28/10/2017 Saturday Kitchen


28/10/2017

Matt Tebbutt is joined by chefs Marianna Leivaditaki and Peter Gordon and special guest Rebecca Front. Susie Barrie picks the wines to go with the studio dishes.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

Good morning. Welcome to your

Saturday serving of incredible food,

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outstanding chefs and amazing

guests. I'm Matt Tebbutt and this is

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Saturday Kitchen live.

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Welcome to the show. Now we've got a

very international line-up today.

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Marianna Leivaditaki, originally

from Crete, Peter Gordon who hails

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from New Zealand and Susie Barrie

from Winchester, our wine expert.

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Good morning. Winchester is very

nice.

It is.

Not too exotic but a

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lovely part of the world.

Yes.

Marianna lovely to see you here,

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your first time here?

Yes.

Greek

influences coming in from you today?

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Yes, absolutely, lots of stuff from

Crete.

And a nice red mullet dish?

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Yes, with rosemary and vinegar and a

mixed cabbage salad.

Very simple but

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lovely ingredients. Peter, nice to

see you.

And you too.

Haven't seen

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you for a long time. New Zealand?

Yes.

So good father of fusion food?

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Yes.

What have you got for us?

It's

a bit fusion thing, a pumpkin

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Coca-Cola curry and a cabbage

mustard salad.

-- pumpkin coconut

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curry. A bit worried about the

pumpkin. Susie lots of nice

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flavours?

I'm looking at the food

and thinking it's colourful. I have

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different colour wines but I'm not

sure I can match that. But we have a

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red specially matched for you.

All

expensive?

Good value wines.

A range

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of prices. We have been digging

around in the food archives to

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unearth some delicious treats from

Keith Floyd, Rick Stein, Nigella

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Lawson and the Hairy Bikers. Now,

someone who has appeared in some of

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my favourite programmes, I'm

delighted to welcome the fantastic

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Rebecca Front. I have to say,

usually on a Friday night, I go back

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to the hotel room and I'm in bed by

9, I don't drink or eat, I'm like a

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monk. Last night, I was up very

late.

We are already in the zone of

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too much information. Where is this

going?

This is about Alan partridge

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isn't it? ! My komono, in fact...

Sorry!

I was at home last night on

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my own...

I was watching old rear

ends of those old shows and they're

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just brilliant.

My shows - that's OK

then. So you were in your hotel room

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watching me. That's OK.

The Thick of

it, Alan partridge, almost timeless

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that humour I think?

Yes, I think

so. I tend to gravitate towards

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stuff that's quite cutting edge so I

think they last longer because

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they're fresher and a bit more

quirky.

Yes. You are here to face

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food heaven and food hell. Just so

we don't start a Twitter storm on

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social media, you

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are a pescatarian?

Yes, I come from

a family that would traditionally

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eat kosher food. Now that I eat

fish, I try to stick with kosher

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fish so that's my kind of rule. I

eat cheese and milk, things like

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that, now I eat kosher fish.

You

when you go to restaurants slip into

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the vegetarian mode?

Yes, sometimes

you don't know what stock they're

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using and things like that so

sometimes it's easier to say I'm

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vegetarian, but at dinner parties as

well. You don't want to start asking

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people to Cheshire out what is

kosher. I just say I'm a vegetarian

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but I'm not properly.

What is your

idea of food heaven?

Olives,

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anything with olives. It's my

favourite snack.

Very healthy?

My

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son is called Oliver.

You have taken

it to another level.

Yes. They are

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healthy.

Very healthy.

They are very

dehydrating because they're salty

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but they are amazing. And now lots

of fish, now that I do eat fish,

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tuna, I love that.

What about hell?

Well, because it's such a peculiar

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dietary Leys that I can inhabit, I

generally like anything. I've learnt

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not to be too picky. There are

certain things that come up too

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often on vegetarian menus so I

suppose I would say goat's cheese.

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It's the fail-safe?

It is, you open

a menu and you go it's goat's cheese

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parcel again, you know.

Parcel?

Yes.

Filo parcel.

It's like the 80s, a

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parcel.

It's all a bit like that,

yes.

Peter, you do some very good

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vegetarian food?

I do. Veggie food

is great because it's a challenge,

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you have to find ways to give it

flavour and texture, all that sort

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of stuff. It's a challenge.

For Rebecca's food heaven, olive and

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spelt broth with tuna. I'm going to

cook the spelt with olives, parsley

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and sautee some tuna. Broccoli will

be add. Scattering over some

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deep-fried garlic, shallots and

chillies and finish with a vegetable

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broth and delicious olive-stuffed

leaves.

Sounds amazing.

Hell is

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goat's cheese and egg yolk ravioli.

So almost like a parcel. Rav youly

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using goat's cheese. I'm going to

serve it with a cream, smoked

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paprika glazed carrots and

watercress. Garnished. -- ravioli.

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The power to decide what Rebecca

eats is yours. The vote is open now.

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Go to the website before 11 and get

voting. We want your food and drink

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questions, you can ask our experts

anything you like.

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Obviously you can get in touch by

social media as well.

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Susie, you are going to read out

some tweets throughout the show?

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Yes, indeed, head of tweets.

Feel

free to chuck in some questions.

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Thank you, I will, here to learn.

Heckle if you like. Let's get

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cooking. Marianna.

Hello.

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Heckle if you like. Let's get

cooking. Marianna.

Hello.

How are

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you?

Very good.

A straightforward

dish?

Yes, pan frying the red

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mullet, dusting it in flour, I would

like you to help me with the salad

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if that is OK.

What is the name of

the dish?

It's called Savore, so

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frying fish with rosemary and

vinegar and you can use whatever

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fish you like. When I was little, we

used eels.

Wow, OK.

We couldn't sell

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those in the market.

Your dad was a

fisherman?

Yes, he was.

This crazy

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contraption you have got here, I've

never seen this as a fish scaler.

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I've only seen this. We used to have

a restaurant in Crete and this is

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the only thing we use to clean fish.

You have to be a little careful if

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you are in a hurry.

Looks vicious.

Yes.

Be right back, I'm just going

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to wash.

Zblur the head chef at the sister

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restaurant?

The new place in Hackney

Road.

How long have you been there?

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I have been there for a

year-and-a-half now.

Hackney's very

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cool isn't it? All the cool kids

live there. You live there, don't

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you?

Yes.

The Hackney massive. There

is a lot of good restaurants?

There

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are lots of places opening up and

it's amazing because sometimes

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people go, oh, you know, you've got

so many people interested in the

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area and it's like, yes, the more

the mayorier, you know, like it's

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really good.

It encourages people to

get there?

Yes.

You started live as

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a waitress, is that right?

I did,

yes.

How long were you a waitress

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for?

Three or four months. I used to

go to Marrow as a student when I was

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studying in Kent at the University

of Canterbury.

You were studying

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forensic psychology?

Yes, I did

psychology then forensic psychology.

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That's quite a departure into

restaurants?

Yes, but I was brought

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up in a restaurant so all my life,

all my childhood was there. I loved

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food. So yes, I kind of returned to

it. It was a passion.

Yes.

So Morrow

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when I was a student was my

favourite restaurant. I used to save

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all my tips and go for a meal maybe

once every two months. That's where

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I knocked first time and said I want

a job.

Yes. And they were quite

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open?

Well they asked me what I can

do and I didn't have any kitchen

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experience so I said, anything

really. They were like, can you do

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the floor, I said yes. So...

It's

amazing that you go in as a

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waitress, you can work your way up

to head chef and now you've got your

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own restaurant.

Yes. I look after it

as if it's my own and it's amazing.

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It's been such a great journey.

Yes.

My bosses are wonderful, we trust

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each other.

They are legends in the

London and world food scene?

They've

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taught me a lot.

Is this a sort of

dish that you would do?

I would

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definitely do it. I really love

using fresh fish and really try and

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give people the opportunity to have

fresh fish because it's not the

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easiest thing.

A lot of olive oil in

there so you almost shallow fry?

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Yes, but there's quite a lot. This

is really good extra virgin stuff.

A

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hefty coating. You want that crispy?

Yes. In Greece that would never be a

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problem because everyone's got

tonnes of olive oil. So you would

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never think you deep fry potatoes in

olive oil there, you know, that

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would never be a problem. I've

turned the fish to get a nice golden

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colour. I'm going to add a handful

of chopped tomatoes.

OK. Olive oil,

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tomatoes. Bit of rosemary?

And right

at the end, we'll put a splash of

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vinegar.

I'm using the same vinegar,

you are using Muscatel vinegar?

Yes.

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What is that bringing to the dish?

It's acidic and sweet at the same

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time. So it does exactly that. It

kind of, it's not just really harsh

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on the palate but together with the

kind of nice flavour that comes from

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the rosemary and those aromas,

there' acidy of tomatoes, the

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sweetness of the vinegar, you get

this emulsion that goes on top of

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the fish and it's just delicious.

I can't describe it.

It's delicious

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because I tried it in rehearsal.

Call us if you want to get in touch.

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A lot of your dishes in the

restaurant, you send off for

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ingredients to Greece for, don't

you?

