18/06/2011 Saturday Kitchen


18/06/2011

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Transcript


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Good morning. Stay right where you are and enjoy 90 minutes of world

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class food cooked right in front of your eyes. This is Saturday Kitchen

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Live! Welcome to the show. Cooking live with me in the studio are two

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formidable chefs. First, the woman who has put Eastern Mediterranean

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food firmly on the culinary map with her best-selling books but

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more recently her brand new London restaurant, Quince. It's the blonde

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bombshell, Silvena Rowe. Next to her is a chef who's helping

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maintain Ludlow as a gourmet hot spot with the shiny Michelin star

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he hangs above the door of his restaurant, La Becasse. Making a

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welcome return to the show, it's Will Holland. Good morning to you

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both. So, Silvena you are kicking off the show, what are you cooking

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for us? It is blueberry and chili molasses glazed belly of pork. And

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a salad that is prepared with feta and yoghurt and cumin.

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It sounds great to me. Slowly cooked? Slowly cooked then a

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flash grill all in the oven. Will? I'm taking a gamble, I'm

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going to have a go at sweet red wine souffle.

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A big gamble xap We are serving that with summer berries, creme

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fraiche and mint. Very few ingredients. Easy to do at home!

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Two very different dishes to look forward to and we've also got a

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great line up of foodie films from the BBC archive. There's Rick Stein,

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Anjum Annand and, Nigel Slater and the great, Mr. Keith Floyd. Now,

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our special guest today has one of the most recognisable faces in the

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world having graced the front cover of nearly every fashion magazine

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from Elle to Vogue. But more impressive than that, she's also a

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massive petrolhead! And a massive friend of mine it is Jodie Kidd. We

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have been trying to get you on the show for ages, but something has

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been keeping you busy? Yes, I'm pregnant! So, I'm very excited. My

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mouth has been watering, telling me about the food.

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Due in September. So, we are cooking for two.

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Yes. At the end of the show, I am

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cooking food heaven or food hell for Jodie. What spr is your

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favourite -- what is your favourite ingredient, food heaven, what would

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it be? R Well, I'm a big -- Well, I'm a big fan of fish. So probably

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a Dover sole. Nothing too pungent or strong.

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And not too expensive, they are about �20 each! Now, what about

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food hell? Probably another fish. Probably a mackerel. Something

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stronger, I'm not a fan of if. You have to get it as fresh as a

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daisy, that's the thing. Really? I will watch and learn.

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Ours is three weeks old! Is it?! either mackerel or Dover sole.

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The Dover sole, this is cooked fish is skinned and filleted then pan

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fried in butter. It's served along with a stew of chorizo, artichokes

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and tomato. It's finished with a few home-made potato gnocchi and a

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handful of fresh herbs. Or Jodie could be facing food hell, mackerel.

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The mackerel is glazed with a mixture of ginger, garlic,

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coriander, tamarind and a spoonful of honey then flashed under a

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fiercely hot grill. It's served on a bed of spicy lemongrass noodles

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and a few chinese greens. You will have to wait until the end of the

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show to see which one Jodie gets. Now, our two guests, eleie, you

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wrote in, who have you with you? have my boyfriend, Ben.

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You are a teacher? Yes, in Reading. Are you off? Five weeks left, then

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the holidays. And the holiday? We are going to

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America. And Ben, what are you doing? I'm in

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the RAF rv. A fantastic job.

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-- I'm in the RAF. A fantastic job.

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To call in: Put your questions to us live later

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on if you get on the show I'll be asking you if Jodie should be

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getting food heaven or food hell. So, start thinking.

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Heaven! Right, let's cook. First, the woman in charge of the brand

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new restaurant in Mayfair, Quince. It is Silvena Rowe. You have been

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busy in the last few months? I have joined the rest of the chefing

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world. 18 hours a day, working with all of that. If I fall asleep, slap

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me, with pleasure! What are we cooking today? I have a fairly

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youngish pork. It is fairly lean. So basically, what I will do with

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So basically, what I will do with that is simply plonk it in my tray.

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Here I have some spices. . I like cardamom, coupin seeds and

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fennel. While you crush the cardamom, I will rub the seeds on

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the top. My restaurant is eastern Mediterranean. It is the food of

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Turkey, Lebanon, Syria, Jordan. So, a little bit of salt in here.

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They have particular spices, cardamom being one, that sort of

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stuff. It is very sweet? Yes, I like to, in this country we love

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pork with apple. So instead of apple I go for blueberry.

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We have three major molasses. We use them in dressings, we use them

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in mar United States, in glazes, etc. So, having done that, we have

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chicken stock here, which I will pour over it. Basically, we are to

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leaf it now for three to four hours in a fairly low oven. Once we cover

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it, of course. So, it is basically braising?

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to be honest I leave it for as long as I can. I like the meat to be

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flaking off. To be able to pull it. So, can you put that in the oven

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for me, please? Thank you so much. So, what temperature? About 150

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Celsius. Something like. There$$NEWLINE So, about a gas

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four? Yes. Let's see what is happening here, then. Very nice.

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So this is looking fairly good. Make sure when you work with it,

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that it is cooler. Now, the salad? Before I do the

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salad, shall we do our, you know? You know who is the chef here,

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don't you. Imagine you are in Quince! I was never in doubt.

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Right, blueberry, don't go for the fresh ones, the cheaper once, the

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frozen ones are just as delicious. You are waring -- wearing the

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proper colours! So, the sugar and water. Then pass it here. Once you

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start a messy job, you have to finish it. Can you pass it through

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the sieve? Yes. I will do that. Once you pass it through the sieve

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add lemon. Congratulations on the restaurant,

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you have the first review today? Apparently we are sultry and

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glamorous! St That is what is being said, I could not disagree with me

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-- it. And r and the restaurant?

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restaurant is fabulous. I think it is the epitomy of sultry and

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glamorous, don't you think?! think it is a real compliment.

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We want a real jam here. You cannot get it from the shops, so this is a

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real work of your own. So it makes it even more delicious.

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. Now, the pork here. James, you are doing everything for

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me now! You know your place on this show, I tell you! Now, this skin,

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we are taking it off. This is fabulous to do a crackling with,

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but not in this dish. What is the best way to do a crackling, James?

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With pork belly, cook it for long slow cooking, but not to cover it

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with tin foil, but about the same amount of time.

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Then crank up the heat before you need it.

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OK. So what we do now is arrange our belly of pork on the tray.

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Where is the chilli going? In here. Yes, in there.

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In there? Yes, please. God, didn't I that! Just double

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checking first. All of my chefs are afraid of me, I

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don't know why? I'll tell you one day! Over the phone! Now, at this

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stage I love to put it in a very, very hot oven to finish it off. If

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you really want if you have the time you can finish it in the sal

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mander. Or a very hot grill if at home.

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So, give it a give amount of this. Is that the portion size? Yes.

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This is one of the best-selling dishes.

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People love it. It is fabulous.

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I bet they do with that size. People who don't love pork even

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love it! If you want to ask a question on the show, call this

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number. I have to do this bit, first! You can put your questions

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to us live later on. You can find Silvena's recipes with the others

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on the show at the website: What we have here is yoghurt and

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feta cheese. I love those two things.

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Here are the leaves. Well done! Explain what we have in

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here? Basically we have yoghurt, feta cheese and we are really

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whoshing it together with a bit of cumin and lemon.

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Yes, a little bit is OK. No need of salt or pepper, the seasoning is

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perfect. The lettuce leaves go in there. Coat them nicely. Then I

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have sesame. With cumin seeds that I will sprinkle on the top. I love

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the crunch. The creaminess of the dressing works together with the

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crunch. Tell us about Quince? It is eastern

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Mediterranean, in the heart of London, Mayfair, fabulous food. It

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is a touch of Lebanese, a touch of Ottoman, but really British fare.

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The best of British pork, beef. Come and try it.

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I swear, we have unbelievable food. The salads are incredible. They are

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all fat-free. I don't use dressings, so the food is light and

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deelectible. Light? You have two kilos of pork

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here! But we are in Britain. I love pork. British pork is phenomenon al,

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so why not. Where do the ideas come from?

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heritage, my dear. I am Ottoman, Turkish, Bulgarian and I have

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basically gone back to my roots. It is a little bit of a play on

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flavours, that kind of thing. That looks good to me.

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This is fabulous, yes. You want it caramelised. Remember

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the blueberry molasses will do that exactly.

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It is fabulous. What is this I'm doing here? It is

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black sesame seeds and cumin seeds it give as wonderful crunch and

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flavour to finish. There is your salad.

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And here are the baby squares. T this is phenomenon al.

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So, it basically goes back in a really, really high temperature?

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Yes. The ovtown is easy, but the grill

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you have to watch it. So, with the seeds on top and this is your dish

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finished. So, remind us what that is again?

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This is blueberry and chili molasses glazed belly of pork and a

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salad with feta and yoghurt and a touch of cumin.

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It looks good to me. I know it smells good, but does it taste goo?

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I'm so excited. Dive into that. Tell us what you

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think? I suppose that pork is the only thing you can do that which?

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Beef, brisket, it will not get the same flavour? No. I think that pork

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lends itself well to the fruitiness. It works great together. People who

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don't like pork even love that dish. Chicken thighs? I have a chilli and

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har Issa marinaded chicken thighs. Happy with that? That is really

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good. It right and fresh. Really good! Will, ever cooked pork and

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blueberries? No, but like you said, you always use something sweet to

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cut the fattiness, so why not use the blueberries.

