Episode 3 Snowdonia 1890


Episode 3

During the Jones and Braddock families' second week of life as 1890 Snowdonia smallholders, making ends meet is proving a struggle.


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Transcript


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'In Spring 2010, two families volunteered to go back in time.'

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'Bye, 'Bye.

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'The Joneses from Denbigh, North Wales

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'and the Braddocks from Abergavenny, South Wales.

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'Their destination, 19th century Snowdonia

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'and a unique way of life.'

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Get them all together.

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It's getting a bit stressful now.

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If they come asking for the rent, we're finished.

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How do you move a cow?

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'For one month, they'll face a battle for survival

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'that combined both farm and quarry.'

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You will not talk of unions here.

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'A Welsh way of life long since abandoned.

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We do not speak Welsh in school.

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I'm too scared to eat just in case we haven't got anything left.

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Give me respect, you'll get it back.

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It is the hardest thing I've done in all my life.

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'Coming up, temper flare at a football match.'

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Concentrate or you won't play properly.

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'Tommy takes centre stage.'

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I was nervous. I was extremely nervous.

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Because I've done really bad and I've let him down.

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'And there's trouble brewing at the quarry.'

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There's the door, you can go now and you've lost everything.

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'It's the families' second week

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'of living on their 19th century Snowdonian smallholding.

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'And they're still struggling with their new lives.

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Oh! Bloody hell!

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Just got to watch your feet.

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It's nice having animals. It's not as nice having to look after them!

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-Keep going.

-It's alright for you.

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I'll show who's boss!

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Sh!

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'With food running out, rent due,

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'and no pay until the end of the month,

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'the families need to get their hands on some cash.'

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I've never put chicken in a sack before.

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-Lay his head out.

-He's got to go.

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'David has hit on a money making scheme.'

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'I've agreed to sell two chickens to the quarry steward.

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I'll supply a chicken and he'll supply one

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and we'll split the money.

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We're supposed to get a shilling for two, six pence each.

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Bring a chicken to work day! A new theme in the quarry.

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'Smallholders were known for their self-reliance

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'and made money whenever and however they could.'

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Between the two families, I counted two cows, ten chickens.

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-We can't sell all our livestock, though.

-No. We need it all, though.

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ALL: Morning. Bore da.

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'At the quarry, Mr Humphries, the steward, is waiting.

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Morning. How are you? Nice and early, lads. Very good.

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-Are these the chickens, David?

-Yes.

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Let's have a quick look, before I pass any money to you.

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CLUCKING

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Good producer of eggs, that bird. Very good.

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-Brown eggs?

-Yes. Lovely.

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That's a shilling.

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Diolch yn fawr iawn. Thank you very much.

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'With twelve pennies to the shilling,

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'each family is now sixpence richer.

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'And the Braddocks are about to acquire an additional wage.'

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Did you ask your parents, Tommy, about the possibility

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-of your becoming a pupil teacher?

-They would be happy for me to.

-Good.

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Now your moment has arrived.

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Will you come forward, please, with the geography book?

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'In 1890, childhood ended early for the working classes.

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'At 13, children left school in pursuit of a wage,

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'or, like Tommy, remained as pupil teachers.'

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-Questions, now.

-OK.

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How long is the English border in length? Jac.

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-355 miles?

-No. I've got 3,000 miles.

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I might be wrong.

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Are you sure that is the question you should be asking?

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-Erm, is it the English-

-So the question is not the border,

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-but the English?

-Coastline.

-Coastline.

-Sorry, guys.

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Change the question.

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'Tommy's weekly wage will be a much needed bonus for the Braddocks,

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'if he can hold his nerve.'

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I was nervous. Yeah. I was extremely nervous.

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Erm, I was shaking, actually.

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But, erm...I felt pleased to sit in Sir's chair.

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'At the smallholding, Alisa Braddock is doing her best

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to feed her family.

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The last time I remember I cooked anything was in school at 13.

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The children aren't starving. Which is good.

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I'm attempting to put food on the table, so...

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I think I'm doing OK.

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Could be better. I think it's easier if you're born into this living.

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It's a good job we've got a vegetable patch.

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'Despite a busy household schedule, Alisa still finds time

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for her basic beauty routine.'

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I have this fantastic thing that I've found.

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This here is...it started off as milk

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that we milked from the cow, from Ruth, our cow.

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The milk sits for a day, then you take the cream off for butter.

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Then you milk more, take more cream off the top.

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Milk more, take more cream off the top.

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Then you're left with this beautiful cream

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which we're supposed to make butter with, which is fine,

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but I'm going to keep some back.

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Because if you look, it's got this beautiful consistency

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and it is amazing as moisturiser.

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And it doesn't smell, it's just absolutely lovely.

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It is so...

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You know, it's got that right sort of...

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Oh, just amazing texture. Better than moisturiser.

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So...

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That's my tip of the day, alright? Keep it to yourselves.

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'Catrin Jones is checking on the livestock.'

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Hello.

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I think I'm getting most attached to the animals at the minute.

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I don't know if it's because I'm here all day with them

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and I am finding myself speaking to them and feeling ridiculous.

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'Each family has been given a flock

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'of six heavily pregnant Welsh mountain sheep.'

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'As inexperienced shepherds, lambing is an anxious time for the families.

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The women used to lamb in 1890, because their hands were smaller

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than men. Men have obviously got bigger hands.

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So if you need to start pulling a head or the front legs out,

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it's a lot easier if you've got smaller hands.

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She's struggling, there, isn't she?

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Yeah, I think she's very near.

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I don't think I'll get much sleep. We'll work out a rota tonight,

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between us, so somebody's watching them.

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'At the quarry, the men are making a last-ditch attempt

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'to re-negotiate the pay terms of their contract, the bargen,

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'with Mr Humphries.'

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We've been offered 35 shillings.

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-Where?

-We're not saying.

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We're not prepared to say, but we've been offered 35 shillings.

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That shows you how much experience you've got as quarrymen.

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The bargen has been set every month.

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You won't get into a quarry here until the end of the month.

