-So, use mascarpone for this, not cream?

-No, creme fraiche.

1:01:341:01:37

-Creme fraiche.

-Yeah, cos I like the acidity it gives the sauce.

1:01:371:01:40

-Right.

-And just a drop of lemon juice and a pinch of salt, as well.

1:01:401:01:43

And to finish off our onions and bacon,

1:01:431:01:46

which have been frying here just gently,

1:01:461:01:48

we're going to put a dash of that sauce in there, as well.

1:01:481:01:51

And this'll just reduce down and glaze

1:01:511:01:53

and give that little bit more richness to our bacon and onions.

1:01:531:01:57

-And they will... You see now it's getting nice and thick?

-Yeah.

1:01:581:02:01

Just let that cook down for a second more.

1:02:011:02:03

In essence, it's quite a quick dish.

1:02:031:02:04

Cos often, when people are making pies,

1:02:041:02:06

-it takes them a lot longer, but this is actually really quick.

-Yeah.

1:02:061:02:09

Yeah, well, it has to be.

1:02:091:02:10

In our kitchen, we do a five-minute count on everything.

1:02:101:02:13

So, this is our eggs. They're perfectly poached.

1:02:131:02:16

Nice and gentle. And they look beautiful.

1:02:161:02:18

-Right.

-OK.

-Look at those.

1:02:181:02:22

See? Look.

1:02:221:02:23

-Lovely.

-Perfect poached egg.

-Lovely.

1:02:241:02:27

-Top tip.

-Everybody'll be doing that later.

1:02:271:02:29

You saw it on Saturday Kitchen first!

1:02:291:02:31

Right, so, there's our boiled onions.

1:02:311:02:33

Our onions, we've actually blanched for eight minutes previously.

1:02:331:02:36

-Yeah.

-And bacon, as well. Make sure it's not too crispy,

1:02:361:02:39

because then I think it becomes a little tough.

1:02:391:02:41

I think people are going to be doing these eggs.

1:02:411:02:43

So, what went in that water? Just a bit of vinegar?

1:02:431:02:45

-Just a touch of vinegar, a touch of salt.

-And that's it?

-And that's it.

1:02:451:02:47

-If you wouldn't mind blending that for me...

-OK. I can do that.

1:02:471:02:50

-..that would be very kind.

-Quick blitz, yeah.

1:02:501:02:53

And we're just going to take our sardines now.

1:02:551:02:57

We haven't pinboned it or anything like that

1:02:571:02:59

cos they're so delicate, the bones, I don't think it needs to, really.

1:02:591:03:02

Right. You've taken the main one out, anyway.

1:03:021:03:05

Yeah, we've taken the main bones out, definitely.

1:03:051:03:07

That's quite important.

1:03:071:03:09

We've got our nice, softly poached quail eggs, like so.

1:03:091:03:12

-OK.

-Hopefully, our puff pastry lids...

1:03:141:03:16

-It's there.

-Wahey!

1:03:161:03:18

-Sits on the top.

-We're just going to...

1:03:191:03:22

Some lovely, light mustard sauce just to go over.

1:03:221:03:24

Often, when people think of pies, you'd have to make this

1:03:241:03:26

and then bake it in the oven, but this is really...

1:03:261:03:28

No, this is a good dinner-party thing.

1:03:281:03:30

-All the prep can be done in advance.

-Yeah.

1:03:301:03:32

Five minutes, it'll be on the table in front of your guests.

1:03:321:03:35

Can you have this as a starter or...?

1:03:351:03:37

I serve it as a starter in the restaurant,

1:03:371:03:39

but you could do it a little larger as a main course.

1:03:391:03:41

-There you go.

-Thank you very much.

1:03:411:03:43

And then, of course, we have to make it stargazy.

1:03:431:03:46

-That's why you have these little holes in the pastry.

-Yeah, exactly.

1:03:461:03:49

There we are. One little head there and one little tail.

1:03:491:03:51

I like a little bit of meat on the tail, as well.

1:03:511:03:54

-Yeah.

-There we go.

1:03:541:03:56

-Let's just pop it in.

-It's like those arrows you get

1:03:571:03:59

-to put on your head as a kid.

-LAUGHTER

1:03:591:04:02

-It is like that!

-Culinary arrows. There we go.

1:04:021:04:05

And there we are, that's a stargazy pie.

1:04:051:04:07

Looks like the arrows, like you said.

1:04:071:04:09

LAUGHTER Look at that.

1:04:091:04:11

There you go. You get to dive into this.

1:04:171:04:18

-I don't know where you're going to start with it. There you go. Have a seat.

-Thank you.

1:04:181:04:22

-Looks great, though.

-Looks fantastic.

-Look at that.

1:04:221:04:24

-There you go. Well...

-Ladies, something that you would try?

1:04:241:04:27

Would you try this for a dinner party or not?

1:04:271:04:29

SHE SIGHS No.

1:04:291:04:31

-LAUGHTER

-That does put you off a bit.

1:04:311:04:33

It does cos he's looking at you like, "Are you going to eat me?"