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The molasses is Turkish. They usualally use pomgran at. The

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blueberries, though is fabulous with the pork. Mull berry, I use in

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my dressings, all of my dressings are made with fruit. Nothing is

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with oil. It is fabulous. Sounds good to me. I will not get

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any of it this side! Now, to Peter Richards to Kent, what did he

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choose to go with the stunning pork choose to go with the stunning pork

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belly? I'm at the light railway here outside of sitting born. I

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have so make track floos town to find some great wines to go with

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Silvena's cooking is all about creativity and delicious, often

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eclectic flavours that can make it difficult to find the right wine.

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In this dish there is feta, pork, blueberries and spices. These

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ingredients can give you options when it comes to the wine. If you

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fancy a palate-cleansing wine, then look no further than this Riesling,

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but my choice is for a red wine, one that marries freshness with

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juiciness, that is not an easy thing to find in an affordable red,

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but it is something that the Ravenswood Vintners Blend Zinfandel

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2007 carries off well. When you look at a bunch of citizen

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fan del grapes at harvest it is messy. There are the ripe grapes as

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well as the overripe ones but with an experienced wine maker putting

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that together, you can make up a beautiful marriage of freshness,

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with character. Citizen fan del is famous for its aromas of

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blueberries and blackberries to pick up on the molasses it is rich

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and juicy to work with the pork and the molasses and the heat of the

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chilli it is fresh and crunchy in texture, to work with the salad and

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there is a lovely savoury creaminess running through the wine

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to pick up on the feta and the yoghurt. It is a succulent,

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motherish, delicious wine. Much like your dish, Silvena. So,

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what a treat! Sorry, Peter, I did not watch any of that. I was

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listening to a two-way conversation about high-heeled shoes, but what

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do you think of the wine? I love it. He has a great sense of my food.

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This is not an easy dish to match because of the sweetness.

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Did he try the dish before choosing the wine? Yes, they do.

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They call me. It is all properly done here, you know! Will, what do

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you reckon? It is lovely. I don't want to annoy you to say it is like

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a barbeque. I have no problem with that.

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It sounds good to me. The men are happy. Ben? Great.

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Beautiful. Now, you can join us here at the

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chef's table, just write to us with your name and address and

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importantly, the daytime phone number.

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Later on, Will is taking on a culinary challenge with a special

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dish... Souffle! A red wine souffle! It could be tricky.

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No producer. First, a Mediterranean escape with

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Rick Stein. He is in the hills of Mount Etna, which it turns out is

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The soil around Etna and the lemons grown round here

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a real Sicilian delicacy, He says the secret

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but they treat the lemons very gently and don't break the skins.

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He only wants the juice and not the mashed-up pith.

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HE SPEAKS ITALIAN

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MACHINE WHIRRS

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Then the lemon juice is mixed with sugar

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and a little water and poured into this wonderful machine.

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I think the creation of machinery like this

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is a real testimony to ingenuity to- create something really refreshing.

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Sicily is home of ices in the Western world,

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Sicily is home of ices in the Western world,

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but they say it was the Arabs

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who gave them the inspiration with their ice-cold sharbats or sherbets.

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Granita is much grainier - which is- what granita means - than a sorbet.

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I just love watching this as the icy shavings turn to slurry which gets

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thicker and creamier until it's time to serve.

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I think a lemon granita is an Italian icon -

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up there with Mario Lanza, caponata and the motor scooter.

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Now do you remember this? Richard Dimbleby's little film

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Well, I'm in Porto Paolo which is just outside Menfi. I'm with Vittorio

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and I'm really looking forward to eating this though which is...

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which is porcini - the ceps, wild mushrooms - with tomato, olive oil, a bit of white wine.

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And he's going to do that with some- vongole. It'll be perfecto.

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He puts in some chopped tomatoes, oil - olive oil of course -

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garlic, the vongole,

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basil...

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Basilico!

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Basilico, of course!

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..chilli flakes.

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And then he chops up a fresh green chilli.

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Giorgio Locatelli told me about Vittorio in London and that's why I'm here.

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He rates him as probably the best seafood chef in Sicily.

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He puts in some parsley and a good dollop of white wine

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and then he gets the pasta going.

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Oh...

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Mwah! I've only just met Vittorio but the thing about cooks - I know I like him.

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The reason I like him is he wants to please me and that's- what good cooks are all about -

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thinking about who they're cooking for and pleasing them -

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and he's just given me that clam because he knows I'll like it

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and I've tried the sauce already and it's absolutely delicious.

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I mean, he's a star!

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And then he puts in the porcini, which literally means

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"little pigs" in Italian,

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and he gets on to make the pasta.

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The thing that keeps cropping up with me with Italian cooking is generosity.

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It's all about families,

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it's all about big portions, it's all about steaming bowls of lovely food.

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Who could fail to have their appetite excited

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about something like this?

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Alla tabella! Pronto. >

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..tabella.

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Well, this is the best bit of the whole job for me.

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I always manage to splatter my shirt at moments like this

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but I don't care - I love being in Sicily!

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Mmm! Delicious!

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Lovely al dente-ness about the pasta.

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Excuse me.

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In the hotel last night, there were some Americans who said

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they'd met up with a strange Englishman who was writing a book about Sicilian food

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while exploring the island on a scooter. Well, we all knew who they- were talking about -

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Matthew Fort, the Guardian's food writer and a friend of mine.

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Food - have you had any decent meals yet?

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I've had a couple of so-so meals but I've had some absolutely, absolutely stormingly good meals

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made from very, very sort of simple- straightforward but extraordinarily- good ingredients. Very high quality.

:23:46.:23:55.
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I totally agree and I think that's what makes this place so fantastic.

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Very nice to see you, Matthew. If you find anything like wine,

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'Matthew mentioned such a good dish -

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'simply grilled swordfish... Don't wave, Matthew!

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'..with a Sicilian classic sauce - salmoriglio.'

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I like doing these sort of simple dishes

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with char-grilled food, with barbecued food outdoors.

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It's the sort of thing where you can have a couple of friends sitting by

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and have a bit of a chat and a glass of wine.

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I always think it's quite nice when you're cooking, to have people around

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but you don't really want them too close when you're in a busy kitchen

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doing something rather over-complicated.

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But this salmoriglio's really straightforward.

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This is olive oil, water and lemon juice.

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I'm adding oregano, flat-leaf parsley and celery tops.

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Then I put in garlic,

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freshly ground black pepper and salt.

:24:58.:25:00.

And this salmoriglio is probably the most popular sauce in the whole of Sicily

:25:00.:25:05.

and it's really good with roasted meat.

:25:05.:25:08.

So now to grill those lovely swordfish steaks.

:25:08.:25:11.

All they need is a few flakes of dried chilli and a bit of seasoning.

:25:11.:25:15.

Swordfish are best in late spring to early summer.

:25:15.:25:19.

I was told that that the Sicilian fishermen say something in Greek before they start fishing.

:25:19.:25:25.

Now this is to trick the fish into thinking that it is Greek fishermen

:25:25.:25:29.

who are not very good at fishing rather than Italian who are!

:25:29.:25:33.

Well that's what the Sicilians say.- Well, they would, wouldn't they?

:25:33.:25:37.

I've cooked the swordfish for four minutes on each side - now that's really important -

:25:37.:25:42.

so that it's nice and moist in the middle.

:25:42.:25:46.

I mean, basically this is a classic, isn't it?

:25:46.:25:50.

I mean, if you think of the perfect- fish for a barbecue, it's swordfish

:25:50.:25:54.

and the salmoriglio goes so well with it.

:25:54.:25:57.

And just a green salad and some chips.

:25:57.:26:00.

Nothing fancy. That's perfect for me.

:26:00.:26:03.

I suppose Matthew is still on his scooter buzzing around Sicily.

:26:03.:26:08.

It would be so good to have had lunch with him and yap about fish,

:26:08.:26:11.

cheeses, tomatoes, great sauces, breads...

:26:11.:26:16.

well, until the wine ran out!

:26:16.:26:26.
:26:26.:26:28.

Fabulous

:26:28.:26:28.

Fabulous food

:26:28.:26:28.

Fabulous food as

:26:29.:26:32.

Fabulous food as always from Rick. That sauce is perfect to go with

:26:32.:26:36.

almost anything you cook outside this weekend. If the weather let's

:26:36.:26:39.

you, of course. It has been raining this week, but brilliant for the

:26:39.:26:45.

fruit and vegetable. You are diving into it already? This is so good.

:26:45.:26:50.

This is from my garden. I picked it in the rain this morning. Just for

:26:50.:26:52.

you. Good man.

:26:52.:27:00.

I thought with you, I would do a little, being with child, a fancy

:27:00.:27:03.

meringue. A raspberry meringue swan.

:27:03.:27:07.

Wow! So we start off the meringue with egg whites.

:27:07.:27:14.

Now, of course, you can buy egg whites that are pasteurised.

:27:14.:27:20.

whites that are pasteurised. Can you? If you can't find those,

:27:20.:27:25.

telein supermarkets already. They are very popular in America. They

:27:25.:27:30.

have just started to come here. Egg whites in a tub in the supermarkets.

:27:30.:27:34.

Already pasteurised. I love that. I will do that with

:27:34.:27:38.

the fingers. I do it with the top of the shell.

:27:38.:27:41.

It takes forever. I like the fingers.

:27:41.:27:50.

Now, brought in up the Bahamas? Barbados. Lovely. Lovely. My

:27:50.:27:54.

parents had a family home in Barbados, so we always were there

:27:54.:28:00.

for the holidays, but lived here. That is where you were spotted by

:28:00.:28:06.

the great Terry O'Neill of course? It was indeed. We were on holiday.

:28:06.:28:11.

I was 15 years old. Terry went up to my mum and said I think that she

:28:11.:28:16.

can be a model. I was engrowsed in horses and showjumping as a junior.

