11/03/2018 Saturday Kitchen Best Bites


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11/03/2018

Matt Tebbutt takes a look back at some of his favourite recipes and best moments from Saturday Kitchen.


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Good morning. We've got breakfast, lunch and dinner all sorted for you on today's show,

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as famous faces tuck into inspirational dishes from top chefs,

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as well as another celebrity facing their food heaven or food hell.

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So, forget about the spring cleaning, sit back and relax

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and enjoy another slice of Saturday Kitchen Best Bites.

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Welcome to the show. Now, don't go anywhere for the next 90 minutes,

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as we have been searching through the Saturday Kitchen archives

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to bring you some of our favourite moments from years gone by.

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Coming up, it's dessert time, as funnyman Bradley Walsh enjoys

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coconut panna cotta with blood oranges and mini-doughnuts.

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The Godfather of Gastronomy himself Michel Roux is here

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with a masterclass on scallops.

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He cooks scallops in fish stock with button mushrooms,

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before serving the scallops in their shells

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with duchess potatoes on a bed of couscous.

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The Queen of Curry Madhur Jaffrey is here, with spicy lamb shanks.

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She marinates lamb shanks in yoghurt with a mix of cumin, cloves,

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cinnamon, ginger, garlic and coriander,

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and serves alongside a dill and cardamom rice pilaf.

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And then it's time for another Saturday Kitchen Omelette Challenge,

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as Jun Tanaka takes on Atul Kochhar at the hobs.

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Saturday Kitchen favourite Galton Blackiston is here,

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mixing Japanese and Norfolk cuisine. He sears feather blade of Wagyu beef

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and serves alongside Norfolk new potatoes, kale,

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beetroot puree and crispy shallot rings.

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And actor James Nesbitt faces his food heaven or his food hell.

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Will he get his food heaven -

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aubergine moussaka with sauteed potatoes -

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or his food hell - a simple simnel cake?

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The choice between sweet and savoury, but which one did he get?

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You're going to have to keep watching until the end of the show to find out.

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All of that still to come,

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plus we've been digging through the BBC archives to bring you

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some classic moments from Rick Stein and Keith Floyd.

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But first up, it's over to Donna Hay who's got breakfast all sorted

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with her pancetta baked eggs.

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-Welcome back, Donna. Your second time on the show?

-Yes.

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-What are we cooking?

-You were really nice to me last time!

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I'm always nice to you.

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I feel you're going to be in trouble today.

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No, not me. It's him over there that you need to worry.

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-Nothing to do with me.

-I feel trouble brewing.

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-OK, what are we cooking, then?

-Pancetta baked eggs.

-Yes.

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I know I offended you, no pastry. But, come on.

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It's the weekend, I'm not going to stuff pastry in these tins.

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Right, OK. Pancetta, so the idea is this is a quiche without the pastry?

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-Yeah.

-Right, OK.

-Well, sort of. Do you have to say it like that?

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Quiche is so '80s.

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Right. We've got the pancetta here.

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We've got the pancetta. You know what, I'm going to halve some of it.

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At home I do it with round pancetta, which I just pop straight in.

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-We can get round pancetta.

-OK. Well, that's a lot simpler.

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But, for this one, just two little pieces in the bottom.

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Then get one of the whole ones and twist it around the sides.

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So, as long as you've roughly lined the tin,

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it's no big deal if there's holes in it.

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It's just to go around the outside.

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And when that bakes, it becomes nice and crunchy and crisp.

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Important to use a metal tin for this, then?

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I like to use a metal tin.

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It makes sure the pancetta goes crunchy and brown.

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But you can't use bacon, just pancetta? That's the key, I suppose.

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Well, I think bacon might be a bit thick. Can you get nice, thin bacon?

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So you want me to make the royale mix, not the quiche mix?

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The royale mix which is eggs, medium eggs.

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-Three eggs.

-Three of these, yeah.

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A little bit of cream, because I want it nice and creamy,

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you know, velvety in the centre.

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-Little bit?

-So, a little bit of cream.

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Some Parmesan cheese, there you go. Grated over there.

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Tell us about yourself, then. Was it...?

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Were you a chef first, or were you an enthusiastic cook, or...?

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-How did you get into it?

-I was an enthusiastic cook.

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My two older sisters, out of necessity, made me cook.

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Right.

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So that's really how I got into it, then I turned it into my career,

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but I'm really a home economist by trade.

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-That's where you trained, was it?

-Yeah... You know what?

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To tell you the truth, I was too scared to become a chef,

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I was scared of you big boys.

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Pushing me around in the kitchen. I was, I was horrified.

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-I don't know about that.

-NICK NAIRN: Pussycats.

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-Every one of us!

-Yeah, yeah.

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-That's how I would describe you, Nick!

-Never lost my temper ever.

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Yeah, pussycat!

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So a home economist and then, what was it...?

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You wrote one book, and then it progressed from there, or...?

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I started writing recipes for magazines, but I really enjoyed the food styling...

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Back when I started - I'm sounding really old -

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but cooking at home was kind of a bit shunned upon,

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it was all about getting cool takeaway

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and not cooking at all.

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So, I just decided that I needed to write really simple fresh recipes...

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-Right.

-..that people could achieve at home, so...

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And that's how it all started,

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cos it's gone on to be hugely popular, cos...

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How many cook books are you on now? How many...?

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I don't know...16, something.

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16 cook books, 4 million cook books,

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but the other thing that's huge is this magazine.

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-Tell us about that.

-Yeah, that's been enormous.

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The day before I got on the plane to come over here,

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we'd just put the 50th issue to the printers, so...

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-Yeah.

-..that's been fantastic.

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Subscribers in, you know,

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a crazy amount of countries all over the world, so it's good fun.

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-Fun working on a mag.

-Fantastic. There you go.

-Thank you.

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-There's your "royale" mixture.

-I'm just going to pop that in there.

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And I really like the addition of all that fresh basil,

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because I am channelling spring, sunny weather,

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and I think the basil just makes it nice and fresh and zingy.

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You don't have to grease these moulds or anything?

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-No, it just pops out, cos it's nonstick.

-OK. In the oven.

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-In the oven - are you going to do that for me?

-I'll do that.

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-What temperature's that going in at?

-Oh, 350 something.

-"350 something"?

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-Details, details, James!

-For some amount of time!

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Some amount of time, something or other.

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350 something, they go in for some amount of time and they come out like this.

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And don't forget that all today's studio recipes,

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including this one from Donna, are on our website.

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Go to bbc.co.uk/saturdaykitchen.

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For dishes from our previous shows, bbc.co.uk/recipes.

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Look at those, they're like little souffles, lovely.

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There you go. Right, peas you popped in boiling water.

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Yeah, just frozen peas. A lot easier.

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But I just want to refresh them and take the frozenness out of them

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without them cooking, really, cos I want them to have as much...

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-Is that over to me, then?

-Over to you.

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So they got drained off, and then you want them in ice-cold water?

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Yes, then a little bit of leaf spinach.

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But do you do your own photography as well for these books, or...?

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No, I don't do the photography, but I do the styling.

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-You do the whole styling for it as well?

-Yeah.

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There you go. And the ethos of these recipes, are they...?

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Cos you've got a new one coming up, the new book now?

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No, but I'm sure I could write one for you later.

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-"Donna has a new cook book out."

-Oh, that one. Sorry.

-"That one"?

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Oh, it's one of the 16! No Time To Cook.

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It came out last year, but I was a bit slow getting up here with it, so...

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-Yes, No Time To Cook.

-Yeah, which is...

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Which has got a lovely ethos of busy people, so one pot, one pan,

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one roasting dish, so slow on the washing up as well.

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-Have you got my peas?

-I've got your peas.

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-Do you want me to take...the things out the spinach?

-No, I don't!

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-Why not?

-Cos it's edible and it's got a nice crunch.

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-Look, that's no food stylist. Look at that!

-OK, all right.

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A big burly boy doing that!

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So, we've got lots of mint leaves, and I like to keep them whole,

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because I like a big punch of flavour when you eat it.

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And then you're going to make me some dressing.

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I just want some olive oil and lemon juice soaking it up.

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-Olive oil and lemon juice? Right, OK.

-Really simple.

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-So they've had boiling water poured over them?

-Yeah.

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-Do you want pips in here?

-No! No.

-Lemon, no?

-No, I don't think so.

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-Rustic. Right, so lemon and olive oil?

-Yes, please.

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Just something simple. Then we'll pop a little bit more mint on this.

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-You want some seasoning in there?

-Yes, please.

-A bit of black pepper.

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Now, you said these were great for picnics.

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Yeah, I love taking these on a picnic. You know why?

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Because you can just wrap this in a tea towel

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and take it in its own little portable dish.

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-Arrives there in style.

-Wrap it in a tea towel? You're going to wrap it in a...sleeping bag,

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the weather we've been having over here!

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To keep that thing warm.

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A little bit of dressing over the top.

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-Donna, you can drizzle the dressing over, cos I daren't touch it.

-Really?

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-Yeah, go on.

-Do I scare you that much?

-No, you don't scare me.

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-There we go.

-A little drizzly, drizzly dressing.

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And these are great, aren't they? As you say, nice and crisp.

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Lovely and soft in the centre. Remind us what that is again.

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It's baked pancetta eggs with a spinach, pea and feta salad.

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-See, I wasn't scary, was I?

-A little bit.

-Check that out.

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Looks absolutely delicious, I have to say.

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And that little home economist touch works.

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There you go, have a seat over here. There you go, Sue. Dive into that.

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-Oh, gosh. That looks so beautiful.

-The food just keeps coming.

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These are a great idea. They're nice and light.

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It's simple, it's for breakfast food, brunch food, picnic food.

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-Put some toast on it.

-Nick's thinking that's on his cafe menu.

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I do, and I love the idea of just wrapping the thing in a duvet

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and taking it away for a picnic, you know,

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for that sunny day that we get twice a year.

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Exactly! In Scotland.

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But the idea of these...

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They puff straight up, and it keeps them nice and light.

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I've just got to have some of this mint and peas.

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Don't forget the spinach

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with the nice stalk bits in there, perfectly placed.

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-Happy with that?

-Oh, that's beautiful.

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They're fantastic.

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Just pour boiling water onto the frozen peas,

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then strain them and use them straightaway.

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That's the key to all that, and it's also the same thing for broad beans.

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Such a brilliant store cupboard standby.

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Something you have in the freezer,

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it's as good as anything you'll get from the garden.

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Other flavourings that could be put in there? Give them some inspiration. Other than basil.

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Oh, goodness. Well, any kind of soft herb. Parsley...

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-Coriander work in there?

-Ooh, not with eggs.

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I don't like coriander with eggs. Chives...

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Nick! Coriander doesn't work!

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What do I...? I've only written 13 books.

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Oh, well, there you go. When you've done 16, you know what you're talking about, eh?

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An excellent brunch dish from Donna there,

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and a great way to kick-start your day.

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Coming up, Bradley Walsh is served coconut panna cotta

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with blood orange and mini-doughnuts,

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but first it's over to Rick Stein who's in India, taking it easy,

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as someone else is doing all the cooking for a change.

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Popular holiday destinations

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mark out, I think, great chunks of social history.

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Package deals to Spain, villas in Tuscany,

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gites in the Perigord, and now, I think, this is probably the latest,

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rice barges with all mod cons in Kerala.

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Cruising through palm-fringed backwaters

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with full air conditioning,

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your very own cook, sun deck and balcony.

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They once brought rice from the paddies inland.

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Who'd have thought, what a leap in imagination, they'd be taking

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honeymoon couples on the holiday of a lifetime?

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I suppose this is what Kerala's all about. Going in a boat

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up and down the backwaters. It's a bit like the exotic version

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of the Norfolk Broads, I was thinking.

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You know, you've got these sort of wide rivers going into big lakes.

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But looking around, it just sums up Kerala to me,

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because, I know I use this word a bit too often, fecundity,

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but, it is so fertile.

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I can watch fishermen all day long.

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It's timeless, basic and magical.

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This guy's catching the most popular fish here, it's called karimeen.

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And lots of little cafes along the backwaters serve it with masala.

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Well, we just stopped off for a coffee

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from filming them catching karimeen,

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the famous fish of the Keralan backwaters,

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and they just said, "Would you like something to eat?"

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So, I just had a look at this.

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I mean, it's such a lovely advertisement menu.

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So, I said, "Can we have some karimeen fry, please?"

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So, I'm really looking forward to that.

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They said, "Would you like some prawns too?"

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So, these are the prawns.

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I mean... Call that...

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I mean, this is a Bobby Dazzler of a prawn!

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So, I said to them, "Is there any chance we can film them?"

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Because, you know, it would be so good to be out there watching them come.

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And they said, "Well, they only do them at night."

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Well, we can't film that, because you wouldn't be able to see 'em.

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So, we said, "Well, do you fancy cooking some for us as well?"

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So, we're going to have them fried!

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I was a bit peckish, so they ended up making two dishes for me,

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starting with these giant prawns

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that were fried with onions, tomatoes and curry leaves.

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When the prawns have taken on colour,

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he puts in freshly ground garam masala,

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ground cumin, turmeric and more curry leaves.

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I think this is a prawn curry

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by which other prawn curries may be measured.

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What they're doing now is cooking the karimeen fry.

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That's the one that's just coated in the masala with cornflour,

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and in the masala we've got garlic, ginger, chilli,

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ground pepper, cumin, turmeric,

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cornflour and lemon juice.

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You won't be able to get the karimeen at home,

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but it would work really well with bass or bream. And, of course,

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what's really important, it's got to be fried in coconut oil.

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The guy helping us out here on the backwaters is Floyd.

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No, not that one!

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But he was brought up here and he's also a chef.

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He worked in the Middle East in Bahrain.

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Any food in Kerala, if you go to any house,

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they don't serve you with a fork or knife or spoon,

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you have to eat it with your hand.

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-Let's go then. You start.

-You start from here.

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Let's just see what it's like.

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Mmm, what a good fish!

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And this...this fish, the karimeen, is the most famous fish in Kerala.

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Yeah, sure, it's the famous fish in Kerala.

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You can go anywhere in Kerala and...but most in Alleppey, you come to Alleppey...

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-Yeah.

-..they ask for karimeen.

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Tell me this, what dish would you be most homesick for

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when you were cooking over in Arabia?

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The dish which makes me homesick, which I feel like eating...

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-Yeah.

-..is fish molee and prawn curry,

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because whenever I leave Bahrain, before I could leave there,

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I call my mother and I tell her,

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-"Mummy, I want this dish."

-HE LAUGHS

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So, she keeps it ready for me.

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I can see what Floyd means.

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This prawn curry certainly didn't disappoint.

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It was bursting with the flavours of pepper, chilli, cumin

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and the restaurant's home-made garam masala.

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Words fail me. I mean,

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just looking at those prawns when they were raw,

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I was just thinking, "This is going to be fabulous."

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I mean, I just love seafood, and...that is...spectacular.

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THEY SPEAK IN OWN LANGUAGE

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Toddy is very important in Kerala.

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It's not just for the tourists.

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The toddy shops are to the locals what our local is to us.

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The toddy comes from the nectar of the coconut palm bud.