Well, there are lots of Greek

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people in London. There are lots of

people that are really interested in

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bringing things as well. So there

are quite a few companies who help

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do that. But I try and bring very

kind of particular things like

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goat's cheese.

Yes.

Maybe you

haven't tried nice goat's cheese.

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Maybe that's what it is.

Honey which

is, there is lots of beautiful

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honeys around the world but I was

brought up with a certain honey and

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I love it.

A lot of the recipes are the dishes

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that you eat and they'll be kind of

determined by the key ingredients?

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Well, yes, I use things from Crete

and then I always follow what we do,

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the kind of Middle Eastern cuisine,

but everything is so interlinked and

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there's ideas from one place, then

you can apply and use your

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ingredients to change it a little

bit.

I loved what you told me

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yesterday when we were chatting -

when you arrived in London you

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weren't using chopping boards

because everything was done by hand

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standing up?

It was. In my family

restaurant where we grew up

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basically in the kitchen, we didn't

have even one... We had one chopping

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board used to slice bread, you know.

So everything was chopped by old

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ladies Wark working in the kitchen

by hand. So it was nothing like

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this.

This new fangled technology we

have!

I love it now, I can't say I

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don't. I didn't know people can

spend hundreds of pounds buying

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kniveles.

Tell us about this because

I can't stop eating this in

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rehearsal. So sweet.

They are

seedless grapes. They are kind of

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very much used as table grapes

really. They can be used for wine,

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they are usually dried. They are

little tiny and sweet grapes without

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seeds.

Delicious. Would you like a

pile of this?

A pile of that. So you

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want to make sure that salad is

really kind of sour and punchy and

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has enough salt.

And enough sugar. It's like you are

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doing a pickle but it's an instant

one so you really want to have that.

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Is that any sauce?

No, it has got

its own sauce.

Remind us what that

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is called?

It is red pullet with

pickled cabbage salad. Beautiful. It

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looks amazing.

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Let's go and see what Rebecca

thinks. Do you like red mullet? I

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do. That looks amazing. The salad

looks great too.

Please, don't wait

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for us.

I like the idea of vinegar.

Sweet-sour, but without using the

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sugar. The sweetness of that

vinegar.

I think that the red mullet

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is part of it. It is quite oily.

It's rich. It's sweet and it is

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fresh. If you eat it like a vinegary

sauce.

That's so delicious.

Is that

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your kind of thing?

That's really

lovely because the vinegar brings

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out the flavour of the fish.

Do you

like straightforward Mediterranean

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food?

I kind of just like food! I

can save you a lot of time here. I

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just like food.

What are we

drinking?

I have a win from Saint

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Mont and it is a blend of local

grape varieties and it is from the

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2015 vintage. You can get it for £9

from M&S. Loved it because it has

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refreshing zesty, lemony, zesty

acidity which you need when you have

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got fish like this and underlying

that is that lovely, ripe yellow

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fruit.

That's delicious.

Do you like

that?

I do.

Excellent. Excellent. It

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will wake up on a Saturday morning.

Just what we wanted at 10.20am.

Wz'

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oning about the grapes and add

sweetness. We were talking about the

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fact that the wine has some richness

as well that you need and it's just

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a lovely wine.

How is that

combination, Peter?

It is crisp and

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fresh. There is almost like an

oiliness on the wine.

Exactly.

It is

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crisply clear and I love the fact

that it is going with Rosemary which

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is unusual to have with fish,

Rosemary and fish.

All good.

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Gelicious.

Peter, you're cooking. I

like your glasses.

I'm having to

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wear them all the time.

I'm not

there yet. What are you cooking for

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us later?

It is a pumpkin coconut

curry and there is some venison and

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it is a nice seasonal dish.

I look

forward to that. Don't forget if you

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want to ask us a food or drink

related question or anything else

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really, call this number:

Lines close at 11am today. So get

0:18:060:18:13

dialling now! Or you could tweet us

your questions using the hashtag

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Saturday Kitchen and don't forget to

vote for Rebecca's food heaven or

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food hell. Let's join Rick Stein and

he is having a whale of a time in

0:18:220:18:27

Iceland. Take a look.

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It would be impossible to overstate

the importance of fish here. So much

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so there is a tribute to cod bang in

the middle of the harbour. It's

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actually a monument to the salting

and drying of cod and up there is a

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traditional cod drying shed and I

just think it just sort of fits into

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the landscape. So, I'm actually very

fond of it, but not fond of the

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prospect of having to come down now

because it's very icy and I don't

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want to slip and I suffer from

vertigo a little!

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Do I look high up by the way?

OK.

0:19:120:19:18

It's all about the fish. Nothing but

the fish. So I'm cooking a

0:19:180:19:33

simple cod gratin with bernais

sauce. So many of my fish dishes

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start like this. Softening veg like

carrot, leek and onion. It always

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makes a lovely base to many a fish

dish and many a fish pie. In Iceland

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they use whey at this stage which

gives the fish pie a nice tartness.

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Frankly, I sort of prefer white wine

for cooking and for drinking!

0:20:030:20:14

A lovely piece of cod. I'm going to

cut it into chunks. In goes my cod.

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Just add a bit of flour, it will

tighten everything up. Into the

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dish.

Look at that. It's so wholesome.

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To make the bearnaise sauce, we

create a reduction. Now peppercorns.

0:20:450:20:52

A bay leaf and some tarragon. Bring

that to the boil and leave it to

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simmer for ten minutes which I'm

going to stir into my beaten eggs

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and butter more my bearnaise sauce.

I'm using some hot water to cook the

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egg yolks so it will get more

volumous, I have to be careful

0:21:130:21:17

because if you carry on it too far,

it will split and you will lose your

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volume and bearna circumstances se.

The vinegar is simmered to a trickle

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and I want every drain. Push that

down a little bit. Next, butter, of

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course, to help the sauce thicken

and finally tarragon, the

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distinctive flavour of bearnaise. I

love this. It smells fantastic. In

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Iceland, they bake it. It is an

unusual thing to do with bearnaise,

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but it works. Just pop that in the

oven. Not too long, about 20, 20 #2

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5 minutes. -- 20, 25 minutes. And

that's it, one Icelandic inspired

0:22:040:22:12

cod gratin.

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The great thing about Iceland is

everyone knows everyone and word has

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got around that I'm here and the

mayor has invited me over for guess

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what? Waffles. What other capital

city in the world would the mayor

0:22:320:22:37

invite you in, sit down and have a

chat. It's that sort of place,

0:22:370:22:42

Iceland. I happen to know there is a

Facebook page dedicated to the

0:22:420:22:47

mayor's hair. Yes, his hair! Only in

Iceland. Just getting his mixer

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ready. Very nice to meet you. Now I

see why. He has actually got very

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nice hair. What a lovely house.

Thank you. Welcome.

Thank you. I was

0:23:030:23:08

just saying it is a great privilege

to be invited by the mayor in to

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some waffles. So you do this once a

year then?

Yes. It has become a

0:23:140:23:21

habit that on Cultural Night which

is the anniversary anniversary, we

0:23:210:23:29

have this big festival. One of the

neighbours this the idea of opening

0:23:290:23:32

up their house and making waffles

and coffee, traditionalise landic.

0:23:320:23:38

So we decided to take part, maybe

ten years ago. And so, now every

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year we have maybe around 1200

people write their names...

1200?

In

0:23:450:23:52

our guest book.

Come through here?

Yeah.

That's a lot of waffles.

A

0:23:520:23:57

natural queue that forms.

Does

anybody talk politics to you?

I

0:23:570:24:00

guess if I would have an open house

to talk politics, I wouldn't get

0:24:000:24:04

1200 people!

LAUGHTER

0:24:040:24:06

No, I doubt you would. And yes, I

did ask, he does use more than one

0:24:060:24:13

waffle iron for 1200 guests! Seven

if you're taking notes!

This is by

0:24:130:24:18

no means a complex thing.

OK.

But

this is rhubarb jam. It's good

0:24:180:24:23

because you have some sour with the

sweet, cream.

Yes.

And then

0:24:230:24:28

something crunchy and you don't need

more. You can live off these.

0:24:280:24:34

Thanks. Exemplary waffles! I like

your rhubarb jam. Delicious. Does

0:24:340:24:49

each of your 1200 people get one of

these?

Yes.

They are very lucky.

0:24:490:24:58

Thank you for that Rick. We saw him

making his delicious looking fish

0:25:000:25:06

stew with bearnaise. You are a fan

of hal but. I'm going to do a little

0:25:060:25:12

halibut dish using bearnaise, but

I'm going to use Jerusalem

0:25:120:25:17

artichokes andical which is in

season. All I'm going to do is poach

0:25:170:25:22

the halibut in here, in this

poaching liquor, I have got wine,

0:25:220:25:27

white wine vinegar and lemon zest,

bay lef, tarragon and coriander

0:25:270:25:33

seeds and star anise. You could just

poach in water if you like. It is

0:25:330:25:37

just there to give it a bit of kick.