:28:16.:28:23.

I was going up to the next level. Your family are heavily into that?

:28:23.:28:27.

My dad was about to go to the Olympics with the show-jumping team

:28:28.:28:33.

until something happened to his horse, but an amazing showjumper

:28:33.:28:38.

and he went on to play polo. I took after him and was being a youngster

:28:38.:28:45.

doing the showjumping scene and then was spotted for models. I was

:28:45.:28:50.

just about to go up to the seniors, I needed a horsebox. I had never

:28:51.:28:57.

had my own horsebox. I thought I would give modelling a go and it

:28:57.:29:05.

could enable me to buy a horsebox. Give it a go! I was a pot washer to

:29:05.:29:11.

make money, you went to be a model! But there was a controversy at that

:29:11.:29:16.

time about the thin models? Yes, when I started modelling it was the

:29:16.:29:22.

time of the adroj news now, you know, girlie, blokey kind of look.

:29:22.:29:32.

Very dark photographs. It was that period.

:29:32.:29:37.

-- adrogynous. Fashion is like that, it changes.

:29:37.:29:45.

It will go into the superCindy Crawford look, then go back into

:29:45.:29:54.

the tomboyish look. Now, I have this done here, the egg

:29:54.:30:04.
:30:04.:30:05.

whites down with the sugar. Now we are going to take the raps berries.

:30:05.:30:09.

-- raspberries. This is where we start to build up

:30:09.:30:16.

the swans. We take this and place two pieces on each one. This is its

:30:16.:30:24.

wing. That's its wing? Is this going to

:30:24.:30:30.

be like a work of art? I won't be able to eat it? It will be a great

:30:30.:30:38.

shame! You will be able to eat it, but the idea is that raspberries

:30:38.:30:44.

are really in season. With the rain, it will make it go crazy. Excuse me,

:30:44.:30:51.

I know I should not lick my fingers, but it is delicious. We take this.

:30:51.:30:57.

What is that? It helps you stick this down.

:30:57.:31:04.

I amateurible with ovens, I was brought up in a country that were

:31:04.:31:12.

all Aga. I only know how to cooken an Aga.

:31:12.:31:19.

You can't do these on an Aga. Make sure that they are nice and

:31:19.:31:25.

thin. Janet did these yesterday, they were like big fat ducks! But

:31:26.:31:31.

you put them in the oven and at 200 degrees they are lovely and soft

:31:31.:31:37.

and sticky. I am going to finish this off. Add

:31:37.:31:41.

some more raspberries. While we are doing that, you are a jack of all

:31:42.:31:48.

trades, you are a model, a polo player? I know. I'm confused.

:31:48.:31:54.

A dancer, a presenter? I am confused in my career path..A

:31:54.:32:00.

Golfer and the racing driver? I know, we are oft on the race

:32:00.:32:04.

track together down at good wood. Yes. When it comes to sport, you

:32:04.:32:08.

are keen on sport, you are doing this swimming thing? Tell us about

:32:08.:32:15.

that? I am. I am. Today we are launching the British Gas Big Dip.

:32:15.:32:21.

They have a 25-metre pool into the middle of Clapham Common. People

:32:21.:32:26.

can go along and they can swim, they can do classes in the water.

:32:26.:32:30.

There is a wonderful beach there. It is mad it is brilliant.

:32:30.:32:35.

This is purpose-built? Yes, it is there for a month and then to goes

:32:35.:32:40.

to Manchester. People can go along, take their family, sit on the beach,

:32:40.:32:45.

relax, hopefully if the sun comes out. They can take part in a huge

:32:45.:32:50.

number of activities. They have volley ball, water polo. They have

:32:50.:32:54.

fitness in the water. This is all about encouraging

:32:54.:33:01.

people to swim? Exactly. To get out, to be active. To get sporty as we

:33:01.:33:04.

are hosting the Olympics next year. This is a drive to get people

:33:04.:33:11.

involved in sport. You are nodding about swimming?

:33:11.:33:20.

am a dolphin myself! You get the Bahamas, you have the Plaque Sea, I

:33:20.:33:27.

have my local pool! I cheated, -- you have the Black Sea. I have my

:33:27.:33:32.

local pool! I cheated, every kid did it, but it is great to get

:33:32.:33:37.

everybody involved in this? Yes. Swimming, while I've been pregnant,

:33:37.:33:42.

it is a lovely thing to do. The reason I really got into swimming,

:33:42.:33:47.

I have a charity foundation that I was raising money for. I thought

:33:47.:33:51.

the best thing to do would be the marathon. I started to train for

:33:51.:33:59.

the marathon. I am just not built for running! Nor am I, love! Nor am

:33:59.:34:06.

I! As I'm about to put a load of cream on! Running is not my bag! So,

:34:06.:34:12.

my body could not handle it with my bones, and everything. So, I did a

:34:12.:34:17.

swim. I did this British Great Swim. You swim a mile and you can still

:34:17.:34:23.

raise money for charity. It is very tough, actually. You have to swim

:34:23.:34:27.

on open water. It was on the Thames? It was, but

:34:27.:34:37.

they have amazing locations. I should have done Lake Windlemere up

:34:37.:34:41.

in the Lake District. It is beautiful there, but I chose the

:34:42.:34:45.

Thames. It was great, but daunting swimming in open water where you

:34:45.:34:55.
:34:55.:34:57.

don't have lines to follow or you are just looking ahead you in this

:34:57.:35:01.

murky water! Look at that. They are amazing.

:35:01.:35:07.

Now, I have done these with the pasteurised eggs, just for you.

:35:07.:35:13.

Amazing. That is so sweet. You can if you want, take that and

:35:13.:35:21.

do the tail! Oh! What can I say, museum work! This is all a bit

:35:21.:35:28.

fancy?!. You are showing off! There you go, and a bit like that. Like

:35:28.:35:37.

most things in the UK, it is raining... Oh, its bottom fell off!

:35:37.:35:43.

Look at that! It is gorgeous. I don't know what to say Just dive

:35:43.:35:47.

into it. Oh, the bum is coming off again!

:35:47.:35:55.

Just ignore that. Stick some mint in instead.

:35:55.:36:03.

How-do I attack that? In the cream I have double cream, a touch of

:36:03.:36:08.

vanilla and raspberries. If you are going out, you are near

:36:08.:36:13.

a garden centre, it is bound to be raining, get yourself strawberry

:36:14.:36:17.

and raspberry plants. They are so simple to grow.

:36:17.:36:23.

How delicious is that? You have just made a pregnant lady very,

:36:23.:36:28.

very happy! What are we cooking for Jodie at the end of the show? Could

:36:28.:36:37.

it be food heaven or food hell. Dover sole, food heaven. Roasted

:36:37.:36:42.

with chorizo. With home-made gnocchi and fresh hers.

:36:42.:36:52.
:36:52.:36:54.

You are -- and fresh herbs. Or could it be food hell? Mackerel.

:36:55.:37:00.

Served with spicy noodles and a few Chinese Greens! That was half a

:37:00.:37:10.
:37:10.:37:11.

swan in your mouth! Some of our guests in the studio get to help to

:37:11.:37:14.

choose Jodie's feat today! Dover sole.

:37:14.:37:18.

What about you? Dover sole. You have to wait until the end of

:37:18.:37:24.

the show for the final result. It is time to spice things up with

:37:24.:37:30.

another menu of easy Indian food from Anjum Anand.

:37:30.:37:40.
:37:40.:37:41.

Take a look at this. I'm heading to the

:37:41.:37:45.

This stunning landscape was the inspiration for Emily Bronte's classic novel, Wuthering Heights.

:37:45.:37:48.

The Keighley and Worth Valley Railway was started in 1968.

:37:48.:37:51.

It's a recreation of a 1950s branch- line serving the local community.

:37:51.:37:58.

It's hugely popular and is entirely run by volunteers like Jessica,

:37:58.:38:02.

who help to maintain a wonderful piece of history in Yorkshire.

:38:02.:38:05.

Hi. Hi. Are you Jessica?

:38:05.:38:07.

I am, yes. Hi. Anjum. How do you do?

:38:07.:38:09.

Nice to meet you. Shall we have a look around? Yeah. OK.

:38:09.:38:15.

And what kind of food do you serve on these evenings?

:38:15.:38:17.

It can be a huge variety.

:38:17.:38:19.

It can be things such as roast beef and things like that for our Sunday lunch train.

:38:19.:38:22.

To more complicated dishes.

:38:22.:38:28.

This is the tiny kitchen where all the action takes place.

:38:28.:38:30.

Jessica and two other colleagues will have to prepare

:38:30.:38:33.

a three-course Indian meal in this space, for up to 50 guests.

:38:33.:38:36.

Have you ever cooked Indian food?

:38:36.:38:39.

No, I've used jars and things, but that's really it.

:38:39.:38:42.

That's not cooking. No.

:38:42.:38:44.

To get her taste buds tingling, I am going to start Jessica off with a Kashmiri specialty...

:38:44.:38:54.
:38:54.:39:01.

Now, Rogan Josh is probably the most familiar Kashmiri dish

:39:01.:39:03.

that we know of in this country.

:39:03.:39:08.

In Kashmir, they would use just lots of spices, and yoghurt.

:39:08.:39:11.

So if you slice that and I'll get into these garlic cloves

:39:11.:39:12.

to make a puree. Mm-hm.

:39:13.:39:16.

First, I'm going to fry up all my spices in hot oil.

:39:16.:39:18.

I'm using black and green cardamom pods, pepper corn,

:39:18.:39:21.

cloves, cinnamon and mace, which is derived from the nutmeg tree.

:39:21.:39:25.

Next, I'm going to make a paste using six cloves of garlic

:39:25.:39:29.

and one square inch piece of ginger.