1:04:331:04:36

-Yeah. "Help!"

-I'm glad they don't do it with, like,

1:04:361:04:39

-a beef pie.

-LAUGHTER

1:04:391:04:41

Just, like, a big cow's head and its tail.

1:04:411:04:43

-There you go. You can start on that if you want.

-LAUGHTER

1:04:431:04:47

-Can't wait for that cauliflower.

-No, you go first, please.

1:04:471:04:51

-Let's have a go, then.

-Dive in.

-As long as we can have a little...

1:04:511:04:54

-Stop looking at me.

-LAUGHTER

1:04:541:04:56

-Can I do that?

-I'll move this.

1:04:561:04:57

-There you go.

-Yeah, there we go. What am I doing here?

1:04:571:04:59

And the eggs will just break down, so that goes into the sauce?

1:04:591:05:02

Yeah, it enriches the sauce and everything like that.

1:05:021:05:04

-I can't do this. There we go.

-The sardine will tell you. It's looking at you.

1:05:041:05:07

-You are very nice.

-LAUGHTER

1:05:091:05:12

Jason might have been put off by the fish giving him the eye there,

1:05:161:05:19

but what a top dish from Tristan.

1:05:191:05:21

Now, it's Omelette Challenge time

1:05:211:05:23

as Stuart Gillies looks to extend his lead at the top of the board

1:05:231:05:26

as he takes on Michael Caines.

1:05:261:05:28

Remember, all the chefs that come onto the show

1:05:281:05:30

battle it out against the clock, and each other, to see how fast

1:05:301:05:33

they can make a very simple, straightforward three-egg omelette.

1:05:331:05:36

Michael, do you think you can stand a chance

1:05:361:05:39

of beating our current champion up here with 31 seconds, Mr Gillies?

1:05:391:05:42

-Billy the kid!

-I'm at the top of the board, but the wrong side.

1:05:421:05:45

-Yeah, you're on the board.

-When I said I'd come back,

1:05:451:05:47

-I didn't want to pitch against him, but...

-Exactly.

1:05:471:05:50

-It's pretty tough today.

-It's going to be a tough one, but I'm up for it.

1:05:501:05:53

You can choose from the ingredients in front of you.

1:05:531:05:55

I'll taste them to make sure they're not scrambled egg. It must be a folded omelette.

1:05:551:05:58

You can use what you like - milk, cream, butter, bit of cheese.

1:05:581:06:01

-Three-egg folded omelette as fast as you can.

-Truffle?

1:06:011:06:03

Yeah, that's only Mr Blanc can bring truffle. Are you ready?

1:06:031:06:06

-Yeah.

-Three, two, one, go.

1:06:061:06:10

They're off. Now, a little birdie tells me...

1:06:111:06:14

Now, your restaurant is in the same building

1:06:141:06:16

-as Mr Marcus Wareing's restaurant.

-It is indeed, yeah.

1:06:161:06:19

A little birdie tells me...

1:06:191:06:20

Actually, it was Marcus himself called the studio

1:06:201:06:22

and said you were practising quite severely.

1:06:221:06:24

-You nicked all of his eggs, didn't you?

-Not quite.

1:06:241:06:26

-No, I don't think so.

-Yes, you did!

1:06:261:06:28

-Don't think so.

-Yeah.

-Oh, hold on.

1:06:281:06:30

-Hello? Hello?

-He was practising so much...

1:06:301:06:32

-Michael?

-I'm busy! I'm busy!

-He's tied up.

1:06:321:06:35

Just call him back in about two minutes.

1:06:351:06:37

Must be a folded three-egg omelette cooked as quick as you can.

1:06:371:06:42

That's it. He's not far off with this one.

1:06:421:06:44

-Not far off with this one.

-Oh, mine looks awful.

1:06:441:06:46

They should have this in the Olympics.

1:06:461:06:48

-Is this OK?

-Come on, Michael. GONG CHIMES

1:06:481:06:51

Oh, look at that one. GONG CHIMES

1:06:511:06:53

-Both very, very close, I have to say.

-Well done, mate.

1:06:531:06:56

But the real true test is in the taste.

1:06:561:06:58

-I've got to taste this one first, Michael.

-That was your wife.

-I know.

1:06:581:07:02

-That was terrible.

-She always calls at the wrong time.

1:07:021:07:05

I have to say, that is probably...

1:07:051:07:07

-It's perfect.

-Oh!

-This, however...

-That's not really folded.

1:07:091:07:12

-Look at this. What's this?

-It's a sauce.

1:07:121:07:16

This is lumps of butter.

1:07:161:07:17

-Yeah.

-Disqualified, I think.

-Do you reckon?

-Oh.

-Yeah.

1:07:191:07:23

-Tough audience.

-It's not seasoned, is it?

1:07:231:07:25

-Not seasoned.

-Not seasoned. No, we'll keep him in.

-Other side.

1:07:251:07:28

We'll keep him in.

1:07:281:07:29

Stuart, how do you think you've done?