0:25:370:25:41

Star anise is very good for avoiding

flu, isn't it?

I don't know.

It's

0:25:430:25:49

probably rubbish.

Do you know,

Peter?

What I do know about star

0:25:490:25:56

anise before you visit the courts in

ancient times you would like a lef

0:25:560:26:01

off the star anise tree and it would

freshen your breath. I suspect it

0:26:010:26:07

has got a good antibiotic.

Congratulations on your new drama.

0:26:070:26:18

Tell us the premise?

It is written

by Kay Mellor. That's a badge of

0:26:180:26:25

distinction. Yeah, I think Kay

decided to write it because she'd

0:26:250:26:31

visited registrar offices to sort

of, you know, register family

0:26:310:26:36

bereavements and births and all

human life is there. So when you go

0:26:360:26:40

to these places, there are people

with brand-new babies and then there

0:26:400:26:43

are people who are in mourning and

the whole brand-new, the label still

0:26:430:26:47

on! So it's all happening there in

front of your eyes. It's a great

0:26:470:26:53

forum for a drama. So in the drama

Ashley Jenson plays this maverick

0:26:530:26:59

registrar who doesn't necessarily

play by the rules because she's

0:26:590:27:02

trying to just do the best thing by

the people who come in and need her

0:27:020:27:06

help and I play this not at all

maverick registrar who plays

0:27:060:27:11

everything by the rules.

Up tight...

She is really kind of, she is a rule

0:27:110:27:17

obeyer, but taken to the the enth

degree.

Is it a straight role. You

0:27:170:27:22

do a lot of straight roles?

I try

and do 50/50 drama and comedy. It is

0:27:220:27:30

a dramatic role, it did get laughs

at a recent screening. Well they all

0:27:300:27:38

seemed happy. There are lots of

jokes in the script. Kay is very

0:27:380:27:41

funny. So Kay was very happy with it

getting laughs. I was thinking, "Oh.

0:27:410:27:47

I didn't think I was playing that

bit for laughs." But she is an

0:27:470:27:53

unsympathetic character and that's

why she is unintentionally funny.

0:27:530:27:57

Did you do any search? Did you go to

the a registrary office?

Yes, in

0:27:570:28:02

Leeds. The whole thing is set in

Leeds and I'm doing a Leeds accent

0:28:020:28:06

which I hope I've done OK. So yeah,

we went to the registrar office in

0:28:060:28:12

Leeds and we met registrars who were

great and lovely and that was

0:28:120:28:16

interesting and I secretly recorded

some accents.

Really? How is your

0:28:160:28:21

Leeds accent?

I'm not going to do it

now because I haven't got my tape

0:28:210:28:24

with me. I hope it's OK, I tried to

do it as authentically as possible,

0:28:240:28:28

but I don't know.

OK, so while we

were chatting here is the raw

0:28:280:28:34

artichokes, Jerusalem artichokes,

the fish is poaching and turn that

0:28:340:28:36

over in a little bit and this is on

a really, really low heat. This is

0:28:360:28:40

the base of the bearnaise. That's my

white wine, white wine vinegar and

0:28:400:28:46

shallots and tarragon in there

reducing. Here shallots, garlic and

0:28:460:28:50

a few crushed hazelnuts, the ones

that haven't fall on the floor!

0:28:500:28:56

Right, that's so far. You come from

a very creative household, you had a

0:28:560:29:02

lot of family members, your

great-grandfather was in musical

0:29:020:29:05

theatre?

Yes, he was in a musical

act. So he was just kind of

0:29:050:29:10

naturally gifted at music and

songwriting and so on. My mum

0:29:100:29:15

writes. Used to write children's

books. My dad is an artist and

0:29:150:29:19

illustrator and my brother is a

writer, script writer. So yeah, it

0:29:190:29:23

is that sort of house.

You went to

Oxford and joined the Oxford Review,

0:29:230:29:29

I believe you were the president?

I

think I was the first female

0:29:290:29:32

president. I believe. That's what I

was always told anyway. Maybe the

0:29:320:29:35

others were keeping it under their

hats.

You met a lot of your

0:29:350:29:40

contemporaries who you have gone on

to work with?

Yeah, Patrick I knew

0:29:400:29:45

very well, we were in the Review

together. I didn't really know

0:29:450:29:49

Amanda and David Schneider

particularly. We met a couple of

0:29:490:29:53

times at Oxford, but our paths

didn't cross much. Do you mind, I'm

0:29:530:29:56

talking...

Sorry.

0:29:560:30:05

We ended up working together which

is nice.

You got a Bafta for the

0:30:050:30:11

Thick Of It.

Thank you for

mentioning that.

That's all right.

0:30:110:30:14

You got a Bafta arm or elbow?

They

are really heavy. I was carrying it

0:30:140:30:23

round, clutching it. The next

morning my arm had gone dead and I

0:30:230:30:27

thought, that's it, I've won the

Bafta, now I've had the stroke.

Now

0:30:270:30:31

I'm going to die?

Yes.

It can't get

any better.

It was an awful kind of

0:30:310:30:37

poetic justice thing, you know, I

trapped a nerve in my arm with this

0:30:370:30:41

big metal thing.

Do you enjoy doing

those sorts of comedy shows?

Yes.

0:30:410:30:47

They are like you said earlier very

cutting edge?

I like quirky comedy,

0:30:470:30:53

dark comedy. So yes, I do. I love

doing drama. I set out to be a

0:30:530:31:00

straight actor really. Then I kind

of drifted into comedy. So for me, I

0:31:000:31:06

just love having that balance. On an

average year if I can get to do 50%

0:31:060:31:12

comedy and 50% drama, I'm really

happy.

Sorry, I've just sauteed

0:31:120:31:17

that. This is my clarified butter.

Going into the eggs there.

Is a

0:31:170:31:26

bernaise tough to do?

On live TV,

yeah. God knows what I was thinking.

0:31:260:31:34

No, it's not that difficult

actually, you just need to be quite

0:31:340:31:38

clever with it, he says as he splits

it. It's much easier to do it like

0:31:380:31:45

Rick did it, over a bowl.

I've never

successfully made mayonnaise but

0:31:450:31:50

it's because I'm impatient. I bash

things around when cooking. You are

0:31:500:31:54

doing that delicate.

That's the fun

isn't it?

Bashing things around?

Yes

0:31:540:31:59

and getting involved. You can't get

too kind of Princesse about cooking.

0:31:590:32:05

True.

Some of the other roles - I said I

0:32:050:32:12

was watching you with Steve Coogan

and Alan partridge. When you look at

0:32:120:32:17

some of the comedy you see on TV, do

you think a lot of commissioners are

0:32:170:32:24

quite scared of taking risks?

It's

really difficult I think to take

0:32:240:32:29

risks with comedy because it's

incredibly subjective. It's very

0:32:290:32:34

interesting, because I'm on Twitter,

when you are in a comedy thing and

0:32:340:32:39

look on Twitter after wards and it's

always split. Some people are saying

0:32:390:32:43

this is absolute rubbish, the worst

thing it's not even a funny, not a

0:32:430:32:47

single joke and people saying this

is the funniest thing. People don't

0:32:470:32:51

really do that with drama, people

say it's quite good, I was gripped

0:32:510:32:57

or whatever but there's something

about comedy, people feel like they

0:32:570:33:00

own it so therefore love or hate it.

You do a lot. Sometimes it takes

0:33:000:33:08

years for people to pick up on the

shows and as soon as they go on,

0:33:080:33:14

people go, this is amazing.

Yes.

It

just seems that it's quite

0:33:140:33:21

difficult, that cutting edge comedy?

It is. Because often it doesn't

0:33:210:33:25

translate on paper, so you look at a

script. Now I'm so used to reading

0:33:250:33:30

comedy scripts, I think I can tell

how it's going to work. But quite

0:33:300:33:34

often you can't really. You look at

something and think, well I think

0:33:340:33:37

that's funny but I don't know.

Someone like Julia, she writes jokes

0:33:370:33:42

but a lot of the comedy comes from

the characterisations and situations

0:33:420:33:45

and the darkness of that.

Yes.

When

you know all-ya's work, you look at

0:33:450:33:50

something on paper and think, I know

how she's going to do that and it's

0:33:500:33:53

going to be hilarious.

Yes.

But you

can't always tell just by looking at

0:33:530:33:58

it on paper because it's not a

standard set-up joke, it's quirkier

0:33:580:34:04

and weirder than that. What she does

with it is brilliant.

So when you

0:34:040:34:10

get a director or writer involved

and you see their credentials, she

0:34:100:34:15

goes yes, I want to do that?

I

always go on scripts really, I would

0:34:150:34:20

never just say yes regardless

because you never know, somebody

0:34:200:34:23

could be having a bad day.

I always go on script. But you can

0:34:230:34:28

tell a lot from reading the script.

I've been doing that for a long

0:34:280:34:32

time. So I know what I'm looking

for.

Just going to give this

0:34:320:34:38

berrnaise a glaze. Sauteed off the

artichokes and the kale. That's the

0:34:380:34:52

garnish that, 's the bernaise and we

need the fish on top.

