Episode 21 Gardeners' World


Episode 21

As Monty Don brings in the tastiest of the summer harvest, he plans for the months ahead, giving advice on what to sow now to keep the crops coming up to the end of autumn.


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Transcript


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Hello, and welcome to Gardeners' World.

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It's that time of year

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when the tomatoes are ripening quicker than you can eat them.

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I've got three varieties in this greenhouse.

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This one is an Italian variety - Costoluto Fiorentino.

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It's ribbed, beefsteak, very flat, absolutely delicious, it's a

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really good salad tomato. On this side, you've got Gardeners' Delight.

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Very different. Very reliable, I always grow it,

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because it never let you down, and also grows well.

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It seems to resist a lot of the problems that other tomatoes

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might have. On this side, I've got a variety called Rose de Berne,

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and its skin is much pinker. You can see if I cut this one here.

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It's meaty and juicy.

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And...if I just taste it.

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Mmm.

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It's lovely, it's got a bit of acidity, juicy flesh.

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And the pleasure of eating your own tomatoes, that you've grown

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yourself, is five times that of anything you can buy.

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This is why we garden. It doesn't matter if it's raining outside,

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when you're eating your own produce, the sun shines brightly.

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On tonight's programme, Nick Bailey visits a village in Essex to

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meet a community who have rediscovered some long lost roses.

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Arit Anderson meets a garden designer who revels

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in recycling unlikely materials that would usually get thrown away.

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John, it really does look like a building site.

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-We've got crushed toilets and sinks here.

-Really?

-Yeah, of course.

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They have to do something with sinks and toilets.

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And Joe Swift explores a sloping garden in Sussex, designed to

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make the most of its glorious view.

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And I will be taking cuttings from a climbing rose,

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as well as dividing plants to build up my stocks, ready for next year.

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Come on. Come on.

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HE WHISTLES

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Although it's still very much summer, and the garden is reaching

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maximum harvest, I am now planning and thinking of the winter months.

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And, of course, in winter you want earthy, warm vegetables,

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very different from the more glamorous summer kinds,

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but nonetheless delicious.

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So today, I'm going to plant some beetroot and sow some turnips

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and swede. Good root crops.

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I've sowed the beetroot into plugs.

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This system works very well,

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but what you don't want to do is handle them too much,

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so sow them directly into the plugs

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and then plant the whole plug out, rather than transplanting

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the seedlings, as you might do, say, with a lettuce.

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This variety of beetroot is one I haven't grown before, it's a

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heritage variety called Crosby's Egyptian.

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And it's important to try these unusual types of veg

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because otherwise they disappear.

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And if we want to keep that diversity, not just of taste,

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but genetic diversity, too, it's important that we all grow them

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in our gardens.

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So you can see each plug, if we extract it out,

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has got a nice network of roots.

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It holds well together,

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so I'm not in any way disturbing the roots by transplanting.

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I'll just pop them in the ground like that.

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And space them about three or four inches apart.

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You don't want enormous beetroot, but on the other hand,

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not so small that they're a fiddle.

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I think anything between golf

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and cricket ball is about right for a beetroot.

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And if the weather turns exceptionally cold,

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don't dig them up, leave them in.

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And the fresh growth from the tops in spring is delicious in a salad.

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Of course, beetroot is a member of the beet family,

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so it will grow alongside spinach and chard, and they'll

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all like the same conditions, which is quite rich soil.

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But they also need fairly good drainage.

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Right, that's a batch of beetroot planted.

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I'll have to water them in at some point,

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but it's been raining today and looks like it's going to

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continue to be showery, so there's no urgency about that.

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But there is some urgency in sowing the rest of my roots

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before that rain comes and the ground gets too wet.

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Just raking a fine tilth on this plot, where I'll put the turnips,

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and then I'll have the swede on the other side.

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Turnips you can sow in spring, you can harvest in summer,

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and certainly they're best eaten young and tender,

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whereas swede are really tough and withstand a lot of cold weather,

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and can be left in the ground and eaten right up until February, March.

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I'm sowing a variety of turnip called Milan Purple Top.

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I've grown them before, they're delicious.

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They have that sweetness that good turnips have.

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And they're not a glamorous vegetable, but they are delicious.

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Right, sprinkle them thinly.

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These are going to have to be thinned to

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spacing of about two to three inches apart.

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So you can see that there's a real risk of wasting seed.

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Ideally they'd be spaced evenly.

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But basically the answer is, if in doubt,

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sow them thinner than you think you need,

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because that's always better than sowing too thickly.

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Right, I'll just cover up these lightly.

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The easiest way to do that is just

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run your fingers down either side, and that closes the soil in over it.

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Right, I won't let those dry out,

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but I know that because the soil is warm, they will grow really fast.

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And I want to encourage the speed of that growth, so perhaps

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cloche them if it gets really cold, maybe even cover them with fleece,

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because turnips grown quickly are tender and delicious,

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and should all be eaten up by about the end of November.

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The swedes are grown in the same way, but will grow bigger

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and slower and can be harvested right up until early next spring.

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Now, these are two unfashionable, unglamorous vegetables,

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but I think they are delicious, and that's all that matters, really,

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because here at Longmeadow,

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we choose what we grow by the way that we choose what we eat.

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But a few weeks ago, we visited the chef Shaish Alam,

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who not only has to cater for a wide variety of customers,

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but also indulge in his real passion for growing superb veg.

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And we went back to visit him

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as he was gathering the best of his summer's harvest.

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Well, it's been three months

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since I started planting all the little baby plants,

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and three months on, I think today is the day, first time

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I get an opportunity to see how they taste.

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I've got my family.

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My child Yusuf is two years old, so I'm going to cook up some

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beautiful mixed veg and get him to try, really.

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I created this side for all the brassicas,

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put a bit of ground cover to stop the weed. That actually helped.

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On this bed I've put purple sprouting broccolis

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and the normal broccolis, and this time of the year, they're coming.

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My dad, from a young age, planted the idea of great food

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and produce into our family, and especially into me.

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When I was younger, they used to bring me

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every week to all different fruits and veg.

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Over the years, these are the things that stayed with me.

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That real love and passion is from my dad.

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Over in this bed, I have aubergines.

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And then halfway up, I've got peppers.

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And then at the end, I've got the sprouts,

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the second bed is Savoy cabbages.

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I did realise that the beginning of the plants, all on both sides,

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get attacked by slugs and bugs and things like that.

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So next year, I will keep an extra border on each of the beds,

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-just for the animals to attack, so the rest of the veg

-I

-could attack.

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And over here is the courgettes.

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These are perfect eating, perfect size for mixed veg and everything.

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But, of course, courgettes, they grow very, very fast, and you can turn...

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They turn into marrows.