1:07:311:07:33

Oh, I was definitely slower today.

1:07:331:07:34

-Do you think you've beaten this?

-No. 41.

1:07:341:07:36

-That's what I think.

-Has the king lost his crown?

1:07:381:07:40

Yeah, but I'm going to get him to put it on the board

1:07:401:07:43

cos this'll be quite funny cos he won't be able to reach.

1:07:431:07:45

-LAUGHTER

-What is that ladder?!

1:07:451:07:48

There you go. You did it...

1:07:481:07:50

..not in 31 seconds. You did it right down here.

1:07:511:07:54

40 seconds. I'm afraid it can't go on the board. You're still champion.

1:07:541:07:59

-OK, that's fine.

-Well done.

-Thank you.

-Michael...

1:07:591:08:01

I've got to improve on one minute two, haven't I?

1:08:021:08:05

Well, you were just behind me, so you must have been...

1:08:051:08:07

-You started the same...

-Yeah.

1:08:071:08:08

..and the omelette hits the pan at exactly the same time.

1:08:081:08:11

-You did it in 40 seconds dead.

-Hey, that's not bad!

1:08:111:08:14

So, you've improved your time by about 22 seconds.

1:08:141:08:17

-APPLAUSE

-Great.

-There we go.

1:08:171:08:20

All those distraction techniques from Stuart

1:08:241:08:27

only hampered his own cause.

1:08:271:08:28

Great improvement for Michael, though.

1:08:281:08:30

Now, up next, it's Swedish chef Niklas Ekstedt,

1:08:301:08:33

who's showing us how to home-smoke cod

1:08:331:08:35

with stolen juniper branches.

1:08:351:08:37

Great to have you on the show, Niklas.

1:08:381:08:40

We've got cod on the menu.

1:08:401:08:41

You said a small piece but this is a big piece of line-caught cod.

1:08:411:08:45

This is huge!

1:08:451:08:47

What are we going to do with it?

1:08:471:08:48

We're going to cure this with some salt and some sugar.

1:08:481:08:52

We actually call this gravad, you know gravad lax

1:08:521:08:54

is the famous dish out of Sweden, it's the same.

1:08:541:08:56

"Gravad" means buried,

1:08:561:08:58

but we're just going to lightly cure it and then smoke it in juniper wood.

1:08:581:09:02

-You want me to do a little salad here?

-Yes, please.

1:09:021:09:05

We've got the insides of the frisee, this is.

1:09:051:09:08

Exactly. Do the inside of that and some fennel, some cucumber,

1:09:081:09:12

apple, dill - always dill in Nordic food.

1:09:121:09:16

Add some capers and then just dress that with some cream.

1:09:161:09:19

The reason why we use the inside, the outside leaves are quite bitter.

1:09:191:09:22

Exactly, so the inside has a little crispier and sweeter flavour to it.

1:09:221:09:27

I'm going to take the cod here and cure this.

1:09:271:09:31

Actually, they call us, the Swedes, they call us the Japanese of Europe.

1:09:311:09:35

We take the shoes off when we come into houses and we like fish.

1:09:351:09:39

Like Italians.

1:09:391:09:42

I'm going to cure this.

1:09:421:09:44

This is line-caught cod, but other fish you can do it with,

1:09:441:09:47

we mentioned haddock.

1:09:471:09:48

Haddock would work perfectly, salmon could also work,

1:09:481:09:51

but whitefish is nice.

1:09:511:09:54

This is salt going on here, normal table salt?

1:09:541:09:59

Yes, normal table salt.

1:09:591:10:00

You could do this in a wet brine as well

1:10:001:10:03

but I prefer to do it in a dry one.

1:10:031:10:05

OK.

1:10:051:10:06

And then depending on how sashimi-style you want your fish,

1:10:061:10:12

depending on how long you leave it,

1:10:121:10:15

if you leave it overnight or two days,

1:10:151:10:17

it would cure all the way down.

1:10:171:10:19

So this is light brown sugar you're putting on?

1:10:191:10:21

Light brown sugar and salt.

1:10:211:10:22

How long would you leave that for then?

1:10:221:10:24

I like the fish pretty raw so I leave it for an hour.

1:10:241:10:27

Sink there if you want to wash your hands.

1:10:271:10:30

Washing hands, good, my mom will be happy.

1:10:301:10:32

Always when I'm on TV, she always tells me to wash my hands.

1:10:321:10:36

So does my mother as well. They never change.

1:10:361:10:40

-Right. This is now cured?

-This is cured, yeah.

1:10:421:10:46

And then I'm going to smoke this in juniper wood.

1:10:461:10:50

I brought this with me from Stockholm.

1:10:501:10:53

Not the pan, this, what's inside it.

1:10:531:10:56

-Not the pan.

-You brought this.

-The juniper wood.

1:10:561:10:58

Where did you get this from?

1:10:581:10:59

I... I picked this up at the ski slope in Stockholm.

1:10:591:11:04

I don't know if I can pick it there though!

1:11:041:11:07

You don't know if you can pick it!