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Would you like to go out now and get work?

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You will not get it. All the bargens have been set for this month.

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We can start next week on a bargen of 35 shillings.

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Our position is that we want to have this bargen

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reviewed at the end of this week.

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If you walk out, you walk out with nothing.

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Many men are looking for work outside this valley.

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Maybe you can tell Mr Cornwallis-West what I've told you.

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I will tell him. If you threaten Mr Cornwallis-West...

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He's your landlord, for God's sake.

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I'm not threatening him, I'm telling you what we've been offered.

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I have a wife and two children at home,

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and if I can earn better money elsewhere,

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then it's only natural.

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The way you've been working in this quarry,

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you'll be very hard-pressed to get work anywhere.

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There's the door. You can go now and you've lost everything.

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'There's no negotiating with the Steward.

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'The men return to work.'

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He told us we won't be able to find work elsewhere.

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He'll put he mockers on that, basically.

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Stop us working elsewhere.

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So I don't know what we're going to do.

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'At the schoolhouse, the children are preparing for a geography test.'

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Let us recap on what we have already read.

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Let's see...Leah.

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Do you remember what latitude means? Leah?

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-Is it when you're an island?

-No.

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I told you this last week. You should remember.

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It is important that we memorise these things.

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That is what our minds are for.

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The only way we can remember them is by repeating them,

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again and again and again.

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Practice makes, all together... ALL: Perfect.

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'In 1890, teaching was focused on learning by rote.

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'For nine-year-old Leah Braddock, it's a struggle.'

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Tomorrow you will be tested, and of course, Tommy,

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-I hope you will be assisting.

-Yes, Sir.

-Good.

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It will be effecting the amount of payment you get as pupil teacher.

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I'm going to do my hardest in the test for Tommy,

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because he really wants the money for the family.

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It's important that they do pass the test for their education,

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so yes, I am going to push them.

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'For the women, too, these are testing times.'

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Alisa!

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Come and have a look at the lamb! We've got a new lamb!

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Look, it's getting onto its feet.

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-Where? Well!

-Minutes old!

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She must've done that this afternoon.

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I think mum looks quite happy, there. She's quite calm.

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All the other sheep have left them alone.

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Aw! So cute!

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-It's one of ours, is it? It's a Braddock sheep.

-Yes.

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'Each family has marked their sheep with a distinctive pitch stain,

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'so they can identify them from a distance.'

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-They're so cute.

-It's quite a good size, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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She's trying to feed, I think.

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Oh yeah, she's feeding.

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'This first lamb has birthed quickly and safely.'

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I want to cuddle one. Well done!

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Yes!

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'Equally as valuable to the families are their pigs.

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'Alisa and Catrin have summoned the butcher.'

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I was thinking, did you want to sell the pigs?

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-Erm, I don't think we'll mind one going.

-Just the one, please.

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Do you want any meat back?

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That would be great.

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We are struggling, really, to feed these men.

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Two pound five shillings and you keep the best parts.

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-Erm, OK then.

-Brilliant, yeah.

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-Quite happy.

-Quite happy with that.

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-Two pounds and five shillings, then. We'd better...

-We've struck a deal.

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Sold. Thank you very much. Thank you.

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One pound two and six, there, for you.

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One pound two and six, there, for you, as well.

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Nice doing business with you.

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-Quite happy with that. I like pork. Like a bit of pork.

-Yes.

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SQUEAL

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Nice apple sauce, now, I'm thinking.

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-Sausages would be nice.

-Yes, and some stuffing will.

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'Not only could pigs be sold to raise money,

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'or used to pay rent in kind,

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'but an animal could feed a family for a year, if preserved.'

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Oh no! My washing! I'm going to die if he knocks that over!

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'Having failed to increase their pay,

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'the men face a damp walk home from the quarry.

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It's going to be a struggle, now. Another two weeks with what?

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-Couple of pennies.

-Yeah.

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'As they near the smallholding, local poacher, Llywarch Jones,

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makes an unexpected appearance.

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-Hi, lads.

-Hello.

-Busy day?

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-Yes. How are you?

-Hardworking?

-Yes.

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How about going for some rabbit?

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-Yeah, that'd be great. Yeah.

-With some ferrets.

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And hopefully you'll have a rabbit for tomorrow in the pot.

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ALL: Yeah.

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'With food supplies dwindling, Llywarch's offer is a welcome one.'

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The main thing is to close up every hole with a net.

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You open that over a hole, when the rabbit bolts out

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it'll close up on him like a purse.

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'The search for rabbits has led the men onto a neighbour's land.'

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I'll hopefully have food tomorrow for them. If not, they'll be starving.

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'Legally, any rabbits they trap belong to the landowner.

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'If caught, they could face a stiff fine for poaching.

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'The prospect of free meat is too tempting.'

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We don't have much food at the moment.

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It'd be nice to get a couple of rabbits.

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Maybe a couple each.

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It'd be handy for a stew.

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SHOUT

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-It's the idiot's guide to rabbiting.

-It pricks your head, doesn't it.

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-I think they might know we're coming!

-Do you reckon?

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OK, lads. He's going in now. Be quiet, OK?

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At the moment we've found no rabbits and I'm a bit bored.

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I can see me and Jamie throwing stones in about two minutes' time.

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'The heavy-footed novices have a lot to learn.

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We're not going to catch anything, are we?

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Call it a day.

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I think we was noisy on the approach, putting nets down.

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We was stomping about and shouting back and fore and things.

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I think they decided to stay in their holes

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and didn't want to make for freedom because they knew we was outside.

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It didn't go to plan.

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'But it's not been a completely wasted trip.

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LAUGHTER

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-That's fantastic.

-'Llywarch's home brew is a welcome lift.'

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There'll be singing at home tonight!

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-How do we get hold of some of that?

-Don't ask too many questions!

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Who cares if we signed a pledge, eh? That's medicinal!

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-Look at the ferret sleeping.

-He's had a good workout.

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-Sorry you didn't catch anything, lads.

-Can we come again?

-Anytime.