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And this is a bit complicated,

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so bear with me, as I had a couple of glasses of this magic nectar

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before witnessing this!

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First of all, this chap climbs the palm

0:15:420:15:45

and then beats one of these huge buds

0:15:450:15:48

in order to get the sap to rise.

0:15:480:15:51

And then it looks like he's already cut off the top of one bud,

0:15:530:15:58

which he rubs with a bit of mud.

0:15:580:16:01

This, I was told, promotes the rise of the nectar, which starts to drip

0:16:010:16:05

almost straightaway and that's captured in the clay pot.

0:16:050:16:11

It's then left overnight

0:16:110:16:12

and collected first thing in the morning.

0:16:120:16:14

It'll start to ferment straightaway

0:16:140:16:16

and by lunch time will be quite alcoholic

0:16:160:16:18

and yet quite pleasant to drink.

0:16:180:16:22

But towards the end of a hot afternoon,

0:16:230:16:26

it'll be absolutely lethal!

0:16:260:16:28

Floyd the chef and my guide here

0:16:280:16:31

insisted that I visit a local toddy shop.

0:16:310:16:34

He said, "You can't say you've been to Kerala

0:16:340:16:37

"without having a glass of toddy."

0:16:370:16:39

To which I replied, "Well, all right, then!"

0:16:390:16:41

-Before you can drink the toddy...

-Yeah.

0:16:430:16:46

..you have to pour a little bit first.

0:16:460:16:48

Oh, I thought we were supposed to be drinking out of this, Floyd.

0:16:480:16:50

-Yes, just a little bit.

-Yeah, OK.

0:16:500:16:52

You wash it, you wash it and just...

0:16:520:16:55

That's the style before you can drink the toddy.

0:16:550:16:58

-Right, that... So.

-So, now...

0:16:580:17:00

-How much do you put in there, then?

-Yeah, you put full.

0:17:000:17:02

-And the first glass...

-Yeah.

0:17:050:17:07

..you have to take it full.

0:17:070:17:08

Oh, I've never tasted it before, what if I don't like it?

0:17:080:17:12

You have to!

0:17:120:17:14

-If you're in a toddy shop...

-I have to!

0:17:140:17:15

..empty the glass, you have to. It goes like this.

0:17:150:17:18

-Cheers!

-Cheers!

0:17:180:17:19

-Crikey, that's not bad actually!

-That is...

0:17:270:17:31

Once you start with the toddy, it's starting...trouble.

0:17:310:17:35

THEY LAUGH

0:17:350:17:37

It's like the engine.

0:17:370:17:39

-Right, you've got to...

-You got to make...

0:17:390:17:41

-..fill the carburettor up...

-Yeah, and then,

0:17:410:17:43

-by the time you start it...

-Yeah.

0:17:430:17:44

..you keep on going.

0:17:440:17:46

Phwoar!

0:17:460:17:48

HE SNORES

0:17:520:17:53

SNORING

0:17:530:17:55

That's what happens when you have too much toddy, you see,

0:18:010:18:03

there you go!

0:18:030:18:04

Now, Rick was in Kerala, which translates as "land of the coconut trees".

0:18:040:18:07

Now, coconut is such a versatile ingredient for savoury

0:18:070:18:10

and sweet dishes, and I'm going to use it to make this dish.

0:18:100:18:12

It's a great dessert.

0:18:120:18:14

It's a coconut panna cotta,

0:18:140:18:15

and I'm going to use it with blood oranges,

0:18:150:18:17

which are in season now, which are fantastic,

0:18:170:18:19

make a little Suzette sauce to go with it, and some little

0:18:190:18:21

doughnuts, which I think go fantastically well with panna cotta.

0:18:210:18:24

So, first off we're going to throw in some sugar into here.

0:18:240:18:27

Now, this is a simple little Suzette sauce.

0:18:270:18:29

So, Suzette sauce is a little bit of brandy,

0:18:290:18:31

or you can use Armagnac, and then we've got some of this

0:18:310:18:34

orange liqueur, these blood oranges, which are fantastic.

0:18:340:18:37

-When you cut them open, look at those.

-Oh, yeah.

0:18:370:18:40

Now, I said they're used for a lot of savoury dishes.

0:18:400:18:42

One of the most famous sauces with this is called a Maltaise,

0:18:420:18:45

which is Hollandaise sauce with blood orange juice added to it.

0:18:450:18:48

Which is great with some poached salmon or asparagus,

0:18:480:18:51

which it would be really nice with as well, with orange, wonderful.

0:18:510:18:54

But with this one we're just going to use a touch of lemon,

0:18:540:18:56

just to give it a bit of sharpness, and warm this up.

0:18:560:18:58

Now, with our panna cotta, we throw in some double cream.

0:18:580:19:01

Panna cotta is basically just a set cream,

0:19:020:19:05

but we're going to flavour this with some vanilla, so when you

0:19:050:19:08

take the vanilla, Bourbon vanilla, which comes from Madagascar,

0:19:080:19:11

big, fat vanilla pod,

0:19:110:19:12

you should be able to bend the pods like that, not sort of snap.

0:19:120:19:16

And then what we do is we take out the vanilla seeds, throw that

0:19:160:19:19

into the cream, and then I've got a mixture of this gelatine.

0:19:190:19:22

This is leaf gelatine, which is in cold water left to soak.

0:19:220:19:25

And then we've got coconut milk and buttermilk.

0:19:250:19:27

Buttermilk adds a little sharpness to the panna cotta as well.

0:19:270:19:30

So, that's that one. All right?

0:19:300:19:32

Yeah, no, good, yeah. I'm absolutely fascinated, actually, yeah.

0:19:330:19:37

-Happy with that?

-Yeah, no, really good.

0:19:370:19:39

-Now, it's got to be the...

-Is it fattening?

-Is it fattening?

0:19:390:19:41

-Yeah.

-Er, yes.

0:19:410:19:43

Cos I was looking at Paul. Do you eat your own food, Paul?

0:19:430:19:45

-There's nothing of you.

-Yeah, yeah. I have hollow legs.

0:19:450:19:48

It just doesn't stick to me. I've got my dad's genetics and...

0:19:480:19:52

-Right, yeah, yeah.

-Yeah.

0:19:520:19:53

Right, so, when you add the alcohol to this,

0:19:530:19:55

you've got to really watch it.

0:19:550:19:56

Be particularly careful with the orange liqueur, this stuff.

0:19:560:19:59

-It's like rocket fuel when you put it...

-Is it going to blow up?

0:19:590:20:01

It literally will fry up. So, add a little bit of colour to the sugar.

0:20:010:20:05

And you want the colour to add, well,

0:20:050:20:07

the flavour to the sauce as well.

0:20:070:20:09

So, you basically just take it off the heat,

0:20:090:20:11

-you add a little bit of brandy...

-Go on, James!

0:20:110:20:13

Now, this'll flame a bit, but not as much as this stuff.

0:20:130:20:15

This is like rocket fuel, so, careful with this one.

0:20:150:20:18

Do you think there was a girl called Suzette that that was invented for?

0:20:190:20:22

-What's that?

-Do you think there was a girl called Suzette?

0:20:220:20:25

I think there probably was.

0:20:250:20:26

-You know, there was bound to be, you know?

-Probably was.

0:20:260:20:29

-In we go with the...

-Like peach Melba.

-..blood oranges.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:20:290:20:32

-Tarte Tatin, the Tatin sisters.

-Who's Mrs Tatin?

0:20:320:20:36

They were a couple of old dames that lived in France somewhere.

0:20:360:20:39

-Really?

-Yes.

0:20:390:20:41

And the tart fell out when it came out of the oven,

0:20:410:20:43

fell upside down, hence the word tarte Tatin,

0:20:430:20:45

-that's where it comes from, upside-down apple tart.

-Oh. Very good.

0:20:450:20:47

Bit like scad the beggars.

0:20:470:20:49

Yeah, exactly. You need all these questions on The Chase, you see.

0:20:490:20:52

I do, that's exactly where I need them, yeah.

0:20:520:20:54

Cos it's the only questions that I would actually get right if I was ever on that...

0:20:540:20:58

I mean, that is an incredible phenomenon, really.

0:20:580:21:00

What are you now, seventh series, eighth series of The Chase?

0:21:000:21:02

-Something like that, yeah.

-It's still getting huge viewing figures.

0:21:020:21:05

Yeah, it's great, I have to say, it's really good.

0:21:050:21:07

I mean, people often ask me, you know,

0:21:070:21:09

"Do you want to come down to the pub quiz?" and stuff like that.

0:21:090:21:11

"You must be good." But it's not like that for me.

0:21:110:21:13

I'm sort of running the show, so it goes in one ear and out the other.

0:21:130:21:16

I'm not really, I'm not...

0:21:160:21:18

It's about having a great memory for names and numbers

0:21:180:21:21

and stuff like that as well, so I'm not brilliant with that.

0:21:210:21:23

-Cos, yeah, I mean, you've done a variety quiz shows that you've been a part of.

-Yeah.

0:21:230:21:28

Is that one of your favourites?

0:21:280:21:30

Is that the one that feels right for you, The Chase?

0:21:300:21:32

Yeah, The Chase especially.

0:21:320:21:34

I mean, it was a nice format and I just sat,

0:21:340:21:37

I literally sat in an office and someone at ITV,

0:21:370:21:40

Di Howie, gave me, and Ali Sharman, gave me a piece

0:21:400:21:42

of A4 paper and said, "What do you think of the rules of that?"

0:21:420:21:45

-I said, "Yeah, it looks good."

-"We're going to do an office run-through."

0:21:450:21:48

-And I did it.

-And I started with a couple of the Chasers in an office run-through, gave them

0:21:480:21:52

a couple of nicknames, and we were up and running.

0:21:520:21:54

And I literally became part of the contestant,

0:21:540:21:58

I literally was the contestant's mate, basically, in the first run-through

0:21:580:22:03

and it sort of stuck, and so we were against the Chasers...

0:22:030:22:06

See, if there's got to be one that's brought back it's got to be

0:22:060:22:08

-Bullseye, hasn't it?

-Yeah.

-I mean, that was the ultimate to me.

0:22:080:22:12

-Yeah, did you like darts though?

-Well, yeah, but you won a rubber Bully,

0:22:120:22:16

which was pretty pointless, and also you won a boat when you lived in, sort of, Birmingham.

0:22:160:22:20

BRADLEY LAUGHS

0:22:200:22:21

Which I thought was just... I thought it was "this is what you could have won."

0:22:210:22:24

So they rubbed it in even more. I thought it was...

0:22:240:22:26

Yeah, I see what you're saying, yeah, but, you know, game shows,

0:22:260:22:29

I mean, they're all sort of a reinvention,

0:22:290:22:31

pretty much of a muchness, a reinvention of something...

0:22:310:22:34

Well, you've done so many different things as well, particularly,

0:22:340:22:37

-I mean, now Law and Order: UK.

-Yeah.

-Fantastic to be a part of that.

0:22:370:22:41

Yeah, well, that's, we're in our eighth series of that,

0:22:410:22:44

I think, now, so that's good. That was...

0:22:440:22:47

I'm really pleased to be part of that.

0:22:470:22:50

Cos, I mean, in America it's massive.

0:22:500:22:52

Well, I think we're the only franchise running

0:22:520:22:54

now at the moment, because it made 420-odd episodes in the States

0:22:540:22:58

and then they took it off, but there are other guises it runs in,

0:22:580:23:02

like SVU, Law and Order: SPU, and Law and Order: Criminal Intent,

0:23:020:23:06

but I think we're probably the only franchise running.

0:23:060:23:09

And our show gets dubbed into French and Portuguese, I think, and Italian, German...

0:23:090:23:14

Cos if you've never seen the US version, anybody out there,

0:23:140:23:16

-it's kind of the same format, isn't it, really?

-Yeah.

0:23:160:23:19

It's the way that it's edited as well. Tell us a bit about it.

0:23:190:23:22

Well, it's quick. I mean, it's the whole thing.

0:23:220:23:24

It's, sort of, the crime, we catch the perpetrator pretty quickly.

0:23:240:23:28

And then it's not really a whodunnit,

0:23:280:23:31

but it's purely and simply the fact that then we've got to

0:23:310:23:33

take them to court and see how the judicial system puts them away.

0:23:330:23:36

Sometimes they get off and sometimes we put them away.

0:23:360:23:40

But strangely enough, most of the stories in its original guise

0:23:400:23:44

came from the front pages of the New York Times.

0:23:440:23:46

Dick Wolf himself would read the front pages, write the story,

0:23:460:23:50

go away with his writers,

0:23:500:23:51

write the story that concerned that particular headline.

0:23:510:23:54

So, basically they were all pretty much true to life, you know.

0:23:540:23:58

-Cos it is one of these shows that, particularly I think, in the UK we've improved.

-Oh, right.

0:23:580:24:04

Well, do you think we've taken an American show? It's difficult for you to say that,

0:24:040:24:07

but it's one of those things that, you know,

0:24:070:24:09

you start off with an American show, because they kind of ruin ours.

0:24:090:24:12

-Well, I don't know about that...

-It's like that Office sort of stuff.

0:24:120:24:15

Well, I've never seen it, so I can't comment, but I...

0:24:150:24:18

LAUGHTER

0:24:180:24:19

-He's sitting on the fence here, you see.

-Come on, Bradley, get off.

0:24:190:24:22

I think it's like American cars, you see, we make them better.

0:24:220:24:25

I'm not, I'm not sitting on any fence. Seriously, I hadn't seen it.

0:24:250:24:27

I hadn't even seen the American Law and Order. I hadn't even seen it.

0:24:270:24:30

Dick Wolf, we was at dinner one night and he said to me,

0:24:300:24:32

"Brad, what did you think of the American show?"

0:24:320:24:34

And I went, "I've got to be honest with you, Dick, I've never seen it."

0:24:340:24:37

And he went, "Well, maybe that's good, so then you're not taking on

0:24:370:24:40

-"board the way it was done and you're bringing it from a fresh side."

-Yours is better.

-Yeah.

0:24:400:24:43

So, it was pretty good.

0:24:430:24:45

I mean, I'm basically playing the part that Jerry Orbach played,

0:24:450:24:48

Lenny Briscoe in the original series of the American show, but it's been great.

0:24:480:24:53

I mean, it was a time, when I first turned up for rehearsals,

0:24:530:24:57

this is in 2008, that I'd just left, not been, I'd been out of another show,

0:24:570:25:02

come into Law and Order, and I was told not to smile at all by the show runner,

0:25:020:25:08

scripter head and the director, because Jamie Bamber who

0:25:080:25:12

was my partner at the time, he said, "No, he's the alpha male,

0:25:120:25:15

"he's the grin, you know, for the ladies to see. You're the grisly old cop."

0:25:150:25:21

And it was great. And it was like, I thought, "Oh, brilliant, something different."

0:25:210:25:24

Cos I'd played Danny Baldwin in Coronation Street, I was Jack the lad and then...

0:25:240:25:28

So, we get to Law and Order and it's knocked out of you,

0:25:280:25:31

and then we put the mac on, the glasses and the slicked-down hair,

0:25:310:25:34

and it's a really nice part to play, actually, very understated.