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So both of them will give a little bit of different texture, different taste.

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But the same plant.

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I've created my own solution of feed.

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Comfrey, mix it with stinging nettles.

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I add it to water

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and then I make a solution to sprinkle over the garden.

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Some of the vegetables that's coming out,

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they look like when I leave this field, they start body-building.

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OK, done, this is a bed that I've made for red spinach.

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I think I planted too many, too much seeds, I got overexcited.

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The actual flavour of this is like, yeah, quite tarty,

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it's like light, bitter taste to it.

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Also, you cook it up with chillies and coriander and it's beautiful.

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I think plants as my childrens.

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They really sustain my life.

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I'm making a bed for them, it's got to be nice and clean,

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I put them in, they get the right amount of food,

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it's not growing just, it's actually having a larger family.

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Larger, tasty family, that's how it is.

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Now these are my special little baby plants.

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They are called Poi Saag. They're from Bangladesh.

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The leaves, I use them for spinach dishes, decorations,

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to bring unique flavour. The texture of it is like...

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I know it sounds funny, like a little slimy taste to it.

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I know it sounds weird, but believe me, it's beautiful.

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First, hot pan, it's piping hot.

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A little bit of oil, just to help brown the garlic.

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You don't want to make it too brown because it goes bitter.

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And then next goes the onion.

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I'm going to put the potatoes in with the onions.

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This blend of spice has haldi, a bit of jeera, a bit of cumin.

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And then it has bay leaf, elaichi and cardamom. But this is perfect.

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Now goes the beans, the aubergines, they take a bit longer.

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So just adding a little bit of water...

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..will stop the spices and everything burning.

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Now I'm going to add cucumbers.

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But you're thinking, "Why am I putting cucumber in a curry?"

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HE LAUGHS

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The cucumber gives a slight sweet,

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and then adding a couple of chillies to it, you get that natural balance.

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I'm just going to use my plate to cover.

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Sit, enjoy the view.

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Broccoli, tomatoes.

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Again, trying to keep all the body of the veg,

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I don't want it to break down too much.

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This is the perfect timing for all our different spinach.

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It's nice and easy. The colour, the smell.

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It's phenomenal.

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And the plate, ready.

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Yusuf, look what Daddy got.

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-Wow.

-Yes.

-Look, Yusuf. Mmm!

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For a two-year-old boy to sit down,

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even look at the food what I've created, it's fantastic.

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I really do believe to everybody's heart is through food.

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I get to cook it, serve it and feed people. Fantastic.

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I would have it no other way.

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Mmm!

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Nice?

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I couldn't agree with Shaish more.

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And I'm really looking forward to going to visit him

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in a few weeks' time.

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Now, this is National Allotment Week, so maybe now is the time for

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you to put your name down and start to think about taking an allotment.

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And if you have an allotment, or if you grow vegetables at home,

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you will know that that pleasure of cooking

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and eating your home-grown vegetables is really precious.

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Now, I've been growing my pumpkins and squashes vertically this year.

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I've put in really strong supports, which, I have to admit,

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felt a bit like overkill when I did it.

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But now they're growing strongly,

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they're going to need all the support they can get.

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But they can put too much growth on.

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And what you end up with is a mass of foliage

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and a mass of very small fruit.

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And you don't get a decent harvest come October.

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And you can affect that.

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The first thing to do is, especially if you're growing them vertically,

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is to keep tying them in, and that will help you see what you've got.

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And then you do need to prune a bit. And the pruning takes two forms.

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One, cutting off unnecessary shoots.

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And two, taking of what you might call unnecessary fruits.

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Because no plant, however vigorous, is going to be able to

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produce more than about half a dozen decent sized squashes or pumpkins.

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As soon as you have enough fruit,

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take off the flowers as they appear, cut back any excess shoots,

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water it really well, regularly, give it a good soak

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and feed it once a week, either with liquid seaweed or a tomato feed.

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These are hungry plants, you can't overfeed them.

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Do that,

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and with any luck, come October, you'll be harvesting three or four

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spanking good pumpkins or squashes.

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This is the cricket pitch.

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Once upon a time it was a very well-kept lawn that we played cricket on.

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And, over the years, we've let the grass grow,

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and I've planted in bulbs - crocus, wild narcissi

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fritillaries, and then the grass comes up and it looks loose and free

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and great for wildlife, but the big problem I have here is that the soil

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is so fertile, it's really difficult to grow annual wild flowers.

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You need low fertility for that to work.

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I have a cunning plan.

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I'm going to grow some perennials. But that's to come.

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Now, Arit Anderson has been looking at the extraordinary

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conditions in which people are creating beauty and, this week,

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she's been to Basildon in Essex to see a garden that is growing out of

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the most unlikely materials.

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As the population increases, there's going to be greater pressure put

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on our land and our gardens

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and we're going to have to really think about what matters

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in every space.

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Now, there are some people out there who are coming up

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with some very clever ideas about how we can garden in the future.

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Today, I've come to a garden near Basildon where designer John Little

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has swapped compost for concrete, to create a garden

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using materials most garden designers would run a mile from.

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-The garden looks absolutely stunning.

-Thanks.

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Where did you get the inspiration from?

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A lot of this stuff has come from our experience of brownfield sites.

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Brownfield is an ex-industrial site

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that has a mixture of different materials.

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I suppose the crucial thing is, they're all man-made.

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It's our waste, really, that we leave behind.

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It looks so vibrant. How have you achieved that?

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Compost? Fertilisers?

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Well, to create this kind of diversity, you need no compost.

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You need to think completely counterintuitively

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as you would as a gardener.

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So take the nutrients out.

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Use soils and substrates that are poor in nutrients.

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That's the key.

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We're basically growing plants in construction waste.

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I'm intrigued. You need to show me some of this waste.

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Yes, of course. Come on.

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John, it really does look like a building site.

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This is going to be our next brownfield garden, the next bit of

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the garden that we're going to try to use brownfield materials for.

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So what exactly have we got here?

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Well, we've got fresh concrete at the far side.

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Very poor nutrient. Virtually nothing grows on that.

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-That's a good thing.

-OK.

-Then we've got crushed toilets and sinks, here.

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-Really?

-Yeah, of course!

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We have to do something with sinks in toilets!

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So they bring them to the centres, they crush them up,

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then they use them back into the construction industry, generally.

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-OK.

-But we're growing plants on them,

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and it's fantastic for growing plants in.

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Are they safe? Do we know they're not contaminated?

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Yeah. You wouldn't want to take them straight from a site, obviously.

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And they're sold by suppliers,

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so you need to check that the material you're buying

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is safe to use in the garden.

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In this garden we're going to mix the materials and see if we can't

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get a recipe that works best for wild plants.

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That's really interesting.