Looks

0:34:520:34:59

absolutely beautiful.

Just poached.

Blowtorch it for a little bit of

0:34:590:35:04

theatre really. You don't need to do

that.

It's quite butch isn't it.

0:35:040:35:08

That is what I was thinking.

It's a

good look for you.

OK, let us have

0:35:080:35:14

the fish which is just poached. A

few more of the hazelnuts and

0:35:140:35:22

shallots for texture and that's it.

Tuck in.

That looks so lovely.

0:35:220:35:27

Right, here I go.

Are you going to say something while

0:35:270:35:35

I eat this or watch while I shove it

in my gob.

As soon as you've got it

0:35:350:35:40

in your mouth, I'm going to ask you

a question.

Now you are all going to

0:35:400:35:45

see how I eat.

I love halibut.

I do

actually, it's one of my favourites

0:35:450:35:52

and Jerusalem artichokes are

wonderful.

They might have a bite to

0:35:520:35:55

them. So what will I be making

Rebecca at the end of the show? Her

0:35:550:36:02

food heaven, olives? If so, it will

be olive and spelt broth with tuna.

0:36:020:36:10

I'll add broccoli and scatter over

deep-fried shallots and chillies and

0:36:100:36:18

finish with olive stuffed sage

leaves. Hell is goat's cheese,

0:36:180:36:31

ravioli, potato, thyme, spoked

paprika glazed carrots. What she

0:36:310:36:35

gets is down to you, 25 minutes left

to vote. Go to the website right now

0:36:350:36:41

and we'll find out the results at

the end of the show. All good?

0:36:410:36:45

Wonderful. The tarragon just makes

it so lovely.

Classic. Now time for

0:36:450:36:53

the Keith Floyd, he's riding high

over Alsas while sampling all the

0:36:530:36:57

local wine. Take a look.

0:36:570:37:00

over Alsas while sampling all the

local wine. Take a look.

0:37:000:37:08

Here we go again. Here is the

production assistant looking very

0:37:110:37:15

anxious. Despite being invaded three

times this is a resilient place, it

0:37:150:37:24

exudes a genuine joy devivre.

0:37:240:37:39

Their cakes are so good. A Hungarian

countess once told me the only place

0:37:400:37:46

to enjoy cakes is in Vienna, but

there is the painstaking care of

0:37:460:37:51

family businesses who employ a

couple of young apprentices very

0:37:510:37:53

proud to learn and maintain the fine

tradition of master cake-making.

0:37:530:37:59

They make exceedingly good cakes and

croissants, of course.

0:37:590:38:02

This is what happens when you let

your emotions rule your mind. I'm a

0:38:190:38:23

fool to myself. My relationship with

the director is based on trust and

0:38:230:38:28

understanding, I don't trust him and

he doesn't understand me. He knows I

0:38:280:38:31

hate fly, no head for heights but

somehow he persuaded me to take a

0:38:310:38:37

flight, just for a few good shots.

The crew were protesting I was

0:38:370:38:42

yellow.

0:38:420:38:46

Don't like being in this balloon. It

looks great on TV, lovely sunshine

0:39:020:39:09

day, Alpine scenery, drifting over

the mountains. Here we are 3,000

0:39:090:39:15

feet up and nothing on the clock but

the maker's name. I have wine to

0:39:150:39:21

cheer me up. This is Floyd on France

absolute hi terrified... He said it

0:39:210:39:29

was simply a question of mind over

matter, he didn't mind and I didn't

0:39:290:39:33

matter. We are out of gas and we

crash-landed in the road.

0:39:330:39:39

Andre, my mad pilot, managed to save

a little gas for essential

0:39:430:39:47

requirements.

0:39:470:39:48

a little gas for essential

requirements.

Of course it's the old

0:39:480:39:56

tradition since 1783.

0:39:560:39:59

Since this year, whenever there is a

new flight, people who fly the first

0:40:030:40:07

time in balloon, they have to drink

champagne.

Didn't save the gas, you

0:40:070:40:16

used it to cool down the champagne?

Yes, sure.

0:40:160:40:19

used it to cool down the champagne?

Yes, sure. We should have Had the

0:40:190:40:22

gas used for something else. OK.

Brilliant.

0:40:220:40:28

And then there is another tradition.

But I guess we'll just have to take

0:40:320:40:39

care of the technical point of view.

This is the other tradition!

My

0:40:390:40:49

rendezvous was a remote farmhouse

where they rely purely on the sale

0:40:490:40:53

of their cheeses. The rest of the

journey was on foot while Andre

0:40:530:40:59

shared his funny stories with me. It

turned out he was a distant relation

0:40:590:41:03

to another of the valley's favourite

sons, Albert Scweizeer who once

0:41:030:41:11

said, you will never get me up in a

balloon, John.

0:41:110:41:18

Very witty. Anyway, the set cheeses

are salted, stored and turned daily

0:41:490:41:55

for up to three weeks. It's a strong

tangy cheese with a pungent smell

0:41:550:42:00

but it's quite delicious.

It's first

of all cheese, but this cheese is

0:42:000:42:06

not riped at all and it's still a

sweet cheese. So it's served with

0:42:060:42:13

some cream and so there is the what

we call in France the small milk,

0:42:130:42:21

it's what drops...

The whey I think

we call it.

And so you pour that on

0:42:210:42:29

the cheese here and this is very

good. I mean you have goose liver or

0:42:290:42:39

champagne, something very renowned

from France, but this one should be

0:42:390:42:43

very well-known. It's very good.

Would you have sugar with this?

You

0:42:430:42:49

take some sugar with this, I guess

there's already some on it, but it's

0:42:490:42:54

very, very fine. So all the

gastronomy in the farms was

0:42:540:43:03

originally...

Beautiful.

So that

people could study all the summer

0:43:030:43:08

long on the mountain and they didn't

need anything, they just took some

0:43:080:43:12

sugar with them.

0:43:120:43:13

Thank you, Keith. Not an obvious

combination of flavours there, but

0:43:190:43:24

they seemed to enjoy it. Nigella

Lawson shows us a delicious recipe

0:43:240:43:31

with chicken later. Chilli flakes

and garlic roasted and served in a

0:43:310:43:39

wrap with yoghurt, htahini and

pomegranate seeds. Instead of

0:43:390:43:42

omelettes, we are doing a Halloween

challenge. We have still got the

0:43:420:43:47

puns though. Which chef will come

out alive, will they have a ghost of

0:43:470:44:04

a chance or will the omelette

challenge come back to haunt them.

0:44:040:44:09

Will they have a trick or a treat?

Will Rebecca get her food heaven

0:44:090:44:14

olives or food hell goat's cheese.

Still chance for you to vote on the

0:44:140:44:19

website. Enough from me, let's get

on with cooking.

0:44:190:44:27

Good to see you back. What are we

making?

Some venison cooked nice and

0:44:270:44:35

rare and pumpkin coconut-curried and

a salad. Two salads today.

That's

0:44:350:44:39

OK.

Shred this as thin as you can

and we will mix with vinegar and

0:44:390:44:45

mustard and sugar. The venison is at

room temperature and it's going to

0:44:450:44:50

go into a hot pan with sesame oil.

This is typical of your kind of

0:44:500:44:56

cooking, isn't it? Fusion, do you

like the term fusion?

It has been

0:44:560:45:02

mistreated. I sort of, I did like it

and then I didn't like it because I

0:45:020:45:08

was reading various other chefs

actually who would say things like

0:45:080:45:13

"Oh, it is confusion, not fusion." I

found that really annoying, but I've

0:45:130:45:18

struggled to find a term that makes

sense to me and I think fusion, it

0:45:180:45:22

sounds laboratory really, doesn't

it?

It's a bit like the term

0:45:220:45:27

gastropub. It has been misused.

I

remember someone said, "It is modern

0:45:270:45:34

British." Someone said, "It's hardly

British." No, it is not really

0:45:340:45:38

British. Is it Pacific rim because I

use flavours around the world and

0:45:380:45:45

not just the Pacific.

You can't be

boxed.

It is not that important.

0:45:450:45:49

Fusion works. It does describe if

you can get over the sort of

0:45:490:45:56

negative connotations sometimes. In

here I have got cumin curry seeds

0:45:560:46:00

and pumpkin and salt and pepper and

I'm going to roast this. I'm going

0:46:000:46:04

to make a pumpkin curry, but I want

it to have the beautiful flavour of

0:46:040:46:08

roast pumpkin.

So you're not peeling

it?

No, skin on.

And that will be

0:46:080:46:15

tender enough to eat?

Tender enough

to eat and we will reheat in the

0:46:150:46:20

curry sauce. To make the curry sauce

I'm going to caramelise onions and

0:46:200:46:25

ginger and garlic and star anise

actually.

Do you want anything

0:46:250:46:29

chopped?

Do you want to chop up the

garl ic and chillies.

You do a lot

0:46:290:46:37

of travelling, don't you?

I do.

Is

that for work or pleasure?

It is

0:46:370:46:41

work. Recently, I was in Venice last

week for work, we were thanking the

0:46:410:46:47

Navy for an event and before that I

was in an island on the Pacific. It

0:46:470:46:54

has a population of 1500.