1:11:071:11:10

-Don't tell anyone.

-You've just told 6.5 million people, but anyway...

1:11:101:11:14

So if you haven't got a local ski slope near you,

1:11:191:11:21

I know there's one in Milton Keynes

1:11:211:11:23

but I don't think it's got juniper wood anywhere near it.

1:11:231:11:25

Is that one of those plastic slopes?

1:11:251:11:27

Yeah, but it's the nearest I'm going to get to one.

1:11:271:11:29

And then put fire to this.

1:11:291:11:32

You put the fire alarm off.

1:11:321:11:35

-This is the key to your cooking?

-Yeah, flames.

1:11:351:11:37

We don't look for amber, we like flames and smoke.

1:11:371:11:40

This is a really good way to get that smoke.

1:11:401:11:44

Let's put this on.

1:11:471:11:48

So, kill it.

1:11:521:11:54

That was totally under control the whole way through!

1:11:541:11:57

Don't worry about it.

1:11:571:11:58

It didn't look as if he was in control then!

1:11:581:12:01

I was looking for the flames.

1:12:031:12:05

-But this is where you cook, all on a fire pit?

-Yes.

1:12:051:12:07

There's no stove? There's no gas stove to cook on?

1:12:071:12:11

No, no. Just a pit with the birchwood,

1:12:111:12:13

big flames coming out and smoke.

1:12:131:12:15

-The landowner was really happy when I introduced it.

-I bet he was.

1:12:151:12:19

No, so we've got a nice little salad here.

1:12:201:12:23

Explain to us what we're doing here.

1:12:231:12:25

So, because it has a very smoky and fatty flavour to the fish,

1:12:251:12:30

I wanted a fresh salad with just a little bit of cream into the frisee

1:12:301:12:34

and some of that fennel.

1:12:341:12:36

I know you want to do a little dressing with this,

1:12:361:12:38

which you've got to make as well, it's like a dipping...

1:12:381:12:41

It's a dipping sauce.

1:12:411:12:42

-Good, you reminded me.

-I was just saying that because you were nicking

1:12:421:12:45

my job doing the cucumber.

1:12:451:12:47

I'm going to roast some mustard seeds and some dill seeds.

1:12:471:12:53

-Now tell us about the food in Stockholm.

-It's booming.

1:12:531:12:56

-It is.

-It's crazy, just opening up restaurants every day

1:12:561:13:00

and the new Nordic food is as hot as it's ever been

1:13:001:13:03

so it's great, great, great fun.

1:13:031:13:06

What have you got in here then?

1:13:061:13:08

Little bit of salt and then mustard seeds.

1:13:081:13:11

Both white and dark mustard seeds?

1:13:111:13:14

Yeah. What do you call these in English?

1:13:141:13:16

What's that? What have we got in there?

1:13:161:13:19

-Little bit of cumin.

-Cumin and this one is dill seeds.

-Dill seeds, yeah.

1:13:191:13:22

And then crush them a little bit.

1:13:221:13:24

And then add the oil from the anchovies can.

1:13:241:13:28

Just the oil...

1:13:281:13:30

Oil from the tin of anchovies.

1:13:301:13:33

That's something for you.

1:13:331:13:36

That's going to go in there.

1:13:381:13:39

Now you're appearing in the UK quite a bit.

1:13:391:13:42

Tell me about this festival, which is bigger than Christmas in Sweden.

1:13:421:13:47

Exactly, so we have the Midsummer Eve.

1:13:471:13:50

It's the biggest holiday in Sweden.

1:13:501:13:52

It's our Christmas celebration.

1:13:521:13:54

We get together with the family,

1:13:541:13:56

so this year there is a British woman,

1:13:561:13:59

I think she worked on the British... Big British Bake Off?

1:13:591:14:02

-Great British Bake Off?

-That's the one.

1:14:021:14:06

And now she's doing a Midsummer party in southern England.

1:14:061:14:09

-It's not Mary Berry, is it?

-Who is she?

1:14:091:14:12

-I'm just saying.

-Young girl?

1:14:121:14:15

-Eh?

-Young, tall, blonde girl?

1:14:151:14:18

-Moving on!

-I don't know, who is she?

1:14:181:14:23

You have legends, don't you, in Sweden?

1:14:231:14:26

-No.

-You understand the word "legend?"

1:14:261:14:28

Legend! Yeah, yeah, yeah.

1:14:281:14:33

Like Obi-Wan Kenobi.

1:14:331:14:35

She is... In fact...

1:14:351:14:37

As a parallel, you've said exactly what I was going to say!

1:14:391:14:43

Mary Berry and Obi-Wan Kenobi.

1:14:431:14:46

That's the one, you don't need to say nothing else after that!

1:14:481:14:51

Cooking Swedish cinnamon buns.

1:14:511:14:54

Obi-Wan Kenobi, that's the first thing we're going to say to her.

1:14:541:14:57

-You've got the fish smoking.

-We've got that coming out of here.