0:25:340:25:37

But looking at all the stuff that you've done, I mean,

0:25:370:25:39

this is a far cry from your first career as a professional footballer.

0:25:390:25:42

Well, actually, my first career was at Rolls-Royce in Leavesden in

0:25:420:25:46

Watford, I used to build helicopter engines for the Ministry of Defence.

0:25:460:25:49

-That's what I used to do.

-He's making all this up.

0:25:490:25:52

This can't be true.

0:25:520:25:54

LAUGHTER

0:25:540:25:55

-It can't be. Your life's not real.

-I left school, I left school...

-That's unbelievable.

0:25:550:26:00

I left school, Francis Combe Secondary Modern, a comprehensive.

0:26:000:26:04

And my dad, I said, "I don't know what to do," cos I was going to, playing football locally,

0:26:040:26:08

and my dad said, "Well, listen, why don't you go to the factory?"

0:26:080:26:12

Which is literally the Harry Potter film studios now.

0:26:120:26:14

And it was literally at the top of our road and I said, "OK, fair enough."

0:26:140:26:18

I only needed a minimal amount of qualifications to get in at floor level,

0:26:180:26:24

and then Rolls-Royce put me through their technical school and I went to college with them.

0:26:240:26:28

And came out the other end a jet engineer.

0:26:280:26:30

If someone had told you your life's going to be like that, you would go, "You're crazy."

0:26:300:26:34

And then I was seen playing for my mum's hospital side on the Saturday, I played for the county football

0:26:340:26:39

and stuff like that, and I was seen playing, and they said to me, Brentford had been watching,

0:26:390:26:44

and they said, "Do you want to play on Monday night against Southend United?"

0:26:440:26:47

And I said, "Yeah," and I scored the winner and signed on straight after that.

0:26:470:26:50

-Have you ever seen James play football?

-No, no.

-He's fantastic.

0:26:500:26:53

LAUGHTER

0:26:530:26:55

But it's like everything else, the game's changed. I couldn't play now.

0:26:570:27:00

We've still got 55 minutes for me to get...

0:27:000:27:02

LAUGHTER

0:27:020:27:04

Yeah, you don't want to see me play football.

0:27:040:27:06

Me neither, me neither now. It's all gone.

0:27:060:27:08

-No, seriously, you don't want to see me play football.

-LAUGHTER

0:27:080:27:11

-So...

-So, Law and Order.

-Yeah.

-And we are on, what, eight series now?

0:27:110:27:15

Yeah, yeah.

0:27:150:27:17

-Fantastic. Well, there are your doughnuts.

-Thanks.

0:27:170:27:20

JAMES LAUGHS

0:27:200:27:21

Roll these around, a bit of sugar. This is an enriched yeast dough.

0:27:210:27:24

Basically it's a bread dough made with sugar and butter added to it.

0:27:240:27:28

-I'll put your one on there.

-Right, thanks.

0:27:280:27:31

-And there you have your...

-Cheers.

-..buttermilk and coconut panna cotta with blood oranges,

0:27:310:27:35

-Suzette sauce, and sugar-roasted doughnuts.

-And a couple for the lads.

0:27:350:27:38

-Do I get to eat it, James?

-Oh, I don't...

-I can see what's happening already.

0:27:380:27:43

THEY LAUGH

0:27:430:27:44

-What do you think?

-Oh, I haven't... Can I, do you mind?

-Yeah, yeah. Dive in.

0:27:440:27:48

-Right, OK.

-And there's no sugar in that panna cotta as well.

0:27:480:27:50

It's just the coconut milk, but it's the buttermilk that adds the sweetness to it as well.

0:27:500:27:54

-Happy with that?

-Beautiful doughnuts, man.

0:27:540:27:56

From jet engineer to footballer and actor, to singer,

0:28:010:28:03

is there anything Bradley Walsh can't do?

0:28:030:28:06

Next up it's the incredible Michel Roux,

0:28:060:28:08

who's giving a masterclass in a classic French scallop dish.

0:28:080:28:12

Now, not every day you get one of the world's best chefs cooking for you.

0:28:120:28:16

Well, our next guest is exactly that.

0:28:160:28:18

He opened Le Gavroche with his brother Albert 40 years ago.

0:28:180:28:23

It soon became the first restaurant in Britain to gain three Michelin stars.

0:28:230:28:26

He eventually left and opened the Waterside Inn in Bray,

0:28:260:28:29

which has held its own three Michelin stars for an amazing 23 years.

0:28:290:28:35

It's the first time he's been on Saturday Kitchen. It's a real honour to have him on.

0:28:350:28:39

It's the godfather of cookery himself -

0:28:390:28:41

I've bigged you up enough - Michel Roux.

0:28:410:28:43

-Thank you.

-Absolute genius.

0:28:430:28:45

What am I supposed to do after all what you say about me?

0:28:450:28:47

-Just cook the scallops.

-LAUGHTER

0:28:470:28:49

-So, what are you cooking for us?

-Scottish scallops.

-Yeah.

0:28:490:28:53

In the shell, which I'm going to cook a la Parisienne.

0:28:530:28:55

-So, we have got the scallop and I am going to open one and pepper it.

-OK.

0:28:550:28:58

If we walk through quickly the ingredients,

0:28:580:29:00

they sit up on a bed of mushrooms.

0:29:000:29:02

Then we have got a little sauce which is made with a roux obviously,

0:29:020:29:05

as the name indicated.

0:29:050:29:07

Flour, a little butter, and then you got a bit of cream,

0:29:070:29:10

-but before anything, fish stock.

-Fish stock.

0:29:100:29:13

You can buy fish stock, we all know that.

0:29:130:29:14

-And that's all served on a bed of...

-Yes, on a bed of couscous..

-Yeah.

0:29:140:29:18

Couscous with a little diamond of broccoli.

0:29:180:29:20

-So, the couscous, you can start the couscous.

-I'll get on the go.

0:29:200:29:24

-Same quantity of couscous than on hot water.

-Yes, Chef.

0:29:240:29:27

-Boiling water.

-I'll do that, yeah.

0:29:270:29:29

Now, scallops, how do you do the scallops?

0:29:290:29:31

Now, if the scallop is open, and normally it's slightly open, you

0:29:310:29:35

take a very hard knife, sharp knife, and you follow the flat leads.

0:29:350:29:39

-You can take a cloth if you want to.

-Take a cloth, yeah.

0:29:390:29:43

I don't need it, but I suggest that people should take a cloth

0:29:430:29:47

to avoid cutting your finger.

0:29:470:29:49

You can see that there is nothing left there, because you don't want to lose the scallops then.

0:29:490:29:54

-These are hand-dived scallops, aren't they?

-Oh, they are.

-Try not to go for dredged ones,

0:29:540:29:57

-because they contain a lot of sand, don't they?

-Now, you can take the knife there,

0:29:570:30:01

or you can take a spoon.

0:30:010:30:02

So, you know, I'll take a spoon and I get that beautiful, yes,

0:30:020:30:04

they are hand dived scallops, look at them,

0:30:040:30:07

they're beautiful, beautiful scallops.

0:30:070:30:09

-And we keep the shell - brush the shell, that's important.

-Yep.

0:30:090:30:13

Under the cold water, and then we serve the scallops in it.

0:30:130:30:16

So what you do there now, you take the membrane.

0:30:160:30:20

And a little prying around it,

0:30:200:30:22

and you've got the beautiful white. Look at that.

0:30:220:30:25

-Aren't they lovely?

-Nice, fresh...

-Yeah, it's beautiful.

0:30:250:30:27

Then you've got the coral, which is the little yellow bit there.

0:30:270:30:32

Try wherever you can to buy it in the shells, aren't they?

0:30:320:30:35

A lot of the stuff like that you buy in the supermarket has been frozen.

0:30:350:30:38

Yes, and they are full of water as well.

0:30:380:30:40

Because that is what they do, they are very naughty -

0:30:400:30:42

they soak them in water and they sell them for more expensive.

0:30:420:30:45

-So they are heavier.

-Absolutely.

0:30:450:30:46

Now, you prick a bit the coral, just a little bit,

0:30:460:30:49

because when you are going to cook it, it won't burst, you see.

0:30:490:30:53

So that's good. And then you keep that lovely little bit...

0:30:530:30:57

Oh, look at that. For the sauce, you see.

0:30:570:31:00

-That's for the sauce I'm using that.

-OK.

0:31:000:31:03

And now I am starting cooking the scallops.

0:31:030:31:05

I am just making you a nice bit of potato.

0:31:050:31:08

Thank you, yes, the pommes de terre duchesse.

0:31:080:31:10

Duchess, which is just potato...

0:31:100:31:12

-Absolutely, potatoes mixed with a little egg yolk.

-Yep.

0:31:120:31:16

And then you add in it - this is very important -

0:31:160:31:19

-you add a little egg yolk and butter.

-Yeah.

0:31:190:31:22

And that's it. It's very easy. So scallops goes there.

0:31:220:31:25

You have got mushroom as well, which goes in that,

0:31:250:31:28

and I have got someone who has been very nice with me indeed

0:31:280:31:31

to get me a little mushroom cut.

0:31:310:31:33

But I'm going to cut you a couple of mushrooms. I need a bit of exercise.

0:31:330:31:37

So here you are.

0:31:370:31:39

So a few mushrooms.

0:31:390:31:40

Now, I leave the tail on the mushroom, because they look better,

0:31:400:31:43

and I never cut them too thinly, because

0:31:430:31:46

if you cut them too thinly, there is nothing left of the mushroom.

0:31:460:31:49

And never wash them, really, because they are like a sponge really,

0:31:490:31:52

-aren't they?

-No, absolutely right.

0:31:520:31:53

If needed, you wipe then a bit with a little kitchen cloth.

0:31:530:31:56

And do you think...?

0:31:560:31:57

I've baked the potatoes to create a nice fluffy mash.

0:31:570:32:01

Irish potatoes, of course.

0:32:010:32:02

They are the best!

0:32:020:32:04

LAUGHTER

0:32:040:32:05

How can I say no after what I said before?

0:32:050:32:07

So here you are, you see, that takes a few minutes to cook.

0:32:090:32:12

And then I'm going to put them into a little bowl.

0:32:120:32:17

So you turn them over, you see.

0:32:170:32:19

We've got a sink behind you, Michel, if you want to wash your hands.

0:32:190:32:22

Yes, you are quite right, absolutely right. Now...

0:32:220:32:27

-I'm nearly there. Nearly there, Chef.

-Good.

0:32:270:32:30

So where did your love of food start?

0:32:300:32:32

Did it come from other chefs, like your parents?

0:32:320:32:34

Your mother?

0:32:340:32:35

Mother, mother, father, and grandfather.

0:32:350:32:37

-We have always been in catering for 150 years.

-Wow.

0:32:370:32:41

But it's been in your family for...

0:32:410:32:42

Well, you have passed on a generation as well.

0:32:420:32:45

Absolutely right.

0:32:450:32:46

Yours and Albert's sons are now running both restaurants.

0:32:460:32:49

You are absolutely correct.

0:32:490:32:50

We have always been, and we worked together for 20 years, Albert and I.

0:32:500:32:54

-Yeah.

-So you see, now I am draining.

0:32:540:32:56

Draining and straining the fish stock.

0:32:560:32:59

And the mushrooms.

0:33:000:33:02

Just to seal them, really.

0:33:020:33:03

Very lightly cooked, indeed.

0:33:030:33:05

Now, so it's that, and I'm making my sauce, so start it now.

0:33:060:33:10

So here we are.

0:33:120:33:14

I'll just move this out of the way for you.

0:33:140:33:15

Thank you very much.

0:33:150:33:17

-You are a very good commis!

-LAUGHTER

0:33:170:33:19

If you can see it, my hands are shaking!

0:33:190:33:22

-Here you are.

-Go on, Chef, right.

0:33:220:33:25

I am always...

0:33:250:33:27

-You never call me Chef, James!

-No!

0:33:270:33:29

So the butter, melting the butter, look at that.

0:33:310:33:36

I'm very pleased with that.

0:33:370:33:39

Now, you could have made the sauce in a big pan,

0:33:390:33:42

but a medium-sized pan is always better.

0:33:420:33:44

-Yeah.

-And then I am doing my Roux.

0:33:440:33:47

I'm just popping my egg yolk into my mash. There we go.

0:33:470:33:51

Season it up.

0:33:510:33:52

Flour's there, Chef.

0:33:530:33:55

Oh, thank you very much, thank you.

0:33:550:33:57

Short-sighted!

0:33:570:33:59

Do you think about the roux?

0:33:590:34:00

The reason a lot of people make the mistake with roux,

0:34:000:34:02

particularly the white sauces, they add too much flour to it.

0:34:020:34:05

Yes, they do. The other thing they do is they sometimes make a roux

0:34:050:34:09

and they put hot liquid with a hot roux, and that doesn't do the job.

0:34:090:34:14

-Yeah.

-It blocks the sauce, you see.

0:34:140:34:17

And you've got little pieces in the sauce,

0:34:170:34:19

and you've never got a smooth sauce.

0:34:190:34:21

-Always one hot and one cold.

-Absolutely right.

0:34:210:34:25

And you look at the roux, you see, light roux,

0:34:250:34:27

not too much flour, and then you take your stock.

0:34:270:34:30

What I'm doing obviously is putting hot in hot, but I've done it before.

0:34:300:34:34

But I suggest you don't do it like that!

0:34:340:34:37

LAUGHTER

0:34:370:34:39

Right, here we are.

0:34:390:34:40

I'm just filling up my little piping bag there.

0:34:440:34:46

You are doing very well.

0:34:460:34:47

You going to do the little border on the scallops?

0:34:470:34:50

I'm ready to do that.

0:34:500:34:51

Look at that sauce coming out now, you see?

0:34:510:34:53

It's almost finished.

0:34:530:34:54

Now, obviously a bit of seasoning.

0:34:540:34:56

I like black pepper because it leaves little dots.

0:34:560:35:00

-Yep.

-Here you are.

0:35:000:35:01

Now, scallops, I'm cutting the scallops.

0:35:010:35:03

-I'll get you a knife, Chef.

-Thank you.

0:35:030:35:06

I don't need that any more, I already have my drink.

0:35:060:35:09

I've cleaned my fingers, so I'm all right, you see, good boy!

0:35:090:35:12

Do you want me to do the scallops, or are you...?

0:35:120:35:16

I'll do that.

0:35:160:35:17

I'll do that on a plate, in fact.

0:35:170:35:19

You see, it is the shaving, very, very little shaving of the broccoli.

0:35:190:35:23

You see what I'm doing?

0:35:230:35:25

I'm not taking the floret, I'm just taking the shaving like that.

0:35:250:35:28

These are the diamonds you were talking about?

0:35:280:35:30

That's the little diamond I was talking about.

0:35:300:35:32

How's my sauce doing?

0:35:320:35:34

Sauce is doing OK.

0:35:340:35:35

So what do you do with the rest of the broccoli, then?

0:35:350:35:37

The rest of the broccoli? Make a soup or you serve it as a veg.