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'At the smallholding, the women are waiting.

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-Good day? No fines?

-No.

-Good.

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'The new lamb is a welcome sight.'

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-That's lovely, isn't it?

-That's very new.

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It's only a couple of hours old, isn't it?

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And it's alright? We don't need to bring it in or anything?

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-No, it's fine.

-It's a relief, more than anything.

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-Come and look.

-Jac, we've got a new arrival.

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-When did it lamb?

-Just after lunchtime.

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I'm going to knit it a little scarf.

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'The sale of a pig has remedied the families' short-term money worries,

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'but David Jones is still concerned.'

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My worry is that we have money now, but nothing untoward has happened,

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there's been no demand for rent, I'm sure that must be coming.

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We are struggling in the quarry.

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So we are relying, at the moment, totally on the women.

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We've managed to catch nothing between us, the men.

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No rabbits. So the breadwinners at the moment are the women.

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We're going to work and we're earning nothing.

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I'm surprised Catrin hasn't said to me, "Why are you going?"

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'At the Braddocks, dwindling food supplies

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'have set family tensions rising.'

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We've had a lot of issues with Jamie with the food.

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He thinks he can eat it, but we're trying to tell him it's got to last

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the rest of the week, or that's got to go between six people.

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He had difficulty grasping that.

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'At the Joneses, the provisions of meat and bread given to the family

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'on arrival are long gone.

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'They settle down to a meal of vegetable stew and home-made bread.

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'But Catrin's baking isn't to everyone's liking.'

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The bread. The bread's the worst bread.

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-What's this bread?

-The bread's not good. I know.

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-It's nice when you dunk it in soup.

-Can I spit this out?

-No.

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You've stuffed it all in at once.

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-It's not nice.

-It's like unleavened bread.

-What's that?

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Yeah. It is.

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-The bread tastes like alcohol.

-It's nice.

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Eat it, eat it.

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LAUGHTER

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-It's not that bad.

-The bread is.

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'Next morning...'

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Alright, alright.

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I've got this battle every morning.

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For about an hour.

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How many miles in length is the coastline of England?

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'Today is the children's geography test.

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-Three thousand.

-Three thousand. That's the width, Jac.

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-What's the capital of England.

-London.

-And what's the population?

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-In 1890?

-Four million. The equivalent ofthe whole of Scotland.

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Well done.

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'At the Braddocks, Tommy has overslept.

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Tommy! Come on!

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He's gone back to bed. I don't know. He won't get up.

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Tommy?

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'He's supposed to be helping Leah with her revision.'

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-Right. See you later.

-See you later.

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Tommy. Get up, you lazy sausage.

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-Ta-ta.

-Bye.

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I've got to quickly have breakfast, now,

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and then help Leah revise so it's my fault if she fails, now.

0:22:340:22:39

I've had a lie-in.

0:22:390:22:40

'The men are off to the quarry.

0:22:400:22:43

Is that Jac's cap?

0:22:460:22:49

-It's not mine.

-Does anything fit you?

0:22:490:22:52

-You forgot something.

-Oh yeah. Kiss.

0:22:520:22:56

See you, Jac.

0:22:570:22:59

See you.

0:23:000:23:02

Can we go now, then?

0:23:040:23:06

'Today's their last day before an enforced four day Easter break,

0:23:070:23:10

'and they're concerned about meeting their slate production target.'

0:23:100:23:14

-How many slates have we made so far?

-We haven't counted yet.

0:23:140:23:20

-About fifteen hundred, I reckon.

-Is it?

0:23:220:23:25

It's the sizes, then. They price the sizes.

0:23:270:23:30

-So we're not too bad.

-Nah.

0:23:300:23:33

'They need to produce 3,000 top-quality slates

0:23:330:23:38

'in order to get paid their 30 shillings at the end of the month.

0:23:380:23:43

'At the quarry, there's an unwelcome surprise.'

0:23:480:23:52

We had a pile of 20 x 10s there yesterday.

0:23:520:23:56

About fifty. They're not there today.

0:23:570:24:00

-We'll ask Mr Humphries.

-There's a gap where we left them.

0:24:000:24:04

It's disappeared and we've got to make fifty slates to replace them.

0:24:060:24:10

They were good slates, too. They were the best we had.

0:24:110:24:14

'Suspicion falls on the Steward.

0:24:160:24:18

We're a bit concerned, as well, Mr Steward,

0:24:180:24:21

that some slates have gone missing.

0:24:210:24:23

-You're taking slates home with you, then.

-No, we're not.

0:24:230:24:27

-We've lost fifty slates.

-You count them every night?

0:24:270:24:30

That's how we know fifty are missing.

0:24:300:24:33

And...I hope you're not blaming me.

0:24:330:24:36

So it's back to work.

0:24:410:24:43

(Tried my hardest!)

0:24:430:24:45

I do believe that he is taking them and selling them for his benefit.

0:24:480:24:55

But we can't accuse him of that,

0:24:550:24:57

because if we do, we'll lose our jobs.

0:24:570:24:59

'With the men's pay packet under threat,

0:25:040:25:07

Tommy's pupil teacher wage is all the more important.

0:25:070:25:11

Now then. Geography.

0:25:110:25:15

Which is the largest island...

0:25:150:25:18

'How much he earns depends on how well the children do in the test.'

0:25:180:25:23

How long is Great Britain?

0:25:230:25:25

Number three. Where are the mountainous areas of Britain?

0:25:280:25:33

'Leah is struggling.'

0:25:330:25:35

Most of the rivers of Great Britain flow eastwards into which sea?

0:25:360:25:41

Question nineteen.

0:25:450:25:47

How long is the coastline of England?

0:25:490:25:52

Put your blotters over your work to dry the ink.

0:25:560:25:59

I know Leah missed out a lot of questions.

0:26:000:26:03

I would've liked her to just write anything, it's better than nothing.

0:26:040:26:09

I've done really bad and I've let him down.

0:26:090:26:14

'Alisa and Catrin are trying to make butter to sell in the village shop.'