:39:29.:39:34.

So in with our meat.

:39:34.:39:36.

OK. All in. Right.

:39:36.:39:38.

And, if I can have you gently browning that off in the onions.

:39:38.:39:41.

I haven't gone too dark with the onions

:39:41.:39:43.

is cos they're going to cook now more with the meat...

:39:43.:39:45.

Even more. Yeah. Yeah.

:39:45.:39:46.

There's big pieces here. Would you leave them this size?

:39:46.:39:54.

OK. So how did you get involved in this train? Or how did that happen?

:39:54.:39:56.

Your parents are involved too, aren't they?

:39:56.:39:58.

Yes. They are still... Slightly less involved than they were. Mm.

:39:58.:40:00.

My father used to bechairman of the catering department.

:40:00.:40:03.

Ah! Now the connection makes sense.

:40:03.:40:05.

He roped you in, didn't he? Something like that, yes.

:40:05.:40:09.

OK. I'm just going to puree these tomatoes.

:40:09.:40:11.

Then I'm adding half a teaspoon of chilli powder

:40:11.:40:14.

and two teaspoons of cumin,

:40:14.:40:16.

coriander and garam masala.

:40:16.:40:20.

Now, fennel seed is really typical of Kashmir. Mm-hm.

:40:20.:40:23.

It is something that should go into- Rogan Josh. It just works.

:40:23.:40:27.

Although it sounds unusual, it works well with the lamb.

:40:27.:40:30.

So I'm adding two teaspoons. OK.

:40:30.:40:34.

In go the tomatoes.

:40:34.:40:36.

This is yoghurt. I've stirred it so it's got no lumps. OK.

:40:36.:40:39.

So, three tablespoons.

:40:39.:40:41.

Straight in.

:40:41.:40:43.

OK? Stir. And that's really all that goes into it.

:40:43.:40:47.

Now I'm going to leave the lamb to stew for about 20 minutes.

:40:48.:40:55.

Once the liquid has reduced, I brown the meat slowly in the masala.

:40:56.:41:01.

What it's doing is concentrating those flavours? Yeah.

:41:01.:41:03.

So you just need enoughliquid in there to stop it catching?

:41:03.:41:06.

Yeah, exactly. So it shouldn't be dry. OK.

:41:06.:41:09.

But there shouldn't be so much liquid that it's bubbling away.

:41:09.:41:11.

Yeah. So I'm happy with that.

:41:12.:41:14.

I can smell the caramelisation of that masala. I understand.

:41:14.:41:17.

I need to add some water.

:41:17.:41:19.

It's not supposed to be a thin gravy, but also not thick,

:41:19.:41:22.

cos we're going to have it with rice

:41:22.:41:24.

so we need enough to moisten that.

:41:24.:41:27.

All right, so that's boiling. I'm putting the heat back on.

:41:27.:41:30.

Turning it down a bit and then, leaving it till the lamb's completely cooked.

:41:30.:41:33.

Another ten minutes or so.

:41:33.:41:37.

Un petit peu de garnish.

:41:37.:41:40.

That is more than garnish cos once you crunch into that with the lamb,

:41:40.:41:42.

it's really fragrant and fresh.

:41:42.:41:46.

And I think it's time to try.

:41:46.:41:54.

That's fabulous. Is it? Yes.

:41:54.:41:56.

That's not converting you to eat lamb in Indian restaurants, is it? It might.

:41:56.:41:59.

You're kidding? Yeah. Success!

:41:59.:42:01.

That's a good curry. Mm.

:42:01.:42:03.

If I do say so myself!

:42:03.:42:13.
:42:13.:42:13.

Apology for the loss of subtitles for 53 seconds

:42:13.:43:06.

I'm going to

:43:06.:43:06.

I'm going to whip

:43:06.:43:07.

I'm going to whip the

:43:07.:43:08.

I'm going to whip the ingredients together for a minute.

:43:08.:43:18.
:43:18.:43:19.

I love the orange. Tasting time. My favourite time.

:43:19.:43:25.

Very nice. Very nice. Very delicate. Light for the end of the meal.

:43:25.:43:30.

I have come back to the railway in south Yorkshire. Today Jessica and

:43:30.:43:36.

the rest of the railway's volunteers are preparing for their

:43:36.:43:39.

round-trip. Jessica is organised, but the size of the task is

:43:39.:43:44.

beginning to dawn on her. I'm busy getting on with it. Not

:43:44.:43:49.

trying to think about it too much. If I do, I will get paranoid about

:43:49.:43:53.

Good morning! How is it going? It is OK.

:43:53.:43:57.

Can I help? I think we have everything under control.

:43:57.:44:03.

I didn't expect to be demoted! But it is good to see Jessica and her

:44:03.:44:07.

team are confident. The passengers are boarding and the journey is

:44:07.:44:10.

about to begin. Now that it is full-steam ahead,

:44:10.:44:15.

the food must be served within the two hours of the trip. 20 minutes

:44:15.:44:24.

into the journey, things are not go Jessica's decided to serve pilaf

:44:24.:44:31.

However, the journey can't be delayed because this historic steam locomotive

:44:31.:44:35.

shares its line with a local commuter train.

:44:35.:44:42.

So, in the heart of Bronte country,- the Keighley and Worth Valley Railway

:44:42.:44:45.

has served up its first Indian menu.

:44:45.:44:49.

Oh, it was exceptional. It tasted nice.

:44:49.:44:51.

Well presented. I really enjoyed it.

:44:51.:44:53.

Very nice.

:44:53.:44:55.

We had the lamb and that was just really good.

:44:55.:44:57.

There was no heat to it, but the spices came through just so well.

:44:57.:45:01.

It was really tasty.

:45:01.:45:06.

I had the rice, and I could have sat down and just had the rice on its own. It was wonderful.

:45:06.:45:09.

The main courses have gone down a treat. Now it's time for dessert.

:45:09.:45:18.

Hi!

:45:18.:45:19.

Dessert? Yes.

:45:19.:45:22.

Kashmiri cuisine, because it's so regionalised has surprised me a little bit.

:45:22.:45:26.

It's just more varied than I imagined it was going to be.

:45:26.:45:30.

Things don't need to be hot, just because you're using spices.

:45:30.:45:33.

So that you can gain depth and taste to a dish without actuallymanaging to blow somebody's head off.

:45:33.:45:37.

It's been quite nerve-wracking, but the great thing is that we've all pulled together,

:45:37.:45:39.

because ultimatelyit is all a team effort down here.

:45:40.:45:43.

That's the best thing about it, really.

:45:43.:45:53.
:45:53.:45:56.

You

:45:56.:45:57.

You can

:45:57.:45:57.

You can see

:45:58.:46:02.

You can see more recipes from Anjum on next week's show. Still to cock

:46:02.:46:06.

on Saturday Kitchen, Nigel Slater is doing battle in his garden.

:46:06.:46:10.

After fighting off the local wildlife, he retreats to the

:46:10.:46:16.

kitchen to make a mixed vegetable soup with cannellini beans and

:46:16.:46:22.

Chard. Keith Floyd is in the Pyrenees mountains from France. He

:46:22.:46:29.

is taking off a Basque chicken to prepare by himself in the fabulous

:46:29.:46:36.

bow tie. There will be serious EGG- plaining to do, Will, if he cracks

:46:36.:46:41.

under the pressure, live a little later on. What are we cooking for

:46:41.:46:47.

Jodie at the end of the show? Will it be food heaven? Can she eat food

:46:47.:46:53.

heaven? Have you eaten the meringues? They are gone! It could

:46:53.:46:58.

be food heaven, sofr sole or food hell, mackerel.

:46:58.:47:04.

Will, what do you like the sound of. The king of fish, the Dover sole or

:47:04.:47:09.

the tiny, cheap, mackerel. I will go for the Dover sole. Just

:47:09.:47:17.

as I don't want to upset Jodie! the man in charge of the hub at La

:47:17.:47:20.

Becasse, welcome back it is Will Holland.

:47:20.:47:26.

Now, souffle, you have made these? Yes, these are going in the oven,

:47:26.:47:30.

but now we shall go through the process.

:47:30.:47:38.

There we go, gas mark 350 degrees for eight minutes.

:47:38.:47:41.

Don't keep checking and opening the door.

:47:41.:47:46.

Right, we are making a syrup. Sugar and water.

:47:46.:47:49.

You are confident with the souffles? The thing is, there is a

:47:50.:47:53.

lot of people at home who are scared about it, basically. There

:47:53.:47:58.

is no need to be scared, that is is no need to be scared, that is

:47:58.:48:03.

what I'm going to show you. Why are you looking nervous! Famous

:48:04.:48:09.

last words! Talk about the syrup? If we are getting technical, we are

:48:09.:48:17.

taking it to 1-2-1. To you, me and everyone, we are boiling it until

:48:17.:48:21.

it is a syrup. Sugar and water boils more than

:48:21.:48:27.

boiling water. You boil water, then add sugar it

:48:27.:48:35.

continues to heat up. It is 1-21. So that is a part. Now in here

:48:35.:48:41.

there is corn flour and red wine. Often making souffles you make it

:48:41.:48:45.

with a custard base. This is the first time I have seen this.

:48:45.:48:49.

There are two ways, as you said, the custard base and then this

:48:50.:48:54.

version, which is corn flour. All I have done is to mix the corn flour

:48:54.:49:01.

and red wine. As I want an intense red wine flavour, I have a wine

:49:01.:49:10.

with a lot of oomph. So something big, a Rioja, a Merlot. A Shiraz.

:49:10.:49:14.

Something that is big that packs a good punch.

:49:14.:49:19.