0:35:370:35:39

Nobody will really see that, taking a little bit off!

0:35:390:35:42

LAUGHTER

0:35:420:35:43

That's a cheeky barber!

0:35:430:35:45

So, you know, you have got two-fold, you're taking money from both sides.

0:35:450:35:51

OK, so the couscous, have you moved to the couscous

0:35:520:35:55

and stirred it a bit? Please, with a little fork.

0:35:550:35:58

Now we are going to put the broccoli in it.

0:35:580:36:00

And a bit of olive oil, just a little touch of olive oil.

0:36:000:36:04

That's it, we put in our broccoli.

0:36:040:36:06

I'll do that, you can do the scallop bit.

0:36:060:36:07

Thank you, that's marvellous, well done.

0:36:070:36:10

So we've got the mushroom...

0:36:100:36:12

So mushrooms on the bottom, very important.

0:36:120:36:15

It gives you a little cushion.

0:36:150:36:16

Do you want a bit of olive oil in there, Chef?

0:36:160:36:18

Yes, please, just a little spoon.

0:36:180:36:21

Look at that, lovely mushroom.

0:36:210:36:22

They are very barely cooked, you can see that.

0:36:220:36:25

Now the scallops, which have been beautifully cut by my friend James.

0:36:250:36:29

He is a good man, that man, isn't he, young James?

0:36:290:36:31

LAUGHTER

0:36:310:36:33

He has done a good job, no sabotage!

0:36:330:36:36

Now we are going to put a little coral on the top.

0:36:380:36:41

As if I'm going to dare to sabotage this!

0:36:410:36:43

Now, the coral is always nice, because when it is too big,

0:36:430:36:47

you cut it in two.

0:36:470:36:48

Look at that, beautifully poached.

0:36:480:36:50

And these are going to look nice on the top. Voila!

0:36:510:36:54

So you have got that there.

0:36:540:36:57

Can I have the duchesse?

0:36:570:36:59

-Yep, just there.

-That's it, well done.

0:36:590:37:01

So I can pipe it. Or you can pipe it.

0:37:010:37:04

Do you want to?

0:37:040:37:06

I'll leave you to do one, I'll grate the old cheese.

0:37:060:37:08

OK, I'll do one.

0:37:080:37:09

Voila.

0:37:120:37:13

So that's the border, which stopped the sauce to go,

0:37:130:37:16

but on the same time you can enjoy the potatoes,

0:37:160:37:19

because potatoes duchesse are lovely.

0:37:190:37:21

You can even cook them with a little garlic if you've got some left.

0:37:210:37:25

-So I can put the sauce on?

-You can pour the sauce.

0:37:250:37:27

Good good, so sauce...

0:37:270:37:29

Look at the sauce, look at that.

0:37:300:37:32

Now that is a sauce, you see.

0:37:320:37:35

Voila! Lovely and beautiful and light.

0:37:350:37:38

-Lovely.

-So are you going to put a bit cheese on the top?

0:37:380:37:42

-Yep, cheese with a bit of crumbs on it?

-Yes, please.

0:37:420:37:44

Now, remember everything is hot, so it just needs a few minutes

0:37:440:37:49

in the oven, or under the grill, or a bit of blowtorch.

0:37:490:37:51

And that's it, that's the dish.

0:37:510:37:53

-So we'll just get a blowtorch.

-So that's it.

0:37:530:37:55

I'll leave you to...

0:37:550:37:57

-Sorry about that.

-Just literally just blowtorch over the top.

0:37:570:38:00

-That's it.

-And everything is hot, nice and hot in the middle.

0:38:000:38:03

Absolutely.

0:38:030:38:04

Now, what I love, you see, is the bed of couscous.

0:38:040:38:07

Can you just grab that one, Chef?

0:38:070:38:09

Yeah, I'll do that.

0:38:090:38:10

A-ha-ha.

0:38:110:38:12

Voila.

0:38:130:38:14

And voila.

0:38:170:38:18

So Michel, remind us what that is again.

0:38:200:38:22

It's the Coquilles Saint Jacques a la Parisienne.

0:38:220:38:24

Scottish scallops a la Parisienne.

0:38:240:38:27

That's the dish itself, and it's perfect for two.

0:38:270:38:31

-Isn't it a lovely little dish for two?

-I can't say any more.

0:38:310:38:34

-Can't say any more.

-It takes no time.

0:38:340:38:36

-It's easy.

-With you!

0:38:360:38:37

LAUGHTER

0:38:370:38:39

The man's a genius.

0:38:390:38:40

Right, follow me over, Michel.

0:38:450:38:48

The proof in the pudding is in the eating.

0:38:480:38:50

I feel like I should be cleaning the floor, cleaning the seat.

0:38:500:38:53

Thank you very much. Oh, what a service!

0:38:530:38:56

Dive into that.

0:38:560:38:58

Careful, it can be a bit hot.

0:38:580:39:00

-Do you want the scallops?

-Go on, you girls dive in together.

0:39:000:39:04

You have got to dive inside as well.

0:39:040:39:06

Yeah, just take that, a bit of mushroom and...

0:39:060:39:08

Now the secret with that is the whole live scallops, isn't it?

0:39:080:39:11

It is, the whole live scallops are the best, and the Scottish ones

0:39:110:39:14

are the best in the world, without any doubt.

0:39:140:39:16

A French classic there from Michel Roux that went down very well

0:39:210:39:24

in the studio.

0:39:240:39:26

Now it's time to dip into the BBC archives,

0:39:260:39:28

as we join Keith Floyd on a trip to Cornwall.

0:39:280:39:30

As you can see, the producer's love affair

0:39:400:39:42

with our stormy coastline continues.

0:39:420:39:44

Thank heavens it's too rough to go to sea,

0:39:440:39:46

or he'd have me doing the shopping for the next scene by boat.

0:39:460:39:49

Attention, all shopping, especially Sainsbury's, Safeway's

0:39:490:39:52

and... Sorry, Tesco's.

0:39:520:39:54

And now, back to Floyd On Food,

0:39:540:39:56

and let's see if I can con a kipper for breakfast.

0:39:560:39:58

-Hi, Martin. Nice to see you.

-Hi, Keith, good morning.

0:39:590:40:01

You know I've come for the stuff for Mary Flint,

0:40:010:40:03

-and it's in this thing, isn't it?

-That's right. Shall I get it out?

0:40:030:40:06

Yes, please. That'd be terrific.

0:40:060:40:09

-Now, aha!

-I think she wanted some kippers, didn't she?

0:40:090:40:12

-She did, indeed. Hey, is that a real kipper?

-That's a real kipper.

0:40:120:40:15

Why isn't it sort of bright orange or yellow?

0:40:150:40:17

-Well, you see, we haven't used any colour...

-Look at that.

0:40:170:40:21

Look, this is the beginning of the Floyd Campaign For Real Kippers, OK?

0:40:210:40:24

Jack the Ripper, as she was born,

0:40:240:40:27

not a golden smoked thing with nasty chemicals in. That's brilliant.

0:40:270:40:30

-There we are.

-Great, thank you very much.

0:40:300:40:32

Come on in, Richard, we want to see into this oven.

0:40:320:40:34

Is it called an oven or a smoker? What's the proper term?

0:40:340:40:37

-Well, it's a kiln. It's a smoking kiln.

-Right.

0:40:370:40:40

Here's one I like the look of very much.

0:40:400:40:42

This is a smoked herring of some kind, but different to the others.

0:40:420:40:45

Yes, it's a buckling. Instead of being done without heat,

0:40:450:40:49

these have been cooked in the same way as the mackerel have,

0:40:490:40:52

so they're ready to eat as they are.

0:40:520:40:54

And this is very much a delicacy in Scandinavia and Germany?

0:40:540:40:56

-That's correct.

-Yeah, delicious.

0:40:560:40:58

You could eat that, by the way, with some soured cream

0:40:580:41:00

with chives chopped in it,

0:41:000:41:01

or some horseradish sauce, slightly weakened with cream.

0:41:010:41:04

-Now, Mary wanted some trout, I think.

-Good, yeah.

-Grand.

0:41:040:41:07

-And what else have you got here?

-I also have an eel. A monster eel.

0:41:070:41:10

A fresh-water eel. Isn't he smashing?

0:41:120:41:14

Yeah, he is. Now, the colours are slightly different here.

0:41:140:41:16

Can you change the colouring by the texture of the wood,

0:41:160:41:19

or what happens there?

0:41:190:41:20

Yes, if we want a darker colour, we can use more soft wood,

0:41:200:41:23

-though we don't want to use too much, obviously.

-Right.

0:41:230:41:26

Oak is the prime, or apple,

0:41:260:41:28

but availability, and the mix required to get the colour.

0:41:280:41:32

Right, so like a painter, you mix the pigments and colour the thing.

0:41:320:41:35

-That's right.

-Right.

0:41:350:41:36

-A smaller one, too.

-A smaller one.

0:41:360:41:38

-Now, did you want a salmon?

-Yes.

-I think Mary wanted a salmon.

0:41:400:41:43

For those who can afford it, that is delightful.

0:41:430:41:45

-Isn't that beautiful?

-Yeah.

0:41:450:41:47

-Smashing fish.

-Good-oh.

-We also have some trout in the same way, which is

0:41:470:41:52

-they're large trout which we smoke like salmon.

-Very good.

0:41:520:41:55

-Which, I think, Mary's got already.

-Right.

-Now...

0:41:550:41:58

A bit of bacon, cos I'm going to stuff a cabbage later on,

0:41:580:42:01

and I wanted some really good smoked bacon.

0:42:010:42:04

I could actually eat that raw, couldn't I? If I wanted to.

0:42:040:42:06

-That's beautiful.

-Well, I think you might cook it, but you could,

0:42:060:42:09

-yes, certainly, it would be in some places.

-Yes. That is delightful.

0:42:090:42:12

That's going into my stuffed cabbage later on. And...what else?

0:42:120:42:16

-The cold-smoked mackerel fillet.

-Right.

-This is rather fun.

0:42:160:42:19

-It's a mackerel fillet smoked in the same way as that.

-Yeah.

0:42:190:42:21

You slice it in thin slices, and eat it as it is.

0:42:210:42:24

I'm overcome with hunger here. I'm sorry about this.

0:42:240:42:27

That is beautiful.

0:42:300:42:32

-That's good. That's a triumph, isn't it?

-Lovely.

0:42:320:42:34

Mm! Have a go at those. Damned good.

0:42:340:42:37

Right. And that about...

0:42:370:42:39

-Oh, and chicken.

-Smoked chicken, and pheasant, of course.

0:42:390:42:42

-Right.

-Which you've already got, haven't you?

-Yes, we have.

0:42:420:42:45

But that's what it would come out like.

0:42:450:42:47

I mean, this is a chicken that has been smoked and cooked...

0:42:470:42:50

-Great.

-..and slightly salted, so that it's a firmer texture

0:42:500:42:53

than you would normally expect from chicken.

0:42:530:42:55

Right. Well, what a golden, natural feast that is.

0:42:550:42:58

That is splendid, isn't it? I've got very into colours.

0:42:580:43:01

I'd like to be a painter, you know,

0:43:010:43:02

but who needs to be a painter when you can prepare food like that?

0:43:020:43:05

That's absolutely fabulous. And just have a look.

0:43:050:43:07

I can't emphasise how beautiful

0:43:070:43:09

that little gibbet of Jack the Rippers are. Isn't that fantastic?

0:43:090:43:13

# Smoke a little kipper and you smoke a little trout

0:43:130:43:16

# Then smoke a little mackerel, that's what it's all about

0:43:160:43:20

# And if you want to beat that old fish fry

0:43:200:43:24

# You can smoke a little eel if you really try. #

0:43:240:43:29

All this smoke has made me feel a bit eel. Sorry about that.

0:43:290:43:32

Anyway, what we've done is we've begged our way,

0:43:320:43:34

conned our way, into a kitchen which we couldn't afford to own,

0:43:340:43:37

not even to rent, from Mary Flint in this wonderful place.

0:43:370:43:40

Mary, thanks very much for having us.

0:43:400:43:41

Let's start our little acquaintanceship

0:43:410:43:44

as we mean to carry on, with a quick slurp of your wonderful wine.

0:43:440:43:46

Nostrovia!

0:43:460:43:48

And thanks for having me here. You love all this kind of fish.

0:43:480:43:51

Have a good look at this fish, Richard, please,

0:43:510:43:53

because I think these buckling, for instance...

0:43:530:43:55

They're like golden bars. They look as though they've been

0:43:550:43:59

dredged from the bottom of the sea, from a sunken wreck.

0:43:590:44:02

Tell me all about this lovely fish and what you're going to do with it.

0:44:020:44:05

OK, that's enough fish now, Richard. Back to us and to my friend Mary.

0:44:050:44:08

What are you going to do?

0:44:080:44:09

I'm going to cut it up and put it on a platter,

0:44:090:44:12

and hopefully concoct a little hors d'oeuvre before your other dish.

0:44:120:44:16

That's really nice. Do you want to get started on that?

0:44:160:44:19

-Why not? I'll start with this.

-This is this fabulous eel, isn't it?

0:44:190:44:22

Yes. And I'm going to cut it in pieces,

0:44:220:44:26

skin it, and have it ready.

0:44:260:44:29

Just skin one bit right away so that people can see how that's done.

0:44:290:44:33

-I'm going to take a larger knife, because...

-Yeah.

0:44:330:44:35

There you go.

0:44:350:44:37

And pay attention to this, Richard.

0:44:370:44:40

You just peel the skin off, you see? No problem, and heave that away.

0:44:400:44:43

Great, I think she deserves a...

0:44:460:44:47

Have a drink, Mary, have one on the firm there.

0:44:470:44:50

I think I'll have one, too. Not a bad idea. Excuse me,

0:44:500:44:52

I've got to roll my sleeves up and do a bit of work, you see.

0:44:520:44:55

Right, quick slurp for me.

0:44:550:44:57

Cheers to me. Cheers, Mary.

0:44:590:45:00

Now, a little story here.

0:45:020:45:05

A few weeks ago, I was at some public exhibition,

0:45:050:45:08

and a fishmonger came up to me and said,

0:45:080:45:09

"Look, would you mind putting your programmes on at the time

0:45:090:45:12

"of the year that match the way we catch the fish?

0:45:120:45:14

"Because it's very annoying when you cook something,

0:45:140:45:16

"people come to buy it the next day, and it's out of season."

0:45:160:45:19

It'll be even worse this time,

0:45:190:45:20

because this is the middle of winter, OK?

0:45:200:45:22

This is the middle of winter, but when you see this cabbage,

0:45:220:45:24

it'll probably be June or July, something like that,

0:45:240:45:27

and you won't be able to buy them.

0:45:270:45:28

Bad luck, so remember it for next time round.

0:45:280:45:30

Anyway, we're doing cabbages today.

0:45:300:45:32

So, Richard, if you'd like to come round and have a little look

0:45:320:45:35

at what we've got here - some ground pork,

0:45:350:45:37

minced pork, belly of pork, that is. The cheapest possible cut.

0:45:370:45:40

A little crushed garlic.