1:15:001:15:03

They're hosting a Midsummer party down in southern England,

1:15:041:15:08

so I'm coming over for that

1:15:081:15:10

but I haven't talked to my wife yet and this will be difficult,

1:15:101:15:14

because I have to leave home for the biggest holiday, family...

1:15:141:15:18

-Yeah.

-And you haven't told your wife.

1:15:181:15:20

Not yet. I'm going to do that when I come home.

1:15:201:15:23

I would probably do that before you take a flight back, to be honest.

1:15:231:15:26

I reckon she's going to find out about it between now and then.

1:15:281:15:31

-So we've got capers going in here?

-I need to text her, maybe now.

1:15:311:15:34

So we've got some capers going in. Tell us about this fish then.

1:15:341:15:38

What have we got happening now then?

1:15:381:15:39

It's lightly cured and then smoked in the juniper wood

1:15:391:15:42

and then I'm going to try to...

1:15:421:15:44

You want to finish this with a blowtorch as well?

1:15:441:15:46

I'm going to finish with a blowtorch.

1:15:461:15:49

Have you got any trademark dishes?

1:15:491:15:53

Last time, you brought this amazing pan you were cooking with as well.

1:15:531:15:56

Yeah, cast iron, that's the big difference between a grill,

1:15:561:15:59

the traditional barbecue,

1:15:591:16:02

and Nordic grills that we use, the open flames,

1:16:021:16:06

and then we just add the pan in to the flames

1:16:061:16:10

and then we cook it in the cast iron so it gives flavour

1:16:101:16:13

from the cast iron, but I did that last time

1:16:131:16:15

so now I need to show other techniques

1:16:151:16:18

so you think I'm a multitalent.

1:16:181:16:20

-The potatoes.

-I'll do the potatoes. I'll drain those off.

1:16:201:16:24

This is just to finish off?

1:16:241:16:26

It's cured, just cooked, this fish as well?

1:16:261:16:31

-So warm potatoes that we've got in here as well?

-Yeah.

1:16:331:16:35

Is there anybody else doing your style of food?

1:16:381:16:41

There are similar ideas and the Nordic food has gone

1:16:411:16:46

from not only... I'm just going to blowtorch this finish.

1:16:461:16:50

-It's hard to hear anything. OK, I'm done.

-That's fine, carry on.

1:16:501:16:54

It's been a lot of focus on new Nordic food product-wise

1:16:571:17:01

but now it's more technically driven.

1:17:011:17:04

You said this juniper, Douglas fir pine, you could use that?

1:17:041:17:08

Yeah, you could use that. A Christmas tree.

1:17:081:17:10

Great way to use up your Christmas tree.

1:17:101:17:13

We could add some olive oil to this as well, even though that's not very Scandinavian.

1:17:131:17:17

Are you happy with that dish?

1:17:171:17:21

-The little dipping sauce on the side.

-Yeah, it looks OK.

1:17:211:17:25

I've done better.

1:17:251:17:26

Fair enough! What's the name of the dish?

1:17:281:17:31

Juniper smoked wood... What? No.

1:17:311:17:34

I've just got Obi-Wan Kenobi going in my head.

1:17:341:17:39

Anyway, check that out.

1:17:391:17:40

You need your own show, to be honest, you do!

1:17:461:17:49

Have a seat over here.

1:17:491:17:50

Gregory, I don't know whether you followed that

1:17:501:17:53

-cos I ain't got a clue what was going on.

-I did, man.

1:17:531:17:56

Dive into that, tell us what you think.

1:17:561:17:58

Let me get the little dipping sauce as well.

1:17:581:18:01

This apple and fennel salad, I make one of those.

1:18:011:18:06

Is that particularly Nordic?

1:18:061:18:08

Yeah. It could be German as well, I don't know.

1:18:081:18:11

It depends on where you draw the border.

1:18:111:18:13

Mm! Mm!

1:18:131:18:15

-Happy with that?

-Yes, and this is the dipping sauce.

1:18:151:18:17

Yeah, dipping sauce. Dive in.

1:18:171:18:19

Now, if you couldn't follow that recipe due to the fire and confusion

1:18:241:18:27

then head over to the BBC website, just don't forget your juniper wood.

1:18:271:18:31

When impressionist Alistair McGowan came in to the studio to face

1:18:311:18:34

his Food Heaven or his Food Hell, he told us he was a lover

1:18:341:18:38

of lemon meringue pie, but definitely wasn't partial to pork,

1:18:381:18:42

and it was my turn to cook Heaven or Hell, but which one would it be?

1:18:421:18:45

It's time to find out whether Alistair is facing either

1:18:451:18:48

food Heaven or Food Hell?

1:18:481:18:50

Now, Alistair, Food Heaven was this,

1:18:501:18:52

lots of lemons, lemon meringue pie.

1:18:521:18:56

Meringue and stuff like that.

1:18:561:18:58

Or Food Hell was this, pork chop, big pork chop.

1:18:581:19:01

-Look at it, it just looks boring.

-Look at the size of it.