0:26:200:26:24

It's like scrambled egg.

0:26:260:26:29

I've never paddled butter before. Have you, Alisa?

0:26:290:26:33

We'll give one a go, anyway.

0:26:330:26:35

Is that enough for one block?

0:26:350:26:37

-Bit more liquid in that, isn't there? Seems a bit more mushy.

-Gooey.

0:26:370:26:42

-It's getting there.

-It's coming.

0:26:420:26:44

I'm sure it will set.

0:26:460:26:49

Ta-da! Yey! Our first butter!

0:26:510:26:53

'Butter-making was an important source of income for smallholders.

0:26:550:26:59

'Local farmer's wife, Margaret Davies,

0:26:590:27:02

'is on hand to offer advice.'

0:27:020:27:05

We're having problems with the butter, Margaret.

0:27:060:27:09

You've worked hard.

0:27:090:27:11

We thought we'd cracked it.

0:27:110:27:13

It's not butter. I'm sorry. Not one of them's butter.

0:27:200:27:24

-Is it more cream, then?

-Hmm.

0:27:240:27:28

Oh dear, girls. Still use it for cooking, can't you?

0:27:280:27:31

-Try, try again.

-Try, try again. We've got to get it right.

0:27:320:27:35

You're enjoying this cream, aren't you?

0:27:350:27:38

'At the quarry, the shift is drawing to a close.

0:27:420:27:46

'The men are now half-way through their working month,

0:27:460:27:49

'and are faced with a four day enforced Easter holiday.

0:27:490:27:53

'The Steward is checking how many slates they've produced so far.'

0:27:530:27:57

I don't know whether we'll meet the target,

0:27:580:28:00

but one thing I've noticed is no-one's shirking or sloping off

0:28:000:28:04

or trying to avoid work.

0:28:040:28:06

-Everybody's doing their bit.

-I was counting earlier. You're a bit short.

0:28:060:28:10

-Aren't we?

-I'd say fifteen hundred.

0:28:100:28:13

-Way down.

-Yeah.

0:28:170:28:19

Another thing, we're doing this.

0:28:220:28:24

Lots of wastage, here. You will be fined for the waste.

0:28:240:28:27

You realise that, don't you?

0:28:270:28:29

We've been working so hard, as well.

0:28:300:28:32

Beginning of the bargen, it wasn't a very good quality slate

0:28:330:28:37

-from the start, was it?

-No.

0:28:370:28:39

-If we had better quality, we'd have done more.

-Yeah.

0:28:390:28:42

Gone home early twice, haven't you? That hasn't helped at all.

0:28:430:28:47

We'll knock off, now, then.

0:28:470:28:49

Let's get the tools back in.

0:28:490:28:52

Four days holiday, so you'll be losing four days, in a way.

0:28:550:28:58

You'll be working hard next week, now.

0:28:580:29:01

Happy Easter to you all, and hope to see you all in chapel.

0:29:030:29:06

-Easter holidays.

-This is the dance you do when you get four days off.

0:29:070:29:11

-Like that.

-The four days off dance, is it?

0:29:110:29:14

'The men are going to have to knuckle down on their return

0:29:140:29:18

'if they want to be paid their thirty shillings each

0:29:180:29:20

'at the end of the month.'

0:29:200:29:22

We've got to pump out fifteen hundred in about seven days.

0:29:220:29:26

-Yeah, right(!)

-We're stuffed.

0:29:260:29:29

Now then, it is time to return your books.

0:29:290:29:33

'Mr Williams has marked the children's geography test.

0:29:330:29:36

Ela, you have a mark of 96%, which is excellent. Come and get your book.

0:29:380:29:44

Thank you.

0:29:470:29:49

-Tommy, 92%, which is still very well.

-Thank you, Sir.

0:29:500:29:57

Jac. I was most pleasantly surprised.

0:29:580:30:00

You, in fact, had a percentage mark of 90%.

0:30:000:30:06

Leah, do you think you did as well as you could have done?

0:30:060:30:12

-Erm, no, Sir.

-No. Sadly, you had a total of 56%.

0:30:130:30:19

However, when we put all those marks together,

0:30:190:30:25

the percentage marks total 84% which means that Tommy will receive 84%

0:30:260:30:31

of the two shillings and eight pence that were possible.

0:30:310:30:37

Here you are. One shilling, two shillings, one, two, three.

0:30:370:30:43

Two shillings and three pence.

0:30:430:30:46

'Tommy's happy but Jac and Ella aren't.'

0:30:460:30:51

Me and Ella did better than Tommy and Leah put together.

0:30:510:30:55

It's a tiny bit unfair that Tommy gets paid.

0:30:550:30:59

'In 1890, a weekly wage of two shillings and thruppence

0:30:590:31:04

'would have been a real boost to the household budget.'

0:31:040:31:09

I'd like to say that is my budget, that's the rent, but it's not.

0:31:090:31:15

We have to keep some back.

0:31:150:31:17

I think my budget is going to be six shillings and five pence.

0:31:180:31:24

Tommy is hopefully earning as well.

0:31:240:31:27

I'm really nervous now.

0:31:270:31:30

It's like when you wait for GCSE results.

0:31:300:31:34

-Hello and how did the test go?

-I got top marks.

0:31:380:31:44

-Did you? You little teacher's pet.

-I got 94 out of 95.

0:31:440:31:50

-No way!

-I got 96%.

-Out of a hundred?

0:31:550:31:58

-I got ninety.

-Well done.

-He got two shillings and thruppence.

0:31:580:32:02

He's getting that for doing well. He's got you to thank for that.

0:32:020:32:08

'The men are back from the quarry but the day's not over yet.

0:32:100:32:15

'They've organised a fishing trip with Llywarch the poacher.'

0:32:170:32:20

-I've got them ready.

-Are you boys ready?

-Yeah.

0:32:200:32:24

'First, they'll need some bait.

0:32:240:32:27

'Worms from the vegetable plot. Jac's mind isn't only on his stomach.'

0:32:270:32:33

I'm really looking forward to it. I've never been before.