0:45:400:45:42

Because it's winter, dried dill,

0:45:420:45:44

but if we could have got fresh, we'd have preferred it.

0:45:440:45:46

Dried apricots, tomato puree,

0:45:460:45:49

parsley, and chopped onions.

0:45:490:45:51

Right, up and over, I'm going to make a nice little mess.

0:45:510:45:54

You can come down again as I chuck all these things into here.

0:45:540:45:58

A bit of onion, like that.

0:45:580:46:01

A bit of parsley in.

0:46:010:46:02

I'll be mixing that with the other herbs.

0:46:020:46:04

These lovely pieces of...

0:46:040:46:06

Ah, I'm getting some assistance here. This is really helpful.

0:46:060:46:09

A bit of dill, bit of garlic, in we go.

0:46:090:46:13

And then nice, gungy tomato puree.

0:46:130:46:17

And a little bit of the chilli powder, not too much of that.

0:46:170:46:21

And my assistant director's ripping me off, at this very moment,

0:46:210:46:24

which he usually does, a piece of tissue so I can clean my hands.

0:46:240:46:27

This will provoke a load of letters -

0:46:270:46:29

"He's used his hands again!" Never mind. Right, that's that.

0:46:290:46:32

Tissue, please, Director... Assistant Director. Thank you.

0:46:320:46:35

See how good they are to me, don't you? They're excellent, aren't they?

0:46:350:46:38

Right, one of the little things I did earlier on was

0:46:380:46:42

I blanched this whole cabbage, so it's partly cooked,

0:46:420:46:46

and the heart's taken out.

0:46:460:46:48

So all I now do is whack a few leaves down, like this,

0:46:480:46:52

and put in my first little layer of my mixture.

0:46:520:47:00

Fold the leaf over like that.

0:47:000:47:02

OK. Then I put another little bit on, like that.

0:47:030:47:06

I get another leaf out.

0:47:060:47:07

And I expect you're all fairly bored with that process,

0:47:070:47:11

but you go on assembling the thing in that way.

0:47:110:47:15

Now, um, great chefs,

0:47:170:47:20

people like Auguste Escoffier, who for me is sort of a saint,

0:47:200:47:23

were not only brilliant, but they were humble.

0:47:230:47:25

This simple recipe I'm making today I've ripped off from him.

0:47:250:47:28

And what would be really good... If the BBC,

0:47:280:47:32

you know all those intelligent programmes they have, like, um...

0:47:320:47:36

-Um...

-Omnibus, er, Arena. Um...

0:47:360:47:39

-Arts programmes.

-Oh, yes. Yeah.

0:47:400:47:43

I know, yes, sorry. All those kind.

0:47:430:47:44

Actually, he's got the heart of a cabbage as well.

0:47:440:47:47

If they, instead of doing these weird flautists and poets

0:47:470:47:50

and things, devoted, you know, 40 minutes to the life and work

0:47:500:47:53

of a great man like that, television would be all the better for it.

0:47:530:47:56

Anyway, I'll get on with some cooking, have a slurp...

0:47:560:47:58

..and see you again in a moment. I'll carry on doing these.

0:47:590:48:03

# Escoffier... #

0:48:100:48:13

Auguste Escoffier, held by some to be one of the greatest chefs,

0:48:130:48:16

was born in 1846, the son of a blacksmith.

0:48:160:48:20

He was best known in Britain via the Savoy, for making super puddings

0:48:200:48:23

for the petulant singers. Ever heard of Peach Melba? Get it?

0:48:230:48:27

# Voila!

0:48:270:48:29

# Escoffier

0:48:290:48:31

# Escoffier... #

0:48:310:48:32

With his friend, Cesar Ritz,

0:48:320:48:33

he fed the monarchy and superstars of his day.

0:48:330:48:36

But, like many geniuses, he died a poor man,

0:48:390:48:42

and although the culinary pendulum has swung far from his style,

0:48:420:48:45

his spirit lives on in kitchens everywhere.

0:48:450:48:48

So I'm sure you feel pretty enriched and happy by that, don't you?

0:48:480:48:52

"Mervin Bargg," eat your heart out.

0:48:520:48:54

Anyway, I've finished the cabbage.

0:48:540:48:55

Just tie it up with a piece of string so it doesn't fall apart,

0:48:550:48:59

and pop it in to a richly made chicken or veal or beef stock.

0:48:590:49:03

I'm walking slowly

0:49:030:49:04

because I don't think the cameraman can keep up with me.

0:49:040:49:07

And in it goes for about 40 minutes.

0:49:070:49:09

The next time you see it and me,

0:49:090:49:11

I shall be sitting with my new-found friend Mary,

0:49:110:49:13

bottle of wine, wonderful fish, wonderful cabbage,

0:49:130:49:16

having a fine time.

0:49:160:49:18

This is absolutely delicious,

0:49:190:49:21

but the point about it is it's totally fresh.

0:49:210:49:23

I know it's smoked, but it's fresh. It's not out of horrible packets.

0:49:230:49:26

No, no, no, absolutely genuinely... Are you going to give me some?

0:49:260:49:29

-Yes, will you have some eel?

-I'll have some eel, yes.

-Right.

0:49:290:49:32

-This is the delight of the whole thing, the eel.

-Great, wonderful.

0:49:320:49:37

Thanks to Martin and his wonderful smokery.

0:49:370:49:39

-A bit of...?

-Yes, that is the smoked mackerel.

0:49:390:49:43

-Yep, and that's nice and flavoursome.

-Let me help you.

0:49:430:49:46

-That's quite different.

-And a bit of the trout.

-Wonderful.

-OK.

0:49:460:49:51

-Really nice, thank you.

-I'll have a bit more eel cos I'm fond of that.

0:49:510:49:54

-Why are you so fond of eel?

-Because it has this wonderful damp texture

0:49:540:49:58

and taste which... I don't know how you'd describe it. How would you?

0:49:580:50:02

-Tell me what YOU think of it.

-I think it tastes like fishy truffles.

0:50:020:50:07

-That's a good idea.

-It really does - it's got a long-lasting flavour,

0:50:070:50:11

which isn't overpowering, and it's not dry and heavy,

0:50:110:50:14

like a factory produced, er...smoked thing.

0:50:140:50:17

-No.

-It's still...

0:50:170:50:19

It's still moist, very slightly oily.

0:50:190:50:22

-It's wonderful.

-Very good indeed.

0:50:240:50:26

One thing that's quite funny on these programmes -

0:50:260:50:28

and I'm at this moment actually quite angry -

0:50:280:50:30

we have spent, for technical reasons,

0:50:300:50:32

quite a long time when we should have been enjoying ourselves

0:50:320:50:35

sorting out a little problem, so I just had a row with the director.

0:50:350:50:38

Anyway, all that's better now, and we're going to have the other bit

0:50:380:50:41

of our meal, which is this fabulous - I hope it's fabulous! -

0:50:410:50:43

-stuffed cabbage.

-Wonderful.

0:50:430:50:45

Can you see it all right, Richard?

0:50:450:50:47

See how nicely layered it is.

0:50:470:50:49

I wonder if it's going to taste right.

0:50:490:50:52

All I've done is pour a little bit of melted butter

0:50:520:50:54

over the chicken stock in which we cooked it.

0:50:540:50:57

And by the way, for those of you who really want to know how long

0:50:570:51:00

these things took, it took about 55 minutes to cook properly.

0:51:000:51:05

-Is that enough?

-Yes, that's fine.

-I'll cut myself a little piece.

0:51:050:51:08

It doesn't matter if it crumbles up.

0:51:100:51:12

I think this is a lovely follow-on to the luxurious part of the meal,

0:51:130:51:16

which is those beautiful smoked fishes,

0:51:160:51:18

and now this very simple, inexpensive thing.

0:51:180:51:21

It's great, isn't it? Smells rather good.

0:51:210:51:23

-Let me just have a quick taste.

-Let's try it.

0:51:230:51:25

It's all right, isn't it?

0:51:270:51:29

It's very good indeed.

0:51:290:51:31

I'm quite thrilled by that.

0:51:310:51:33

I want to tell you something which you really frightened me about.

0:51:330:51:36

It's the first time I've ever cooked a stuffed cabbage, you see.

0:51:360:51:40

And I wanted to do something really simple because some of the

0:51:400:51:44

programmes are extravagant things, and I like a nice balance, you see.

0:51:440:51:47

I was happily making this, although I'd never made it before, and you

0:51:470:51:50

said, "Oh, you're going to be doing this little Polish number".

0:51:500:51:54

And I thought, "Oh, my God!" How would you have made these?

0:51:540:51:56

I would have done them as individual little parcels,

0:51:560:51:59

but the effect would have been virtually the same.

0:51:590:52:03

Instead of making a big parcel, you make individual parcels.

0:52:030:52:07

And do you like the idea of the tomato sauce with it?

0:52:070:52:09

Yes, and that is called golobki,

0:52:090:52:11

which is a well-known, extremely good Polish dish.

0:52:110:52:15

-And slow, simple peasant cooking.

-Wonderful.

0:52:150:52:19

It doesn't need a lot of money, it just needs, what, patience?

0:52:190:52:21

Love. Love.

0:52:210:52:23

-Love. I'll drink to that.

-And I too. Cheers.

0:52:230:52:27

-Thanks very much, Mary.

-Great pleasure.

0:52:270:52:29

Wonderful stuff as ever from Keith.

0:52:330:52:35

Now, don't go anywhere just yet as there's still plenty more

0:52:350:52:38

to come on today's Saturday Kitchen Best Bites.

0:52:380:52:41

Coming up...

0:52:410:52:42

There's a battle in the kitchen as Jun Tanaka takes on

0:52:420:52:44

Atul Kochhar in the Saturday Kitchen omelette challenge.

0:52:440:52:48

Galton Blackiston is here with an unusually toned-down jumper.

0:52:480:52:51

He's serving up a Japanese-Norfolk fusion, as he makes Wagyu beef

0:52:510:52:54

with new potatoes, kale, beetroot puree and crispy shallot rings.

0:52:540:52:58

And finally, James Nesbitt faces his food heaven or his food hell.

0:52:580:53:01

Did he get his food heaven -

0:53:010:53:02

aubergine moussaka with sauteed potatoes?

0:53:020:53:04

Or his food hell - a simple simnel cake?

0:53:040:53:07

Two classic dishes, but which will be served - sweet or savoury?

0:53:070:53:10

You're going to have to keep watching

0:53:100:53:11

till the end of the show to find out.

0:53:110:53:13

But, before all of that, it's over to the queen of spice,

0:53:130:53:15

Madhur Jaffrey, who's cooking up spicy lamb shanks.

0:53:150:53:19

Welcome to the show, even though you've given me grief...

0:53:190:53:22

So, what are we cooking?

0:53:220:53:23

Now, we're cooking lamb shanks, which I adore.

0:53:230:53:25

Their gelatinous texture, and everything about them.

0:53:250:53:28

But we're going to braise them slowly, as they should be cooked,

0:53:280:53:31

-in yoghurt.

-In yoghurt?

-And spices.

0:53:310:53:34

OK, and spices. Run through the lamb first of all.

0:53:340:53:37

-You're going to seal off the lamb first?

-I'm going to sear it.

0:53:370:53:39

-Yeah?

-I'm going to...brown them.

0:53:390:53:42

And, if you could in the meantime, do two things.

0:53:420:53:44

-You can chop the ginger and garlic...

-Ginger and garlic...

0:53:440:53:49

-I want it in a fine paste, with a little water.

-All right.

0:53:490:53:53

And then, after that, I'll give you two tasks,

0:53:530:53:56

if you can remember two things at the same time!

0:53:560:53:58

LAUGHTER Rock on!

0:53:580:54:01

If you'd kindly grind the coriander. Coriander, you can get it ground,

0:54:010:54:05

but there's something, if you smell it just after you've ground it,

0:54:050:54:08

it's absolutely something else.

0:54:080:54:11

-It's delicious.

-It is delicious.

0:54:110:54:12

It has an aroma, which the other thing doesn't have.

0:54:120:54:15

-So, seasoning well...

-Yeah.

-..the lamb shanks.

-Yeah.

0:54:150:54:18

Oh! One is rolling off.

0:54:180:54:20

Literally, ten years ago, these kind of used to be almost free food.

0:54:200:54:24

-20, 15p each.

-Dirt cheap.

-Something like that.

0:54:240:54:26

Now they've become quite trendy.

0:54:260:54:27

A lot of top chefs sort of started using them, and when that happens,

0:54:270:54:30

it catastrophically goes through the roof,

0:54:300:54:32

like pork belly and stuff like that, you know?

0:54:320:54:35

So, anyway, in we go with those. They need sealing off first of all.

0:54:350:54:37

-There's a sink out the back if you want to...

-I will.

0:54:370:54:40

-Definitely. I'll just wash my hands.

-Wash your hands.

0:54:400:54:42

We're going to seal those, just get a nice colour on them.

0:54:420:54:45

Meanwhile, we've got the ginger here, which I'm going to chop up,

0:54:450:54:48

with quite a bit of garlic going in here as well.

0:54:480:54:50

-Yeah, garlic is very good for you.

-I wouldn't say anything different!

0:54:500:54:53

-It's very good for your blood.

-But you have this thing -

0:54:530:54:56

"Garlic is very good for you, but maybe I don't like it."

0:54:560:54:58

-You had that tone.

-OK.

0:54:580:55:00

So, plenty of garlic. What, eight or nine cloves, something like that?

0:55:000:55:05

-No, no, no. Not that many.

-Not that many?

0:55:050:55:08

Seven cloves, sorry! There we go. A bit of water.

0:55:080:55:12

-OK.

-Blitz it.

0:55:120:55:13

Are you related to a chef called Silvena Rowe?

0:55:180:55:22

-Who?

-No, no. It's all right.

0:55:220:55:23

-Who?

-She picks on me as well, but anyway...

0:55:230:55:26

-Right, so, we're sealing that nicely.

-Yeah, we are.

0:55:280:55:31

Your passion for food started from letters...

0:55:310:55:34

Well, I knew nothing about cooking.

0:55:340:55:36

I think I'd failed the cooking exam at my high school.

0:55:360:55:39

-And then I came to America, I mean, first to London.

-Yeah?

0:55:390:55:42

And I was at RADA, and I couldn't cook anything,

0:55:420:55:45

so I started writing letters to my mother,

0:55:450:55:47

saying, "Please, please, please, teach me how to cook."

0:55:470:55:50

So, she sent me letters back, and that's how I started learning.

0:55:500:55:54

It was a correspondence course.

0:55:540:55:56

But acting, is a...is a...

0:55:580:56:00

..almost the same sort of passion in your life as food, really.

0:56:000:56:03

-It's equal quantities.

-Equal, equal.

0:56:030:56:05

When you're doing television cookery, you're doing both.

0:56:050:56:08

But I mean, you're a hugely successful actress.

0:56:080:56:11

More than one major film!

0:56:110:56:13

-Oh, yeah.

-Go on.

0:56:130:56:15

-Well, I didn't do Bounty.

-Yeah.

-But I did do...

0:56:150:56:18

The most recent things I've done that you might have seen me in,

0:56:180:56:22

one was a film with Meryl Streep called Crime.

