Episode 3 Spring Kitchen with Tom Kerridge


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Episode 3

Tom Kerridge is joined in the studio by musician Paul Young and Michelin-starred guest chef Angela Hartnett for some great seasonal recipes and spring food.


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Spring is here and we've got some great seasonal dishes

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to get your taste buds going, and some lovely guests as well.

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It's time for Spring Kitchen.

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Hello and welcome to the show.

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We have a great line-up for you this afternoon.

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We join chefs Angela Hartnett and Luke Holder in the New Forest

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for a masterclass in fresh pasta with chorizo and peas.

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Plus we take a peek into the BBC food archive and join Rick Stein,

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who makes spicy prawns with coconut, mustard seeds and chillies.

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Now, joining me in the studio is a great friend of mine

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and a super chef, it's Paul Ainsworth.

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And also with us is a special Spring Kitchen guest to tell us

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all about the wonderful seafood that's on offer at this time of year.

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It's our very own fish man, Johnny Godden.

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-Hello, you two.

-Hi, Tom.

-Hello.

-How are you doing?

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-Very good, Tom.

-It's springtime. Are you happy as a chef, Paul?

-Great.

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It is much lighter, fresher, brilliant.

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-Loads of lovely green things.

-Yeah.

-Those are lovely.

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Apart from fish. What sort of fish have you got? Is it a good time?

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The sea water is warming up, lots of different species are coming in.

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Fantastic. OK. Now, our star guest today is a pop sensation

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who we also discovered was a dab hand at a bit of cookery

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after his stints on Celebrity MasterChef and Hell's Kitchen.

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It's Paul Young. Hello, Paul, how are you?

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APPLAUSE

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-All OK? Big foodie, then.

-It's all good.

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I don't quite know how it started, other than travel,

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going around the world,

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thinking, this is great.

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-Finding lovely things to eat.

-Yeah.

-What a great way to find out.

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OK. So let's see what we've got on offer today.

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Paul, what are you cooking?

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I'll be doing you a lovely Cornish steak with a beautiful spring salad.

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PAUL YOUNG: I like it when you look at me and say that.

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You're doing ME a Cornish steak.

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Absolutely. Embracing peas, broad beans, Cornish new potatoes,

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-radishes, all with an oyster mayonnaise.

-Sounds lovely.

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Later on I will be doing a recipe with red mullet and cucumber.

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I am going to pan fry the red mullet

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and serve it with seared cucumber and borage

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with a little bit of a beurre blanc sauce.

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And Johnny is here, because he is my fish guy.

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He also delivers to Paul and in my first recipe, I'm going

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to be using mussels. He can tell us all about them.

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I'm going to cook and you are coming with me, Mr Paul Young.

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Come on, let's head this way.

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OK. So the first dish today is kind of a play on moules mariniere

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so that classic French moules mariniere -

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mussels cooked in white wine.

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Except this time we are going to be doing it

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because we have the West Country massive here.

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Those two boys... You know when you go on a school trip

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and at the back of the coach you have these two naughty boys

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that sit there, flicking sweets at the teacher?

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That is those two. So if you get hit on the back of the head with something, it's one of those two.

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-I don't think you'd be far behind us, Tom!

-Exactly.

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You're the ring leader!

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Johnny is from my part of the world, near Gloucester, Paul is not

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originally from the West Country but you've settled down there.

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Yeah, absolutely.

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In honour of that we are doing some mussels that have come from Cornwall

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and we will be cooking them in some fantastic scrumpy cider

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which is instead of using white wine.

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White wine has that beautiful balance of acidity and sweetness,

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in the moules mariniere.

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This scrumpy cider has exactly the same sort of thing.

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It's a nice dry scrumpy cider. I'm going to get the mussels in.

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This is a very hot pan and we are going to steam them

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very quickly in the cider.

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Then we're going to use that cider to make a sauce.

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-The mussels, this time of year, good time of year?

-Fabulous time of year.

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These are rope-grown mussels.

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-They are grown off St Austell Bay in Cornwall, which you must be aware of?

-Oh, yeah.

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The rope-grown mussels are very good. They're very clean.

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What you do is you set a rope out into the sea,

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and you let the baby mussels attach.

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And they let them grow.

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And they take about two years to get to that edible size.

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-It is quite a process.

-Two years to grow the mussels? You see,

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I always thought mussels would be quite a quick thing to get done

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but two years seems like quite a long time.

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At a year, you could eat them, but they would be small.

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You want them plump, like they are now.

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So it is a good two-year cycle before you can eat them.

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I did buy some sea mussels once but they are quite ugly looking

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with all the little attachments. And the girls don't like them.

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-They're not great...

-They want a nice clean shell.

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These ones are cleaned. They are put through a machine which takes the barnacles off

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so you have a nice clean mussel, no grit.

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Some of the best mussels come from Cornwall. You would argue that.

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Fowey mussels are very famous.

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The chap doing this now is the man that started Fowey mussels,

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but he has put them at sea.

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So what it is with Fowey, it's grade B waters.

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With these, they are farmed at sea and they are a grade A mussel.

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They are the best in the country, in my opinion.

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There you go, the best mussels in the country.

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You spend a lot of time down in Cornwall, don't you?

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-Paul and Paul, you actually know each other?

-We do.

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It is like putting the band back together, it's like a load of mates.

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LAUGHTER

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I had my own Cornwall collective when I did a cookbook about 18 months ago,

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so a lot of it was based down there,

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we even got a deal with the place,

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where they lent me the kitchen so I could do the photography for the book.

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-Yeah.

-So I had plenty of trips down there, and then we would try

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and repair over to Paul's place once we had done our work.

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So you have done a cookbook?

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Yes, I did a cookbook about 18 months ago, I based it on my travels.

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Music took me round the world and it was

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kind of a side-effect of being a musician I had never thought of.