When you are doing the souffle moulds for Will, you basically take

:49:19.:49:24.

the butter and make the lines up the side of the dish. This is

:49:24.:49:29.

supposed to make the souffle rise? Thaet it.

:49:29.:49:36.

Onwards and up wards. -- that's it.

:49:36.:49:46.
:49:46.:49:52.

I think that this is murmow jumbo. Make one up and one down. -- mumbo

:49:52.:50:01.

-jumbo. I think that is a Michelin tale!

:50:01.:50:10.

Any way! I'll do it your way! We are using our eggs pasteurised

:50:10.:50:15.

again. We are using these so you don't get

:50:15.:50:21.

partially cooked eggs. Fantastic! What is in there?

:50:21.:50:25.

corn flour and the red wine mix. You have to bring it to the boil.

:50:25.:50:31.

You can see how thick it comes it has been there for a minute or two.

:50:31.:50:37.

You have to keep whisking it? you don't want it lumpy.

:50:37.:50:43.

This is Rioja in there? Yes. As soon as it comes to the boil, out

:50:43.:50:49.

it comes. You can see how thick it is. Get all of that out. Whisk the

:50:49.:50:54.

syrup and the red wine mix together. That's it. That is the finished

:50:54.:50:59.

base. Now, tell us about Ludlow. An

:50:59.:51:05.

amazing place, famous for wonderful antique shops. Great food?

:51:05.:51:09.

course! I'm just going to pop this in the fridge.

:51:09.:51:16.

I'm going to throw in the sugar. When we make the souffle it must be

:51:16.:51:22.

cold. Ludlow is a fantastic food destination. It has great

:51:22.:51:26.

restaurants and it is the culture of the town, the butchers, the

:51:26.:51:31.

bakers, there is a fantastic food festival that happens in September.

:51:31.:51:36.

You are doing it? I'm not doing it, it has been going on a lot longer

:51:36.:51:41.

than I have been in town. It is its 17th year this year. That is

:51:42.:51:46.

incredible. So for each souffle. I need a whisk. I will use this one.

:51:47.:51:53.

It is important that the base is cold when you make the souffle.

:51:54.:52:03.
:52:04.:52:06.

Which whisk? A Kenny Atkins whisk or are a normal whisk? You said

:52:06.:52:12.

that, not me! So, a couple of tablespoons here.

:52:12.:52:21.

Ludlow is famous for Sean Hill? was the pine year. I am there to

:52:21.:52:31.
:52:31.:52:31.

fly the flag. It is -- He was the pioneer.

:52:31.:52:37.

It is a great area? It is a rich area for all things lovely. Someone

:52:37.:52:42.

is rearing suckling pigs for me. I have a farmer, the pigs have my

:52:42.:52:47.

name on them as they are running around the yard. I don't think that

:52:47.:52:53.

they know it! They are all called Will? Yeah, they have a tag on them.

:52:53.:52:59.

Now, you are using a whisk, but I think this is quicker? Listen, I

:52:59.:53:07.

don't want to say it is a fool proof recipe, yet.

:53:07.:53:13.

It doesn't look like it at the moment! But you can be brutal with

:53:13.:53:19.

it. It is the corn flour? Yes. Did you sugar those? Yes, they've been

:53:19.:53:24.

sugared. Excellent. Instead of using a

:53:24.:53:29.

spatula, tonight be afraid of getting your arm in there,

:53:29.:53:31.

incorporating the meringue and the base.

:53:32.:53:35.

Now, you make these before service? These are brilliant at home.

:53:35.:53:40.

Because of the corn flour it is a sturdy mix. You don't have to make

:53:40.:53:45.

them and cack them straight away. You can make them a couple of hours

:53:45.:53:49.

before. You can pop them in the fridge, so the desert is ready to

:53:49.:53:55.

go, basically. As soon as it is pudding time, pop them in the oven,

:53:55.:54:02.

eight minutes or so... Now you have to be careful not to... You press

:54:02.:54:12.
:54:12.:54:19.

it around the edges with a pala tte knife? Well, na any area of the --

:54:19.:54:24.

any area of the ramekin, if it has not got butter it will stick. So

:54:24.:54:27.

use the knife and smooth it off like that.

:54:27.:54:33.

I know you are a keen cook, Jodie, ever tried making a souffle for a

:54:33.:54:40.

dinner are party? It is dangerous. Especially with the old aga, but I

:54:40.:54:46.

have someone at home who is a fantastic cook called Rachel. She

:54:46.:54:51.

did a cheese souffle the other day. That was brilliant. So I do love

:54:51.:54:56.

them, but I'm a roast girl. I can do a roast for a dinner party, but

:54:56.:55:06.
:55:06.:55:13.

souffle, I would get a little nervous! So this method stops the

:55:13.:55:20.

mix from sticking to the edge. You pop them in the fridge and put

:55:20.:55:27.

them in the oven when you are ready. James you have made the berry salad.

:55:27.:55:32.

It is lovely with the fruits coming from your garden. There is creme

:55:32.:55:36.

fraiche and mint chopped through it. The lemon is in there to bring out

:55:36.:55:41.

the flavour. Do you want to get them out?

:55:41.:55:44.

get them out, I'll put them on the plate.

:55:44.:55:49.

The moment of truth. I heard the eight minutes.

:55:49.:55:56.

They look good. They look pretty, pretty good! They look good to me!.

:55:56.:55:59.

There we go. Amazing.

:55:59.:56:04.

It is a good job they did work, you brought something that is special

:56:04.:56:11.

with you this morning? Yep, it is my mum's birthday, my special guest.

:56:11.:56:19.

Not only have a made a souffle live on telly, it is my mum's birthday.

:56:19.:56:25.

Your boy did good. Remind us of that again? Sweet red wine souffle!

:56:25.:56:31.

You lucky thing. How chuffed are you?! He eis pretty good at this

:56:31.:56:34.

game. Look at that. They are all works of

:56:35.:56:44.

art. I feel ashamed to... Well, here, both of us! Dive in.

:56:44.:56:50.

This is gorgeous. Someone tried it yesterday, they

:56:50.:57:00.
:57:00.:57:01.

said it was like eating hot red wine marsh mallow! Gorgeous. That

:57:01.:57:05.

is seriously good. I was wondering what the wine would

:57:05.:57:10.

be like with it. It has a delicious sourness to it. It works

:57:10.:57:15.

beautifully with the egg white. It is not as good as the meringue,

:57:15.:57:23.

but it is OK! Let's go and see what Peter has chosen to go with Will's

:57:23.:57:33.
:57:33.:57:36.

Peter has chosen to go with Will's Will's souffle is stunning. It is a

:57:36.:57:41.

really intentive take on a classic recipe. When it comes to sweet

:57:41.:57:45.

dishes you want the wine to be sweeter than what you have got on

:57:45.:57:50.

the plate, but we don't want anything too rich or heavy, it

:57:50.:57:54.

could overwhelm the bright and fresh flavours. The key for me with

:57:54.:57:59.

this dish is that light, airy, almost frothy texture of the

:57:59.:58:03.

souffle. That makes me thing that a little bit of fizz in our wine

:58:03.:58:10.

would be a brilliant thing. You could go for a derbgs misec

:58:10.:58:16.

champagne, but I have a wine that not only goes perfectly with the

:58:16.:58:21.

wine, but it is sensational value for money. It is the Taste The

:58:21.:58:24.

Difference, Brachetto d'Acqui 2010. There are those who may see the

:58:24.:58:29.

wine on the shelf and thing it is pink, sweet, cheap and passen by,

:58:29.:58:34.

but that would be a crying shame. This is a gem of a wine. Brachetto

:58:34.:58:42.

d'Acqui 2010 is an historic style from the famous Piedmonte region.

:58:42.:58:47.

It is renowned for its fruity character. That is what you get and

:58:47.:58:51.

what we need with the dish. The red wine with the souffle make it is

:58:51.:58:55.

fruity. That combined with the berries in the dish tie in

:58:55.:58:59.

brilliantly with the wine. You get that gentle sparkle here. That

:58:59.:59:04.

picks up well in the lightness of texture in the souffle. Yes it is

:59:04.:59:08.

soft, sweet, but also fresh and herbal that works well with the

:59:08.:59:12.

basil and the mint in the dish. Finally, the beautiful colour that

:59:12.:59:19.

ties in so well with the vivid presentation on Will's dish. So,

:59:19.:59:27.

Will, it is a style of wine that may not be to everyone's test, --

:59:27.:59:37.
:59:37.:59:38.

taste, but it is a great match. Is it a great match? I don't thing

:59:38.:59:43.

he tasted it with the souffle. It is quite sweet and artificial.

:59:43.:59:50.

It is horrible. It is like being a kid when you

:59:50.:59:56.

drank cherry aid, not keen. What do you reckon? I would say

:59:56.:00:01.

that the match with my dish was a great success.

:00:01.:00:07.

Ben? It tastes like pop! It is quite light, but a miss.

:00:07.:00:13.

Now, you can be joining us here at the chef's table. All you have to

:00:13.:00:18.

do is write to us with your name, address and daytime telephone

:00:18.:00:24.

number. The address is: It is time for Nigel Slater to supply us with

:00:24.:00:31.

simple supper ideas. Today he is raiding the vegetable patch,

:00:31.:00:35.

hopefully no snails, let's see if there is anything left for him to

:00:35.:00:43.

I suppose I'm what you might At home my garden is split

:00:43.:00:47.

That's what I love about growing your own.

:00:47.:00:49.

I can pick a courgette when I want.

:00:49.:00:52.

It's much fresher than in the shops.

:00:52.:01:02.
:01:02.:01:03.

Growing your own, it's not just about planting seeds and picking things.