0:32:330:32:38

My uncle is a fisher person.

0:32:380:32:41

In this house, we don't get to spend a lot of time with our fathers

0:32:420:32:48

because they are always at the quarry working late

0:32:480:32:53

and then it's time for tea and then it's bedtime.

0:32:530:32:58

It would be nice to spend some time with him

0:32:580:33:02

to see how good he is.

0:33:020:33:04

Wow! How many have you got?

0:33:060:33:10

About fifteen?

0:33:110:33:13

'The prospect of a fish supper has raised everyone's spirits.'

0:33:130:33:19

-Jac?

-Yeah?

-When they bite, let them bite twice,

0:33:190:33:24

and on the third bite, give it a good pull.

0:33:240:33:28

Because the first two times, he's only nibbling.

0:33:280:33:32

-How do you know when it bites?

-You'll feel it.

0:33:320:33:36

-So, it will be one, two..

-And then a good pull.

0:33:360:33:40

Not far now.

0:33:400:33:41

'They are heading for a lake higher up in the mountain slope.

0:33:410:33:46

'It's located on common land so if they catch a fish,

0:33:460:33:50

'they won't be poaching.'

0:33:500:33:53

I've fixed the hooks for you.

0:33:530:33:55

'Free of quarry work and chores, for the first time in a fortnight,

0:34:020:34:07

'the men are able to relax and reflect on the experience so far.'

0:34:070:34:12

The experience has been very stressful

0:34:140:34:16

so it's had an adverse effect not a positive effect.

0:34:160:34:20

Because there's so much to do and everything is quite difficult,

0:34:200:34:24

the animals and the early mornings and the long days at the quarry.

0:34:240:34:30

With Lisa having to do so much as well.

0:34:300:34:33

It's created a stressful environment rather than a relaxing one.

0:34:330:34:39

Nothing seems to be going right.

0:34:390:34:41

The cow seems to play up at every given opportunity.

0:34:410:34:47

That's difficult because milking is more like a wrestling match.

0:34:470:34:52

MUSIC

0:35:000:35:02

I live with my grandparents, I don't see my mother and Tommy a lot.

0:35:020:35:07

Having four days off in a row has really enlightened me.

0:35:070:35:12

I'm happy to be spending time with them

0:35:120:35:15

especially having time off.

0:35:150:35:17

We're fishing and I'm explaining to Tommy what to do

0:35:170:35:22

and Leah knits me bags and I really appreciate it.

0:35:220:35:28

It's really good especially at night time.

0:35:280:35:30

We play games before we go to bed and it's really good bonding.

0:35:300:35:35

It's really nice.

0:35:350:35:38

It's good having a few days off to be with the family.

0:35:380:35:43

You get a bit more time to do things like this.

0:35:430:35:47

You aren't in the quarry doing the same work non-stop.

0:35:470:35:53

I'm going to enjoy the next couple of days far away from that quarry.

0:35:530:35:59

We're useless hunters. Can't catch rabbits, fish.

0:36:010:36:07

'The fishing trip may have been a welcome break from work,

0:36:070:36:11

'but the men have failed to catch anything.'

0:36:110:36:15

-You've been doing a bit of fishing?

-Yeah.

0:36:150:36:18

Just going home again and saying to the wife, no fish!

0:36:180:36:22

-Let's go home, then.

-Okay, then.

0:36:220:36:25

Hold on!

0:36:250:36:27

'With no hope of a bite, it's back to the smallholding

0:36:270:36:31

'where an important chore must be performed before dark.'

0:36:310:36:35

MUSIC

0:36:350:36:40

'The Braddocks' day old lamb needs to be marked with pitch

0:36:410:36:47

'to deter foxes.'

0:36:470:36:49

'Gareth, the local farmer, has arrived to supervise.'

0:36:490:36:53

I think we might have an argument when we catch that one.

0:36:530:36:57

-Get her in that corner there.

-Okay.

0:37:000:37:03

We want to disturb her as least as possible.

0:37:030:37:07

Yes, now.

0:37:070:37:11

That's it. Around its neck. You've got him.

0:37:110:37:14

Catch him. Pick him up, quick.

0:37:140:37:17

-There you are. Not too much!

-Go on.

0:37:170:37:20

-Fantastic, brilliant.

-It's so soft.

0:37:200:37:24

That one is going to bring a lamb tonight.

0:37:250:37:28

I think you might have two lambs.

0:37:280:37:32

You arrange for either one of you to get up tonight

0:37:320:37:36

and keep an eye every two or three hours.

0:37:360:37:41

I've got a lot of confidence in you.

0:37:410:37:44

'Though their first weeks were a struggle,

0:37:490:37:54

'they are starting to embrace their role as smallholders.'

0:37:540:37:58

After two weeks, we are getting used to what needs to be done.

0:38:030:38:08

We're coping now with what we need to do.

0:38:080:38:11

'It's Easter in 1890.

0:38:220:38:26

'The families are kicking off festivities

0:38:290:38:31

'with a trip to the shop.

0:38:310:38:34

'The men have been left behind.

0:38:440:38:48

'In Victorian times, men would never have done any household chores

0:38:480:38:54

'and up until now, Jamie and Mark Braddock have been true to history.

0:38:540:38:59

'But today, they've decided to role up their sleeves.'

0:38:590:39:04

I'm never going to live this down!

0:39:040:39:06

We've done all the animals and everything else.

0:39:060:39:10

We thought, we'd have a go at the washing.

0:39:100:39:14

I think she'll end up doing it again, but we had a go. We had an attempt.

0:39:140:39:21

When Alisa comes back from the shop, we won't have to do anything else!

0:39:210:39:26

You've done your fair share this morning.

0:39:260:39:29

We've got to milk the cow again.

0:39:290:39:32

Milk the cow, do the washing, cook the food and it all starts again.

0:39:320:39:37

'David Jones has always helped around in the cottage.

0:39:370:39:41

'Bringing a little of 2010 into 1890.'

0:39:410:39:45

Everyone has to chip in here.