0:56:220:56:25

-How's that?

-That's very good.

-Anthony Hopkins!

0:56:250:56:29

-And then I did something with Will Smith...

-It's like top trumps, this!

0:56:290:56:33

Yes. I'm down!

0:56:330:56:35

..Six Degrees of Separation.

0:56:350:56:36

Then I did something with De Niro. Have you done anything with De Niro?

0:56:360:56:40

-No.

-LAUGHTER

0:56:400:56:41

Lawless.

0:56:410:56:43

But have you done anything with Bob the Builder?

0:56:430:56:46

You haven't had a number-one hit yet.

0:56:520:56:54

-I had two number ones, by the way.

-Oh, you had two?

-Yeah.

0:56:540:56:57

INDISTINCT

0:56:570:57:00

-OK. We've got that...

-This is now brown.

0:57:000:57:02

Now we're going to take this out.

0:57:020:57:04

-Do you want me to grab that for you?

-Yes. Somehow I'm working it wrong.

0:57:040:57:08

Why isn't it opening? Or I have to do something to open it further?

0:57:080:57:11

-Yeah. There you go.

-OK.

-What's next?

0:57:110:57:14

Now I'm going to put whole spices in.

0:57:140:57:17

What spices have we got in there?

0:57:170:57:19

We've got cinnamon, cloves, cumin seeds and black pepper.

0:57:190:57:23

Do you want me to blend these...? BLENDER WHIRS

0:57:230:57:26

I hate this thing!

0:57:260:57:27

-OK.

-That's that. This is coriander seeds in here.

0:57:300:57:33

I need... Oh, they're popping. I'm going to move this...cos it's hot.

0:57:330:57:37

-Now you infuse...

-Watch it!

0:57:370:57:39

-..you infuse them in the hot oil, yeah?

-Yeah.

0:57:390:57:42

And now, if you would kindly bring the garlic and ginger, and...

0:57:420:57:46

Yeah, that's got in.

0:57:480:57:49

I'll stand behind you!

0:57:520:57:54

-Right. That's going in there.

-All right.

0:57:540:57:56

Now you have to really get it brown.

0:57:560:57:59

This is, again, very important, this step,

0:58:000:58:03

-of lightly browning the garlic and ginger.

-OK.

0:58:030:58:06

And then I will take it off the heat and put the yoghurt in.

0:58:060:58:10

And the reason for that is that you don't want it to curdle.

0:58:100:58:13

-You're browning the spices first of all?

-Yeah.

0:58:130:58:15

-Browning the garlic and ginger.

-Yeah.

0:58:150:58:18

-And then I will take it off.

-OK.

0:58:180:58:20

Off the heat.

0:58:200:58:22

I'm getting good at it!

0:58:220:58:24

And then all the yoghurt goes in.

0:58:240:58:26

-Now, this is full-fat yoghurt?

-This is full fat.

0:58:260:58:30

-And if you want, you can go not so full-fat, but don't bother.

-Nah!

0:58:300:58:33

You don't watch this show very often! It's full fat.

0:58:330:58:37

-There you go.

-No, no. OK, I think we have it all.

0:58:370:58:39

Do you want me to get a spatula there?

0:58:390:58:42

Yeah, yeah, that would be good, too.

0:58:420:58:43

So, are we going to see some more cookbooks, or...?

0:58:430:58:46

I'm here, actually, to see my editor...

0:58:460:58:49

I came here for two reasons.

0:58:490:58:50

One was to do a talk in Cambridge

0:58:500:58:53

-for Oxford Gastronomica.

-Yeah.

0:58:530:58:58

And then to see my editors here.

0:58:580:59:00

I write for the Financial Times, and I write my books...

0:59:000:59:03

There I was thinking you came all this way just for us!

0:59:030:59:06

Yes, and I came all the way just for you!

0:59:060:59:08

We're third on the list there!

0:59:080:59:10

-I'm going to put in some turmeric...

-Turmeric.

0:59:100:59:13

..which is very healthy, cleans up your body inside.

0:59:130:59:17

-And some chilli powder and salt.

-Yeah.

-That goes in as well.

0:59:170:59:21

-Don't they use turmeric for cuts and bits and pieces?

-They do.

0:59:230:59:25

In fact, when I had my ears pierced in India, it was clarified butter.

0:59:250:59:30

You see? All food, we just can't do without it.

0:59:300:59:32

-They put clarified butter in your ear?

-And turmeric in my ear.

0:59:320:59:36

And I went to school with yellow ear lobes for a month.

0:59:360:59:38

I think they did that as a laugh!

0:59:380:59:40

No, I don't need this. I need this back.

0:59:400:59:43

You need this? Do you want this one as well?

0:59:430:59:45

Oh, yeah, that goes in as well.

0:59:450:59:47

That goes in. This is the ground spice.

0:59:470:59:49

Now we just have to bring it to the boil.

0:59:490:59:52

-And then I will wash my hands again...

-OK.

-..after this.

0:59:520:59:55

-That goes in.

-That goes in, and we...

-Move that across.

-Yeah.

0:59:550:59:59

it just have to come to the boil.

0:59:591:00:00

-Wash...

-OK, leave you to wash your hands.

1:00:001:00:02

What about the cinnamon in there, you don't want to put that in yet?

1:00:021:00:05

Didn't we put it in? I think one got left behind, but that's all right.

1:00:051:00:08

That's the wonderful thing about Indian food -

1:00:081:00:10

little more, little less, you're OK!

1:00:101:00:11

-That goes in. Right, what's next?

-Now water.

-Water. OK.

1:00:131:00:16

Because you need...the liquid for the slow braising,

1:00:181:00:23

and you have to have enough.

1:00:231:00:24

Then you cover it very tightly and you put it in a 325-degree oven

1:00:241:00:30

when it comes to the boil, and let it cook slowly, slowly.

1:00:301:00:33

Very slowly for about three hours.

1:00:331:00:34

-So, it's about 160. So the idea is bring this to the boil?

-Yeah.

1:00:341:00:37

-I'll go put it in the oven for you.

-Thank you.

-So a nice low oven.

1:00:371:00:40

And do you want to tell us about the rice, then?

1:00:401:00:42

All right, I'm going to make some basmati rice, which I have soaked.

1:00:421:00:46

And the reason for soaking it is because in India they say that rice,

1:00:461:00:49

when it's cooked, should be like brothers,

1:00:491:00:52

close together, but not stuck to each other.

1:00:521:00:54

So the ways you can get the rice elongated and separated is...

1:00:541:01:00

One of the things is soaking it.

1:01:001:01:02

About 30 minutes at least, but you can soak it for more.

1:01:021:01:05

And I need a little strainer...

1:01:051:01:07

-There you go.

-..just to strain this out.

1:01:071:01:11

Because I'm not going to cook... In many ways to cook rice,

1:01:111:01:14

you can cook it by the pasta method,

1:01:141:01:17

you can do all kinds of things, but this is cooking in a steam,

1:01:171:01:21

in its own steam.

1:01:211:01:22

So...you put very little water in this.

1:01:221:01:26

All right. Now, I'm going to make a pilaf.

1:01:261:01:29

-Do you want me to finely chop the onion?

-Yeah.

1:01:291:01:31

Only about that much is fine, and I will start the dill.

1:01:311:01:35

I know he's eagerly looking at this sort of food

1:01:351:01:37

because chefs, I mean, they are passionate about Indian cooking.

1:01:371:01:40

-Yeah, absolutely.

-But we never seem to get it right.

1:01:401:01:43

They're like magicians, aren't they?

1:01:431:01:45

-They hide all their spices away...

-It's not just that.

1:01:451:01:47

I think you're not adventurous and you don't go far enough.

1:01:471:01:51

-Yeah.

-Like...

1:01:511:01:53

LAUGHTER

1:01:531:01:54

The producers are going to want you back on again, I can see the script!

1:01:541:01:58

We're not adventurous! Right, there we go. Onions?

1:02:011:02:03

-Not yet.

-No, not yet.

-Not yet.

1:02:031:02:06

Because there are so many. For example, dill.

1:02:061:02:09

Who has used dill in Indian food? But you can.

1:02:091:02:12

There's almost everything that was cooked, that you cooked before

1:02:121:02:15

on this programme, you can make Indian food with the same things.

1:02:151:02:21

Including the tuna. So you let the oil get hot,

1:02:211:02:24

and then you put in cinnamon, bay leaf and cardamom.

1:02:241:02:28

I'm standing back at this point! Yeah...

1:02:281:02:31

You're leaving me to myself?

1:02:311:02:33

You're flavouring the oil, as well,

1:02:331:02:34

-you get some nice flavours out of it.

-Yes. And...

1:02:341:02:38

Now ready for the onions.

1:02:381:02:40

And the oil will be now flavoured,

1:02:401:02:42

like an injection going in with these spices.

1:02:421:02:44

And it's a different flavour, the cinnamon gets a different flavour.

1:02:441:02:47

They all get different flavours,

1:02:471:02:49

which is why Indian food uses the same seasonings

1:02:491:02:53

like cinnamon, but gets a different taste from Morocco, if they want to.

1:02:531:02:57

Now the lamb here, we've just taken the lid off

1:02:571:03:00

and you're reducing down this liquor.

1:03:001:03:02

Yeah, I'm just reducing the liquor, which is very...

1:03:021:03:05

You want a thick sauce.

1:03:051:03:06

So, the rice, you've basically just put in cold water and left?

1:03:061:03:10

Yeah. Now it's just... not quite ready yet.

1:03:101:03:14

-I just want to brown the onion.

-All right...

1:03:151:03:17

-I'll turn the heat up.

-No, no, it's fine.

1:03:171:03:19

-Like you said, dill's not often used in Indian cooking.

-It is!

1:03:191:03:23

-It is?

-It is, in north India.

-I'll grab my jacket again!

1:03:231:03:25

LAUGHTER

1:03:251:03:26

-North India and west India, it's called sowa.

-Right.

1:03:261:03:29

And it is used all the time in all kinds of dishes -

1:03:291:03:33

rice dishes, meat dishes...

1:03:331:03:36

-..vegetables, with dill.

-Right.

1:03:361:03:39

-So quite a lot of dill in this one.

-Well, yes, yes. You'll see why.

1:03:391:03:43

-OK.

-OK. I actually want it browner, but do I have time?

1:03:431:03:47

-No.

-OK.

-Stick those in?

1:03:471:03:50

-Yes.

-Right, in goes the rice.

1:03:501:03:52

Now...you have to stir it.

1:03:521:03:54

I need...something, a flatter stirrer. Oh, well...

1:03:541:03:59

-So now you stir it.

-How many do you want, Madhur? Look, here...

1:03:591:04:03

LAUGHTER

1:04:031:04:05

-What do you want?

-I was looking for a specific one with a flat end.

1:04:051:04:10

-A flat end?

-Yes.

1:04:101:04:11

Can we get Madhur a flat-ended wooden spoon, please?

1:04:131:04:16

It's all right, I'll make do. OK. So now what am I doing?

1:04:161:04:20

I'm stirring this like a souffle. Thank you for putting it all away.

1:04:201:04:23

Don't worry, I'm listening.

1:04:231:04:25

-You have to stir it very gently or the rice breaks.

-OK.

-Like so.

1:04:271:04:32

And the other thing that keeps the rice grains separate

1:04:321:04:35

is getting oil between each grain of rice, like so.

1:04:351:04:38

-OK.

-All right, now...

1:04:381:04:40

-Then you've got the stock.

-Then goes the stock.

1:04:401:04:43

And if you don't want... This is chicken stock.

1:04:431:04:45

If you're a vegetarian, use water...

1:04:451:04:49

..or vegetable stock.

1:04:491:04:51

If you're vegetarian, you're kind of stuck, really,

1:04:511:04:53

with lamb, aren't you?

1:04:531:04:54

No, no, just eat the rice.

1:04:551:04:57

-OK. Now, the lid on?

-No...

-No!

1:05:001:05:02

-You have to bring it to the boil! How will you know it's boiling?

-OK.

1:05:031:05:06

So, once it is boiling, then you cover it very tightly,

1:05:061:05:11

and either you put it on very low heat,

1:05:111:05:13

-or you can put it in your oven.

-In the oven. It's going in the oven.

1:05:131:05:16

-Without a lid, OK?

-Without a lid?

1:05:161:05:20

You put a lid on it, look.

1:05:201:05:22

-There you go, without a lid.

-For 25-30 minutes. And here we are.

1:05:221:05:26

-Watch the pan, it's very hot.

-So, now this is...

-Very hot.

1:05:261:05:30

See how it is now.

1:05:321:05:34

And how the rice has elongated.

1:05:341:05:36

I'm glad you've done the rice, Madhur. I'm a rice murderer.

1:05:381:05:42

I've got a rice curse. I don't seem to be able to make it properly.

1:05:421:05:45

I'll talk to you later.

1:05:451:05:47

-Shall we leave the bay leaf and the spices in?

-Yeah.

1:05:471:05:50

Because they're partly... they're decorative

1:05:501:05:53

-And...

-I'll grab the lamb out.

-Yes, thank you. Thank you.

1:05:531:05:55

And yeah, perfectly. Just a little mess.

1:05:551:05:59

-Remind us what that is again.

-Sorry?

-Remind us what it is again.

1:05:591:06:03

It is lamb shanks braised with yoghurt and spices,

1:06:031:06:08

and a pilaf with dill and spices, whole spices.

1:06:081:06:12

And I'm going to do my research on Indian food

1:06:121:06:14

before we get you back again. There you go.

1:06:141:06:17

"We have a date," you said. Is that a chat-up line from Madhur Jaffrey?

1:06:211:06:24

-Yes.

-Over here. Grab a seat. Now, dive into this.

1:06:241:06:27

I tasted this in rehearsal

1:06:271:06:28

and it is absolutely... I have to say it looks spectacular.

1:06:281:06:32

I've had lamb cooked in yoghurt before,

1:06:321:06:36

but I was crossing the Wadi Rum Desert with the Bedouin tribe.

1:06:361:06:40

Yes, yes.

1:06:401:06:41

And we had it in a giant pot for about 30-odd people

1:06:411:06:44

in the middle of the desert.

1:06:441:06:46

-I had lamb, before, cooked in yoghurt in Birmingham.

-Yeah!

1:06:461:06:51

I need to get out more, obviously!

1:06:511:06:52

-What do you think?

-Oh!

1:06:521:06:54

James didn't stand a chance in the kitchen there, but at least

1:06:591:07:01

he got a date out of it, which is nice,

1:07:011:07:03

and an incredible dish from Madhur.

1:07:031:07:05

It's omelette challenge time. With Jun Tanaka in third place,

1:07:051:07:08

he was looking to reach the top of the leaderboard,

1:07:081:07:11

as he takes on Atul Kochhar.

1:07:111:07:13

Right, let's get on.

1:07:131:07:14

As usual, the omelette challenge, the guys on the board here,

1:07:141:07:17

Jun's third place, and Atul's down in sort of 32 minutes area.

1:07:171:07:22

Usual rules apply, three-egg omelette cooked as fast as you can.

1:07:221:07:24

-Let's put the clocks on the screens. This boy is quick.