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It kind of opened my eyes,

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and instead of being one of those guys that just wanted pizza

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and burgers, we would want to find out what was local and what was good.

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And that was the carrot, if I was getting bored of life

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on the road or doing press - I hated doing press!

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They would book me a restaurant at the end of the day and go, "Don't worry, We're going there."

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Not always posh restaurants,

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the places that...food that represented the area you were in?

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Yeah. If possible.

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I remember going to Portland, Oregon once, and we pulled up...

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We were in a taxi coming from the airport,

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we said to the cabbie, what was the best restaurant in Portland?

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Cabbies don't always know, but he told us it was this place called Jake's Fish Bar.

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We went there,

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and every American I have ever spoken to says they know that place.

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It was amazing seafood. Really nice.

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-Fantastic.

-At that younger age,

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I wasn't eating as much fish as I do now,

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-but it was very special.

-Yeah.

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That kind of travel led to the cookbook being so fantastic,

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and your enjoyment of food and being in kitchens,

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is that what led you to take part

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-in Celebrity MasterChef and then Hell's Kitchen?

-Yes.

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Yeah. To begin with, it was like a sustenance thing,

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and then once I travelled, I thought I could really impress my friends

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if I could do this back home.

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Especially going to New Orleans, I still don't know the good place

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to go to get New Orleans food.

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So I bought a cookbook from Paul Prudhomme,

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who was about the only well-known chef in the 1980s.

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You could not get in his restaurant. So I bought his book

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and started doing it at home.

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Back then, some of that produce was not as easy to find,

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from an American recipe book.

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They would put "heavy cream".

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-I thought, what is that?

-Double cream or clotted cream.

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In actual fact, their dairy is not as rich as ours,

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so it was coming out way too thick.

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It is funny you should say that

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because we are going to add a little bit of this dairy into our mussels!

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We have clotted cream, another great West Country thing.

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So this is known as VERY heavy cream.

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-I'll say. Double heavy cream.

-Double heavy cream, exactly.

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You have been doing a little bit of baking recently.

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The world has gone mad for baking.

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You have been doing a little bit of your own as well?

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I think we decided to capitalise on the baking,

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so... I've been involved with the children with Cancer UK for a long time,

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and this year the idea was to have a bake club in the month of May.

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So we are trying to encourage everybody to bake stuff at home,

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take it into the office, or get kids to take it into school,

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sell little cakes or sponges they have made,

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and put that money towards Cancer Research.

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These are cakes you have made yourself.

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Yeah...well, it was another collective. That's a lot of cakes.

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Let's see if the Michelin-starred chef likes them.

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What you have to remember, Mr Ainsworth, you have to be nice

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because Paul Young frequently enters into your restaurant.

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-So you have to be nice about his cake.

-I was nice about your courses.

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They are lovely.

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I need to start working with sourdough, I love that taste.

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Do you make sourdough, Paul? Do you do sourdoughs?

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-Yeah, on pizza bases. Reganos.

-OK, so you do sourdoughs. Fantastic.

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OK.

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OK. What I've got here, I have some carrots, some shallots,

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some celery, and I have sweated it down in a little bit of butter.

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Just stirring in

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at the last minute, a little bit of that very nice, thick,

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West Country clotted cream.

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And then into that, I'm just going to pick a few of these mussels.

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These are great big, beautiful mussels.

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They have been de-bearded, cos nobody wants to eat them.

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This is kind of... I suppose

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it's going to be like a very posh open sandwich.

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I've also chopped up some celery - the leaf from celery,

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because it's much underused - it's really fragrant and delicious.

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I've also done some chervil as well.

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We're just going to mix the whole lot together.

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Could you use clams for that as well?

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Clams, cockles, anything - any shellfish would work beautifully.

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Clams as well.

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For me, they're one of the most fantastic, beautiful shellfish.

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It's quite under-used.

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The problem is there's so many different varieties,

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it's hard to get hold of them.

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OK. So, we're stirring this together, I'm going to season it.

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Mr Ainsworth, if you come over.

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I have a slight problem - the fact that I can't eat this

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because I have a shellfish allergy.

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I look at it and I think that looks absolutely delicious.

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You tell me if it tastes nice, Paul.

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It needs a bit more salt and pepper.

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It's lovely, absolutely stunning.

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You can go away now.

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You stay... You're not going to get the glory!

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I'm going to get the glory of plating it up.

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Could do with a bit more lemon juice. Only joking!

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THEY LAUGH

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Honestly!

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-You don't trust him!

-Honestly!

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If there's too much lemon juice, it's Paul's fault.

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Johnny, come on over. Have a little taste.

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How much cider did you put in?

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Just a big splash. Loads of the sea water comes out of the mussels,

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and you end up with this beautiful cidery, musselly clotted cream.

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I can't think of a better representation of the West Country.

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Clotted cream, cider and Cornish mussels.

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Get in there and start eating.

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Dive in and have a taste.

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Before you do that, did you eat one of those cakes?

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I haven't yet.

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You haven't yet? Paul's saving that for pudding.

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The clotted cream's amazing, isn't it?

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In every show,

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we're visiting some of our favourite chefs on their home turf

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for their take on spring ingredients.

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Today, we join chefs Angela Hartnett and Luke Holder

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at their New Forest hotel for a beautiful fresh pasta recipe,

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but first, they need some chorizo.

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So, we're out of winter, doom and gloom,

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spring is upon us,

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which I love because we have so many fabulous ingredients.

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Great time of year for chefs.

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It is, and we're going to get really busy at the hotel.

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We're very lucky here to have all this produce on the grounds.

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We're also lucky to have this smokehouse.

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If we pop down there, we might be able to find

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something a little bit special.

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A little bit special? OK! Looking forward to it.

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These are a spiced pork mix,

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stuffed into ox intestines.

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Then they'll dry out, and, after a few months, they'll turn into these.