Wow.

I was

there doing a food tour and what was

0:46:540:47:00

lovely, I got to eat fruit bat.

Is

that lovely?

It wasn't too bad

0:47:000:47:04

actually.

Right.

It wasn't too bad.

It was like an aged grouse in

0:47:040:47:09

flavour.

A what, sorry?

An aged

grouse.

You were tucking into sea

0:47:090:47:15

cucumber?

Which was...

Yum-yum?

Quite nice and these huge crabs.

0:47:150:47:22

They get up to six kilos. They are

the world's largest living...

The

0:47:220:47:29

big crabs.

The body...

This big!

There are reports of one meter

0:47:290:47:40

circumference crab. That's with the

legs out. They are huge.

Are they

0:47:400:47:44

good eating?

Delicious. They survive

on a diet of coconut. They are

0:47:440:47:55

really fresh.

Have you tried that?

No.

Any crazy food?

My dad used to

0:47:550:48:02

use sea cucumbers for baits. We had

to prepare them to put on the hooks,

0:48:020:48:07

but I've never eaten one.

Apparently

they are delicious.

What is a sea

0:48:070:48:12

cucumber?

It is like a giant slug!

It is quite funny.

Do you cook it

0:48:120:48:20

before you eat it?

I don't know, ask

him! I wasn't there!

0:48:200:48:26

Recipes on the website!

At the feast

there was a whole suckling pig

0:48:260:48:32

cooked and tuna and crabs and this

bowl of grated carrot. And it was, I

0:48:320:48:37

thought I will have some grated

carrot, but it was sea cucumber and

0:48:370:48:41

the lady said it was the fat from

the inside of the cucumber. When you

0:48:410:48:45

swim around and you see these, you

need to mix those together.

Sorry.

0:48:450:48:50

When you swim around, you see sea

cucumbers everywhere, but you see

0:48:500:48:57

the world's most venomous snake, a

sea snake.

0:48:570:49:02

Star anise. You also sea snakes and

that aside, you run this charity

0:49:020:49:10

evening in London, for leukaemia, is

that right?

Yes. Yes. I had an idea

0:49:100:49:17

20 years ago, my sister had

leukaemia and I was a bone marrow

0:49:170:49:23

donor and I thought it would be nice

to do something. Someone approached

0:49:230:49:26

me to dmaout a book, a woman called

Karen and I thought I can do more

0:49:260:49:31

than donate a book. I had this idea

and then I met with the committee

0:49:310:49:34

and I teamed up with Chris and

Hannah and the team and other people

0:49:340:49:40

and we created this thing called Who

Is Cooking Dinner. On the night, the

0:49:400:49:50

people arrive and they don't know

who is cooking dinner and the chefs

0:49:500:49:54

don't know who is cooking. That's

when someone like Rick Stein

0:49:540:50:00

discovers that his table don't eat

fish.

Excellent.

Which happened. We

0:50:000:50:07

have got a nice begin Gerry

Charlesic chilli mix going on and

0:50:070:50:13

the coconut milk here.

OK. This is

what I was in two minds about, but

0:50:130:50:18

it's actually delicious?

When I eat

coconut, I think of it as a moisture

0:50:180:50:26

that's fatty and it's not dairy. Do

you eat fish sauce shall I go for

0:50:260:50:34

soy sauce to be safe?

There are

sometimes oysters in soy sauce.

I'm

0:50:340:50:41

going to season it with soy sauce.

I

love that you have accommodated this

0:50:410:50:46

already. In the ingredients?

It

would be dodgy to feed her fish soy.

0:50:460:50:59

Especially on TV.

There is nowhere

to hide really.

That would curtail

0:50:590:51:03

my Saturdays!

So the pumpkin is

roasted and looking delicious. The

0:51:030:51:08

curry leaves are nice and crispy. We

warm it all up. The venison, well I

0:51:080:51:16

like to cook it in a pan, the smoke

gives it a lovely flavour.

Just

0:51:160:51:22

takes on that smokiness inside the

pan?

It does and it just, it just,

0:51:220:51:26

and lovely flavour. You could roast

it in the oven, but I do like pan

0:51:260:51:31

cooking, I have to say.

Right.

How

are we doing for time, boss?

We're

0:51:310:51:36

on there, obviously.

Cabbage. We've

got this. And what I like about this

0:51:360:51:45

dish, it is really flavoursome, it

is the sort of nood we would serve

0:51:450:51:50

at our restaurant.

A lovely

restaurant as well. Does the menu

0:51:500:51:55

change frequently?

Yeah, it changes

quite a bit. We have got the two

0:51:550:52:03

restaurants in the one building.

You

were ahead of your time with the

0:52:030:52:06

tapas. I remember in the 90s it was

about Marco and Gordon and the

0:52:060:52:14

Michelin men and you popped up and

there was like a rogue kitchen

0:52:140:52:17

because it was very cool. It was an

open kitchen. Everyone looked like

0:52:170:52:21

they were having fun which is

unheard of in the 90s in kitchens,

0:52:210:52:25

but frankly and we were all jealous

and then you brought the book out

0:52:250:52:29

and people were copying it?

It was

good. No, it was... I'm from a small

0:52:290:52:36

town in New Zealand and whenever

anything like that happens, I find

0:52:360:52:41

myself going, "How did this happen

to me? How lucky am I?" All meat

0:52:410:52:46

should be rested because you're

going to carve it. Chicken breast

0:52:460:52:50

not so much. This venison if we had

taken it out of the pan and sliced

0:52:500:52:54

it, we would have ended up with

something that would have blood

0:52:540:52:58

pouring over the plate. Rest your

mate for as long as you cook it and

0:52:580:53:01

those are the dishes.

Fantastic.

Remind us what it is called?

Seared

0:53:010:53:10

venison and pumpkin coconut-curried

and mustard cabbage.

0:53:100:53:16

So let's not mix these up.

Wow,

thank you.

Tuck into that.

It smells

0:53:190:53:26

amazing, doesn't it? Lovely. Gosh.

Dive straight in. Don't...

If you

0:53:260:53:33

get star anise in your teeth, don't

chew it.

Or you would have nice

0:53:330:53:37

breath.

Do you put in the star

itself or do you crack open the...

0:53:370:53:41

No, I think the whole thing has so

much flavour and the leaves have a,

0:53:410:53:46

I went to a star anise plantation in

China and it was one tree, it was

0:53:460:53:51

communist China and it was one tree

and they are the most beautiful

0:53:510:53:55

things. Really beautiful.

What do

you think, Rebecca, is it good?

I

0:53:550:54:00

want to keep eating, it is fabulous.

The star anise is amazing.

Let's

0:54:000:54:08

have some wine.

Peter, I have chosen

a wine from your home country. It is

0:54:080:54:17

a New Zealand pinot Noir and it is

called Most Wanted. When I tried

0:54:170:54:24

lots of different wines with this

dish because fusion, you do need to

0:54:240:54:28

try a few different things to work

out what's right, it was the one

0:54:280:54:31

that I most wanted to keep drinking.

Just gorgeous. It's quite a light

0:54:310:54:37

style of Pinot, it is light and

peppery and it has got some lovely

0:54:370:54:42

sour cherry flavours and with this

kind of dish where it's crunchy and

0:54:420:54:47

aromatic and you have got the lean

venison, it is a lovely match. You

0:54:470:54:52

dwoont to over power the flavours.

It really works. Have you tried

0:54:520:54:56

this?

Yes, I have.

It's fantastic.

Really goodmed and that works

0:54:560:55:01

incredibly well, as well.

Thank you.

Thank you.

Right, anyway, enough for

0:55:010:55:04

us. It is time for Si and Dave the

scary Bikers and they are continuing

0:55:040:55:09

their

0:55:090:55:13

scary Bikers and they are continuing

USA and getting stuck into stacks of

0:55:130:55:14

pancakes. Tough work. Have a look!

0:55:140:55:24

Oh man, we have jaofr slept. I'm not

sure I'm cut out to be a cowboy,

0:55:280:55:33

dude, sleeping out under the stars

and all that.

I know what you meet,

0:55:330:55:41

Kingy. I think this heat is getting

to me.

I this this really bizarre

0:55:410:55:45

dream?

What was it about?

Some

things are just best left unsaid.

0:55:450:55:48

Come on.

I think we need some brekkie.

Let's

0:55:480:56:00

make some plough-out patches.

You

what?

Pancakes, one sweet with

0:56:000:56:05

blueberries or one savoury with

sausage.

That's a balanced diet

0:56:050:56:08

around here, dude!

So we need to fry. I have got

0:56:080:56:21

self-raising flour in a bowl and now

a pinch of salt.

0:56:210:56:24

A bit more salt than usual, I feel.

A teaspoon of baking powder. This is

0:56:260:56:31

going to make our pancakes lighter,

lighter than Donald Trump's hair

0:56:310:56:36

piece! It's just going to go... Pop

that in there. Give that a stir.