:01:03.:01:07.

It's about looking after things.

:01:08.:01:10.

It's about nurturing them.

:01:10.:01:11.

In my case, it seems to be a never-ending game with predators.

:01:11.:01:15.

I mean, these red cabbages,

:01:15.:01:20.

they have been lunch for... probably him, actually.

:01:20.:01:27.

This little chap has probably had more of my cabbage than I'll have.

:01:27.:01:35.

If it's not the snails, it's the squirrels that have a go at anything.

:01:35.:01:37.

I just stand there shaking my fist at them...uselessly.

:01:37.:01:41.

It's so exciting to see my vegetables grow into tasty produce that I can simply add to any dish.

:01:41.:01:45.

Well, that's if I can get to them first.

:01:45.:01:48.

Somebody's had a nibble at my courgettes. In fact, that's not a nibble - that is somebody's supper.

:01:48.:01:53.

It could well be the foxes. They are incredibly hungry.

:01:53.:01:56.

They come right up to the back door.

:01:56.:01:59.

And they seem to be living in my neighbour's garden.

:01:59.:02:06.

My Tuesday night supper.

:02:06.:02:07.

I'm cooking what I call Nigel's Adaptable Bean Soup,

:02:07.:02:10.

which, in short, means you can adapt it to be whatever you like.

:02:10.:02:12.

Start by making a base.

:02:12.:02:14.

Chop some spring onions and carrots.

:02:14.:02:17.

Add to a little hot oil.

:02:17.:02:19.

And throw in a bay leaf or two to add some depth.

:02:19.:02:22.

To add colour, I'm putting in tomatoes then pour in some

:02:22.:02:26.

vegetable stock, fresh or dried, whatever you have in your cupboard.

:02:27.:02:30.

To give my soup some real body and make it into a main course, I'm adding cannellini beans.

:02:30.:02:37.

These are pre-boiled.

:02:37.:02:39.

Strange as it sounds, I'm going to put some orange in there. Just a single piece of peel.

:02:39.:02:44.

It just adds a quiet, warm citrus flavour to it.

:02:44.:02:47.

The real secret to a good soup is using your old cheese rinds, the ones in the back of the fridge.

:02:47.:02:52.

I found some Parmesan.

:02:52.:02:54.

If you leave it there, it doesn't really dissolve. It just slightly softens.

:02:54.:02:58.

And it sends that savouriness that you get with Parmesan very gently through the soup.

:02:58.:03:06.

So when you taste it, you don't think, wow, there's cheese in this soup.

:03:06.:03:09.

But you know there's something working behind to bring

:03:09.:03:12.

all the flavours together and give it a real richness.

:03:12.:03:16.

The crazy thing is, it's the end of your Parmesan.

:03:16.:03:19.

It doesn't cost anything at all.

:03:19.:03:21.

At this point, this soup can become anything I want it to be.

:03:21.:03:27.

And I honestly don't know what it's going to be.

:03:27.:03:30.

There is a point when you open the fridge,

:03:30.:03:33.

you go to the salad crisper, you go to the veg rack and just see what's there.

:03:33.:03:37.

I mean, I know that there's some beautiful chard out there.

:03:37.:03:43.

Chard is one of those vegetables that deserves to be better known.

:03:43.:03:48.

It's a wonderful vegetable. It's so easy to grow.

:03:48.:03:51.

And it's one of the few vegetables that doesn't seem to be attacked by all sorts of slugs and bugs.

:03:51.:03:57.

The lovely thing is, it's two vegetables in one.

:03:57.:03:59.

It's the crisp stalks and then the very soft, tender leaves.

:03:59.:04:04.

You don't really find it in supermarkets.

:04:04.:04:07.

But most people on allotments will have a row of chard.

:04:07.:04:10.

If you have an organic box, you will probably get a weekly supply.

:04:10.:04:20.
:04:20.:04:22.

The stalks take a little longer to cook than the leaves, so pop them in first.

:04:22.:04:29.

I'm adding some fresh parsley for seasoning,

:04:29.:04:32.

but you can add whatever you fancy.

:04:32.:04:35.

What I've got in there are very...

:04:35.:04:38.

earthy, quite robust vegetables.

:04:38.:04:42.

And I want something in there that's very soft and silky.

:04:42.:04:46.

Chard leaves, because they are a bit like spinach leaves...

:04:46.:04:51.

they just become soft and melting when they're warmed.

:04:51.:04:54.

They don't need much cooking.

:04:54.:05:00.

So...

:05:00.:05:03.

the cheese has softened but not completely melted.

:05:03.:05:08.

It's just added bags of flavour.

:05:08.:05:11.

The beans have turned the whole thing into a main course.

:05:11.:05:17.

I've got this lovely tomatoey stock.

:05:17.:05:26.

Then, just because I love it, for no other reason,

:05:26.:05:31.

I'm going to put a bit of my favourite olive oil, a really fruity extra-virgin olive oil.

:05:31.:05:37.

Just enough.

:05:37.:05:40.

It just drizzles over.

:05:40.:05:46.

There we are.

:05:46.:05:56.

Make a whole batch of this, and it will last you for days.

:05:56.:06:00.

You can add something new every time you get it out.

:06:00.:06:10.
:06:10.:06:19.

Come Friday, my meals tend to be about what's left

:06:19.:06:21.

in the cupboards and fridge from my shop earlier in the week.

:06:21.:06:24.

It's often about making the most of a bad job.

:06:24.:06:26.

But it's quite surprising what magic you can make out of what you have left.

:06:26.:06:28.

So I'm going to make them into the most delicious meal.

:06:28.:06:32.

Supper tonight is a Tidy Friday Pan-fry.

:06:32.:06:38.

This to me says fry-up.

:06:38.:06:40.

One of those big rustic meals that's not about gentle flavours.

:06:40.:06:45.

It's about getting things fried in a pan with crispy edges.

:06:45.:06:49.

Just a very cheap meal where I'm using everything.

:06:49.:06:54.

This really is making it up as you go along.

:06:54.:06:58.

It's a collection of what's left in the fridge and what's still hanging around in the cupboards.

:06:58.:07:03.

This is seriously relaxed cooking,

:07:03.:07:06.

restricted only by your own good taste.

:07:06.:07:13.

If I wanted this to be a little bit- more elegant, I'd peel the potatoes.

:07:13.:07:18.

But I love potato skins, particularly when they go crisp in the hot oil.

:07:18.:07:22.

That's when I think they're at their best.

:07:22.:07:25.

Dishes like this have got to be rustic. They are meant to be big.

:07:25.:07:28.

They're meant to be quite untidy looking.

:07:28.:07:37.

Chop and gently boil the leftover cabbage,

:07:37.:07:41.

just enough to soften it a little.

:07:41.:07:47.

I'm also going to slip in some parsley.

:07:47.:07:56.

Chuck the fresh greens in with all the crispy things.

:07:56.:08:00.

Throw in some parsley.

:08:00.:08:10.
:08:10.:08:12.

It's my Friday night supper, but it's also a great kids' dish.

:08:12.:08:16.

It's an idea that they're actually getting some fresh greens in there as well.

:08:16.:08:26.
:08:26.:08:28.

The trick of a great pan-fry

:08:28.:08:31.

is having different textures, tastes, shapes and sizes.

:08:31.:08:41.
:08:41.:08:45.

There

:08:45.:08:46.

There is

:08:46.:08:47.

There is more

:08:47.:08:52.

There is more quick and easy recipes from Nigel next week. Right,

:08:52.:08:58.

it is time to answer your foodie questions. First on the line it is

:08:58.:09:03.

Rebecca from Durham. Rebecca, hello, how old are you?

:09:03.:09:11.

11! What is your question for us? How do you make the perfect

:09:11.:09:15.

chocolate fondant? Well, you basically make it similar to the

:09:15.:09:18.

souffle, so starting off with butter and chocolate in a bowl and

:09:18.:09:24.

warm it up over a pan of hot water. You add a little bit of corn flour,

:09:24.:09:29.

and fold in the egg whites. Put it in a mould. Lining the mould like

:09:29.:09:34.

Will did with the souffle with butter and sugar and bake it in the

:09:34.:09:38.

oven for eight to ten minutes. Then you can freeze them or put them in

:09:38.:09:44.

the fridge and cook from frozen, but butter the moulds really,

:09:44.:09:49.

really well, but cook them for exactly eight to ten minutes.

:09:49.:09:53.

Having said that, I will send you a recipe. So stay on the line. How is

:09:53.:10:00.

that for you? Thank you. What is that for, is that for your

:10:00.:10:07.

cookery badge? Yes, and I'm doing the Young Chef's award.

:10:07.:10:11.

Well done. What would you like to see at the

:10:11.:10:19.

end of the show for Jodie? Food heaven.

:10:19.:10:29.
:10:29.:10:30.

Tu! And Brian, what is your question for us.

:10:30.:10:33.

Thank you! What I have is courage ets.

:10:33.:10:39.

What can I do with them? I love courage ets.

:10:39.:10:45.

-- courage ets. I like them with a bit of flour and

:10:45.:10:51.

then fry them in some butter and omive oil. Or saute them with corn

:10:51.:11:00.

flour and they are beautiful cold or warm. You can cook them like a

:11:00.:11:02.

rosti. Or stuff them.

:11:03.:11:07.

And remember, keep the flowers. Everybody is getting rid of them.

:11:07.:11:15.

Keep them, a nice little batter, of vodka and tonneic.

:11:15.:11:21.

-- tonneic. They are fantastic with may nais.

:11:21.:11:28.