-I know, I can't.

1:07:241:07:28

-Are you ready?

-You make both, OK?

1:07:281:07:30

Three, two, one. Go.

1:07:301:07:32

Watch how quick this goes.

1:07:371:07:39

Ooh, just a little falter there!

1:07:391:07:41

Oh, it's sticking.

1:07:461:07:47

Look at the concentration on his face!

1:07:481:07:51

Pretty good, pretty good, he's there.

1:07:521:07:54

Atul, make sure you get on the... There you go.

1:07:541:07:58

Right, let's have a taste of this.

1:07:581:07:59

It's the kind of stuff that looks like you dodge around the pub,

1:08:061:08:08

-outside of pubs on a Saturday morning.

-Is it?

1:08:081:08:11

-That sort of stuff, on the pavement.

-Urgh! Come on.

-Right, this one.

1:08:111:08:15

-Atul.

-Disqualified.

1:08:221:08:24

You did it in 25.04.

1:08:261:08:28

-But I'm not eating that.

-There you go. I know that.

1:08:281:08:30

-Jun.

-I won't have beaten the time.

1:08:301:08:32

You did it in 21.76, so both hopeless.

1:08:341:08:38

That certainly looked super speedy from Jun, but unfortunately,

1:08:421:08:45

it wasn't quick enough to send him to the top of the leaderboard.

1:08:451:08:48

And now it's over to Galton Blackiston,

1:08:481:08:50

who's serving up a luxurious Wagyu beef dinner.

1:08:501:08:53

Great to have you on the show.

1:08:531:08:54

-So something different for you with this one.

-Yes, indeed.

1:08:541:08:57

This was sort of brought to my attention earlier on this year,

1:08:571:09:00

and this is Wagyu beef.

1:09:001:09:02

It's a feather blade,

1:09:021:09:03

but the interesting thing of it is the fact that it's from Suffolk.

1:09:031:09:07

I wouldn't entertain it normally

1:09:071:09:08

if it was from the other end of the world. You know?

1:09:081:09:11

Suffolk's good to me.

1:09:111:09:12

-Wagyu beef's traditionally from Japan, this one.

-Exactly.

1:09:121:09:16

So tell us about Wagyu, then.

1:09:161:09:18

What's the difference between Wagyu and a normal beef?

1:09:181:09:20

Right, now then, what the difference is,

1:09:201:09:23

is the fact that you get this unique marbling.

1:09:231:09:26

I don't know if you can see that, but that is fantastic marbling.

1:09:261:09:28

And that means that the flavour is there.

1:09:281:09:31

It's got a unique flavour, in my opinion.

1:09:311:09:33

And it's just something that when I first tasted it,

1:09:331:09:36

it absolutely blew my mind.

1:09:361:09:38

And that even goes as far as the mince.

1:09:381:09:39

The mince was amazing.

1:09:391:09:41

But it's diet, lifestyle, everything,

1:09:411:09:43

-that transforms the meat into this.

-Yes.

1:09:431:09:45

Now, this is feather blade, but the fillet and the sirloin...

1:09:451:09:48

Yeah, YOU'D be able to afford the fillet and sirloin.

1:09:481:09:51

Not like us poor chefs!

1:09:511:09:53

We have to make something great with something cheaper.

1:09:531:09:57

-Moving on. So, what's this?

-So, this is the feather blade,

1:09:571:10:00

and you've got this wonderful sort of...

1:10:001:10:01

I don't know. What is it? Collagen running through the middle of it,

1:10:011:10:04

and that actually is quite soft and quite tender

1:10:041:10:07

and it just adds to the flavour of it.

1:10:071:10:09

First of all, what I'm going to do is seal it off

1:10:091:10:11

in a hot pan with a little bit of oil.

1:10:111:10:13

You don't need a lot of oil in it cos it creates a lot of fat itself.

1:10:131:10:16

-A bit of seasoning.

-But this is produced where, now?

1:10:161:10:19

This is now produced in a village, or town, called Earl Stonham,

1:10:191:10:23

which is in Suffolk.

1:10:231:10:24

And I'm just blown away by it.

1:10:241:10:27

You'll have to tell me what you think.

1:10:271:10:28

I know by the way you look at it, like that, that you're a bit wary.

1:10:281:10:32

These are fantastic Norfolk Peer potatoes.

1:10:321:10:35

I love to show you things like this.

1:10:351:10:38

These are produced in Swaffham, which is about 12 miles from us.

1:10:381:10:42

And it's all about the flavour.

1:10:421:10:44

They get better as you go on throughout the year.

1:10:441:10:46

They're like Jersey Royals, then?

1:10:461:10:48

Well, at this time, maybe, but as you get towards Easter time,

1:10:481:10:53

then you go like this to them and the skins just peel off,

1:10:531:10:56

and the taste is, in my opinion, fantastic.

1:10:561:10:58

-OK.

-I'll just chuck them in with a bit of mint.

1:10:581:11:01

So, you're not seasoning that beef, just leaving it...?

1:11:011:11:03

I have seasoned it. I'll do it again for you.

1:11:031:11:05

LAUGHTER

1:11:051:11:07

Right. But then... Now, moving on.

1:11:071:11:12

So, I've got some of these potatoes, which are just about ready.

1:11:121:11:16

-OK.

-I'm also going to do some beetroot puree.

1:11:161:11:19

I love beetroot puree.

1:11:191:11:20

-NORTHERN ACCENT:

-Do you from up north love beetroot puree?

1:11:201:11:24

What, "oop north" of South Africa?

1:11:241:11:26

Wait till you hear my Brummie accent!

1:11:261:11:29

Beetroot...

1:11:301:11:32

If you take beetroot, it makes great soup, so many different things.

1:11:321:11:36

-Salads. Pickled beetroot, I'm a big fan of.

-Yeah, absolutely.

1:11:361:11:40

-Right, you've got these onion rings.

-Flour, egg wash, breadcrumb...

1:11:401:11:45

Egg and then breadcrumbs.

1:11:451:11:47

-How many do you want, anyway?

-Oh... I don't...

1:11:471:11:51

Well... You always do this.

1:11:511:11:54

-You always do loads.

-What do you mean, loads?

1:11:541:11:56

You want to get him in the kitchen, in the mise en place.

1:11:561:11:59

-He's a machine, James is.

-Yeah, he is a machine.

1:11:591:12:02

Anyway, so I would do a little bit less than that because I like to

1:12:031:12:07

be quite nice and delicate.

1:12:071:12:10

In actual fact, now you've made me go completely funny.

1:12:101:12:13

-I want to put this...

-LAUGHTER

1:12:131:12:16

..into there.

1:12:161:12:18

-OK?

-It proves that whatever age you, are you never stop learning.

1:12:181:12:23

And then...cover it with some apple juice, OK?

1:12:231:12:27

Put a lid onto them...like so.

1:12:271:12:30

-Right.

-Now, this is going along nicely.

1:12:301:12:33

It doesn't take long to cook, this. You want it fairly rare. OK?

1:12:331:12:36

-Yeah.

-And then strain the new potatoes, and then halve them.

1:12:361:12:41

And then a frying pan on for them.

1:12:441:12:45

-Now, you said these potatoes are Norfolk potatoes.

-Yes.

-Yep?

-Yes.

1:12:451:12:50

We've got some... You want some cavolo nero.

1:12:521:12:54

-You've got some...greenery over there.

-Yeah, some kale.

1:12:541:12:58

-Kale, I love kale.

-NATALIE:

-I love kale.

1:12:581:13:02

On the coast, where we are, we get sea kale, which is

1:13:021:13:05

beautiful at this time of year, leading up to spring

1:13:051:13:08

and all that sort of thing, which is absolutely beautiful.

1:13:081:13:11

I think that's just about there, James.

1:13:111:13:12

-We'll leave that to rest.

-There you go.

1:13:121:13:15

-You're doing well!

-Thank you!

-You are.

1:13:151:13:19

OK, so that pan goes on.

1:13:191:13:21

A little bit of oil in that pan, please, James.

1:13:211:13:23

-This one? Yeah.

-Yeah.

1:13:231:13:24

-There you go.

-Thank you.

1:13:241:13:27

And then we'll just saute off these new potatoes.

1:13:271:13:29

-So, Morston Hall, 20th anniversary this year.

-Yes.

1:13:311:13:33

Oh, by the way, happy birthday, Tracy, for tomorrow. Love you!

1:13:331:13:37

Mmmwah! Mmmwah!

1:13:371:13:38

LAUGHTER

1:13:381:13:39

-Happy birthday, girl!

-Who's Tracy?

-That's my wife!

-Oh, right!

1:13:421:13:46

It's a good job it WAS your wife!

1:13:461:13:48

Now, to get those on like so, a bit of seasoning on those.

1:13:521:13:55

This is now perfect, so let that rest on the side.

1:13:551:13:58

Now, I have also got some beetroot, which is already cooked.

1:13:591:14:06

So blitz that for me, James, will you?

1:14:061:14:08

-So, that's done in apple juice, yeah?

-Apple juice.

1:14:081:14:10

I either do it in apple juice or orange juice, one of the two.

1:14:101:14:13

I think it just adds to the flavour of it. It's beautiful.

1:14:131:14:16

-Take that out of there...

-Thank you.

-Put that on there to heat up.

1:14:161:14:21

-You've been very useful.

-It smells fantastic, the beef.

1:14:211:14:25

The beef is great. It's really great stuff.

1:14:251:14:27

I'm really pleased with it.

1:14:271:14:29

And as I say, the mince apparently makes the most amazing burgers,

1:14:291:14:33

which I can actually vouch for, cos I've had them at home.

1:14:331:14:36

-They are brilliant.

-I mention, it is very expensive.

1:14:361:14:39

It's something like, the fillet steak is something like...

1:14:391:14:43

..£60 a steak, isn't it? Something like that.

1:14:431:14:45

Well, it probably is, yeah.

1:14:451:14:47

I know it's very expensive, but at the end of the day...

1:14:471:14:50

..on something like that, you get what you pay for.

1:14:511:14:53

This is a bit of beef... I'm just...deglazing the pan with.

1:14:531:14:57

The feather blade's only about sort of three quid?

1:14:571:14:59

-Now, that... Yeah, about £3 a portion.

-Right.

1:14:591:15:03

But it's something different, and it's unusual.

1:15:031:15:05

I want that fairly fine...

1:15:051:15:07

-Do you want some of this apple?

-Yeah, a bit of juice in there.

1:15:071:15:09

What about the football? You're doing well, ain't you, Norwich?

1:15:091:15:12

Oh, the Canaries are flying high!

1:15:121:15:15

Oh, Glynn, he knows... Glynn knows how to tick my boxes!

1:15:151:15:19

We've got that relationship, haven't we?

1:15:201:15:22

We have this guy up front called Grant Holt, who is just amazing.

1:15:221:15:26

-Top boy, isn't he?

-And built like you.

1:15:261:15:28

-LAUGHTER

-Yeah, that's perfect.

1:15:281:15:31

Good boy. Well done.

1:15:311:15:32

-You're 50 this year, as well, aren't you?

-Ohhh...

1:15:321:15:35

LAUGHTER

1:15:351:15:37

Did you have to say that?!

1:15:371:15:39

BLENDER WHIRS

1:15:391:15:41

I gave you strict instructions before - don't mention my age.

1:15:411:15:45

Yes, I am.

1:15:471:15:48

Not looking forward to it, but hey...

1:15:481:15:51

This is coming along really nicely. We're nearly there.

1:15:511:15:54

Right. So I'm going to thinly slice this for you.

1:15:541:15:57

Some mint, that goes in at the end.

1:15:571:15:59

This curly kale doesn't take long to cook.

1:15:591:16:01

There you go. I'll keep...

1:16:031:16:05

Do you want me to put a little bit of seasoning in here as well?

1:16:051:16:08

Yeah, you can do, please.

1:16:081:16:10

-Add a bit of the kale.

-A bit of salt and pepper.

1:16:101:16:12

Toss these around.

1:16:121:16:14

I have to say, I think these potatoes are the new thing.

1:16:141:16:18

-I think they're excellent.

-And what's the name of them again?

1:16:181:16:21

-Norfolk Peer.

-Peer.

-P-E-E-R, and they are delicious.

-There you go.

1:16:211:16:25

From Swaffham.

1:16:251:16:27

-That's your puree.

-Now...

1:16:281:16:31

-Done.

-And you're actually featured in our magazine

1:16:331:16:35

to commemorate 20 years, James, you know?

1:16:351:16:37

-Am I?

-You are. Heavily featured.

1:16:371:16:40

LAUGHTER

1:16:401:16:43

-Heavily featured in your magazine.

-Heavily featured, cos... Yes...

1:16:461:16:50

-I feel honoured.

-Yeah, well... I'm honoured!

1:16:501:16:53

A bit of that on there.

1:16:551:16:57

This puree, I suppose, would work

1:17:031:17:04

-really well with venison, wouldn't it?

-Of course it would.

1:17:041:17:07

I mean, I find beetroot is one of the chef's dream things

1:17:071:17:12

cos it's so wonderful, it adds beautiful texture, colour, flavour.

1:17:121:17:16

A little bit of the beef. Look at that beef, that's perfect.

1:17:161:17:22

Just one piece?

1:17:221:17:23

Yeah, James, you see? I knew you'd say something like that.

1:17:231:17:27

Because, in Norfolk, or where I am,

1:17:271:17:29

I always like to leave people wanting a little bit more.

1:17:291:17:32

LAUGHTER

1:17:321:17:35

You might be slightly different up north.

1:17:351:17:37

It's all about just that lingering little bit more, isn't it?

1:17:391:17:43

A little bit more. And the onion rings. Don't forget the onion rings.

1:17:431:17:46

Cos I thought that would appeal to you as well.

1:17:461:17:48

-A little bit more...?

-No! Less is best.

1:17:481:17:51

So remind us what that is again.

1:17:511:17:53

There we are. There's Wagyu featherblade

1:17:531:17:55

with Norfolk new potatoes, shallot rings, beetroot.

1:17:551:17:58

Brilliant.

1:17:581:17:59

Right, you've got to dive into this.

1:18:041:18:06

In fact, you'll probably eat all this in one mouthful!

1:18:061:18:09

LAUGHTER Dive in, tell us what you think.

1:18:091:18:11

Have you ever tried Wagyu beef on your travels?

1:18:111:18:13

I've never been as far as Asia yet, so...

1:18:131:18:16

You don't have to go to Asia!

1:18:161:18:18

-GLYNN:

-It's just around the corner from Norfolk!

1:18:181:18:21

Tell us about this, then. It is...

1:18:211:18:23

I mean, the texture of it is very different to a normal steak,

1:18:231:18:27

-isn't it?

-It is, but I just think it's about the flavour on that one.

1:18:271:18:31

For something which is normally thought of

1:18:311:18:34

as a fairly tough piece of meat.

1:18:341:18:36

-Like that?

-That's so tender.

1:18:361:18:38

-It is good, isn't it?

-That's delicious.

-It's beefy.

1:18:381:18:40

-You're not going to get any over there.

-There's not enough!