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I noticed that you've laid it all out onto a sort of landscape fabric.

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Yeah. This is a good way that just separates the rich topsoil

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from underneath to these very nutrient-poor substrates.

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So you don't have to take all the topsoil away.

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So, you're good to go?

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Just lay it down and it goes straight on top.

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John's designs, using recycled building materials,

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have been used in public spaces,

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gardens on London housing estates,

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schools and even on roofs.

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But his new ideas all start here.

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It is incredible. I mean, you look at it and you think, the amount of

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different plants that are going on.

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We've got some wild marjoram.

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There's wild basil on here.

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There's Lady's bedstraw.

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Really kind of classic chalk downland plants, I suppose,

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plants that love this kind of slight disturbance, very dry places.

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Also, there just seems to be an incredible amount of insects here,

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and wildlife. What has this space brought in?

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We had an entomologist come in and have a look at it,

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and it turns out that

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there's 600 species of invertebrates in this garden.

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But most importantly, three times the amount that were on the rubble.

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So I like to think that we made it three times more important!

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There's no reason why you can't miniaturise this idea.

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No reason why you can't pull it into a domestic space.

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It would be easy.

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We built this in October last year,

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and it was really an attempt to galvanise all the things we'd been

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banging on about, and how important all this stuff is.

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We tried to make it much more of a designed space.

0:21:200:21:23

And it certainly feels designed.

0:21:230:21:25

But, obviously, you've got that naturalistic feel.

0:21:250:21:28

I'm loving the wild carrot.

0:21:280:21:30

Fennel, which is always one of my favourites.

0:21:300:21:31

Fennel's the best, yes.

0:21:310:21:33

And it just goes to show,

0:21:330:21:34

it's not all about roses.

0:21:340:21:35

No, no! That's true.

0:21:350:21:37

If you're designing, instead of raking everything level,

0:21:380:21:41

plant around it,

0:21:410:21:42

so you get pockets of damper soil,

0:21:420:21:45

much drier soil on the top of these mounds,

0:21:450:21:47

so, use the topography much more.

0:21:470:21:49

This could be part of your garden.

0:21:490:21:51

So this could be your sort of dry, recycled little space

0:21:510:21:53

within maybe a more conventional garden.

0:21:530:21:56

John, this garden's full of so many wonderful plants you've chosen,

0:22:040:22:07

the biodiversity that I'm seeing,

0:22:070:22:09

and you've really embraced using some very innovative ideas.

0:22:090:22:13

We've made the flowers work because of the way we've used the soil.

0:22:130:22:18

But you don't just need flowers, of course.

0:22:180:22:19

If you're going to get wildlife,

0:22:190:22:21

if you're going to get bees, especially,

0:22:210:22:23

you need somewhere for them to breed, so we've given them

0:22:230:22:25

bee posts to breed in and we have designed those

0:22:250:22:29

with different sized holes, from 3mm to 9mm,

0:22:290:22:32

because solitary bees need a wide variety of holes.

0:22:320:22:36

There's 250 species of these things.

0:22:370:22:39

Some of them are tiny, tiny things, and some of them are quite big.

0:22:390:22:43

But there's another big group of solitary bees that like nesting

0:22:430:22:45

in the ground.

0:22:450:22:47

So we've tried, here, to create, basically, a pile of sand,

0:22:470:22:50

but we've obviously got to contain that,

0:22:500:22:53

so we've encased it in a perforated steel drum, in effect,

0:22:530:22:57

and that allows the bees to come in through the perforated steel

0:22:570:23:00

from the side and nest, and the ones that like to nest

0:23:000:23:02

on a horizontal surface, which some do, they can go in through the top.

0:23:020:23:07

So if I want to create that, can I use any sand?

0:23:070:23:10

Not any sand.

0:23:100:23:11

You need to use building sand.

0:23:110:23:14

Definitely not sharp sand.

0:23:140:23:15

Sand that's got some sort of clay content

0:23:150:23:17

so that it doesn't fall to pieces when they try to make a hole in it.

0:23:170:23:20

I think the real key is to this is that our waste can become

0:23:200:23:26

not only an aesthetic

0:23:260:23:29

but actually a really important place for biodiversity

0:23:290:23:31

and for plant growth. So thank you so much for that.

0:23:310:23:35

No, thank you. Thanks for coming.

0:23:350:23:36

It is very inspiring to see what can be done

0:23:460:23:49

in the most unlikely of conditions.

0:23:490:23:52

If you've got good, rich soil, then it's actually very difficult

0:23:520:23:57

to impoverish it, and you wouldn't want to,

0:23:570:23:58

unless you were making a wild flower meadow.

0:23:580:24:01

But I want the cricket pitch to look full of colour,

0:24:010:24:05

from the first crocus right through to this time of year,

0:24:050:24:08

and the way to do it is to plant herbaceous perennials

0:24:080:24:13

into the grass,

0:24:130:24:14

and not have a wild flower meadow - have maybe a tame flower meadow.

0:24:140:24:18

Now, a good, cheap way to achieve that end

0:24:190:24:22

is to propagate your own plants

0:24:220:24:24

and you can do that really easily at this time of year,

0:24:240:24:26

by buying large, herbaceous perennials

0:24:260:24:30

which will be discounted because they've finished flowering,

0:24:300:24:33

they're looking a bit sprawly.

0:24:330:24:35

We've got this geum here,

0:24:350:24:36

we've got this geranium, looking raggedy and not at its best,

0:24:360:24:42

but they're nice and big and they will provide lots of material

0:24:420:24:45

to make new plants for next year.

0:24:450:24:47

But it really doesn't matter what the top looks like,

0:24:470:24:51

as long as it's healthy, because all of that is going to be removed.

0:24:510:24:55

It's what is happening underneath the surface of the potting compost

0:24:550:25:00

that is really significant.

0:25:000:25:02

So the first thing to do is remove it. Remove everything.

0:25:020:25:04

And then we can get down to the serious business

0:25:070:25:09

of dividing up the roots.

0:25:090:25:11

Now, a plant like this in full flow

0:25:120:25:15

is likely to cost you about ten quid,

0:25:150:25:18

but this was discounted down to less than half that,

0:25:180:25:23

so if I can get ten plants from it

0:25:230:25:27

you're looking at about 50p per plant,

0:25:270:25:29

and each one will be as big as the parent by this time next year.

0:25:290:25:33

This is a really good example...

0:25:380:25:40

..of what you're looking for. Masses of root.

0:25:420:25:45

That tiny little growing point - actually, that's fabulous,

0:25:450:25:50

because it's the root that is the measure of the plant,

0:25:500:25:53

and if we have strong roots,

0:25:530:25:55

inevitably we'll have strong top growth.

0:25:550:25:57

And then the critical thing is to use a weak compost.