1:19:011:19:04

Nice kind of Asian slaw, that would be delicious.

1:19:041:19:07

-What do you think you got?

-I hope I got the pie.

1:19:071:19:10

I've had so much savoury, I'm just ready for a sweet.

1:19:101:19:12

You weren't sure what I was going to do, were you?

1:19:121:19:15

No, but I'm interested to see what you're going to do.

1:19:151:19:17

OK, well, I can tell you it is...

1:19:171:19:19

-It's the lemon meringue pie.

-Get in!

1:19:191:19:22

-Guys in the studio, you went for it, right?

-Yeah.

1:19:221:19:25

Most of our callers.

1:19:251:19:27

Boys, if you want to clear that, let's get this on.

1:19:271:19:30

So, guys, I'm also going to need you to do, I've got some lemon curd,

1:19:301:19:34

so one of you guys, who wants to do lemon curd?

1:19:341:19:37

I'll make the lemon curd.

1:19:371:19:38

OK, beautiful, which leaves Martin, you can do the cream,

1:19:381:19:41

we've got some mascarpone cream there,

1:19:411:19:44

with some double cream, some more lemon.

1:19:441:19:46

Right, I'll get on with the cake, I'll stop talking.

1:19:461:19:48

Looks like a... What is it you call it?

1:19:481:19:50

Not a separated egg.

1:19:501:19:52

-Deconstructed!

-Deconstructed! That's the word. That's the buzzword.

1:19:521:19:57

-Terrible word.

-Deconstructed lemon meringue pie.

1:19:571:20:00

Let's get this in.

1:20:001:20:01

Start blending the butter and the sugar.

1:20:011:20:03

You want that sugar to dissolve.

1:20:031:20:06

Let's get that in.

1:20:061:20:08

Start beating that.

1:20:081:20:10

-I do this by hand if I'm doing stuff.

-You don't?

1:20:101:20:13

-I do, yeah.

-Have not got one of these?

-No. I enjoy it.

1:20:131:20:16

It's my workout, you don't need it.

1:20:161:20:18

That's very kind.

1:20:181:20:20

Right, I've got some bicarb in there,

1:20:201:20:22

that's going to lighten the load.

1:20:221:20:24

It's kind of a chuck it all in cake.

1:20:241:20:26

Let's take this over here.

1:20:261:20:29

And some self-raising flour.

1:20:291:20:32

My ingredients are going everywhere.

1:20:321:20:35

So ideally, you want to let that cream, let it cream,

1:20:371:20:40

and then add your eggs slowly, but that's with the luxury of time.

1:20:401:20:43

-This is for the pastry.

-And we're short on that.

1:20:431:20:46

No, no, it's not pastry!

1:20:461:20:48

This is the cake, we're making a lemon cake

1:20:481:20:50

and then we've got the lemon curd, cream, the mascarpone...

1:20:501:20:53

OK, no pastry.

1:20:531:20:55

OK, right, let's get a few eggs in there.

1:20:551:20:58

-Right, guys. Who's free?

-There's some limes here.

1:20:581:21:02

-Really?

-Some lemons.

1:21:021:21:04

Lemon zest.

1:21:041:21:07

-You've done it?

-Yeah.

-Amazing!

1:21:071:21:09

You don't need me to do anything?

1:21:091:21:12

OK, so slowly add the eggs.

1:21:121:21:14

I'll let you do it.

1:21:141:21:16

And this is a real kind of quick, chuck it all in method.

1:21:161:21:19

But you do need a mixer, you'll be there for hours.

1:21:191:21:23

Yeah...

1:21:231:21:24

So what do you eat when you're on the road then?

1:21:241:21:27

It's tricky, actually, because it's finding a time to eat

1:21:271:21:30

because you don't want to eat too close to a show

1:21:301:21:33

and the wisdom is you don't eat after a show.

1:21:331:21:35

-And lay in bed...

-Exactly, not good for you.

1:21:351:21:37

And if you're turning up in towns you don't know,

1:21:371:21:39

sometimes - it's not true now but in the old days -

1:21:391:21:42

you turn up at five o'clock to eat and nowhere's serving till six,

1:21:421:21:44

you know, at the earliest so it's tricky.

1:21:441:21:46

But the best thing is to eat at lunchtime.

1:21:461:21:48

And do you find it hard? Whenever I'm out and about,

1:21:481:21:51

I always find it hard not to eat loads of bread.

1:21:511:21:54

You can't get fruit at a service station

1:21:541:21:56

and everything is bread-based.

1:21:561:21:58

Yeah. That's why this food we've had today has been so nice

1:21:581:22:00

because it's very difficult to get any vegetarian food

1:22:001:22:03

or any healthy food, unless you just eat raw veg or raw fruit.

1:22:031:22:05

I love my fruit so I survive on fruit. Fruit and chocolate!

1:22:051:22:09

Fruit and chocolate?

1:22:091:22:11

-Well, not together!

-That's a nice balanced diet!

1:22:111:22:13

But it is hard to eat on the road.