0:56:360:56:44

Have a nice day! Meanwhile the wet

goods. 600mil, buttermilk. Look at

0:56:440:56:51

that. If you haven't got muller

mill, just a bit of milk with normal

0:56:510:57:00

milk, a -- butter mill, just a bit

of normal milk. Now hen berries.

Hen

0:57:000:57:10

berries?

I have got a job for you,

Si.

What's that?

These egg whites

0:57:100:57:16

need to be whipped until stiff.

You're joking.

No, I'm not.

What in

0:57:160:57:21

this heat?

Right, stiff peaks.

Right, stiff peaks in this heat.

I

0:57:210:57:27

have got my three hen berry yolks

and I need to add 50 grams of melted

0:57:270:57:33

butter. I just left the butter out

and look at it! Pour that in.

Stiff.

0:57:330:57:41

Peak. Test for stiff peaks is to

hold it over your friend's head!

0:57:410:57:52

That's stiff. So we mix the

ingredients. Just mix it. Kingy,

0:57:520:58:08

these egg whites, could you just do

like a big spoonful at a time and

0:58:080:58:13

I'll fold them in. As Delia Smith

says you fold and cut.

We want to

0:58:130:58:18

keep as much air in these egg whites

because what's going to happen,

0:58:180:58:21

that's going to form lovely bubbles

in the pancake.

There you are, mate,

0:58:210:58:26

there is your batter.

Perfect.

Lovely job. Right. Now, what we will

0:58:260:58:36

do now is we just hang on and wait

until it's firm enough to flip and

0:58:360:58:42

it will be alcouple of minutes. No

more than that because this is quite

0:58:420:58:46

hot.

Do you grant some greaseproof

Kingy?

Yes, please, mucker.

Now for

0:58:460:58:59

the blueberry one, self-raising

flour, add a touch of salt, but not

0:58:590:59:03

as much for this sweet batter. A

teaspoon of baking powder for a bit

0:59:030:59:07

of bounce and separate your egg

yolks into the buttermilk.

And

0:59:070:59:13

simply beat the whites.

Whilst

you're standing there, can you whip

0:59:130:59:16

up the egg whites?

Oh, you can get

lost.

I'm do it myself then!

Stiff

0:59:160:59:24

peaks. Now, the things that sweeten

this up, into my wets I put a

0:59:240:59:32

teaspoon of vanilla extract. Into my

drys, some cinnamon. So half a

0:59:320:59:40

teaspoon goes in.

0:59:400:59:51

Do you think this is the hottest

we've ever been?

Yes.

Why weren't we

0:59:531:00:00

doing a salad?

Yeah, I don't know.

I'm hot.

So am I. Proper hot.

I'm

1:00:001:00:06

hot.

Let's have a look. Oh, look at

that.

That's a pancake that, dude.

1:00:061:00:18

And there you have it, a breakfast

fit for any self respecting cowboy.

1:00:181:00:25

American pancakes, one sweet and one

savoury.

A bit like you and me,

1:00:251:00:29

mucker.

I'm savoury more like.

Crumbs, I only wanted one.

Let's

1:00:291:00:39

have a sausage first.

Let's have a

sausage first, dude.

Are they good?

1:00:391:00:45

I love them.

Oh, they are good.

That

buttermilk makes all the difference.

1:00:451:00:50

Oh, it does.

This is the sort of

thing Elvis would sit down for his

1:00:501:00:55

tea. Try the blueberries. I love the

fact when you flip them the

1:00:551:01:02

blueberries are cooked so they are

juicy and just burst on your tongue.

1:01:021:01:05

They're wonderful.

This would be

considered one of your five a day in

1:01:051:01:09

the States.

Yes. I think that these

are a true taste of America.

You're

1:01:091:01:13

right. Well, one of them.

1:01:131:01:21

This is my favourite part of the

show. Let's talk calls from our

1:01:311:01:34

viewers. We have got Mike from

Weymouth. What's your question.

1:01:341:01:45

viewers. We have got Mike from

Weymouth. What's your question.

I

1:01:451:01:45

need to know how to cook razor

clams.

It looks unpleasant.

What

1:01:451:01:50

about the sack?

You can eat that

though.

1:01:501:01:53

You can eat the whole thing.

The

mouth at the end?

You can eat it but

1:01:531:01:58

it looks a bit gross, it won't kill

you. Heat up a bit of oil and butter

1:01:581:02:02

in the pan, throw in the clams, put

the lid on and just before it's

1:02:021:02:08

finished, add white wine and a bit

of salt and pepper.

Rebecca, tweets

1:02:081:02:15

- yes?

Kosher fish, what is it, a

lot of people are asking. It's fish

1:02:151:02:21

that has fins and scales and you

can't have shellfish or clams, for

1:02:211:02:25

example, you can't have squid or

oysters, anything like that.

I've

1:02:251:02:29

got a kosher app on my phone.

Very

handy, just in case people like me

1:02:291:02:34

come round for dinner.

Yes.

I shall

be expecting to be invited. The

1:02:341:02:39

other tweet is from Jackie who says,

any ideas what I can do with slows

1:02:391:02:44

other than slow gin. I don't know

why you would need anything other

1:02:441:02:47

than slow gin?

Shall I answer that

one?

Whoever?

I'm a great chutney

1:02:471:02:54

maker so I would put the slows in a

pot with some sugar and vinegar and

1:02:541:02:58

boil it, then pass it through a

sieve. I would caramelise ginger and

1:02:581:03:04

add spices and cook it all together.

There is a lot of stone with very

1:03:041:03:11

little flesh so separate those at

the beginning.

Slow chutney, sounds

1:03:111:03:15

amazing.

Don't chat about that now,

I was going to talk about that

1:03:151:03:21

later. Paul from Burnley, what is

your question?

Good morning. I

1:03:211:03:26

bought a spaghetti squash and have

no idea what to do with it.

I think

1:03:261:03:33

they are really fun squashes,

they're springy and fun, I would

1:03:331:03:36

bake it, cut it in half, scoop it

all out. Season it with salt, olive

1:03:361:03:42

oil, lemon. Make a nice tahini and

yoghurt sauce. It's really

1:03:421:03:47

systemple. A bit of seasoning, pour

it on top, spiciness, coriander,

1:03:471:03:54

parsley, mint, whatever you like,

serve it with flat bread or crisp

1:03:541:03:59

bread, have it.

Sounds delicious,

running out of breath!

Maybe a Greek

1:03:591:04:06

white with that, a lovely refreshing

wine for the tahini and everything,

1:04:061:04:12

yes.

Very nice. Like that. Thanks to

everyone who called and tweeted in

1:04:121:04:17

questions. Now, at this time it

would normally be the omelette

1:04:171:04:21

challenge but as it's nearly

Halloween we have a different test

1:04:211:04:23

of skill for our chefs and it's the

Saturday Kitchen pumpkin challenge.

1:04:231:04:28

We haven't worked on the title for

too long! Marianna, come here, this

1:04:281:04:32

is your station. Peter, this is

yours. Much history with carving

1:04:321:04:39

pumpkins?

Not really. We don't

really do this in Greece. I've done

1:04:391:04:43

it a bit in the past year.

Big in

New Zealand?

Halloween falls in

1:04:431:04:48

spring so there are no pumpkins.

So

no. We gave you the heads up. So you

1:04:481:04:55

brought along some interesting bits

and pieces. We've hollowed these out

1:04:551:04:59

for you to speed it up, otherwise it

would take hours. You have got to

1:04:591:05:05

come up with the scariest face for

Halloween, Rebecca is going to judge

1:05:051:05:09

the scary face so get going, let's

do it.

OK.

Look, we have the music.

1:05:091:05:16

Anyone was born in the 70s will

remember this. Tony Hart. Getting

1:05:161:05:22

creative. Does it make you feel

creative this music?

Kind of.

At

1:05:221:05:31

what point did you think I'm carving

a pumpkin, I'll bring a drill?

My

1:05:311:05:37

friend Tim said to take a drill and

I was like, brilliant OK. Thank you,

1:05:371:05:41

Tim.

How are you doing?

Yeah, OK.

I've got not such a good device, a

1:05:411:05:49

little hammer.

You are going old

school?

Yes.

With a really blunt

1:05:491:05:54

knife.

It's actually quite sharp.

Watch your fingers.

It's quite fun.

1:05:541:06:01

I like the fact you brought the

cutters and you have destroyed it by

1:06:011:06:05

trying to shove it in a pumpkin.

I

know. I thought it would work.

Do

1:06:051:06:11

you do a lot of carving? ?

This is

always my dad's domain because he's

1:06:111:06:16

an artist and also not afraid to get

busy with a power tool. He's the one

1:06:161:06:21

who does the carving and my mum

stands to one side saying, careful,

1:06:211:06:25

Charlie. That's our Halloween

tradition.

That's all dads.

1:06:251:06:29

This might take a while. Let us see

how they get on. This week we are

1:06:291:06:33

going to catch up with Katie

Davidson in Cornwall, also known as

1:06:331:06:38

the oyster lady. She's celebrating

the health and environmental

1:06:381:06:41

benefits of the humble oyster. You

two keep carving!