0:39:450:39:48

Everyone has to do their bit and give everything.

0:39:480:39:52

Not that I'm saying I wouldn't be happy living in 1890s life,

0:39:520:39:56

it would be nice to come home and say, "Where's tea?".

0:39:560:40:01

'The trips to the shop are proving to be the highlight of the week.

0:40:010:40:08

'The families can stock up on supplies and the women earn

0:40:080:40:13

'an extra income by selling homemade produce.'

0:40:130:40:17

-Here's a dozen Welsh cakes.

-Right.

0:40:170:40:19

-Two dozen actually.

-Are these freshly made today?

0:40:190:40:24

This morning. Ella and I have been at it.

0:40:240:40:28

How much was the coffee?

0:40:280:40:30

The coffee was ten pence ha'penny.

0:40:300:40:33

We can't afford that.

0:40:330:40:35

'Back at the smallholding, the men have done their chores.

0:40:350:40:39

'Now, they are getting ready for some macho pursuits.

0:40:390:40:43

'It's Saturday and it's footy time. Jamie's a keen player

0:40:430:40:47

'but this is a completely different ball game.'

0:40:470:40:51

At home, it would be "What do you do before a game?".

0:40:540:40:59

Chilling out, watch a bit of TV and listening to music.

0:40:590:41:04

I'd have pasta and Lucozade. Get pepped up thinking of the game.

0:41:040:41:09

What did you do today? "Milked a cow, mucked it out and had tea."

0:41:090:41:15

That's how it works in this era.

0:41:150:41:18

-See you in the football game Leah.

-'Bye.

0:41:180:41:22

'The women are back from the shop and Alisa has treats!

0:41:220:41:26

I shopped 'til I dropped. I feel so bad.

0:41:260:41:29

Catrin didn't spend half as much as me.

0:41:290:41:33

-You got your lucky wish.

-Thank you, Tom.

0:41:330:41:36

-My favourite.

-We bought you coconut cake.

0:41:360:41:39

-It's a Madeira.

-Oh!

0:41:390:41:42

-Jamie, do you like coconut?

-Morello cherry, that sounds nice.

0:41:420:41:47

-This is the best. Coffee.

-I haven't seen that. Coffee.

0:41:470:41:51

-That's liquid coffee.

-Lush.

0:41:510:41:55

'At the Joneses, Catrin has been more frugal.'

0:41:550:42:00

-I didn't get the mixed peel. It was so expensive.

-Okay.

0:42:000:42:05

-I've got some currants and raisins.

-We can make it without mixed peel.

0:42:050:42:10

Jac, put it down careful.

0:42:100:42:12

'There's just enough time for the women to make a picnic

0:42:120:42:17

'and then they're off to the match.

0:42:170:42:19

'Easter was not a big event

0:42:220:42:24

'amongst the conformists quarrying community.

0:42:240:42:27

'They differed from their Anglican counterparts

0:42:270:42:31

'in their belief the resurrection should be celebrated

0:42:310:42:34

'every Sunday.

0:42:340:42:36

'Saturday, however, was a different matter.

0:42:360:42:39

'Even in hardworking 1890, communities did get together

0:42:390:42:45

'for a little entertainment.'

0:42:450:42:48

'As the women set up the picnic in their seats

0:42:510:42:55

'the men are getting fired up.'

0:42:550:42:57

Come on, Jamie, listen!

0:42:570:42:59

If you won't concentrate, you won't play properly.

0:42:590:43:03

MUSIC

0:43:030:43:07

Well done, Dave!

0:43:070:43:09

SHOUTING AND CHEERING

0:43:090:43:14

'They're playing in a local derby against a rival quarry.

0:43:140:43:18

'And to make up the numbers, there are some familiar faces.'

0:43:180:43:23

'Gareth, the farmer.'

0:43:230:43:24

CROWD CHEER

0:43:240:43:27

Go on boys, tackle him.

0:43:270:43:28

'And Mr Humphries, the quarry steward.'

0:43:280:43:32

WHISTLE

0:43:330:43:34

Oh!

0:43:340:43:36

ALL:Yes

0:43:370:43:40

'It's a friendly fixture.

0:43:400:43:42

'But a football match in Victorian times followed different rules.

0:43:420:43:47

'Shoulder barging, tripping and kicking shins all acceptable.'

0:43:470:43:54

1890 rules is basically anything goes.

0:43:540:43:56

If they kick you, kick them back.

0:43:560:43:59

'Mark Braddock is getting into the spirit of things.'

0:44:000:44:04

Good fun, nearly as good as wrestling a cow.

0:44:050:44:08

'David is finding things a bit rough.'

0:44:080:44:13

I stubbed my toe on somebody's leg and it hurt.

0:44:130:44:19

CROWD CHEER

0:44:230:44:25

'As the final whistle blows, the result is a draw at six all.

0:44:250:44:29

'Mark Braddock's team-mates are really impressed by him.

0:44:290:44:35

'I've never seen anybody being sent off so many times.

0:44:350:44:39

Five times in one game. Five!

0:44:390:44:42

'Back home, David is licking his wounds

0:44:520:44:55

leaving the others to get on with the evening's chores.'

0:44:550:44:59

You relax now, darling and I'll do all the milking and the farm work.

0:44:590:45:05

-I'll come and give you a hand.

-I'm only joking!

0:45:050:45:09

-Right, see you later.

-Okay.

0:45:090:45:12

It's gone a bit blue. It's going to be nice and painful tomorrow.

0:45:120:45:18

Glad it's only chapel tomorrow and not work.

0:45:180:45:23

I'd have a job walking to work tomorrow.

0:45:230:45:27

We've had a football game today.

0:45:290:45:31

Some people took it a bit more serious, i.e., Jamie

0:45:310:45:35

who thought it was the FA Cup.

0:45:350:45:38

On the whole, the rest of us had really good fun.

0:45:380:45:42

We played a bit of a dirty game.

0:45:420:45:45

It was a dirty game of football in the 1890s.

0:45:450:45:49

I don't even know there were any rules!