0:25:570:26:02

If you use a normal potting compost or even try and enrich it,

0:26:020:26:06

all you'll do is stimulate growth of the foliage much quicker

0:26:060:26:11

than the roots can sustain them,

0:26:110:26:13

whereas if you have a weak mix, it will grow more slowly

0:26:130:26:16

and that way the plant will build its strength

0:26:160:26:19

and then next spring, when you plant it out,

0:26:190:26:22

it will be a good, strong, robust plant

0:26:220:26:25

and give you masses of colour.

0:26:250:26:27

Now, these are going to stay in these pots until I plant them out.

0:26:300:26:36

They don't need any protection -

0:26:360:26:38

these are hardy herbaceous perennials.

0:26:380:26:42

I just water these in, put them to one side

0:26:420:26:45

and let them get on with it.

0:26:450:26:47

But sometimes gardens need a more dramatic intervention

0:26:470:26:51

where they're transformed, and Joe has been looking at gardens

0:26:510:26:55

where design has really reshaped them.

0:26:550:26:59

This week, he's been to the Sussex Weald to see a garden

0:26:590:27:03

that has made the most of its dramatic situation.

0:27:030:27:07

Just a mile from the coast,

0:27:140:27:16

Fairlight End is an exposed and heavily sloping site,

0:27:160:27:21

and it poses a unique set of challenges for a garden.

0:27:210:27:25

The owners of this garden, Chris and Robin Hutt,

0:27:280:27:31

started work on it back in 2005.

0:27:310:27:33

But, as Chris found out, tackling the terrain proved quite a task.

0:27:330:27:37

When I arrived here from a 40-year business career,

0:27:400:27:45

I was a straight line, geometric kind of guy

0:27:450:27:49

and this garden doesn't accept that kind of approach.

0:27:490:27:53

I think that's very interesting.

0:27:530:27:55

So did you find the size and the awkward site intimidating?

0:27:550:27:59

Oddly enough, I didn't.

0:27:590:28:01

I mean, it is a very odd and wonky site,

0:28:010:28:04

it slopes all over the place and the slopes conflict with each other,

0:28:040:28:09

but I thought that I could tackle that just as a gardener.

0:28:090:28:13

Yeah, why not?

0:28:130:28:15

When I first arrived here, all I'd ever done was manage

0:28:150:28:18

a little postage stamp of a garden behind a semidetached house.

0:28:180:28:22

What made you think that you had the skills

0:28:220:28:25

that were needed for the site?

0:28:250:28:26

Sheer bloody ignorance...

0:28:260:28:28

JOE LAUGHS

0:28:280:28:30

..and over-optimism.

0:28:300:28:32

And, anyway, I soldiered on for three or four years like that

0:28:320:28:36

and then I could tell it wasn't going to work.

0:28:360:28:39

So, at what point did you think,

0:28:390:28:40

"I've got to do something about this"?

0:28:400:28:42

That's my study there.

0:28:420:28:44

It's 40 foot below the house, and it was a grassy bank

0:28:440:28:49

between the two, and I'd overstay down there

0:28:490:28:53

and, without a torch, I'd be clambering up this wet bank,

0:28:530:28:58

slithery bank in November. I'd be falling over and swearing

0:28:580:29:02

and I realised I'd got to do something about it.

0:29:020:29:06

Chris called upon landscape architect Ian Kitson.

0:29:060:29:09

I saw the sinuous, curvaceous way that Ian deals with his gardens

0:29:090:29:17

and instinctively, without being able to explain it,

0:29:170:29:21

I felt that that would be the way forward for us.

0:29:210:29:24

So when it comes to plants, how have you gone about choosing the palette?

0:29:240:29:28

Is it yours or is it Ian's or is there a bit of crossover?

0:29:280:29:32

One of the things that happened

0:29:320:29:34

when we did this garden that we're sitting in four years ago,

0:29:340:29:40

at that time the meadow was all on the far side of the hedge

0:29:400:29:43

over there and I felt sad about the fact that the meadow

0:29:430:29:47

didn't come into the garden, so we slashed a hole in the hedge

0:29:470:29:51

-and we allowed the wild flowers to invade.

-Yeah.

0:29:510:29:55

The wilder it is, the happier I am.

0:29:550:30:00

Ian Kitson is the brains behind it all, and best known for creating

0:30:080:30:11

contemporary gardens inspired by their surrounding landscapes.

0:30:110:30:16

But how did you go about designing this space?

0:30:160:30:19

Well, the brief was a delight, because I'd known Chris on-and-off

0:30:190:30:23

for three years, designing bits around the garden,

0:30:230:30:26

and with this main space we'd got to the point where

0:30:260:30:29

the brief actually was, "Ian, just do what you do."

0:30:290:30:34

I could just be my creative self.

0:30:340:30:37

And I remember standing on the grass slope, about this point,

0:30:370:30:41

and taking in these views and thinking at some point,

0:30:410:30:44

this is going to be a lovely place to be and sit and stop in,

0:30:440:30:47

the obvious solution here is to create some terrace areas,

0:30:470:30:51

either as a more level lawn or where we're sat now.

0:30:510:30:53

So, what was important when tackling this space?

0:30:530:30:57

The use of the Corten.

0:30:570:30:59

It's actually exclusively to do with not having a coping detail,

0:30:590:31:04

because when you look from the house at there on,

0:31:040:31:07

most of the upper garden,

0:31:070:31:08

all you have is this infinity edge of grass,

0:31:080:31:11

and if that was a lumpy stone coping detail

0:31:110:31:14

or a lumpy brick detail, it would just be too clunky,

0:31:140:31:17

and it just felt like it wanted a hot knife slicing through the soil.

0:31:170:31:23

I mean, in a way, you're scaling down the trees and the hedges

0:31:230:31:27

on the landscape and bringing it down into a domestic level.

0:31:270:31:30

I think you have to be sometimes in quite an intimate space

0:31:300:31:34

to feel comfortable in a big landscape.

0:31:340:31:36

So when you break it down, actually, there's not too many materials here.

0:31:360:31:40

We've got the deck, we've got the Corten retaining wall -

0:31:400:31:44

that's the structure of the garden

0:31:440:31:46

and the rest is pretty much planting.

0:31:460:31:48

It is. I think some of the planting that I've put in,

0:31:480:31:51

like the topiary shapes - whilst they're not hard landscaping -

0:31:510:31:54

they're dealt as quite static objects.

0:31:540:31:56

And the deck, you know, at the moment we're being invaded

0:31:560:31:59

with this meadow...

0:31:590:32:00

Hang on, you don't sound too comfortable about that!

0:32:000:32:02

This is Chris's meadow.