1:06:411:06:46

Oyster farming helps the environment

because they are what we'd call a

1:06:561:06:59

Keystone species and have a positive

impact on any environment they are

1:06:591:07:02

grown in. A single oyster can purify

40 cans of water a day, not only

1:07:021:07:08

that, natural oyster reefs will

create an ecosystem for about 200

1:07:081:07:12

other species to thrive. They are

known as eco engineers because they

1:07:121:07:19

sequest nitrogen and CO2 from their

immediate environment. They are

1:07:191:07:22

known for carbon capture which is

important with the effect of climate

1:07:221:07:25

change.

We only have two types in this

1:07:251:07:30

country that grow here. One is an

indigenous oyster, Austria edgeless,

1:07:301:07:40

we have a Japanese water as well.

It's also known as rock or Pacific,

1:07:401:07:46

more commonly.

Been here for the last 35-36 years.

1:07:461:07:57

We buy young big oysters from

specialist hatcheries. They come in

1:07:571:08:01

at roughly this size. They sit in

these bags.

1:08:011:08:07

After harvesting and grading, they

come into this room. It's a legal

1:08:171:08:21

requirement. Water circulates

through the shellfish for 42 hours

1:08:211:08:27

minimum which means we can drain the

tank down then and sell them to the

1:08:271:08:31

public. We started off for a bit of

beer money, struggled to sell them

1:08:311:08:35

for a while. Keith Floyd then reck

Stein sort of started to push

1:08:351:08:40

shellfish and the markets gradually

climbed, yes. Selling a lot to

1:08:401:08:44

France, now most of it goes in the

UK.

1:08:441:08:48

First off, we want to track some

oysters, it's simple once you know

1:08:481:08:53

how. Most important is to protect

your hand from the shell. Go in at

1:08:531:08:56

the hinge, side to side, once you

have got a bit of purchase like

1:08:561:09:01

that, twist and pop and you're

pretty much done. Cut the adductor

1:09:011:09:06

muscle across the top, cut it at the

bottom also, and you've got your

1:09:061:09:11

oyster read write to go. The fact

that people are looking for more

1:09:111:09:16

sustainable protein sources is

another reason why they've become

1:09:161:09:19

popular. There is a strand of

veganism that calls themselves oast

1:09:191:09:23

radio-vegan and they have decided

that because the oyster has no

1:09:231:09:29

central nervous system and it's

ethical and sustainable, they can

1:09:291:09:33

eat them, they term it as a mushroom

in a shell. It's one of the most

1:09:331:09:37

sustainable foods you can eat. They

actually have this triple bottom

1:09:371:09:41

line where they are good for you,

good for the environment and they

1:09:411:09:44

taste really good as well.

Thanks for that, Katie. I love the

1:09:441:09:49

look of that pasta dish, I'm going

to try that one. How are our chefs

1:09:491:09:54

getting on, or got on, have you

finished?

Yes.

Looks amazing.

1:09:541:09:59

Thanks.

Have you finished?

Yes, I

have.

Nothing more to do.

Let's have

1:09:591:10:05

a look at that. That's great. I

don't know about scary but it makes

1:10:051:10:10

me laugh.

Right. Peter's done Eric Morecambe.

1:10:101:10:20

Is it use?

It's me. Don't you see

the resemblance there. Self-portrait

1:10:201:10:26

pumpkin.

Love the hair.

I took these

for my garden this morning, they are

1:10:261:10:32

a New Zealand plant.

Are you trying

to win favour with the judge here,

1:10:321:10:36

showing off, what are you doing?

Vaguely, yes.

Out of your garden

1:10:361:10:43

picking your own plants,

1:10:431:10:44

Vaguely, yes.

Out of your garden

picking your own plants, yeah...

1:10:441:10:45

Bring the rights down. Sexy

lighting. Let's get the full effect

1:10:451:10:49

of the pumpkins. Oh, yes!

Really

good.

Addams Family music not scary,

1:10:491:11:02

Psychomusic would have been scary.

They are both amazingly brilliant.

1:11:021:11:08

Who is scary?

Marian's is scarier,

although you were scarier with the

1:11:081:11:13

drill. But I think the pumpkin, it's

just the teeth, those very scary

1:11:131:11:19

fangs.

Really. Marianna!

Everyone

deserves a prize.

1:11:191:11:24

There you go. Nobody goes away empty

handed. This is full of all that

1:11:241:11:30

kind of rubbish you give kids on

Halloween. So that's handy isn't it?

1:11:301:11:33

Yes.

If you get trick or treaters,

just lob it at them and that'll see

1:11:331:11:39

'em off. Beautiful bag. So will

Rebecca get her food heaven or hell?

1:11:391:11:45

We are going to find out after

Nigella Lawson shows us her

1:11:451:11:52

delicious recipe for chicken.

1:11:521:11:54

Nigella Lawson shows us her

delicious recipe for chicken.

1:11:541:11:56

I'm lucky enough to live near a

Middle Eastern deli so my guests get

1:12:021:12:08

to crunch on pickled Peppers and

turn ins. Beetroot is what turns

1:12:081:12:13

them so radiantly pink.

And for me, nothing beats proper

1:12:131:12:19

Middle Eastern pitta bread.

1:12:191:12:28

What I'm making to eat with these is

something I get started on in

1:12:301:12:34

leisurely fashion a day ahead.

1:12:341:12:40

I'll admit my chicken dish relies on

an awful lot of spices but this

1:12:491:12:53

couldn't be easier to make. And

besides, any recipe that starts with

1:12:531:13:00

a zest induced two lemons makes my

heart sing.

1:13:001:13:03

And this involves minimal washing

up, always an important factor for

1:13:031:13:07

me! I throw everything in a plastic

bag and I've already got 12 skinless

1:13:071:13:13

boneless chicken thighs nestling in

there.

1:13:131:13:16

Some serious impaling work to do

because on top of that fabulous

1:13:161:13:22

mimosa sprinkling of lemon zest, now

the sharpness of the juice.

1:13:221:13:30

Remarkably pitless lemons, although

I don't much mind if a pip or two

1:13:301:13:33

falls in. Already Very satisfying

work.

1:13:331:13:41

Regular olive oil.

1:13:461:13:50

Bit of moisturiser.

1:13:531:13:56

And now for my carefully calibrated

spice collection. Paprika first off.

1:13:581:14:06

Gorgeous colour and gorgeous taste.

Next, cumin. The thing about these

1:14:111:14:18

spices is, it's not their individual

voices, but it's the choir of

1:14:181:14:24

flavour when they're together.

Coriander. Always the junior partner

1:14:241:14:30

to cumin but no less valuable. Dried

chilli flakes. And now a slight

1:14:301:14:42

flirt with the sweeter spices.

Before I put too much in, a little

1:14:421:14:47

bit of cinnamon. And some nutmeg.

Freshly grated over.

1:14:471:14:59

Being a bit more bows truss now --

boisterous now with some garlic.

1:15:031:15:12

Don't be alarmed, the garlic doesn't

overwhelm. It's all perfectly

1:15:121:15:17

harmonious. And I'm happy to throw

the end bits in and then - fabulous.

1:15:171:15:29

A crunch of salt. And two bay

leaves.

Serious bit of squelching to

1:15:291:15:45

do now.

This sits in the fridge

gaining tenderness and flavour, into

1:15:451:15:58

the oven for 30 minutes and it's

cooked. It's how you eat it, as well

1:15:581:16:04

as the fabulousness of the chicken

itself. So I want a pile of warm

1:16:041:16:09

flat breads on the table, tomatoes

I'll chop up with fresh mint, some

1:16:091:16:14

shredded lettuce to go under the

chicken. Of course, my pickle

1:16:141:16:19

purchases and I have to have my

tahini yoghurt sauce that I sprinkle

1:16:191:16:27

with pomegranate seeds.

1:16:271:16:31

Now although tradition decease this

sauce should be served only with

1:16:351:16:46

lamb shawarma, it partners my

chicken. Add a good sprinkle of sea

1:16:461:16:58

salt flates and mince or grate in

some garlic. When I serve this, I

1:16:581:17:04

add a scattering of ruby pomegranate

seeds, but all I need to do is stir

1:17:041:17:09

it together.

1:17:091:17:19

As I'm making this ahead of time, I

simply cover and chill this until I

1:17:221:17:27

need it.

1:17:271:17:36

You are meant to be on bread duty,

but you are too busy with your

1:17:441:17:50

talking. I will take it. I'm going

to try and give you some lettuce

1:17:501:17:54

too.

So they are beautiful, the

pink, the red and the gold, I'm

1:17:541:18:01

loving that so much.

1:18:011:18:12

What's

What's in that sauce?

Tahini.

Can I recommend a bit of the very

1:18:121:18:19

nice turnip? And then I am going to

apply to face!

1:18:191:18:35

Right, thank you, Nigella. She is

really tucking in there. It is time

1:18:391:18:43

to find out if Rebecca is getting

her food heaven or food hell.

1:18:431:18:51

Heaven, olives, tuna and you like

spelt, don't you?