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What's the spice mix in here?

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We've got a spicy paprika, with a little bit of chilli,

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fennel seeds, coriander seeds, a little bit of wine.

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They will lose some of the weight.

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Yes, we want them to lose 30-40% of their weight before they're ready.

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We encourage this mould growth on the outside.

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It shows that the sausage is fermenting,

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and that's when we know that sugars are converting into acid.

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That's how we know it's safe to eat.

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White mould is good - we encourage that to grow all around it,

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because that's a sign that fermentation is happening

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and we're getting the results we want.

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-Lovely.

-Mmm!

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-How long are they curing?

-18 months.

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They start at around 10kg.

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This is the slow food movement.

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We don't need to do anything with it, we let time naturally ebb away at it.

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We're looking for 30% weight loss.

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We're using the chorizo today, yes?

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Yes. We've got a couple of different types here.

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We've got a fennel salami - that one there.

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Based around the traditional...

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You can see the colour.

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This one looks just about ready to go.

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You can see the slight size difference,

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the mould growth on the outside...

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-This would be perfect for the recipe.

-OK. Let's go.

-Cool.

-Brilliant.

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We're going to do a lovely spring recipe today,

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which is going to be garganelli with home-made chorizo and peas.

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Talk us through the ingredients.

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Obviously, the chorizo from the smokehouse -

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we've removed the skin and it's ready to go.

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Lovely seasonal peas. We've podded them, ready to rock 'n' roll.

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A little bit of flatleaf parsley.

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You're going to be rolling the pasta.

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A bit of Parmesan and butter. Simple.

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Perfect. So, the first thing is to roll out the pasta.

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We make pasta with just yolks and 00 flour.

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Yes, it's the classic Northern Italian style.

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It enriches the pasta.

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Explain the history behind the garganelli.

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Yes. Garganelli - we know it as penne pasta over here in the UK.

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We've got one of these lovely little garganelli boards.

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It's dead simple.

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As the ridges are rolled into the pasta, and the sauce is made,

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-it's great for attaching to cream-based sauces.

-OK.

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We don't put too much flour in between it, just a little like that.

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You need it to be a little bit wet so when we roll it,

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it will stick together itself.

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Right, you're on that. I'm going to start doing the sauce.

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-I will jump over here.

-Yup.

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To get the garganelli shape,

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all we need to do first of all is to just square off the pasta.

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Around three or four centimetre rectangles.

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Once we've got those in place,

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lay them on top of each other.

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This dish is so quick and easy to do.

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Even if you don't want to do your own home-made garganelli.

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-Yes.

-Slice the chorizo down, peas are blanching...

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You do all that while your pasta's cooking.

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As we're just rolling this and sealing this,

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what's important is that square points down away from the board,

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so you get that nice finish.

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They look incredible.

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Yes. You can see how those ridges are going to take up that sauce.

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Right, so our peas are blanching.

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Because it's so quick, we're just going to blanch them

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and then put them straight into the sauce.

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Just a bit of olive oil in the pan, just a small amount

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because you've got the natural fat from the chorizo.

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And a little bit of garlic oil as well.

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-It's a bit of a one pan wonder, isn't it?

-Yes.

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I love a one pan wonder.

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-Less washing up, all the better!

-It just works.

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We have some garlic in there and let our chorizo melt down quickly.

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I add some of the blanching liquid.

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We don't want it to be overcooked.

0:17:130:17:17

Keep it still soft like that.

0:17:170:17:20

Then we'll finish it as soon as we put our pasta in.

0:17:200:17:24

Put the peas down there.

0:17:240:17:26

-I'd better hurry up!

-Yes, if you could, Chef.

0:17:270:17:30

We'll get our pasta water boiling. That's ready to go.

0:17:300:17:34

I'm going to put these ones down now.

0:17:340:17:36

So, nice boiling water.

0:17:370:17:39

-Have you got enough?

-Give me those last couple.

0:17:390:17:42

That's perfect.

0:17:440:17:45

One more.

0:17:470:17:49

Our chorizo is there. Add a little bit of our peas in there.

0:17:490:17:53

A little touch of cream and butter, please, Luke.

0:17:560:17:58

A little knob of butter.

0:17:580:18:00

A little bit like that.

0:18:000:18:01

OK.

0:18:050:18:06

It smells lovely.

0:18:090:18:10

Literally, I only added a tiny amount of cream and butter.

0:18:100:18:15

Bit of parsley to add right at the end.

0:18:150:18:17

Little bit of fresh pepper.

0:18:190:18:20

Then our garganelli - just literally cooks in a matter of minutes.

0:18:250:18:29

-You're just setting the egg yolk in there, aren't you?

-Yes.

0:18:290:18:32

That's how you want it - all tossed together.

0:18:320:18:36

And finally, a little bit of the Parmesan.

0:18:360:18:41

You really cannot do without that.

0:18:410:18:44

Goes with everything.

0:18:440:18:45

OK, right. A plate, please, good man.

0:18:450:18:48

And just some of that pasta water. That gives it a little...

0:18:480:18:53

What we love to do at the restaurant

0:18:540:18:56

is be able to just pour the dish out.

0:18:560:19:01

Beautiful.

0:19:010:19:02

Beautifully, like that.

0:19:020:19:04

Little bit of fresh Parmesan on top.

0:19:040:19:07

-So there we go. Fresh garganelli with peas and chorizo.

-Perfect.

0:19:070:19:11

-Angela, this looks lovely.

-Let's have a try.

0:19:130:19:17

Not bad pasta, chef!

0:19:170:19:18

Mmm, that is lovely.

0:19:200:19:22

Spring is in the air.

0:19:220:19:23

Thank you very much, Angela and Luke.

0:19:270:19:29

That looked absolutely incredible.

0:19:290:19:31

Most impressive was the salami shed! What more could you want?!