0:45:490:45:53

Our team lacked structure and organisation.

0:45:530:45:57

Didn't help his Dad got sent off. There was a gap in defence.

0:45:570:46:02

Mark got sent off about five times in one match.

0:46:020:46:06

They played dirty and I was scared.

0:46:070:46:11

I thought there'd be a big riot.

0:46:110:46:15

I did get sent off five times but that was down to the referee.

0:46:150:46:19

I think he was biased.

0:46:190:46:21

I was being kicked a lot and I kicked them back.

0:46:210:46:24

He'd send me off but I think he was playing for the other side.

0:46:240:46:28

'After a busy day, it's bath night for the boys.

0:46:390:46:44

-You're not having a bath in your underpants.

-Yes I can!

-Off!

0:46:450:46:48

-Off!

-Yeah, I can. Come here, I'll do it.

0:46:480:46:53

I'll hide your modesty.

0:46:530:46:56

Ah! That's boiling!

0:46:560:46:58

How's that? That's nice.

0:46:580:47:00

-That's boiling.

-Put your head down, quick.

0:47:000:47:04

-Oh, not my hair?

-Yes! Too late!

0:47:040:47:06

-It's changed from ginger!

-Not too hot!

0:47:060:47:12

'It's Easter Sunday. The day of rest.

0:47:190:47:24

'And the kids are taking it far too literally.'

0:47:240:47:28

Tommy!

0:47:280:47:30

-Tom!

-Yeah?

0:47:300:47:33

Are you getting up? Jordan?

0:47:330:47:37

We have to be in chapel in a couple of hours.

0:47:370:47:41

It's Easter Sunday today so it's a full day of chapel.

0:47:410:47:45

I wouldn't have it any other way on Easter Sunday.

0:47:450:47:50

No chocolate eggs, no Easter bunny,

0:47:500:47:54

just a long winded minister and chapel.

0:47:540:48:00

Yes, sounds great.

0:48:010:48:03

Oh, dear!

0:48:030:48:06

'Over at the Joneses, it's a similar story.'

0:48:060:48:11

Right, still no action here.

0:48:110:48:14

Fifth or sixth time I've asked you.

0:48:140:48:18

No! No! Up!

0:48:180:48:23

No, up! You're out now Jac, good. Ella, come on.

0:48:230:48:29

Come on, up you get or else I'll rugby tackle you.

0:48:290:48:35

Hey! Out of there! Jac, you're in trouble now.

0:48:350:48:39

Come on, Ella. Come on now.

0:48:390:48:42

'David Jones has been up since dawn milking and mucking out the barn.'

0:48:420:48:47

Chapel on a Sunday isn't all it's cracked up to be

0:48:470:48:51

because, quite simply, it puts you behind with everything.

0:48:510:48:58

The animals don't get fed, the cows don't get milked.

0:48:580:49:03

When you come back, you have more to do.

0:49:030:49:06

It's a nuisance. I'm fed up because the weather's horrible.

0:49:060:49:10

It's raining. When it rains here, it rains for Britain.

0:49:100:49:15

Yesterday was a good day, we had the football.

0:49:150:49:18

It was really nice. The weather was nice.

0:49:180:49:21

Today, a bit fed up to say the least.

0:49:210:49:26

It's promising snow later on in the week.

0:49:260:49:29

We've had every type of weather here.

0:49:290:49:32

The only thing we haven't had are blizzards and tornados.

0:49:320:49:36

So, we might as well throw those in for good luck.

0:49:360:49:39

'The chores are done and everybody's up at last.

0:49:430:49:47

'Now, all they have to do is get dressed for chapel.

0:49:470:49:51

-It's wrong, isn't it? Totally wrong.

-Is it?

0:49:510:49:55

These Sunday best are a nightmare.

0:49:570:49:59

They're the most ridiculous things I've ever had to put on.

0:49:590:50:04

All this effort for very little reward!

0:50:060:50:11

It's not the most exciting of processes.

0:50:110:50:14

-The songs..

-are very Welsh and I don't speak Welsh.

0:50:140:50:17

I haven't got a clue what they are on about.

0:50:170:50:20

The songs are lovely but in Welsh.

0:50:200:50:23

'The families have been here for two weeks now

0:50:270:50:30

'and as non-Welsh speakers from Abergavenny

0:50:300:50:33

'the Braddocks sometimes feel in a foreign country.'

0:50:330:50:36

The language is a nice language when you hear it spoken.

0:50:370:50:40

But it would be nice if we did understand the language

0:50:400:50:45

we'd feel that much more part of chapel and the whole service

0:50:450:50:51

and the whole thing.

0:50:510:50:52

We feel a bit alienated some times by the fact you can't speak Welsh.

0:50:520:50:57

I've got the important stuff covered.

0:50:580:51:00

-'Dwi'n dy garu di.

-'Dwi'n dy garu di.

0:51:000:51:02

'Dwi'n dy garu di.

0:51:020:51:04

HYMN SINGING

0:51:180:51:21

'The chapels at the time were far more than places of worship.

0:51:240:51:30

'They were the powerhouses of Welsh cultural identity.

0:51:300:51:33

'Dead set against the established church

0:51:340:51:36

and the Anglican political elite.

0:51:370:51:39

'Welsh was the language of the non-comformist congregations.'

0:51:450:51:51

That was really boring today. It's boring singing in Welsh.

0:51:570:52:01

If you don't know the words and meaning,

0:52:010:52:04

you don't know how to put the meaning into it.

0:52:040:52:06

And you don't know the tune.

0:52:060:52:08

I didn't even know what page it was. I was on the wrong page.

0:52:080:52:12

We were on the wrong bit.

0:52:120:52:14

-Once you lose it then, you can't catch up.

-You're completely lost.

0:52:140:52:19

It's difficult.

0:52:190:52:20

There we are once again.

0:52:200:52:22

'The adults are heading home but it's not over for the youngsters.'

0:52:220:52:27

Welcome to Ysgol Sul. Croeso. Bore Da.

0:52:270:52:31

'They are back in for another dose of Sunday School.