0:32:020:32:04

No, no, this is part of the deal, that the garden changes

0:32:040:32:06

so much throughout the year.

0:32:060:32:08

You know, I'd like the meadow to ooze in to that point there

0:32:080:32:11

-and then...

-No further.

-No further.

-No further!

0:32:110:32:14

Is this the point at which you said it could ooze in?

0:32:140:32:17

No, that's actually slightly further than I find comfortable.

0:32:170:32:20

-Back!

-Yeah.

-Get back, boy.

-Exactly.

0:32:200:32:22

What struck me, wandering around the garden,

0:32:280:32:31

is it's a true collaboration, this garden,

0:32:310:32:35

between designer and client, and I don't think either of them

0:32:350:32:39

could have come up with this garden by themselves.

0:32:390:32:42

But together they've reinvented and updated what sits between

0:32:420:32:46

an 18th-century house and a beautiful landscape beyond.

0:32:460:32:51

Now, as a garden designer, that's not only interesting,

0:32:510:32:54

but for me, I want to get out there and design more gardens.

0:32:540:32:58

It's inspirational, and that's why I like it so much.

0:32:580:33:01

Come on.

0:33:100:33:11

Whenever you take on a new plot, there's always the inclination

0:33:130:33:17

to impose yourself on it, to make a garden.

0:33:170:33:20

But sometimes it's best just to let the garden come to you.

0:33:200:33:24

Instead of making a garden, you receive a garden,

0:33:240:33:29

and certainly, that seems to have worked there.

0:33:290:33:31

A lovely combination of landscape and garden coming together.

0:33:310:33:37

Now, having said all that, I've been trying to impose myself

0:33:370:33:40

on this site and make a herb garden, and it's coming along fine.

0:33:400:33:45

We planted peppermint, spearmint and apple mint

0:33:450:33:49

and it's doing what mint does best,

0:33:490:33:52

which is growing like mad horizontally.

0:33:520:33:54

You can see really clearly here these sideways shoots

0:33:550:33:59

spreading across the path, and if that was soil,

0:33:590:34:02

every one of that pair of leaves would have some roots down below it

0:34:020:34:06

and it would layer itself and it would be rampant.

0:34:060:34:10

So always plant mint either in a container or somewhere

0:34:100:34:14

where you can keep it contained, and I'm going to contain this

0:34:140:34:16

simply by cutting off all those side shoots.

0:34:160:34:19

Now, coming up on tonight's programme...

0:34:260:34:29

Carol has been out and about,

0:34:290:34:30

visiting people in their own gardens,

0:34:300:34:33

helping them to solve their plant problems.

0:34:330:34:36

It's slightly higgledy-piggledy, isn't it?

0:34:360:34:39

Let's make a little recess into the middle of the bed.

0:34:400:34:43

But first, Nick Bailey has been to Essex,

0:34:450:34:48

where he's visited a community that's been working hard

0:34:480:34:52

to celebrate a very special kind of rose.

0:34:520:34:55

There's no doubt that here in the UK we love roses.

0:35:010:35:04

We want glorious colours, beautiful scent,

0:35:040:35:08

and of course, never-ending blooms.

0:35:080:35:11

And this rose gives just that.

0:35:130:35:15

It's a Pemberton rose

0:35:160:35:18

with large clusters of delicately-coloured blooms,

0:35:180:35:21

with an exquisite scent and flowers that repeat throughout the year.

0:35:210:35:26

This unique collection of roses takes their name from creator

0:35:280:35:32

Rev Joseph Pemberton,

0:35:320:35:34

who was born here in the village of Havering-atte-Bower in 1852.

0:35:340:35:38

He was taught to propagate roses by his father at a young age

0:35:400:35:44

and for nearly half a century, he competed and exhibited every year.

0:35:440:35:49

But that wasn't enough for Joseph.

0:35:490:35:50

After becoming president of the National Rose Society in 1911,

0:35:540:35:59

Joseph set about breeding a special set of roses here on his land

0:35:590:36:04

which would flower all the way till Christmas

0:36:040:36:06

when other roses had faded.

0:36:060:36:09

He had up to 10,000 seedlings annually growing under glass

0:36:090:36:13

and 4,000 of his own specimens.

0:36:130:36:17

Not bad for a man who had a day job as a reverend.

0:36:170:36:20

Sadly, from their heyday in the early 20th century,

0:36:220:36:25

the Pemberton roses fell into obscurity and many were lost.

0:36:250:36:29

But now, 100 years later,

0:36:330:36:35

the village is back blooming with them.

0:36:350:36:38

In fact, it holds the largest collection in the world.

0:36:380:36:40

This is Saint Francis Hospice, Nick,

0:36:420:36:45

and it's got a very special connection to the Pemberton roses

0:36:450:36:49

because the Pemberton family once lived at the hall.

0:36:490:36:51

Laura Hill, from the hospice, holds the key to this intriguing comeback.

0:36:540:36:58

-The pink one in the middle is Nur Mahal...

-Oh, yeah.

0:37:000:37:03

..which was used by Pemberton to breed another one,

0:37:030:37:06

whose variety's called Fortuna.

0:37:060:37:08

This one's Althea, which is really beautiful.

0:37:110:37:13

HE SNIFFS

0:37:130:37:15

Oh, the scent's distinctly fruity, isn't it? What about this...?

0:37:150:37:18

That's the beautiful Pink Fairy here.

0:37:180:37:20

Such a variety of colour, of scent.

0:37:220:37:26

Really amazing collection of roses.

0:37:260:37:28

How did you get the world's biggest collection

0:37:350:37:37

back here in the village?

0:37:370:37:39

Well, our gardener, Dave Collins, he had 35 years' experience

0:37:390:37:43

as a rosarian, and because of the hospice connection

0:37:430:37:46

with the Pemberton roses, he wanted to build up the collection.

0:37:460:37:51

There are 69 varieties in total

0:37:510:37:54

and Dave has managed to collect 49 of those varieties.

0:37:540:37:57

How big a challenge was it for Dave

0:37:570:37:59

to pull all these roses together again?

0:37:590:38:02

The majority of these roses, they are no longer available commercially,

0:38:020:38:05

so Dave had to contact a number of private collectors around the world.

0:38:050:38:11

Sadly, he was taken ill a couple of years back

0:38:110:38:13

and he's not been able to continue the work.

0:38:130:38:16

The roses Dave tracked down were propagated at a nursery in Lincoln.

0:38:180:38:23

1,600 plants were brought back here, not just for the hospice, but

0:38:230:38:27

for all the people in the village to plant in their own gardens.

0:38:270:38:30

So many people in the village turned out to collect the roses

0:38:320:38:35

and it's created all these new rose enthusiasts,

0:38:350:38:38

and we're already talking about having amateur propagation days.