0:19:310:19:35

It's somebody else's turn to cook, and it's going to be Paul Ainsworth.

0:19:350:19:39

What are you going to be doing, chief?

0:19:390:19:40

OK. I've got a lovely Cornish sirloin steak. Beautiful Dexter.

0:19:400:19:45

-Dexter beef?

-Dexter cattle.

0:19:450:19:48

We've got some lovely oysters,

0:19:480:19:50

which we were talking about earlier.

0:19:500:19:53

St Austell, Fowey, we got these from Porthilly.

0:19:530:19:55

We're going to make an oyster emulsion.

0:19:550:19:58

I'll get going on that. You get going on your steak.

0:19:580:20:01

And then we've got the radishes, the peas and the broad beans.

0:20:010:20:05

We're going to do a salad.

0:20:050:20:07

Yes, we're going to make it slightly different.

0:20:070:20:09

We'll use mayonnaise, as you would for a potato salad,

0:20:090:20:12

but we'll keep it separate.

0:20:120:20:13

And we'll have that lovely combination of beef and oyster.

0:20:130:20:18

Beef and oyster, very classic.

0:20:180:20:20

Yes, it's delicious.

0:20:200:20:22

I've put the oil on the steak, as opposed to on the char-grill.

0:20:220:20:26

It goes straight on.

0:20:260:20:28

Very important that the meat is room temperature

0:20:280:20:31

and not fridge cold.

0:20:310:20:33

So it's come up to temperature.

0:20:330:20:36

It's almost warm in the middle already.

0:20:360:20:38

Absolutely. So you've got what we call the cooking temperature

0:20:380:20:42

through the middle.

0:20:420:20:43

And we're going to cook it beautifully pink -

0:20:430:20:46

a nice medium rare.

0:20:460:20:47

OK. And I'm going to make this oyster mayonnaise.

0:20:470:20:50

This is basically the oysters - we're going to blend them

0:20:500:20:53

with a little bit of Dijon mustard

0:20:530:20:56

in a hand blender.

0:20:560:20:58

And then we'll slowly emulsify this water.

0:20:580:21:03

Absolutely.

0:21:030:21:05

Paul, you need to wash your hands if we're going to do this steak.

0:21:050:21:10

-Yes.

-I'll have a little look.

0:21:100:21:12

I'm just going to turn that for you.

0:21:120:21:14

Now we're going to make this oyster emulsion.

0:21:150:21:18

So, this is oysters, Dijon mustard, in a hand blender.

0:21:180:21:24

Slowly add oil.

0:21:240:21:26

That's it, until you get a nice, thick mayonnaise consistency.

0:21:290:21:34

Exactly as happened in rehearsal!

0:21:340:21:37

Exactly like that!

0:21:370:21:38

Paul, that oyster mayonnaise,

0:21:390:21:42

do you do any other dishes in the restaurant where you use that?

0:21:420:21:47

Yes, we've got one on right now. We can pair it with lots of things.

0:21:470:21:51

It's not necessarily always the oyster flavour.

0:21:510:21:55

It's that lovely sea freshness,

0:21:550:21:57

which is going to go beautiful with potatoes, radishes.

0:21:570:22:00

The trick with the steak, Tom, is not to move it too much

0:22:000:22:04

and just let it beautifully caramelise.

0:22:040:22:07

The reason I put a thin layer of oil is because

0:22:070:22:09

then the smoke is going back into the steak.

0:22:090:22:12

So, this is like a tartare dressing.

0:22:120:22:16

A fine dice of shallot...

0:22:160:22:19

This is what I'm going to make, a lovely rapeseed oil dressing

0:22:200:22:25

to go with our lovely spring vegetables.

0:22:250:22:28

So that tartare is kind of a classic steak garnish.

0:22:280:22:34

Yes, absolutely.

0:22:340:22:36

Padstow is very busy at this time of year.

0:22:360:22:40

Easter must have been very busy?

0:22:400:22:42

Extremely busy.

0:22:420:22:44

It was a long Easter and we're going into the May Day celebrations.

0:22:440:22:50

It's a great time of year for us.

0:22:500:22:53

It does get quiet for us in January, February and March,

0:22:530:22:58

-so it's nice to be busy again.

-Yes, sure.

0:22:580:23:01

Paul, have you seen a difference after the floods?

0:23:010:23:04

That emulsion has come together, I've just put it in the fridge.

0:23:040:23:09

Rest assured, it has actually worked this time!

0:23:090:23:11

Thank you!

0:23:110:23:13

So these are radishes that you've brought from Cornwall with you?

0:23:130:23:18

I have. We've got an amazing grower half a mile from the restaurant

0:23:180:23:24

and he grows a good amount of vegetables for us.

0:23:240:23:29

We just loving using it, especially at this time of year

0:23:290:23:32

with all the different styles of radish that we get.

0:23:320:23:36

Absolutely beautiful.

0:23:370:23:39

So, different types of white radish, pink radish,

0:23:390:23:42

and what are these long ones here?

0:23:420:23:44

They're almost like little carrots,

0:23:440:23:46

but they have the same characteristics

0:23:460:23:49

as the breakfast radishes.

0:23:490:23:51

That nice sort of pepperiness.

0:23:510:23:53

-I suppose this is like a mooli, is it?

-Yes!

0:23:530:23:57

-A baby mooli.

-Very much so.

0:23:570:23:59

And when you get these lovely tops, which are delicious,

0:23:590:24:02

we're going to almost use that as our salad as well.

0:24:020:24:06

You'll see, as this salad comes together.

0:24:060:24:09

Our steak is just doing wonderfully now.

0:24:090:24:11

Johnny, this time of year, what kind of oysters are these?

0:24:110:24:15

These are the rock oysters.

0:24:150:24:17

The native oysters are finished, but Paul was saying earlier,

0:24:170:24:21

they're from Porthilly, an estuary that runs from Padstow to Wadebridge.