0:52:310:52:36

'Miss Owen has an announcement to make.'

0:52:360:52:39

I'll take this time to remind you about the trip tomorrow.

0:52:390:52:44

There is a cost for the trip and it's eleven pence per adult

0:52:440:52:50

and six pence for each child.

0:52:500:52:54

What if you can't afford it?

0:52:540:52:57

I need you to take that information home and you can discuss it further.

0:52:570:53:02

I hope that you are able to come. I'm sure it will be a glorious day.

0:53:020:53:08

'The Sunday school trip was an important event

0:53:080:53:11

'in the social calendar.

0:53:120:53:15

'But at four shillings per family, or a third of their monthly budget,

0:53:150:53:19

'it may prove too expensive.

0:53:190:53:22

'Back at the smallholding, David's preparing Sunday lunch.

0:53:240:53:29

He bought a rabbit from the poacher. Catrin isn't happy.

0:53:290:53:34

-I didn't know. I've just been told.

-Told what?

0:53:340:53:38

-That you've spent our hard earned money.

-Only a couple of shillings.

0:53:380:53:45

It's well worth it.

0:53:450:53:47

Okay, you're the man of the house, I'm the little lady.

0:53:470:53:51

-It's meat.

-It's rabbit and I don't want it anyway.

0:53:510:53:55

Fussy!

0:53:550:53:58

I can't believe how fussy you are. This is the 1890s.

0:53:580:54:01

People would be starving and you'd have a rabbit on the table

0:54:010:54:05

and you'd say, I don't want that.

0:54:050:54:08

'The kids are back from Sunday School

0:54:080:54:10

'and now everybody can relax.'

0:54:100:54:14

Playing cards on a Sunday, are we children?

0:54:160:54:19

You know you will go to hell, don't you?

0:54:190:54:22

I find the chapel boring but the minister cheers me up

0:54:230:54:27

because he looks really funny.

0:54:270:54:30

His eyebrows are raised and his lips go up

0:54:300:54:33

and one side of his lips go down.

0:54:330:54:36

Most of the time, I am sleeping in chapel.

0:54:360:54:39

I'm leaning against onto my mum's shoulders or my dad

0:54:390:54:43

and falling asleep.

0:54:430:54:45

But the minister keeps waking me up when he shouts.

0:54:450:54:48

He says something normal and then he'd shout "praise to God."

0:54:480:54:56

I'd just go, uh! It really wakes me up.

0:54:560:54:59

'At the Braddocks, Jamie has told Alisa the bad news about the cost

0:54:590:55:04

of the Sunday School trip.'

0:55:040:55:07

'That's a bit of a slap in the face, shall we say?

0:55:070:55:13

I can't believe how expensive it is

0:55:130:55:19

to go to on a trip. It's a day out with your community.

0:55:190:55:25

Yeah, it's going to be a very expensive day out.

0:55:250:55:29

A day we don't need. We've actually contemplated not going.

0:55:290:55:32

'Over at the Joneses, they're tucking in to their rabbit.'

0:55:320:55:38

-What's wrong?

-Bones.

0:55:380:55:42

-It's not bad!

-Is that rabbit?

0:55:420:55:44

That might have been a bone the rabbit might have had a snack on.

0:55:440:55:50

What's wrong?

0:55:500:55:52

Jac, come on or you'll be hungry.

0:55:520:55:56

Yes but I don't want any rabbit.

0:55:560:55:58

'Ella finds all this talk a bit much for her vegetarian sensibilities.'

0:55:580:56:02

You don't talk about anything but this rabbit's nice.

0:56:020:56:06

Or "How do you kill a rabbit?" or how do you rabbit that?

0:56:060:56:11

We'll call it Noo Noo!

0:56:110:56:14

It's Noo Noo stew from now on okay? Noo Noo stew.

0:56:140:56:19

Come here!

0:56:210:56:23

Have you got Childline's number?

0:56:230:56:26

-I didn't kill the Noo Noo!

-Shut up!

0:56:260:56:32

-'With money tight, both families will have to scrape together

0:56:320:56:36

'the pennies to go on the trip tomorrow.

0:56:360:56:38

'But at least some pleasures can be enjoyed for free.'

0:56:380:56:44

You can't beat a sunset,

0:56:460:56:47

you can't beat the sun going down on the sea.

0:56:470:56:50

It's pretty. It's really amazing, isn't it?

0:56:500:56:53

The views are fantastic up here. Fantastic.

0:56:530:56:57

We've done everything. The animals are sorted, the cow's been milked

0:56:570:57:02

and there's food cooking and we've got nothing to do.

0:57:020:57:05

We thought we'd come out and see the sun set and have a chat.

0:57:050:57:09

It's nice now because it's all been done.

0:57:090:57:12

-It's near enough done, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:57:120:57:14

I'd say that this is the best reward we've had.

0:57:140:57:18

We haven't had any moments where we can sit and watch the sunset.

0:57:180:57:24

It probably makes up for everything else we have to go through.

0:57:260:57:30

This is a minor reward.

0:57:300:57:32

It's very pretty, I'd like to do this more often

0:57:320:57:36

but as pretty as it is, I wouldn't trade my life in 2010 for it.

0:57:360:57:41

'Next time - tensions rise in the Braddocks'.'

0:57:440:57:48

Give me respect, you'll get it back.

0:57:480:57:50

'Is a strike brewing at the quarry?

0:57:500:57:53

Do not talk of unions here, I'm telling you now.

0:57:530:57:57

'And the families experience Snowdonia in Spring weather.'

0:57:570:58:01

If this lasts three or four day, what are we going to do?

0:58:010:58:05

We are marooned up here. We won't be able to get out and get any food.

0:58:050:58:10

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:100:58:12

During the Jones and Braddock families' second week of life as 1890 Snowdonia smallholders, making ends meet is proving a struggle.

With the men yet to earn any money at the quarry, it's left to the women to bring home the bacon. As the Easter weekend draws closer, everyone is looking forward to a welcome break from the daily grind of Victorian life.


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