0:38:380:38:42

I'm so delighted.

0:38:430:38:45

I think it's a tribute to the work that Dave has done.

0:38:450:38:49

People will be swapping propagation material between themselves

0:38:490:38:52

to help keep the collection going.

0:38:520:38:54

Now, I understand that there's some roses still missing

0:38:560:38:58

from the collection. You're trying to track those down.

0:38:580:39:01

Yes, sadly there's 20 roses still missing,

0:39:010:39:04

but we managed to find Pearl in France

0:39:040:39:07

from a private collector there.

0:39:070:39:09

It starts as a very pink bud and then goes white

0:39:090:39:12

and we know it can grow into a large bush.

0:39:120:39:15

There's so many still that we need to find.

0:39:150:39:18

They could be in people's gardens, they could be in the local parks

0:39:180:39:21

or cemeteries and just haven't been discovered yet.

0:39:210:39:24

What's wonderful about this collection is knowing how much

0:39:270:39:31

the community has taken it to its heart.

0:39:310:39:33

And there's one local who has embraced

0:39:330:39:35

saving this horticultural heritage.

0:39:350:39:37

Aleksy Michalak is growing every single rose

0:39:410:39:43

in the revived collection.

0:39:430:39:45

Wow, this is really quite a house, isn't it?

0:39:470:39:50

Welcome to The Round House.

0:39:500:39:52

The Pemberton family lived here for quite a long time.

0:39:520:39:55

And so, why did you get involved with growing the Pemberton roses?

0:39:560:39:59

Well, I look after The Round House, and when I learnt about

0:39:590:40:02

the Pemberton roses, I fell in love with the story and this place.

0:40:020:40:06

How many have you got going now?

0:40:060:40:08

I think we've planted about 150 of them all around the farm, actually.

0:40:080:40:13

I notice there's one here looking absolutely beautiful. What is this?

0:40:130:40:16

This is a Havering Rambler. We have quite a lot of them.

0:40:160:40:19

We planted those I think two years ago now, so they grow quite fast.

0:40:190:40:23

And if you look closely, they are really, really delicate.

0:40:230:40:26

I think what's special to me about the Pembertons

0:40:260:40:30

is about their history and this land and this house

0:40:300:40:33

and the buildings around, the story of the village.

0:40:330:40:36

And because the Pemberton family was much-loved in the neighbourhood,

0:40:360:40:40

and I think it's really nice to know that their roses are back

0:40:400:40:43

where they belong and where they were created.

0:40:430:40:46

Of course, Pemberton roses are known to a lot of us as Hybrid Musk,

0:40:590:41:04

and I've got a few here at Longmeadow.

0:41:040:41:06

I've grown them for years, actually.

0:41:060:41:08

This is called Felicia, I've got another called Cornelia.

0:41:080:41:11

But Laura is still missing 20 of those Pemberton varieties,

0:41:110:41:17

so if perhaps you've got a rose in your garden

0:41:170:41:19

and you're not sure what it is but it does have these

0:41:190:41:22

clusters of fairly small flowers, is fragrant and goes on flowering

0:41:220:41:27

well into autumn, that might just be one of them.

0:41:270:41:31

And if you think that could be the case, go to our website

0:41:310:41:34

and you can get the details of how to contact Laura, and who knows?

0:41:340:41:37

You could add to the collection.

0:41:370:41:39

I know that there is a certain mystique around rose propagation,

0:41:450:41:50

but you can take rose cuttings

0:41:500:41:53

and they are pretty reliable.

0:41:530:41:56

There's a fairly low success rate,

0:41:560:41:57

but because they're so easy to do, you can take lots

0:41:570:42:01

and certainly make yourself quite a few roses for free.

0:42:010:42:05

And because they're cuttings, they will flower true

0:42:050:42:07

and they should start flowering in a couple of years from taking them.

0:42:070:42:11

Now is the earliest that you would start to take hardwood cuttings

0:42:110:42:15

and you can go on doing it right through almost till Christmas.

0:42:150:42:18

This rambler, really vigorous, growing up into the apple tree,

0:42:180:42:22

it's called Rosa multiflora Carnea. It's a species rose.

0:42:220:42:27

It's on its own root stock, so if I take a cutting from it,

0:42:270:42:30

it will not only have exactly the same flowers

0:42:300:42:32

but also the same growth pattern.

0:42:320:42:34

So a really good one for growing up into apple trees

0:42:340:42:37

or on a north wall.

0:42:370:42:39

This arching stem, this side shoot, is ideal for cut material,

0:42:400:42:45

because I'm looking for new growth

0:42:450:42:48

that's about the thickness of a pencil

0:42:480:42:50

and I've certainly got it here.

0:42:500:42:51

What I'll do is, rather than cutting off individual pieces,

0:42:510:42:54

I'm going to cut one long stem and then divide it up.

0:42:540:42:57

So I'm going to cut this off just below that bud there, like that.

0:42:570:43:03

And just so I don't get confused about which is the top

0:43:030:43:06

and which is the bottom, I'm going to cut the bottom straight

0:43:060:43:10

and the top at an angle.

0:43:100:43:12

So I'm just going to straighten that one up so I don't get confused,

0:43:120:43:16

and then we'll cut always just below a leaf.

0:43:160:43:20

Remove the foliage, except for perhaps the top one.

0:43:230:43:28

Cuttings cost nothing, and if you're prepared to be a little patient,

0:43:290:43:33

because these will take a year or two to get going,

0:43:330:43:36

well, you can have an awful lot of climbing roses

0:43:360:43:39

for absolutely nothing.

0:43:390:43:41

Come on, Nigel, come on!

0:43:430:43:45

HE WHISTLES

0:43:460:43:48

Come on, Nige.

0:43:500:43:51

I've often taken rose cuttings in a container, using potting compost

0:43:590:44:04

mixed 50-50 with grit or perlite and that works perfectly well.

0:44:040:44:09

But you need a pot, you need the perlite, you need all the grit

0:44:090:44:12

and you need the compost and you need to put it somewhere.

0:44:120:44:15

They will also take just as well outside, directly into the ground.

0:44:150:44:19

So, having made a very slim trench with one straight side

0:44:250:44:29

and one angled, I'm going to fill the bottom with grit,

0:44:290:44:32

and this is really important.

0:44:320:44:33

Grit, sharp sand, anything with really good drainage.

0:44:330:44:38

That means that the cutting will not sit in cold, wet soil,

0:44:450:44:49

because that is the kiss of death.

0:44:490:44:51

If it's got free drainage, it is much more likely to root.

0:44:510:44:55

And you take the cuttings, remember,

0:44:550:44:57

with the slanting end at the top, and just push them in

0:44:570:45:01

so that they are going to be buried...

0:45:010:45:03

..right up to their necks.