0:24:210:24:25

What happens is the bloke actually put them in big sacks

0:24:250:24:29

when they're little babies,

0:24:290:24:30

and when the estuary comes in, they grow, and he turns them over

0:24:300:24:34

so they get bigger and bigger.

0:24:340:24:36

They're fantastic this time of year, really good quality.

0:24:360:24:39

-Good. Do they need to be purged?

-Absolutely.

0:24:390:24:44

Any shellfish, especially from an estuary,

0:24:440:24:48

grade B waters, will have to go into a purification tank

0:24:480:24:51

and be UV-ed for about 48 hours to kill any bacteria in the shellfish.

0:24:510:24:56

-UV?

-UV.

-What does UV mean?

-Sunbeds!

0:24:560:24:59

-So the oysters have to go on a sunbed!

-That's right!

0:24:590:25:04

So, what I've got here, Tom, Cornish new potatoes.

0:25:040:25:09

Right bang in with spring.

0:25:090:25:10

We've got peas - I'm not going to blanch those.

0:25:100:25:13

You know when you just eat them out of the pod?

0:25:130:25:16

It gives the salad a lovely texture.

0:25:160:25:18

-OK. So, this is a very raw, crunchy texture here?

-Yes.

0:25:180:25:23

Broad beans.

0:25:230:25:24

When you pop them, just pick the baby ones for the salad.

0:25:240:25:27

Use the larger ones to make soup.

0:25:270:25:29

Put some oil into this?

0:25:290:25:32

Yes, some rapeseed oil into there, and a little bit of garlic.

0:25:320:25:36

-Half a clove of garlic.

-Grated? Smashed up? Chopped?

0:25:360:25:39

Finely grated, please.

0:25:390:25:41

So that's our steak. That's it. It's all about the resting.

0:25:410:25:46

We'll just warm it up when we're ready to bring the dish together.

0:25:460:25:50

OK, so just rest the steak up.

0:25:500:25:52

Now, you're got lots of fantastic producers down your way in Cornwall.

0:25:520:25:56

It's a great area.

0:25:560:25:58

You looked at Johnny then,

0:25:580:26:01

questioning the fact that your fish man is great, I love that!

0:26:010:26:05

You know what they say, Paul!

0:26:050:26:06

It's a fantastic area for farms and produce.

0:26:060:26:10

The West Country is brilliant for that.

0:26:100:26:12

And, as a restaurateur, to be based down there, it must be brilliant.

0:26:120:26:16

Like we were saying about the farm up the road,

0:26:160:26:19

that we get a lot of vegetables from,

0:26:190:26:21

this steak that we're using -

0:26:210:26:23

we have an amazing butcher in Launceston.

0:26:230:26:25

This steak is from near Truro.

0:26:250:26:28

We're very fortunate. Great lamb...

0:26:280:26:30

We've not really been known for pork in the West Country

0:26:300:26:34

but the pork coming through now, we've got amazing saddlebacks,

0:26:340:26:37

middle whites down there, so, like you were saying,

0:26:370:26:40

we're very privileged to have the produce that we've got.

0:26:400:26:43

It is fantastic area.

0:26:430:26:45

We actually... Even though I'm based just outside London,

0:26:450:26:49

we actually take a lot of produce from the West Country

0:26:490:26:52

because it's so strong and rich,

0:26:520:26:54

with great farmland, and surrounded by coastline.

0:26:540:26:57

Perfect for you, Johnny!

0:26:570:27:00

The best fish in the world.

0:27:000:27:02

-Me and you, Paul, we've known each other a long time.

-We have, Tom.

0:27:020:27:07

In 1998, I first walked into a kitchen,

0:27:070:27:10

and I was actually Paul's sous-chef in 1998.

0:27:100:27:14

I was a sous-chef for the great Gary Rhodes.

0:27:140:27:18

Paul was there as a fresh-faced young commis.

0:27:180:27:21

He still has the fresh face - he still looks about 17!

0:27:210:27:25

But he's grown up, gone on to great things.

0:27:250:27:30

You left Gary's and you went on to work for Gordon,

0:27:300:27:34

-and then for the great Marcus Wareing as well.

-Yes, good times.

0:27:340:27:39

And now has a Michelin star of your own.

0:27:390:27:41

Yes. It's been a great journey. I've worked for some fantastic people.

0:27:410:27:47

How are we getting on?

0:27:470:27:48

We're there. It's important when you're resting the steak,

0:27:480:27:53

you see how the juice is coming, just turn it

0:27:530:27:56

so the juices run back through the meat.

0:27:560:27:59

You don't have to heat it back up.

0:27:590:28:01

I always get asked that question - if you rest it, it goes cold.

0:28:010:28:05

It doesn't, just lovely room warmth.

0:28:050:28:08

-I'll get the oyster mayonnaise.

-Lovely.

0:28:080:28:11

We can actually use the one that I made, Paul,

0:28:110:28:15

because this one actually worked!

0:28:150:28:16

The one you made before was delicious! Slightly soupy!

0:28:170:28:22

The new one's delicious!

0:28:220:28:25

This is what I love about Paul being one of my great mates.

0:28:250:28:30

We spend a lot of time with each other and away,

0:28:300:28:32

and the fact that at one point I was his boss,

0:28:320:28:36

but that doesn't stop him taking the Mick.

0:28:360:28:39

You've got to love that.

0:28:390:28:41

-So, we need to get this out now, Paul.

-Absolutely.

0:28:410:28:45

Oyster mayonnaise onto the plate. You've got your salad going.

0:28:450:28:48

-There we are.

-I'll put the salad into the bowl.

0:28:480:28:50

I've just put some of that tartare dressing we've made

0:28:500:28:53

with that beautiful rapeseed. Another great British ingredient.