Tonnic. -- they are fantastic with mayon

:11:28.:11:37.

ace. Now, Toby? What would you like to

:11:37.:11:47.
:11:47.:11:48.

ask us? I have been fly-fishing. I have caught my first fresh

:11:48.:11:55.

rainbow trout. What would you do with it? Keep it whole. Stuff the

:11:55.:12:01.

belly with something, nice soft herbs, dill, chervil. Wrap it in

:12:01.:12:08.

tin foil or paper. A splash of white wine and pop it into an oven.

:12:08.:12:13.

At 10 degrees. For ten to is a minutes it steams inside the tin

:12:13.:12:18.

foil of the paper so it keep it is nice and moist. When you open it

:12:18.:12:22.

you get a lovely waft coming from the bag.

:12:22.:12:28.

I know that I like my butter, but literally, nut brown butter. A hot

:12:28.:12:34.

pan, butter, it starts to go brown and a squeeze of lemon Joyce over

:12:34.:12:38.

the top of fresh trout is delicious. What dish would you -- would you

:12:38.:12:46.

like to see at the end of the show, food heaven or fell if? -- or food

:12:46.:12:52.

hell? Food heaven. It is a whitewash! Right, it is

:12:52.:12:56.

that time of the show where the chefs battle it out to see how fast

:12:56.:13:04.

they can make a three-egg omelette. This is going to be tight today, I

:13:04.:13:08.

think? I know he is a Michelin- starred chef, so lead on.

:13:08.:13:14.

Let's get the clocks on the screens, please. Are you ready, a three-egg

:13:14.:13:19.

omelette cooked as fast as you can. Three, two, one, go! The cons

:13:19.:13:29.
:13:29.:13:30.

station you get! competitiveness! Oh, my God!

:13:30.:13:36.

Remember it must be an omelette it must be an omelette.

:13:36.:13:46.

Remember your mother, Will! Will, Will! Notice there is no round of

:13:46.:13:52.

applause for that one. Will, your mother may be here,

:13:52.:13:56.

mate... But.... You can disqualify that. I'm not proud of that

:13:56.:14:04.

What is your mother going to say! Silvena? Well, it's not bad.

:14:04.:14:10.

It's not bad?! It's not good, really. Come on. This is not bad. I

:14:10.:14:17.

work 18 hours a day now, it's not bad! Look, this is... Don't feel

:14:17.:14:24.

sorry for her James! I ain't pregnant, but I ain't eating either

:14:24.:14:29.

of them! So, will Jodie get her idea of food heaven or food hell?

:14:29.:14:34.

All of our guys have been going for food heaven, Dover sole. We will

:14:34.:14:40.

find out what Jodie is having after a classic film from the Keith Floyd

:14:40.:14:45.

archives. After last week's bat well a formidable French cook, he

:14:45.:14:55.
:14:55.:15:14.

has retired to a fancy hotel. He is stretching from the Mediterranean

:15:14.:15:21.

You usually see them from the plane- But these mountains profoundly

:15:21.:15:24.

as reflected in the highly-spiced cooking of these fiery people.

:15:24.:15:27.

These farmers aren't posing for picture postcards. They are essential to this region.

:15:27.:15:31.

The landscape is dotted with stacks- of fern, like crunchy walnut whips.

:15:31.:15:35.

Spanish influence abounds.

:15:35.:15:38.

The cooking is highly spiced, gutsy, and simple to cook.

:15:38.:15:43.

This place is like a morgue! Nobody here! Forty-eight tables, and not an order in the place.

:15:43.:15:52.

Well, it IS January.

:15:52.:15:55.

You know how we scrounge things, and inconvenience the "patrons".

:15:55.:16:00.

So they have the afternoon off, and I'll cook my own lunch.

:16:00.:16:05.

Basque people are proud about their red peppers - come down here,- Clive! - green peppers, and onions.

:16:05.:16:13.

In fact, those are the colours of Pays Basque.

:16:13.:16:18.

They're also proud of their jambon de Bayonne, which is an essential part of this chicken dish.

:16:18.:16:26.

Maize-fed, free-range chicken - just the legs, because that's economical. I've seasoned them.

:16:26.:16:33.

Some beautiful fresh tomatoes which I've peeled and crushed up.

:16:33.:16:38.

One thing we must have is their famous red pimento powder, which is a bit spicy.

:16:38.:16:45.

So I'll do a bit of chopping, a bit of cooking...

:16:45.:16:49.

a little glass of M Bonnet's special wine - it's his hotel that we're staying in.

:16:49.:16:54.

They say a day without wine is like- a day without you-know-what!

:16:54.:17:00.

The director says I haven't been doing enough chopping, so we'll put that to rights.

:17:00.:17:08.

We'll fry these onions in a moment,

:17:08.:17:11.

in some lovely lard.

:17:11.:17:15.

You don't use olive oil in the Pays Basque, or butter, or corn oil, as I've said before.

:17:15.:17:22.

You use goose fat, duck fat or pork fat. I have to chop these green peppers up.

:17:22.:17:29.

Show them, Clive! Come on! I'm doing my best to be jolly sporty on this January afternoon,

:17:29.:17:36.

dashing away with the sharp knife!

:17:36.:17:39.

People like to watch this, because they hope I'll cut my fingers, but I never do!

:17:39.:17:46.

Very elementary, very simple.

:17:46.:17:50.

Then we need some Bayonne ham, cut into tiny pieces. I'll explain where all these go in a minute.

:17:51.:17:59.

I'll chop those a bit finer, I think.

:17:59.:18:03.

Pleased with me so far? I'm quite enjoying myself. I've got the hotel to myself.

:18:03.:18:10.

About 800 rooms, and only the BBC crew staying in it - quite a turn-off for the owners!

:18:10.:18:17.

Bit of parsley. Lovely fresh thyme.- Look, I've made a rainbow!

:18:17.:18:23.

A little bit of pimento.

:18:23.:18:28.

Stay on that, Clive. Thank you. I'm going over to the stove, OK ?

:18:28.:18:38.
:18:38.:18:47.

I put chopped onions, little pieces- of jambon de Bayonne, which is ham from Bayonne - get it? OK ? -

:18:47.:18:52.

and some lovely, lovely lard.

:18:52.:18:56.

Next, I put in the seasoned leglets- of "poulet de mais" - chicken raised on corn.

:18:56.:19:04.

I hope there's a picture of those corn stores!

:19:05.:19:09.

That's why the chickens are yellow.

:19:09.:19:12.

Anyway, back to the pot!

:19:12.:19:15.

Let those take a nice golden colour- in this quite brisk heat. Turn them all over.

:19:15.:19:23.

Next, in go my red and green peppers.

:19:23.:19:28.

Stir those well in. Let them take the lard, and get well seasoned with the bits of ham.

:19:28.:19:37.

Now, if the director... Oh, I can manage.

:19:37.:19:41.

Into my little bit of parsley I've put that fierce, red pimento powder, OK ? And the garlic.

:19:41.:19:49.

Got it, Clive? So that goes in.

:19:49.:19:53.

It all takes the heat really well.

:19:53.:19:57.

Then, finally, these chopped tomatoes and all their juices.

:19:57.:20:03.

Stir it in like that.

:20:03.:20:07.

Give it a good...

:20:07.:20:11.

..a good shake, like that, and let it simmer.

:20:11.:20:16.

That'll take one hour, 20 minutes. I'm going for a stroll. See you in the dining-room.

:20:16.:20:23.

Bye, now!

:20:23.:20:27.

MUSIC: Ravel's "Bolero"

:20:27.:20:31.

BBC research shows that you find these pictures just as exhaus... as fascinating as I do.

:20:31.:20:39.

This was the birthplace of Ravel. It's said he hummed "Bolero" on his way down to St Jean de Luz

:20:39.:20:46.

for a plate of grilled sardines. Yum yum!

:20:46.:20:50.

Seriously, this former whaling port- is great in winter. Louis XIV got married here.

:20:50.:20:57.

Hemingway liked it, and I like Hemingway. "We had a good meal.

:20:57.:21:02.

"Roast chicken, new green beans, mashed potatoes, a salad, and apple pie and cheese."

:21:02.:21:09.

Sounds good! ALMOST as good as my brilliant Chicken Basquaise. Isn't that delicious!

:21:09.:21:17.

As you can see, it's down to me and Ernest at the moment,

:21:17.:21:22.

so I'll get on with my lonely supper.

:21:22.:21:26.

If any publishers are out there, I really want to be a novelist.

:21:26.:21:31.

Here's a piece I've just written.

:21:31.:21:35.

REVERENT VOICE: "The cold air cleared my head, and the snowy mountains looked fine.

:21:35.:21:42.

"Jake wanted a drink. I said no, we'd miss the dealing.

:21:42.:21:47.

"As we walked, the sun broke the ridge. The horsehair was going good, and men did business."

:21:47.:21:54.

Pulitzer Prize for me, I shouldn't be surprised!

:21:54.:21:59.

"Pablo was cooking Bayonne ham over charcoal.

:21:59.:22:04.

"I watched Clive taking mood shots of men discussing pelote with passion.

:22:04.:22:10.

"The women sold hard mountain cheeses on rough tables,

:22:10.:22:15.

"and stacked spiced sausages like gold bars.

:22:15.:22:19.

"Jake said it was time Clive won an award for his photography.

:22:19.:22:25.

"I went to buy a Gateau Basque." Filled with custard. It's good!

:22:25.:22:35.
:22:35.:22:37.

Yes,

:22:37.:22:38.

Yes, we

:22:38.:22:38.

Yes, we did

:22:38.:22:41.

Yes, we did like, that Keith. Classic stuff. It is time to find

:22:41.:22:46.

out if Jodie is facing food heaven or food hell. Everybody here has

:22:46.:22:52.

made their minds up, if it was not writing on the cards, already, food

:22:52.:22:57.

heaven could be this lovely piece of Dover sole, the king of all flat

:22:57.:23:00.

fish. With artichokes and chore eethow.