0:45:050:45:07

There we go.

0:45:070:45:08

Push the soil back around them.

0:45:100:45:12

Don't expect to see anything till at least next spring,

0:45:140:45:18

and you won't know if they've rooted until you see fresh new growth,

0:45:180:45:21

and that probably will be next summer.

0:45:210:45:24

Now, whilst we do do our best to cover as wide a range

0:45:240:45:27

of horticultural topics as we can here at Longmeadow,

0:45:270:45:30

we're never going to cover it all.

0:45:300:45:32

We visit other gardens, and some of them are grand and great

0:45:320:45:35

and some inspirational, and quite a few are downright quirky.

0:45:350:45:39

But Carol is on the road visiting your gardens

0:45:390:45:44

and she's going to be doing her best to solve your plant problems.

0:45:440:45:48

We've had an amazing response on social media

0:45:580:46:01

about all your planting problems, and it's clear -

0:46:010:46:04

whether your gardens are big or small,

0:46:040:46:07

a lot of you would appreciate some help.

0:46:070:46:10

Well, I've got my gardening boots on and I'm ready to go.

0:46:100:46:14

My port of call is Hampshire,

0:46:190:46:20

and this lovely home that belongs to Jill Meech and her family.

0:46:200:46:24

Keen gardener Jill has a problem

0:46:250:46:27

most of us will probably identify with -

0:46:270:46:30

she loves plants so much that her borders are chock-full of them.

0:46:300:46:34

Wow, lots and lots and lots of plants.

0:46:370:46:40

Do you think I'm a plantoholic?

0:46:400:46:42

I think you're inveterate, by the look of it.

0:46:430:46:46

Oh, wow. And which is the bit you want help with?

0:46:460:46:49

-Mainly this bit here, Carol.

-Right.

0:46:490:46:52

Because as you can see, I just love plants,

0:46:520:46:55

so I just buy a lot and then, where I see gap, I stick it in.

0:46:550:46:59

It's slightly higgledy-piggledy, isn't it?

0:46:590:47:02

From hostas to hellebores,

0:47:030:47:05

everything is living on top of one another

0:47:050:47:08

and there's just no room for plants to shine.

0:47:080:47:11

But that's not Jill's only problem -

0:47:110:47:13

she has a degenerative eye condition

0:47:130:47:16

that means she will eventually go blind.

0:47:160:47:19

I've got an eye condition called retinitis pigmentosa.

0:47:190:47:23

It's a bit of a mouthful, so we call it RP for short.

0:47:230:47:26

But it means that my peripheral vision isn't too good.

0:47:260:47:30

It's progressive and it's hereditary.

0:47:300:47:33

Some of my family members who are older

0:47:330:47:36

and have it have lost their sight.

0:47:360:47:38

The point is to try and maximise what you can see.

0:47:390:47:42

It's clear that the garden is jam-packed,

0:47:420:47:45

so I want to show Jill a way of transforming

0:47:450:47:47

a section of the borders so she can replicate it in the future.

0:47:470:47:52

I think if we just choose one chunk.

0:47:520:47:56

-Maybe these lupins could be our goalposts, yeah?

-Yes.

0:47:560:47:59

We'll see what we can save,

0:47:590:48:01

take out anything that's perhaps not suitable,

0:48:010:48:04

and then add some more things

0:48:040:48:06

which establish this sort of planting principle

0:48:060:48:10

that's going to help, you know.

0:48:100:48:11

-That's going to help me in the future.

-Yeah.

0:48:110:48:14

With limited time, it's really important that Jill

0:48:140:48:18

makes the most of her garden while she still has her sight.

0:48:180:48:22

We're going to make a start by taking everything out of this part

0:48:220:48:25

of the border, leaving us with a blank canvas.

0:48:250:48:29

-Here we go, Carol.

-Oh, great.

0:48:290:48:32

I'm just making a nice crisp edge so we know where we're working to.

0:48:320:48:37

-Yeah.

-Right the way along our allotted plot.

0:48:370:48:40

You've got violets here, you've got primroses.

0:48:400:48:44

There's these little hellebores here.

0:48:440:48:46

-What gorgeous soil!

-It's nice, isn't it?

0:48:480:48:51

-It's light, it's really sandy. It just...

-Crumbles.

0:48:510:48:55

-It crumbles through your fingers.

-Yes, it does.

0:48:550:48:58

There's a lovely hosta here.

0:48:580:49:01

You've a hosta there?

0:49:010:49:03

There's a gorgeous one here

0:49:030:49:04

and I've seen a third one just down there.

0:49:040:49:07

So instead of having them dot, dot, dot, let's try putting them

0:49:070:49:12

all together and make a little recess into the middle of the bed.

0:49:120:49:16

-Yes, yes.

-You know, so you can see through to the back.

0:49:160:49:20

By replanting in this way, it'll open up the border

0:49:200:49:23

and allow plants to fulfil their potential.

0:49:230:49:27

And plants not suitable for this spot can be relocated elsewhere.

0:49:270:49:31

We're certainly not going to waste anything here.

0:49:310:49:33

-Wonderful.

-Here we go.

0:49:330:49:36

We've got a load of this.

0:49:360:49:38

Do you know what colour it is?

0:49:380:49:39

It's a lovely orangey, sort of peachy colour.

0:49:390:49:42

-Sounds delicious.

-Yes.

0:49:420:49:44

-And I think it would be a great idea to plant that back in here.

-Yes.

0:49:440:49:48

I think that Jill, and any gardener with failing or poor sight,

0:49:530:49:58

could learn lots of lessons

0:49:580:50:00

from the famous woman gardener Gertrude Jekyll.

0:50:000:50:03

Gertrude's sight got increasingly worse as she got older.

0:50:040:50:09

She planted in great big blocks of colour

0:50:090:50:12

and the kind of colours that she really went for were

0:50:120:50:16

brilliant colours, things like yellows, blues and whites.

0:50:160:50:20

They became more and more dominant in her designs.

0:50:200:50:24

In fact, all those bright, saturated colours are much easier

0:50:250:50:29

for people with visual handicaps to actually perceive.

0:50:290:50:33

There are other pointers too that you might like to follow.

0:50:350:50:38

For a start, indulge your other senses.

0:50:380:50:41

It's important to include as many different textures

0:50:410:50:45

so you can feel your way round the garden.

0:50:450:50:49

Don't get confused with too many different kinds of perfumes,

0:50:490:50:52

you don't want scents confusing your nose,

0:50:520:50:55

but choose two or three which are really strong,

0:50:550:50:59

really powerful and which you love.

0:50:590:51:01

I've brought along just a few plants that I think exemplify

0:51:030:51:07

the kind of principles we're talking about.