0:28:530:28:57

Yeah, rapeseed oil is fantastic. I'm a huge fan of it.

0:28:570:29:01

I'll just wash my hands and we're ready to go.

0:29:010:29:04

-You're going to slice the steak.

-Yes.

0:29:040:29:07

Get ready to eat, guys.

0:29:070:29:09

I'm throwing peas at the cameraman!

0:29:090:29:11

Sorry, boys! You can have them later!

0:29:110:29:15

Going to put the salad on the side.

0:29:150:29:17

Come on, guys. Come on up.

0:29:180:29:21

Paul's slicing his steak. Let's hope it is not overcooked!

0:29:210:29:25

Look at that, Chef. You taught me well!

0:29:250:29:28

You taught me well.

0:29:280:29:30

Brilliant, brilliant. Beautiful steak.

0:29:320:29:34

Then we dress it with the salad immediately.

0:29:340:29:37

Dig in. You do not want it to sit for too long.

0:29:370:29:40

We are just going to have that in there.

0:29:400:29:43

Take some more of that lovely dressing, over the top.

0:29:430:29:47

Almost like a salsa verde.

0:29:470:29:49

-Very similar.

-There we are. There we have it.

0:29:490:29:53

Help yourself.

0:29:530:29:55

Cornish steak, oyster mayonnaise and a beautiful spring salad.

0:29:550:29:59

-Delicious.

-Happy with that? Happy with that, Johnny?

0:29:590:30:04

-Try a bit of that.

-A bit of that oyster mayonnaise.

0:30:040:30:07

Radishes and potatoes.

0:30:070:30:10

That is lovely.

0:30:100:30:12

OK, While we eat this, let's take a trip into the BBC's food

0:30:120:30:16

back catalogue as Rick Stein rustles up some spicy prawns in India.

0:30:160:30:20

There's something about a curry that's all pervading.

0:30:230:30:27

Just the thought of it ignites a longing deep inside us.

0:30:270:30:31

It is the only food I can think of where the sense of smell works

0:30:320:30:37

so wonderfully well with memory and imagination.

0:30:370:30:41

At the mere mention of the word, I sense turmeric,

0:30:410:30:43

coriander, garlic and cumin.

0:30:430:30:47

No other food I know gives the taste buds such a roller coaster ride.

0:30:470:30:51

For nearly three months,

0:30:550:30:57

I travelled all over India, tasting curries

0:30:570:30:59

and watching cooks, trying to find out their secrets,

0:30:590:31:03

because curry is full of complexities

0:31:030:31:06

and it's taken very seriously here and I wanted to show that there's

0:31:060:31:11

more to curry than three pints of lager and a prawn vindaloo.

0:31:110:31:16

First-class curry, Ricky.

0:31:170:31:19

So back at the little house on the lagoon,

0:31:200:31:23

it's time to cook a brilliant prawn curry I had at a restaurant in Kolkata.

0:31:230:31:26

And as soon as I tasted it, I said, "I've got to cook that."

0:31:260:31:31

Gosh, it's really hot today, but I love where I'm cooking.

0:31:330:31:37

Now, I've just added some mustard oil into this very lovely pan.

0:31:370:31:41

When you first see the amount of mustard that goes

0:31:410:31:44

into Bengali cooking, you think, that is far too much,

0:31:440:31:49

and you have to get used to the flavour of mustard seed.

0:31:490:31:52

It's not like the flavour of our hot English mustard.

0:31:520:31:55

It's that really bitter, pungent flavour which comes

0:31:550:31:58

when you whizz up the seeds, because the seeds are little,

0:31:580:32:02

like, cases that encase this wonderful, slightly moist

0:32:020:32:05

but very, very vigorous flavour which is in all Bengali cooking.

0:32:050:32:10

It's really important, I think, in all Indian cooking,

0:32:130:32:16

cook your onions for a long time at a moderate heat

0:32:160:32:20

so they don't burn but they get this lovely brown colour.

0:32:200:32:24

Then, in a blender, grind up a couple of ounces of mustard seed into a coarse paste.

0:32:260:32:32

That'll give this dish of prawns and coconut a real hot zing.

0:32:320:32:35

You don't want to blend them too much

0:32:380:32:40

cos that becomes a very sort of smooth puree,

0:32:400:32:43

you need a little bit of warp and weft in it,

0:32:430:32:45

a bit of mustard husk in there.

0:32:450:32:48

Good. Right, my onions are nearly done.

0:32:480:32:50

Now turmeric. A teaspoonful.

0:32:500:32:53

Experienced curry cooks never overdo the turmeric.

0:32:530:32:56

It has a way of dominating the other flavours.

0:32:560:32:59

Then coconut milk.

0:33:010:33:02

And this is made fresh out here

0:33:020:33:04

but if I was at home, I wouldn't hesitate to use a tin from the supermarket.

0:33:040:33:08

And next, of course, the mustard paste.

0:33:110:33:14

So even from this far it's sort of catching the back of my throat.

0:33:140:33:19

And as I keep saying,

0:33:190:33:21

that flavour that, you know, it's like so much in cooking,

0:33:210:33:24

the first time you taste something we're all a bit conservative.

0:33:240:33:28

And you think, "Oh, I'm not going to like that",

0:33:280:33:30

and then after a while you think, "I can't have enough of it".

0:33:300:33:32

And that's the case with mustard.

0:33:320:33:34

And next, the grated coconut.

0:33:340:33:37

About a teaspoon of salt.

0:33:450:33:48

Stir that in and now the prawns.

0:33:480:33:51

And while it's cooking I'm just going to chop up some green chillies.

0:33:510:33:55

The vexed question of whether you leave the seeds in or take 'em out.

0:33:550:34:00

You know, I like spicy but I must say, a couple of these recipes,

0:34:000:34:04

I'm sort of sending the recipes home back to Padstow

0:34:040:34:07

and my son Jack is testing a lot of them.