:23:00.:23:10.
:23:10.:23:18.

I love -- ch ritzo. Or there could be mackerel. What do

:23:18.:23:23.

you thing that this lot have decided? I really hope that they

:23:23.:23:29.

have gone author that -- for that 7-0. The mackerel is gone. So, I am

:23:29.:23:34.

going to take this fish, first of all. I have to prepare the fish. If

:23:34.:23:44.
:23:44.:23:46.

you guys can make me the gnocchi, Phil, if you Will? -- if you will?

:23:46.:23:55.

-- if you guys can make me the gnocchi, Will if you will?! With

:23:55.:24:01.

Dover sole, this is one of the world's most expensive fish, this

:24:01.:24:05.

one was �17. Wow! Mind you, we are in London.

:24:05.:24:11.

So, London prices and all of that. But it is quite expensive is Dover

:24:11.:24:14.

sole. So, remove the skirt. That is

:24:14.:24:16.

So, remove the skirt. That is called the skirt.

:24:17.:24:25.

Now, the skin if you go that way it is smooth, but like a cat's tongue

:24:25.:24:32.

if you go that way. So we have to remove this skin. We cut this at

:24:32.:24:37.

the back of the tail. That is why we keep this part of the tail on.

:24:37.:24:44.

So we remove that. Grab a cloth. This part of the skin not that

:24:44.:24:48.

tasty. For a whole Dover sole we are have to prepare it.

:24:48.:24:58.
:24:58.:24:59.

Oh, look at that. It reminds me of waxing my legs! For Lady Gaga, she

:24:59.:25:07.

has a handbag there! Remove that bit off as well and we can take the

:25:07.:25:09.

head off. Yes.

:25:09.:25:15.

Remove that head. So chop it through. A nice sharp

:25:15.:25:19.

knife and straight through. Is it difficult to fillet these or

:25:20.:25:26.

is it a time thing. It is easy to fillet.

:25:26.:25:32.

Mackerel is too. Now, salt, pepper, often you would

:25:32.:25:36.

not put flour on this, but it working really well.

:25:36.:25:41.

So get hot oil in the pan. As we are going to cook this whole. We

:25:41.:25:47.

place the whole fish in the flour. If you have it whole, you would

:25:47.:25:51.

cook it similar to what I am doing now. We start off with the oil

:25:51.:25:54.

first of all. Then you start cooking it with the butter and

:25:54.:25:59.

stuff. Sorry, I'm in the way. I'll point

:25:59.:26:09.
:26:09.:26:10.

it over here! What's that now? That is more oil? Just normal? Yes, you

:26:10.:26:20.

can use olive oil or rapeseed oil is very good. Seer it off, then are

:26:20.:26:25.

going to add a few nobs of butter. If we add the butter too early, it

:26:25.:26:28.

will burn. So add the oil and colour it a little bit.

:26:28.:26:33.

Then we add the butter. So the butter is going to give it a nice

:26:33.:26:40.

flavour while it is cooking, see? Hmm! Now, at that point, we just go

:26:40.:26:44.

round... Yes, the bump. So it is starting to brown now.

:26:44.:26:48.

So you get a nice colour and we flip it over.

:26:48.:26:51.

Lovely. That is what we are looking for.

:26:51.:26:55.

Now at this point, take the whole pan and straight in the oven. So

:26:55.:27:01.

with the butter, with everything else, it speeds up the cooking time.

:27:01.:27:05.

Don't transfer it on to a tray if you don't have to. That goes in

:27:05.:27:10.

there for five minutes. In the meantime we have the gnocchi. That

:27:10.:27:15.

is what Will is making it is baked potatoes. The skin is off. Put

:27:15.:27:25.
:27:25.:27:26.

through a ricer. You definitely need one of these it makes the best

:27:26.:27:33.

mashed potato. Is it lazy mashed potato No, we

:27:33.:27:43.
:27:43.:27:45.

have to do all the work! Then with the potato you need eggs and

:27:45.:27:51.

parsley. Now, the artichokes we are cooking that with this.

:27:51.:28:01.
:28:01.:28:03.

This is the choritzo. That goes in there. In the pan.

:28:03.:28:07.

So, the artichokes go in. A little bit of oil.

:28:07.:28:17.
:28:17.:28:17.

Yep. And we start them off. We take this

:28:17.:28:25.

Ibericochoritzo. So, quite chunky pieces? Yes, you

:28:25.:28:30.

want the flavour from that. There is no point in cutting this too

:28:30.:28:34.

small. This is fantastic stuff. You can find it here? Yes, right

:28:34.:28:38.

here. There are lots of Spanish suppliers now.

:28:38.:28:45.

Tomatoes... Score the tops of them and put them in boiling water.

:28:45.:28:50.

That's that. Straight in there. We are basically going to conkas the

:28:50.:28:57.

tomatoes, to remove the skin. -- concasse. You put them in

:28:57.:28:59.

boiling water for ten seconds, the skin starts to come off.

:29:00.:29:03.

So, in that pan we are going to add sherry.

:29:03.:29:09.

Stand back a bit. Sherry? A bit of sherry.

:29:09.:29:15.

Look at that! Some chicken stock, even though this is a fish dish we

:29:15.:29:19.

put a bit of chicken stock in there. Cook that down.

:29:19.:29:23.

Take the tomatoes out. See the skin coming off? Yes.

:29:24.:29:31.

Take them over to the guys here and they will concasse the tomatoes.

:29:31.:29:41.
:29:41.:29:41.

That is deseeding them? Yes, deskinned and deseeded and diced.

:29:41.:29:45.

There are the gnocchi. They are lovely.

:29:45.:29:50.

You can freeze the gnocchi. But they go straight in. You can

:29:50.:29:54.

flavour them with whatever you want, saffron or whatever you want.

:29:54.:29:58.

Straight in the boiling salted water. As soon as they come to the

:29:58.:30:04.

surface they are cooked. Now, if I can have my tomatoes

:30:04.:30:10.

carefully done as well. We turn that up now. The reason we

:30:10.:30:15.

put the lid on is to cook the artichokes. That is the key. If are

:30:15.:30:18.

preparing this, with the artichokes, they go brown.

:30:18.:30:23.

That's when they are ready? When they go brown? Well, no, if you

:30:23.:30:28.

leave them out, they oxidise like the apples. So once they are peeled

:30:28.:30:33.

they have a habit of oxidising. So see that, the gnocchi has come to

:30:33.:30:36.

the top? So quick. Grab a plate.

:30:36.:30:38.

That's it. Thank you very much.

:30:38.:30:43.

So, these can them come out. They are the little gnocchi.

:30:44.:30:48.

They look lovely. Now, this is cooking away.

:30:48.:30:52.

Artichokes don't take long to cook about four or five minutes. They

:30:52.:31:00.

have nice flavour from the sausage. Some double cream.

:31:00.:31:06.

Stop taking the mick of how I pronounce things. I mentioned what

:31:07.:31:14.

I said to the there are manager, you have put weight on, you've been

:31:14.:31:24.
:31:24.:31:25.

eating pork pies! So we have a little bit of chervil and chives.

:31:25.:31:31.

Now, the tomatoes in, the gnocchi in. You can almost have this as a

:31:31.:31:34.

dish on its own. This is good enough to eat as it is

:31:35.:31:37.

like that. It looks incredible.

:31:37.:31:43.

Salt, pepper. Our fish is out. That can go straight on our plate, will.

:31:43.:31:48.

This oil from the sausage is amazing.

:31:48.:31:55.

So, that is it. A nice hot oven is what you want

:31:55.:32:01.

for this. A touch of lemon juice on there. I will season it up for you.

:32:01.:32:04.

That is a monster of a fish. Beautiful.

:32:04.:32:08.

It is lovely, isn't it? Then you have this.

:32:08.:32:13.

And so quick. That is the key, well it is with

:32:13.:32:20.

three of us cooking! That would take me all day! It is, you can do

:32:20.:32:24.

this dish with any fish, it doesn't have to be Dover sole, but the idea

:32:24.:32:30.

if you have all of that with the herbs on the top, guys.

:32:30.:32:35.

Wow! That looks amazing. A nice and easy dish. Careful of

:32:35.:32:45.
:32:45.:32:46.

the bones in there. There you have it. My Dover sole with choritzo and

:32:46.:32:49.

artichokes. Dive into that. You have to see if that is food

:32:49.:32:54.

heaven. It looks like it is! Tell us what you reckon.

:32:54.:32:57.

Now, all of this waste from the artichokes, you can't do anything

:32:58.:33:02.

with it, but you get an amazing flavour from the artichokes.

:33:02.:33:07.

What would you do with the spare artichokes? You have to get rid of

:33:07.:33:14.

it. You can't really use it. Now, to go with this, Peter has chosen a

:33:14.:33:15.

Stork's Tower Tempranilllo Shiraz Rose 2009.

:33:15.:33:20.

Ignore the colour. It is fine. �4.99. I preferred this one to the

:33:20.:33:25.

one we had before. Dive into that. What do you reckon?

:33:25.:33:32.

The gnocchi is nice! Thank you very much! Delicious! Nice? Very, very

:33:32.:33:37.

delicious. What it is, it is the perfect pasta sauce as well.

:33:37.:33:41.

Thank you very much. Best of luck for September. That is all today on

:33:41.:33:46.

James Martin hosts the live cookery show, with guest chefs Will Holland and Silvena Rowe. There are classic moments from Nigel Slater, Rick Stein, Anjum Anand and Keith Floyd; and wine expert Peter Richards matches wine to all the studio dishes.


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