0:51:070:51:10

So, the first plant I have chosen for you is this achillea.

0:51:100:51:14

It's one called Moonshine.

0:51:150:51:18

So these big, solid heads,

0:51:180:51:20

plateaus of brilliant colour.

0:51:200:51:22

Shall we have that stachys next?

0:51:240:51:26

I think it's got to be one of the most tactile of plants.

0:51:260:51:29

-It has, like bunny ears.

-Yeah.

0:51:290:51:31

-You just feel like rubbing it on your nose.

-You do.

0:51:330:51:37

And the thing is, each of these stems will spread out,

0:51:370:51:40

-so you get this lovely soft line coming to the front.

-Yes.

0:51:400:51:44

So how about this one here?

0:51:460:51:48

That's such a lovely grass.

0:51:480:51:50

-Is it an evergreen one?

-Yeah, it is.

0:51:500:51:52

In the winter it will go quite sort of beige

0:51:520:51:55

-and really soft mellow colour.

-Lovely.

0:51:550:51:57

-But it's the touch of it.

-Yes.

0:51:570:51:59

-You know, this is what it brings to your border, isn't it?

-It does.

0:51:590:52:02

Look at those seed heads, it's so lovely.

0:52:020:52:04

That looks fantastic, Carol.

0:52:060:52:08

This is the rule from now on, you know -

0:52:080:52:10

big blocks, bright colour,

0:52:100:52:13

soft touches, beautiful perfume.

0:52:130:52:15

-Follow the eye through.

-Yeah.

0:52:150:52:17

I've had such a lovely day with Carol.

0:52:180:52:20

We've had such fun planting up this border.

0:52:200:52:23

I think going forward I've got to crack on

0:52:230:52:25

and really get on with finishing up this bed.

0:52:250:52:28

What Carol's done, and helped me with the yellow that goes through,

0:52:280:52:31

I've got to replicate that so that over the next few years,

0:52:310:52:34

that's what's going to catch my eyes as my eyesight fails.

0:52:340:52:37

If your garden's in a bit of a muddle,

0:52:410:52:44

why not try something similar?

0:52:440:52:46

Take out your plants and replant them using big blocks of colour.

0:52:460:52:52

You bring movement, you bring colour, you bring light

0:52:520:52:55

and you bring cohesion to your beds and borders that way.

0:52:550:52:58

I love the way that at this time of year in the borders

0:53:080:53:11

the yellows have such a range - from the bright yellow

0:53:110:53:16

that sings out even on a gloomy day like today

0:53:160:53:20

to the more subtle, slightly lemony tones,

0:53:200:53:23

and then they go into oranges and even browns and caramels.

0:53:230:53:28

It really is a feature of late summer

0:53:280:53:31

and if you want to keep them going, of course, deadhead.

0:53:310:53:34

Keep deadheading and the flowers will keep coming on back.

0:53:340:53:39

But don't think that deadheading is the only thing

0:53:390:53:42

you've got to do this weekend.

0:53:420:53:43

Here are some other jobs you can do.

0:53:430:53:45

The Alchemilla mollis has been really good at Longmeadow this year,

0:53:530:53:57

but its day is done, and rather than just leave it,

0:53:570:54:00

cut it back hard, removing all the foliage

0:54:000:54:03

as well as the spent flowers.

0:54:030:54:05

This will quickly regrow and look fresh for the rest of the summer.

0:54:050:54:09

Ornamental carrots, like ammi or orlaya,

0:54:170:54:20

are much best sown now

0:54:200:54:22

and planted out in October so their taproots can get established.

0:54:220:54:26

Sprinkle the seed onto a seed tray or seed pan,

0:54:260:54:30

water them and put them somewhere warm to germinate,

0:54:300:54:33

and then they can be pricked out later to grow on.

0:54:330:54:35

At this time of year, stone or brick paths can get really slippery.

0:54:430:54:48

I've tried lots of ways of dealing with this

0:54:480:54:50

and have found that the most effective method is simply to

0:54:500:54:53

brush in sharp sand with a stiff broom.

0:54:530:54:56

Work it in well and it absorbs the moisture

0:54:570:55:00

and acts as a scourer to scrape away the algae.

0:55:000:55:03

I'm cutting back these hosta flower stems

0:55:180:55:21

because they don't look good once they've finished

0:55:210:55:24

and to a certain extent, they're taking energy from the roots.

0:55:240:55:29

What does the good is this canna growing in the pond.

0:55:290:55:33

This is Canna Erebus, and it's very happy

0:55:330:55:36

completely submerged beneath the water,

0:55:360:55:39

and it's produced these slightly surprising pink blooms.

0:55:390:55:44

It's doing its stuff and it's doing it proud.

0:55:440:55:46

Now, that's in water

0:55:480:55:49

and I've been dodging water for most of the day from the sky,

0:55:490:55:52

it's been really squally.

0:55:520:55:54

So let's see if that is going to continue for us gardeners

0:55:540:55:57

over the weekend.

0:55:570:55:58

Well, we've had the full range of English weather today.

0:57:120:57:15

We've had heavy rain, wind, some quite hot sunshine,

0:57:150:57:19

but not for very long. It's come at us from every quarter.

0:57:190:57:23

But the garden doesn't seem to mind, it's growing well.

0:57:230:57:26

The only major problem is things get bashed,

0:57:260:57:28

so I'm staking as much as I can.

0:57:280:57:31

But the canna is growing strong, and standing next to it

0:57:310:57:34

and looking at it like this,

0:57:340:57:36

I realise I do like my cannas to be rich.

0:57:360:57:38

The oranges and the lovely chocolate-coloured foliage

0:57:380:57:43

is really more canna-like for me

0:57:430:57:45

than the pink flowers of the canna in the pond.

0:57:450:57:47

But each to their own.

0:57:470:57:49

And that is it for today, we've run out of time,

0:57:490:57:53

but I'll be back here at Longmeadow at the same time next week,

0:57:530:57:57

so join me then. Bye-bye.

0:57:570:57:59

As Monty starts to bring in the tastiest of the summer harvest, he is planning for the months ahead as he gives advice on what to sow now to keep the crops coming up to the end of autumn. He also plans for next spring when he gives tips on saving money by propagating perennials.

Carol Klein visits a lady who is losing her eyesight and helps her organise her confused borders and give her recommendations of plants which will be a feast for her senses. Joe Swift takes a close look of the design of a contemporary country garden and Nick Bailey travels to an Essex village to meet a bunch of enthusiastic villagers who are using their gardens to help in the revival and preservation of the historic Pemberton roses. Arit Anderson meets a gardener who is looking to the future in the design and planting of his extraordinary garden, and we pay a second visit to Wales to catch up with Shaish Alam to find out how his crops have been faring in his newly planted field.


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