1:22:131:22:16

Cooking itself, obviously you've got to be at home to do it,

1:22:161:22:18

but you like your own kitchen and you like your own food, so it's difficult.

1:22:181:22:22

It's a big thing now for you guys to do these massive tours, isn't it?

1:22:221:22:26

Theatre is slightly different,

1:22:261:22:29

people have been doing that for years. It's different with stand-up.

1:22:291:22:32

-But the stand-up thing is...

-Yeah, yeah.

1:22:321:22:34

The venues I was doing was like the little theatre in Monmouth

1:22:341:22:36

and, to be perfectly honest, people were saying, you know,

1:22:361:22:39

"We had Dara O Briain here last week,

1:22:391:22:40

"he's trying out stuff for his national tour, his arena tour.

1:22:401:22:43

"When's your big tour?"

1:22:431:22:44

-And I would say, "This is my tour!"

-That's quite nice, though.

1:22:441:22:47

-Quite sort of intimate...

-Yeah.

1:22:471:22:49

Do you get a sense of where you are?

1:22:491:22:52

Do you have that heckle, that feedback?

1:22:521:22:54

You try and fit things in, depending on where you are.

1:22:541:22:58

If I'm in the Birmingham area, obviously,

1:22:581:23:01

you put in people like Frank Skinner,

1:23:011:23:03

who maybe you wouldn't do anywhere else.

1:23:031:23:05

And particularly, this struck me as weird, I was in Newcastle

1:23:051:23:08

and I've done Brendan Foster for a long time,

1:23:081:23:10

the athletics commentator, and when I do Brendan normally,

1:23:101:23:12

people laugh at the end of my Brendan Foster routine

1:23:121:23:14

but when you're in Newcastle or anywhere in the north-east,

1:23:141:23:17

they're laughing straightaway,

1:23:171:23:19

so people like you to do the people from their area.

1:23:191:23:21

Yeah, sure. Build a relationship.

1:23:211:23:23

In the West Country or Wales if you start doing Stephen Merchant,

1:23:231:23:26

people really seem to, to laugh at that,

1:23:261:23:27

-because they like a bit of Stephen Merchant.

-I'm so easily pleased.

1:23:271:23:30

-Doing a local person.

-Have you got any requests, while he's here?

1:23:301:23:33

He's already done Trevor Brooking.

1:23:331:23:36

The sport thing, the sport voices are quite big for you?

1:23:361:23:39

Yeah, it always has been. I love watching sport.

1:23:391:23:42

I mean, that's the thing, really, doing impressions.

1:23:421:23:44

You got to do people that you watch a lot, and for me as well,

1:23:441:23:47

I like my tennis, so I do a lot of tennis voices.

1:23:471:23:50

Andy Murray, obviously. Nowadays the response to me doing Andy

1:23:501:23:55

has gone, well, through the roof, you know.

1:23:551:23:58

It's second nature.

1:23:581:23:59

I have to work hard at the politicians

1:23:591:24:01

because I follow politics like anybody else

1:24:011:24:04

but it's not natural for me to do that.

1:24:041:24:05

I have been enjoying doing Boris.

1:24:051:24:07

And Boris was saying the other day, I don't know if you heard this,

1:24:071:24:11

he said, we face three major crises in this country at this moment in time.

1:24:111:24:14

We face a fuel crisis, we face an obesity crisis and we face an unemployment crisis.

1:24:141:24:18

We could solve all three crises at a stroke.

1:24:181:24:20

All we need to do is suck the fat out of the fat people,

1:24:201:24:23

turn it into fuel and pay them for it!

1:24:231:24:25

Who needs fracking when we've got snacking, that's what I say!

1:24:251:24:28

-Right, OK, so that's the all in one.

-I missed that.

1:24:311:24:34

I'll talk you through it. Don't worry about it.

1:24:341:24:36

Eggs and sugar, and then the lemon zest, the lemon juice,

1:24:361:24:39

the bicarb and the self-raising flour.

1:24:391:24:41

Chucked it all in, creamed it together,

1:24:411:24:43

-into a hot oven.

-Using that.

-Using that bad boy.

1:24:431:24:46

Right, so let's move this over.

1:24:461:24:49

OK, so this is what will come out.

1:24:491:24:51

-This is what will come out.

-And once it's cool...

1:24:511:24:53

You've got a bit of a soggy bottom there, seems to have dropped quite a lot.

1:24:531:24:57

I'm not happy with that as a base, I've got to say.

1:24:571:24:59

I'm not happy with that as a base at all there.

1:24:591:25:01

Don't know what Mary thinks.

1:25:011:25:04

Is it part of your job to keep up?

1:25:041:25:07

Yeah, completely.

1:25:071:25:09

And I found myself cursing once when we were doing

1:25:091:25:11

the television series years ago. I rang a friend and he said,

1:25:111:25:13

"What are you doing?" I said, "I've just been watching Rising Damp.

1:25:131:25:16

"I've had to watch Rising Damp cos we're doing Rigsby next week.