0:34:070:34:10

And this particular one he sent me the e-mail saying,

0:34:100:34:13

"Delicious, Dad, but nobody could eat it. Too hot."

0:34:130:34:17

And I think the problem really is...

0:34:170:34:19

That's about three or four chillies,

0:34:190:34:21

The problem really is that I've just got a bit immune to chilli.

0:34:210:34:25

So it's up to you.

0:34:250:34:27

But for me and for the guys that drink lots of beer

0:34:300:34:33

and like our prawn vindaloo as hot as possible, leave 'em in.

0:34:330:34:38

Thank you very much. That's your next-door neighbour.

0:34:460:34:49

-Smashing in India. I love Rick Stein.

-He's incredible.

0:34:490:34:53

Throughout this series, we are showcasing some real key

0:34:530:34:56

seasonal ingredients that are at their absolute best this time of year.

0:34:560:35:00

Today I'm going to be doing a recipe with pan-fried red mullet,

0:35:000:35:03

-seared cucumber. I need Paul Ainsworth to make a beurre blanc for me.

-Absolutely.

0:35:030:35:07

That is the first thing you're going to do.

0:35:070:35:10

Red mullet, this is a fantastic fish.

0:35:100:35:13

Very seasonal. Quite hard to get hold of. Is that right, John?

0:35:130:35:16

Really difficult to get hold of.

0:35:160:35:18

Through the winter months, you hardly see it,

0:35:180:35:21

and as soon as it goes into spring, they show up.

0:35:210:35:23

-Very nice. Especially day boat ones like that.

-This is beautiful.

0:35:230:35:27

You were telling me about this in rehearsal,

0:35:270:35:30

the slight yellow colouring on top of the fish.

0:35:300:35:33

You can see it there where the scales have been taken off,

0:35:330:35:37

but red mullet have three yellow stripes going down the middle of it.

0:35:370:35:42

If you have one for more than two days, the yellow stripes

0:35:420:35:47

disappear, so you know you have a nice fresh one when you see them.

0:35:470:35:50

So you're looking for beautiful red and yellow.

0:35:500:35:54

-Red and yellow.

-Where do they come from?

0:35:540:35:58

Just off Looe in Cornwall.

0:35:580:36:01

They are inshore boats.

0:36:010:36:03

They're only there for 12-15 hours, the boats.

0:36:030:36:06

-Only?

-That's not long in fishing terms.

-A lot of boats go out for longer.

0:36:060:36:12

Two to three weeks in some cases.

0:36:120:36:14

-Imagine there are fish that are three weeks old.

-Packed on ice.

0:36:140:36:19

But these little day boats, literally for 12 hours,

0:36:190:36:24

when it comes in it is fresh.

0:36:240:36:27

You can get it to the plate quite quickly.

0:36:270:36:30

Quite a delicious flavour, considering what it feeds on.

0:36:300:36:34

If you knew what they sort of feed on.

0:36:340:36:37

Yes, they are bottom feeders, but a lot of them do taste nice.

0:36:370:36:41

You mean they are at the bottom of the ocean.

0:36:410:36:44

-LAUGHTER

-You always have to do that.

0:36:440:36:46

They go down and feed off what is at the bottom, a bit like crabs.

0:36:460:36:49

Crabs taste delicious as well but they literally are the dustbins of the sea.

0:36:490:36:53

Red mullet are the same. But I think it's a really good, beautiful fish to eat.

0:36:530:36:57

We have got red mullet here and it is in the pan.

0:36:570:37:00

Instead of red mullet, you could use gurnard.

0:37:000:37:03

Gurnard is a fantastic fish, again from Cornish waters.

0:37:030:37:08

Yes, you get red gurnards in the summer months.

0:37:080:37:12

They are a smashing fish,

0:37:140:37:16

they work very well, very similar to red mullet.

0:37:160:37:19

A fraction of the price.

0:37:190:37:21

OK. To go with the red mullet, I'm going

0:37:210:37:25

to cook a little piece of cucumber.

0:37:250:37:27

Not often that people cook cucumber.

0:37:270:37:29

I have taken the top of it off and exposed the lovely seeds.

0:37:290:37:35

I will put them in a pan, it has some oil in, and I am going to fry it.

0:37:350:37:39

These seeds go toasty.

0:37:400:37:42

It is like, I suppose, cucumber popcorn, that flavour comes through.

0:37:450:37:50

You can keep the cucumber for sandwiches.

0:37:500:37:54

We are just doing it for here.

0:37:540:37:57

Paul, you have a new album coming out.

0:37:570:38:01

Yes, it is not a Paul Young album, it is Los Pacaminos,

0:38:010:38:05

a band which I have had for 22 years.

0:38:050:38:09

Longer than the Beatles, and still nobody knows us.

0:38:090:38:13

Really, I didn't want people to know us.

0:38:130:38:16

I wanted it to stay in bars and small theatres,

0:38:160:38:19

but we made this new album and it is too good to waste, so I decided

0:38:190:38:26

to get a proper record company, an official release date,

0:38:260:38:30

and promote it as, like, a side project.

0:38:300:38:33

Do you sing in the band or do you play an instrument?

0:38:330:38:36

I do both, but I wanted to get back to being in a band.

0:38:360:38:39

The one thing I missed the most... I was a reluctant solo star.

0:38:390:38:42

I took the deal because it was offered, but I was very happy

0:38:420:38:45

being in a band, which was the Q-Tips, a soul band,

0:38:450:38:48

and I wanted to get back to being in a band.

0:38:480:38:51

So it is kind of soul music?

0:38:510:38:52

No, no, no. Not at all, it is just the feeling of being with your friends.

0:38:520:38:56

-Right.

-I did not want to just be the front guy.

0:38:560:38:59

I am choosing Jamie because he sings and plays the guitar.