1:18:401:18:42

Wonderful stuff from Galton there,

1:18:471:18:49

with a dish perfect for those perfect occasions.

1:18:491:18:51

Now, when actor James Nesbitt came to the Saturday Kitchen studio

1:18:511:18:54

to face his food heaven or his food hell, he told us

1:18:541:18:57

he would be a lucky man if he got lamb mince,

1:18:571:18:59

but would get Cold Feet if he had to eat marzipan.

1:18:591:19:02

Which one did he get? Let's find out.

1:19:021:19:04

Right, it's time to find out

1:19:041:19:06

whether Jimmy will be facing his idea of food heaven or food hell.

1:19:061:19:08

Everyone in the studio has made their minds up.

1:19:081:19:11

Jimmy, just to remind you, your version of food heaven would be

1:19:111:19:13

lamb mince, in particular.

1:19:131:19:14

You like all mince, but particularly lamb mince.

1:19:141:19:17

Could be transformed into sort of my version of a classic sort of

1:19:171:19:19

Greek moussaka.

1:19:191:19:21

Alternatively, the dreaded food hell - marzipan.

1:19:211:19:24

This time of year, classic dish, simnel cake.

1:19:241:19:27

Beautiful fruit cake here with all sugars and spices

1:19:271:19:29

and all these different sort of dried fruits,

1:19:291:19:31

topped off with marzipan, marzipan balls round the edge.

1:19:311:19:34

We know what the people at home wanted to see.

1:19:341:19:37

How do you think that these lot wanted?

1:19:371:19:39

I'm hoping... Marzipan is pointless. I don't see the point in marzipan.

1:19:391:19:43

It's like sprouts -

1:19:431:19:44

if you love it that much, why don't you have it every day?

1:19:441:19:46

Well, I have to say, you must have been good to everybody, cos,

1:19:461:19:49

unanimously, 6-1, people want to see the lamb mince.

1:19:491:19:54

Ha! Yeah, exactly, cos they've got sense.

1:19:541:19:56

But because he made such a good job of it in rehearsal,

1:19:561:20:00

Gennaro, I want you to make one of your lovely, lovely Easter chickens.

1:20:001:20:05

-Right.

-Just to show everybody.

1:20:051:20:07

That'll keep him quiet and keep them busy -

1:20:071:20:08

that's why I give him that anyway.

1:20:081:20:10

Right, if you can then chop me the potatoes,

1:20:101:20:12

we're going to basically saute off some potatoes with this.

1:20:121:20:14

Right, moussaka, what we'll do...

1:20:141:20:16

Obviously we've got the lamb mince, we've got different spices,

1:20:161:20:19

we've got nutmeg, a bit of cumin, a bit of oregano.

1:20:191:20:21

We've got onions, garlic, and aubergine here.

1:20:211:20:23

We've got some mint, a few tomatoes,

1:20:231:20:25

red wine and a bit of stock.

1:20:251:20:26

So, first thing, we're going to take our aubergines,

1:20:261:20:29

which I'm going to slice.

1:20:291:20:30

That's something I only discovered recently, and I love them.

1:20:301:20:33

-They're fantastic.

-Aubergines are fantastic.

-Amazing.

1:20:331:20:35

The river cafe people, they do a fantastic aubergine pasta dish

1:20:351:20:39

with lots of...

1:20:391:20:42

-Yeah.

-Fantastic.

1:20:421:20:44

So you want a body and two wings.

1:20:441:20:47

I'm going to do it. It won't take you very long to do.

1:20:471:20:50

A few minutes.

1:20:501:20:51

So with the aubergines, really, now...

1:20:511:20:53

I actually grow my own aubergines at home, so

1:20:531:20:55

I know a little bit about them,

1:20:551:20:56

but they're hybrids of aubergines, these ones now.

1:20:561:20:59

You don't really need to salt them any more.

1:20:591:21:01

-Not any more, no, you don't.

-Thank you, Gennaro, for that.

1:21:011:21:04

So what we're going to do is just basically hollow out the skin.

1:21:041:21:08

Obviously, traditionally this would be done in a dish,

1:21:081:21:11

but we're going to do it this way.

1:21:111:21:12

If you can take some oil, which is the biggest one.

1:21:121:21:16

Yeah, I know what oil is!

1:21:161:21:18

Olive oil?!

1:21:181:21:20

Sorry, I'm used to working with him!

1:21:201:21:22

Whack it all in, that's it.

1:21:231:21:25

Throw in the aubergine.

1:21:251:21:27

There you go. We're going to fry this all off as well.

1:21:281:21:31

So this can all go in. Start this off cooking. That's it.

1:21:311:21:34

Plenty of aubergine, give it a quick stir around.

1:21:341:21:36

There you go, you've got a spoon. Stop it from catching.

1:21:361:21:38

Remove this off as well. Get plenty.

1:21:381:21:41

Tony's there, chopping my potatoes,

1:21:411:21:43

-which should cook in real time, hopefully.

-In oil?

1:21:431:21:46

Yeah, oil. Olive oil for that one, I think.

1:21:461:21:49

-So, throw in the aubergines.

-Finished!

1:21:491:21:52

Is that it?

1:21:541:21:56

Unbelievable, isn't it?

1:21:561:21:58

It's like something off Planet Earth, isn't it?

1:21:581:22:00

Walking With Dinosaurs. No, we'll have that, that's all right.

1:22:001:22:05

-It soaks up the oil very quickly.

-It soaks up the oil,

1:22:051:22:07

but don't forget we're going to add plenty of mince anyway,

1:22:071:22:09

so we don't need to add to much more oil.

1:22:091:22:11

The aubergines will soak it up and then dump it out again,

1:22:111:22:14

so you don't keep adding it, otherwise it's too fatty.

1:22:141:22:16

Tony, if you can make me a sauce as well.

1:22:161:22:18

-Yep.

-We're going to do a little mozzarella sauce.

1:22:181:22:22

We've got a bit of flour, bit of butter, make a simple little roux.

1:22:221:22:25

Add the milk. Then we've got some mozzarella here,

1:22:251:22:27

egg yolk, a bit of nutmeg and some cheese grated over the top.

1:22:271:22:31

At the same time...

1:22:311:22:33

-You say you cook with mince quite a lot at home.

-Yeah.

1:22:331:22:37

What's the dishes that you do, then? Shepherd's pie?

1:22:371:22:39

Well, Mary adores shepherd's pie...

1:22:391:22:42

-Mince with anything, I like, you know?

-Yeah.

1:22:421:22:44

-And very easy to make.

-Simple. As you are proving now.

1:22:461:22:51

Very simple. In we go with the spices.

1:22:511:22:53

We've got in here cumin, which is fantastic with lamb.

1:22:531:22:56

-I don't know about you, Tony...?

-Oh, cumin and lamb....

1:22:561:22:59

-It's wonderful.

-It's hard to beat.

1:22:591:23:00

For this one, you've got oregano, just keep him happy as well,

1:23:001:23:03

-and cinnamon, I absolutely love.

-Cinnamon, I wouldn't have a lot of.

1:23:031:23:06

Cinnamon, whack it in there, it's just tastes fantastic.

1:23:061:23:09

-Mmm, smells nice.

-In we go with the mince now.

-Yes.

1:23:091:23:12

-Throw that in.

-Gorgeous.

-Break that up.

1:23:121:23:14

-You'd be just quite happy with a plateful of this, though?

-Yeah.

1:23:141:23:17

-I love it.

-And some fat chips.

1:23:171:23:20

Are there no onions in this?

1:23:201:23:21

Yeah, you put some onions in, they're chopped in already.

1:23:211:23:24

Gennaro, if you can chop me some parsley, that'd be great.

1:23:241:23:27

-How are we doing with our potatoes?

-They're just... They're slow.

1:23:291:23:32

Swap that round a bit. Use that one.

1:23:321:23:35

Turn that one over there. There you go.

1:23:351:23:38

Turn that one down.

1:23:381:23:40

Then we grab our tomatoes, which are going to go in as well.

1:23:401:23:43

The idea is that we kind of dry-fry everything first

1:23:431:23:46

to add a bit of colour.

1:23:461:23:47

You've got your tomatoes.

1:23:491:23:50

And that can go in.

1:23:501:23:52

Obviously, traditionally,

1:23:521:23:54

you would then layer this mince with the aubergines and everything else.

1:23:541:23:57

This is totally different, this one.

1:23:571:24:00

Red wine.

1:24:001:24:01

Happy with that? There you go.

1:24:051:24:06

-Bit of stock, just a touch.

-What is that stock, though?

1:24:081:24:11

-That's chicken stock, that one.

-Oh...

-Fresh chicken stock.

1:24:111:24:13

-When it gets cold, it goes gelatinous.

-Ah...

1:24:131:24:16

That can leave-to on that side.

1:24:161:24:18

What I'm going to do is turn that down. Take this pan here.

1:24:181:24:21

Tony's got something to cook on over there.

1:24:211:24:23

So this wants to cook for about 20, 25 minutes,

1:24:231:24:26

and then you end up with our mince that we've got in here.

1:24:261:24:31

So, some salt. Just a touch of salt.

1:24:311:24:34

Black pepper. Where's the black pepper gone?

1:24:341:24:37

What have you done with the black pepper, Gennaro?

1:24:371:24:39

Black pepper, peppercorn, black pepper, yellow corn.

1:24:391:24:44

Where is it?

1:24:441:24:45

Who steal it?

1:24:461:24:48

-Are you using those?

-Yeah, we use these.

1:24:481:24:51

Cos, basically, it's great for one portion size, I think.

1:24:511:24:54

But you grab a bit of parsley. Obviously season it up as well.

1:24:541:24:58

-But you don't eat those?

-Yeah.

-Oh, do you?

1:24:581:25:00

-Yes, this is going to go back in the oven.

-Oh, sorry!

1:25:001:25:03

But the idea is now...

1:25:051:25:06

I'll just do a wee bit of that there, Tony.

1:25:061:25:09

-Give that one a turn there.

-Is it hot? Turn that up a bit.

1:25:091:25:12

The idea is, now, we fill these right up.

1:25:121:25:17

This is a great dish that you could do in advance, you see.

1:25:171:25:19

Cos you can make all this lot up. It's wonderful.

1:25:191:25:23

You want an egg yolk in that sauce.

1:25:231:25:25

It's a great dish you can do in advance,

1:25:251:25:28

you can make these all up, place them in the fridge,

1:25:281:25:32

leave them to set, and then just before you want them...

1:25:321:25:34

-Then go out to a Greek restaurant.

-Go out to a Greek restaurant, yeah!

1:25:341:25:38

But you could make this today, stick 'em in the fridge,

1:25:381:25:41

make the sauce tomorrow, pour it over the top,

1:25:411:25:44

and then just pop them in the oven.

1:25:441:25:45

It tastes fantastic.

1:25:451:25:47

Hopefully Tony over there has got our sauce.

1:25:471:25:51

Hang on, hang on...

1:25:511:25:52

Oh! Oh, God...

1:25:521:25:55

-The mozzarella must go in as well.

-Just at the end.

1:25:561:25:58

You got it in at the end.

1:25:581:25:59

Give it a quick stir. Have you seasoned it?

1:26:011:26:04

Yeah. A little bit more salt.

1:26:041:26:05

That's going to go in there as well. Give that a quick mix.

1:26:071:26:09

-How are we doing?

-Yeah...!

1:26:111:26:13

The minute Gennaro took over, it's now gone all lumpy.

1:26:131:26:16

-It's not lumpy.

-Stick it on there.

-Yeah.

1:26:161:26:19

-There you go.

-You done it, you got it?

1:26:191:26:22

Some mozzarella.

1:26:221:26:23

-And there it is.

-Gorgeous.

-Put that over there.

-Wow.

1:26:261:26:29

What was in that there? That was mozzarella and...what?

1:26:311:26:34

That's milk gone in there, butter, bit of flour, bit of nutmeg...

1:26:341:26:37

-Egg.

-Egg yolk.

-Cheese. Cheddar cheese and mozzarella.

1:26:381:26:42

Pop that straight in the oven, and then this can go really in...

1:26:421:26:45

If you're doing this at home tomorrow,

1:26:451:26:47

literally put it in for about a good 15-20 minutes.

1:26:471:26:50

Make sure the aubergines are cooked.

1:26:501:26:52

And then you've got this wonderful aubergine dish here.

1:26:521:26:56

There you go. Now, grab a plate.

1:26:561:26:58

-Oh, it's gorgeous.

-Can you grab us a fish slice, please, Tone?

1:26:581:27:01

Thank you very much.

1:27:041:27:06

I love these sort of aubergines in the skin.

1:27:081:27:10

There you go.

1:27:131:27:15

It's a perfect sort of portion size.

1:27:151:27:17

-They look gorgeous as well, don't they?

-Last minute, get the potatoes.

1:27:201:27:24

A bit of salt gone in there, Tone? In we go with the parsley.

1:27:241:27:27

They're going to go in.

1:27:271:27:29

Chuck them on the side of the plate, mate. They're done.

1:27:291:27:32

-You're just happy, just being here, aren't you?

-Oh, it's fantastic!

1:27:341:27:37

You've just giggled throughout this entire show, haven't you?

1:27:371:27:40

-It's magic.

-That's your idea of food heaven, hopefully.

1:27:401:27:43

-Dive in.

-Dive in!

-Dive in, tell us what you think.

1:27:431:27:45

I'll get some wine to go with this while you're doing it.

1:27:451:27:48

Gorgeous, absolutely gorgeous.

1:27:481:27:50

Les Rives d'Alcion, that's what Tim has chosen.

1:27:501:27:53

-Right, over here...

-Mmm!

1:27:531:27:55

-It's fantastic.

-What do you think? It's hot.

-It's fantastic.

1:27:551:27:58

Cool it down with some wine.

1:27:581:27:59

It's hot, but I think the cinnamon and stuff like that,

1:27:591:28:02

I think really works. Dive in, girls.

1:28:021:28:04

Tell me what you think of the wine, Gennaro.

1:28:041:28:07

Tell us what you think of that as a match.

1:28:071:28:10

A nice French red.

1:28:101:28:11

I think the cinnamon really does help in moussaka

1:28:111:28:14

I think it's really nice.

1:28:141:28:15

It's a nice way of doing it, rather than just layering it all up.

1:28:151:28:18

-It's gorgeous.

-Are you a happy man?

-It's gorgeous.

1:28:181:28:20

Started the show with a glass of wine in his hand,

1:28:201:28:22

he ends it with a glass of wine in his hand. He's a happy man.

1:28:221:28:25

So, James got his food heaven, and didn't he look pleased?

1:28:301:28:33

But, Gennaro, what on earth was that marzipan mess meant to be?

1:28:331:28:36

A for effort, D for execution.

1:28:361:28:38

Now, unfortunately, that's all we've got time for today,

1:28:381:28:40

but I hope you've enjoyed taking a look back

1:28:401:28:42

at some of the best moments from the Saturday Kitchen archives.

1:28:421:28:44

And if you want to give any of today's studio recipes a go

1:28:441:28:47

then you can find them all on the BBC website.

1:28:471:28:49

Enjoy the rest of your weekend, and we'll see you next week.

1:28:491:28:52