I do.

A little bit

1:18:511:18:58

of chilli and garlic, that was your

heaven. This is your hell, carrots,

1:18:581:19:03

particularly overcooked carrots?

Quiet carrots I used to call them.

1:19:031:19:07

When I was a child. There is no

crunch in them.

Hue like halloumi.

1:19:071:19:12

Sn

Yes.

Is that a bit noisy?

Squeaky

halloumi.

Smoked paprika.

It

1:19:121:19:20

empowers things.

And this beautiful

goats' cheese which you are not a

1:19:201:19:24

fan of and a little ravioli or a

parcel as you like to call it.

A

1:19:241:19:29

parcel. A parcel has to be filo with

jam or something really

1:19:291:19:39

inappropriate on the side.

What do

you think you've got?

I think it

1:19:391:19:42

might be hell because I think people

are going to be offended by my not

1:19:421:19:47

loving goats' cheese.

You are

absolutely correct. 54% of you went

1:19:471:19:51

for hell.

Thank you very much! Can I

just eat the olives?

Thank you so

1:19:511:20:03

much more this, not only does

Rebecca not want to eat this, I

1:20:031:20:07

don't want to cook this dish because

I do it did it in a restaurant about

1:20:071:20:20

20 years ago and we had more than

six minutes.

1:20:201:20:24

I'm going to tuck into some olives.

I can't bear to see them go to

1:20:241:20:34

waste.

1:20:341:20:36

And then over here, Peter is just

making the little mix. Rising

1:20:381:20:43

potatoes and we're going to mix that

with the goats' cheese and I will

1:20:431:20:47

attempt to make the egg yolk

ravioli. Right, let's get on with

1:20:471:20:53

it. I need to do something. We were

all racing ahead there.

That's the

1:20:531:20:59

thing. It is the big slab of goats'

cheese.

Do you want to try it?

A

1:20:591:21:05

tiny amount is wonderful. There is

always too much goats' cheese.

It is

1:21:051:21:11

very acidic, but fresh and quite

delicious.

OK.

I think it is a

1:21:111:21:16

particularly lovely one, actually.

Yeah. Yeah. It's really great.

You

1:21:161:21:24

just don't want it in a big parcel.

Is that enough?

Another one of

1:21:241:21:30

those. Chopped thyme and season it

up and olive oil. That's olives,

1:21:301:21:37

always here to help. So a little bit

of cream to let this goats' cheese

1:21:371:21:41

down and that's going to be the

goats' cheese cream on the base of

1:21:411:21:45

the plate. Growing up in the 70s as

a vegetarian, how was that?

Nobody

1:21:451:21:56

was veggie in those days. It was

weird and freakish. My dad started

1:21:561:22:01

being vegetarian. I got the idea

that my dad was vegetarian because

1:22:011:22:05

he used to work near an abattoir and

years later I wrote this in a book

1:22:051:22:10

and my dad read it and said, "Hang

on a minute, I worked in advertising

1:22:101:22:15

in Mayfair. What was the abattoir?"

I don't know where I got this story

1:22:151:22:19

from, but that's what I have been

telling people for Donningy's years.

1:22:191:22:24

I don't know why we were vegetarian.

It's a mystery!

Goats' cheese and

1:22:241:22:37

more goats' cheese than potato. This

is hell! Your dad was a very good

1:22:371:22:42

cook, wasn't he?

They are both good.

My mum tended to do traditional

1:22:421:22:50

Jewish things. My dad is

adventurist. He does really good

1:22:501:22:55

pasta sauces and he would do

spaghetti squash. That was one of

1:22:551:23:01

his specialities.

What did he do?

He

just used to do it with, I think, he

1:23:011:23:06

used to do it as if it was

spaghetti. It was an early version

1:23:061:23:13

of cord getty. He would do it with a

vegetable sauce.

You have a guilty

1:23:131:23:19

pleasure, a tinned food.

My husband

is an incredibly gifted cook. He is

1:23:191:23:24

a really brilliant amateur cook, but

wonderful so when he is not in, I

1:23:241:23:28

open up the tin macaroni cheese and

things like that because I can't do

1:23:281:23:32

that in front of him if I open

anything like that, he just stands

1:23:321:23:37

looking at me going, "Are you going

to eat it?"

I learnt there is a

1:23:371:23:44

group of kind of restaurants if you

call them that in Lisbon, that

1:23:441:23:49

specialise in tinned food.

Really?

You go in and get fresh bread and

1:23:491:23:53

they open up a tin for you.

And then

they charge you an enormous amount

1:23:531:23:58

of food.

Some of the tins are

fantastic food and they are really

1:23:581:24:02

expensive.

I went to a restaurant in

Barcelona, I was filming there last

1:24:021:24:07

year, and they brought the

ingredients to the table in tins and

1:24:071:24:12

there was a tin of sardines which

they opened. I did sit there

1:24:121:24:17

thinking, "I could do that myself."

I'm making my own lunch.

The smoked

1:24:171:24:23

paprika is in the sauce.

So you put

a whole egg yolk in each parcel?

1:24:231:24:28

Yes.

Does everybody need one?

Pretty

much. We used to serve this in a

1:24:281:24:37

restaurant I worked in a long time

ago and it was a little starter. So,

1:24:371:24:42

this pasta is a little bit dry.

It

looks brilliant and so clever.

1:24:421:24:49

What happens if the egg yolk breaks?

You will get shouted at and you do

1:24:491:24:54

it again! Like that. So what you do,

move that aside. Over here...

1:24:541:25:02

LAUGHTER

OK. I'm really sorry about that.

1:25:021:25:06

Thanks.

What happens if the second

one breaks?

I'm glad you picked

1:25:061:25:11

this. I've got one in here. I will

turn that down and simmer it.

Is

1:25:111:25:22

that palento flour.

We were not sure

whether to make some of these...

1:25:221:25:30

Good job you did.

The ravioli will

go in for two or three minutes. You

1:25:301:25:39

are a great writer...

Well, thank

you.

But you hate it?

I hate it.

Why

1:25:391:25:45

do you do it?

Well, sometimes you

write to get good parts. I co write

1:25:451:25:52

scripts with my brother who is a

fantastic proper writer and my

1:25:521:25:57

friend is a writer and they love

writing and when I'm with them, it's

1:25:571:26:00

great because we sit around and we

eat and talk and then occasionally

1:26:001:26:04

they will go, "We really ought to do

some work at this point." I really

1:26:041:26:08

don't enjoy it and I have written my

second book, I didn't enjoy that

1:26:081:26:11

either! I love the book tour. The

book tour is great because you meet

1:26:111:26:17

people and you read things out and

you think, "I wrote that." But it is

1:26:171:26:21

the actual thing of sitting in a

room with a computer.

Is it like

1:26:211:26:27

homework?

It is. I don't like being

on my own. It is unsociable and when

1:26:271:26:37

I'm acting I am with is a big group?

Is it true?

There is one about me

1:26:371:26:44

attempt to go cook at a dinner party

in my new book because my husband

1:26:441:26:49

does all the cooking and there was

one time we had a row because he

1:26:491:26:52

said I do all the cooking and I

said, "Well, I'll do it. Invite

1:26:521:26:57

people over and I'll cook.

Do you

regret that?

Yeah.

You should have

1:26:571:27:03

done them an egg yolk ravioli.

I

tried to make a souffle and while

1:27:031:27:09

they were there, I have nothing, but

cheese, eggs and flour. There is

1:27:091:27:15

nothing else I can make, I made a

souffle and it worked. That looks

1:27:151:27:26

very pretty.

A little bit of that.

I

don't have to eat this, do I?

This

1:27:261:27:38

is not hellish. You need to try it.

Suzie, shall we get wine?

For your

1:27:381:27:47

Italian extravaganza of egg and

pasta. We have got Extra Special

1:27:471:27:54

Gavi From Asda which is £7.

It is floral and easy drinking to

1:27:541:28:05

wash the pasta down.

Well, it

doesn't look hellish.

Thank you. It

1:28:051:28:09

is quite hellish to cook.

Would you like wine?

It is like an

1:28:091:28:23

extravagant pastule.

1:28:231:28:26

Would you like wine?

It is like an

extravagant pastule. Ranchts

How is

1:28:261:28:28

that? Love, lies and Records starts

on BBC One in mid-November. Good

1:28:281:28:34

luck with that. That's delicious and

now I'm going to drink the bottle.

1:28:341:28:44

Thanks to our guests, Marianna

Leivaditaki, Peter Gordon, Susie

1:28:441:28:51

Barrie, Rebecca Front and all the

recipes from the show are on the

1:28:511:28:55

website, bbc.co.uk/saturdaykitchen.

Don't forget Best Bites with me

1:28:551:28:59

tomorrow

1:28:591:28:59

Matt Tebbutt is joined by chefs Marianna Leivaditaki and Peter Gordon and special guest Rebecca Front. There are great moments from the BBC food archive, including clips from Rick Stein, Keith Floyd, the Hairy Bikers and Nigella Lawson, and wine expert Susie Barrie picks the wines to go with the studio dishes.