1:25:161:25:19

"I've just watched five episodes back-to-back."

1:25:191:25:21

He actually said to me, "Most people would give their eye teeth

1:25:211:25:24

"to be paid for watching five episodes of Rising Damp."

1:25:241:25:26

So it's not always a hardship.

1:25:261:25:28

But that's why I do people I enjoy watching.

1:25:281:25:30

Because then it doesn't feel like work at all.

1:25:301:25:33

Thank you, boys.

1:25:331:25:35

We've got our cooled lemon curd.

1:25:351:25:38

Yes. I missed that, so what is lemon curd?

1:25:381:25:41

-I have always wondered what lemon curd is.

-Talk him through it.

1:25:411:25:44

Lemon curd is eggs, sugar and lemon whisked until it should be

1:25:441:25:48

ribbon stage and then you add butter to it to emulsify.

1:25:481:25:52

Does it need to set? Has it got to set before you use it?

1:25:521:25:55

Needs to go, yeah, it's obviously going to be hot,

1:25:551:25:57

it needs to go in the fridge and cool down.

1:25:571:25:59

I'm just going to ripple this through.

1:25:591:26:01

It's already looking really, really tantalising.

1:26:011:26:04

It's not what you had in mind, I think,

1:26:041:26:06

when you think of lemon meringue pie, as it were.

1:26:061:26:10

Let's try not to slop that on the deck.

1:26:101:26:13

-OK, so that's been rippled through the mascarpone.

-Yeah.

-Right?

1:26:131:26:17

We'll have to lose that.

1:26:171:26:18

OK, so here we've got some lemon slices. These, very easy to do.

1:26:181:26:25

They look like the lemons you left in the fruit bowl

1:26:251:26:28

and kind of forgotten about, but they are not,

1:26:281:26:31

so what you need to do is to slice them

1:26:311:26:33

and you could leave them out in your Aga or in a low oven overnight

1:26:331:26:36

or something like that.

1:26:361:26:38

They basically dehydrate.

1:26:381:26:39

Is that just the dressing or can you eat the whole thing?

1:26:391:26:41

-You can eat them, do you want to try one?

-With the rind as well?

1:26:411:26:44

They are quite poky.

1:26:441:26:46

Poky, what does that mean?

1:26:461:26:48

That's poky.

1:26:481:26:50

-It is. Quite a nice little snack.

-It's nice.

1:26:501:26:54

Let's turn that heat off.

1:26:541:26:56

Thank you, chef.

1:26:561:26:59

This is the wafer thin meringue.

1:26:591:27:03

So I'm hoping to get some shards.

1:27:031:27:07

It's not really working.

1:27:071:27:08

So, hang on...

1:27:081:27:10

What we would do, right, is make a meringue,

1:27:101:27:12

spread it out, leave that to dry.

1:27:121:27:14

You're going to do it.

1:27:141:27:16

Leave that to dry.

1:27:161:27:18

That worked!

1:27:181:27:21

That's what we're after!

1:27:211:27:23

Let's have some shards!

1:27:231:27:26

This is what's called stiff peaks.

1:27:261:27:28

Beautiful.

1:27:281:27:30

That looks all right, actually,

1:27:301:27:32

that looks better than the one I did earlier.

1:27:321:27:35

Let's move that like that and that's it!

1:27:351:27:37

Do you want to dig in? Put your lemon down!

1:27:371:27:41

-Dig in, have a spoon. Yes, you do! Yes, you do.

-OK.

1:27:411:27:45

I can't believe I'm about to say that my mother makes it better, but...

1:27:451:27:49

Try that.

1:27:491:27:50

It's a disappointing bake, I've got to say.

1:27:501:27:53

Alistair, remind us when your tour starts.

1:27:531:27:56

My tour of Pygmalion starts in ten days' time.

1:27:561:27:58

-I'm speaking with my mouth full!

-That's fine, it's all relaxed here.

1:27:581:28:01

In Cambridge and then we go around Aberdeen, Brighton, Bath,

1:28:011:28:04

Oxford, all over the country.

1:28:041:28:06

Coming to a town near you.

1:28:061:28:07

If there's a theatre royal we're in it, doing Pygmalion.

1:28:071:28:10

-Is that all right?

-This is lovely,

1:28:101:28:11

and it's a very funny play, I should say that.

1:28:111:28:13

Cheers.

1:28:131:28:15

I tell you what, those meringues were a nightmare

1:28:181:28:20

but it was well worth the effort to see the look of enjoyment

1:28:201:28:23

on Alistair's little face as he tucked into his Food Heaven.

1:28:231:28:27

Anyway, that's it from us this week, I'm afraid.

1:28:271:28:29

I hope we've enjoyed taking a look back at some of our favourite

1:28:291:28:32

moments from the Saturday Kitchen archives, and don't forget,

1:28:321:28:34

if you fancy giving any of today's studio recipes a go,

1:28:341:28:37

then just head over to the BBC website.

1:28:371:28:39

Enjoy the rest of your weekend and we'll see you next week.

1:28:391:28:42

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