0:38:590:39:02

Drew is a great songwriter with a lovely voice.

0:39:020:39:04

We chop and change.

0:39:040:39:05

If you think, like, Mark Ronson would put an album out,

0:39:050:39:08

He has got Amy Winehouse on one track and somebody else on another track.

0:39:080:39:11

We write the songs, we choose the person who is good to sing that song.

0:39:110:39:15

You could do something for the three of us.

0:39:150:39:17

-Do a duet together.

-All in blue shirts, all of us. We look like a band.

0:39:170:39:22

A very bad boy band.

0:39:220:39:24

You could be the dancer, Paul.

0:39:240:39:27

Show us some moves.

0:39:270:39:29

It is so much fun to do. We've got stand-ins.

0:39:290:39:33

Jamie is going to go off with Tom Jones soon.

0:39:330:39:36

We get Robbie McIntosh, who was in the Pretenders

0:39:360:39:39

and Paul McCartney's band.

0:39:390:39:42

We had Jim Cregan, who was in Rod Stewart's band.

0:39:420:39:46

We had Hamish Stuart from the Average White Band

0:39:460:39:49

playing bass couple of nights ago.

0:39:490:39:51

It is so much fun that once somebody has done it once,

0:39:510:39:55

they want to do it again.

0:39:550:39:57

OK, so just a quick recap of what we have got here.

0:39:570:40:00

The cucumber is being fried here. It has got a lovely,

0:40:000:40:04

really toasty colour, and that flavour almost goes nutty.

0:40:040:40:09

Into that, put a little knob of butter and some salt,

0:40:090:40:12

and what Paul has done is made a classic beurre blanc.

0:40:120:40:15

And what he has done is he has put some shallots in

0:40:150:40:18

and covered them with white wine vinegar.

0:40:180:40:21

He has reduced it down, given it a little blend,

0:40:210:40:24

gently incorporated some butter.

0:40:240:40:26

-Do you need a whisk?

-Yes, thank you.

0:40:260:40:30

Paul is trying to use a spoon rather than using a whisk.

0:40:300:40:33

This is the great thing about chefs, we use a spoon for everything.

0:40:330:40:36

Isn't that right, Paul?

0:40:360:40:38

Works for everything. It's not working with a whisk.

0:40:380:40:41

Childhood memories of growing up, Paul -

0:40:440:40:46

what sort of food did you have?

0:40:460:40:48

Quite basic food. My mum made a mean Irish stew.

0:40:500:40:53

It was all the usual growing up things.

0:40:550:40:57

I was slow to appreciate food.

0:40:570:40:59

That did not happen until late teens, early 20s.

0:40:590:41:03

OK. OK.

0:41:030:41:06

What has happened is this red mullet,

0:41:060:41:08

I have just flicked it over, we have

0:41:080:41:10

a nice crispy skin, finish it with a little splash of butter,

0:41:100:41:15

then give it a little slice of lemon juice,

0:41:150:41:18

little splash in there, then we are going

0:41:180:41:21

to baste it up.

0:41:210:41:23

Just finish that cooking.

0:41:230:41:25

What happens if you add butter at the end rather than the

0:41:250:41:28

beginning, all those kind of buttermilks in the pan boil.

0:41:280:41:31

It steams it from the bottom upwards.

0:41:310:41:35

You have a nice, crispy beautiful skin. Unfortunately the three

0:41:350:41:40

little yellow marks have gone,

0:41:400:41:42

but we have a lovely, beautiful red mullet there.

0:41:420:41:45

The cucumber has been toasted and fried.

0:41:470:41:50

It has that lovely flavour.

0:41:500:41:52

Paul has got beurre blanc, this classic French sauce

0:41:520:41:58

which goes with fish very well.

0:41:580:42:01

You could use that for any fish you wanted.

0:42:010:42:05

It goes really well with most fish dishes.

0:42:050:42:07

You could use smoked butter if you like. It goes very well.

0:42:100:42:14

With meat, you could use a smoked butter dish, with perhaps chicken or pork.

0:42:150:42:19

A bit of that cucumber, nice piece of fish on the side.

0:42:190:42:25

-That sauce there.

-That sauce there. Look at that.

0:42:250:42:28

Everything has been way better than in rehearsal. You can come back.

0:42:280:42:31

Little bit of the butter sauce on the top.

0:42:330:42:36

That is beautiful.

0:42:360:42:38

We are going to put some borage cress on there.

0:42:380:42:40

I am not normally a massive cress fan,

0:42:400:42:42

but borage cress tastes of cucumber,

0:42:420:42:45

so it has got this beautiful cucumbery taste.

0:42:450:42:47

Come on over, guys.

0:42:470:42:49

Then we've got these beautiful little cucumber flowers

0:42:490:42:52

that can sit on the top.

0:42:520:42:54

You've got this cucumber... Get in there and start eating.

0:42:540:42:56

-Knives and forks, help yourselves.

-Here we go again.

0:42:560:42:59

We have beautiful red mullet, beurre blanc, toasted cucumber.

0:42:590:43:04

Get in there and have a little taste. Skin nice and crispy.

0:43:040:43:07

The flavour of that red mullet is amazing.

0:43:070:43:11

Very meaty, quite powerful and quite strong.

0:43:110:43:14

Happy? Love it? Mm-mm-mm.

0:43:140:43:17

Loads of "Mm"s. That's great.

0:43:170:43:19

That is all from us on Spring Kitchen today.

0:43:190:43:22

A massive thank you to Paul Ainsworth, Johnny Godden and

0:43:220:43:25

Paul Young. And of course, Angela Hartnett and Luke Holder.

0:43:250:43:29

All of the recipes are available on the website.

0:43:290:43:32

Go to bbc.co.uk/springkitchen.

0:43:320:43:36

Thanks for watching. See you next time.

0:43:360:43:38