Episode 11 The Beechgrove Garden


Episode 11

Gardening magazine. Carole and George clear the blanketweed from the Beechgrove pond, while Jim takes a flamethrower to the weeds.


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Transcript


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That's quite a display behind us there, eh?

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Beautiful, that azalea and the viburnum.

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Absolutely. Hello, and welcome to Beechgrove, a gorgeous, sunny day.

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And we've been talking about the seasons.

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It's been kind of very strange this year.

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You started it off early on, didn't you,

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drawing attention to the fact that all the bulb flower species

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-were all flowering at the same time?

-All out at once.

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-It was that concertina effect.

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

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So we'll be thankful, whenever they care to flower.

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So where are we going now?

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Well, talking about concertinas, come and have a look at this.

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-Look at these, eh?

-George, this is lovely. My favourite colour.

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I think I'll take the bragging rights for this

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-because we planted these...

-HE LAUGHS

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We planted these last year and we took the seed heads off them

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and all the rest of it, and there's just some gorgeous ones.

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Of course, I can get to meconopsis, but what's that one?

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Well, this is Slieve Donard,

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and that is one which is of Irish origin.

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You know, Slieve is a mountain in Ireland.

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And then we've got lingholm and we've got mildred...

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They look the same! They look the same!

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They do, don't they? But there's little subtle differences.

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If you look at mildred,

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she's got all these wonderful heads on the one stalk.

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-I think she's a bit paler as well.

-Yeah, a little bit.

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But, you know... Now, in order to keep these going,

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you've got to feed them.

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You really have to.

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And I'm suggesting leaf mould to that depth,

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or well rotted farmyard manure to that depth.

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-Really?

-Over the top.

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-Won't rot the base or stem or anything?

-No, it won't.

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-And to keep the moisture in.

-Keeps the moisture in.

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-It keeps the soil cool. And they like cool, moist conditions.

-Mm.

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Absolutely.

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And the other thing which we did last time was,

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if you'll excuse me...

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Out with the secateurs again.

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To make sure that they keep flowering in other years,

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wait for it, you just go and take off the seed heads just like that.

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OK? Don't let them seed,

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because all the energy goes into the seed head.

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Meanwhile, in the rest of the programme...

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It's deja vu for me, because I'm back to revisit the garden

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that surrounds this beautiful pond and disused quarry.

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It's a horticultural haven.

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And today, Brian and I are putting our heads together...

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For a bit of blue-sky thinking.

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Well, you know, it's hard to believe that just two weeks ago,

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we were getting rid of our spring bedding.

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In fact, this is some that's left, the lovely violas and myosotis.

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And we were putting in the summer bedding.

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But I now want to think ahead to more spring bedding

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for next year and sowing from seed.

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Now, all of these are called biennials,

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so what do I mean by that?

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Well, what it is, is it's something that you sow now,

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it flowers for next year, then it either dies, or you discard it.

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So, at the moment, I'm sowing wallflowers,

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but there are quite a range, I've already mentioned the violas,

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the myosotis, we've also got pansies.

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And this is a very easy way to sow them.

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Just into a drill, direct in the ground.

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And what I've done already is, I've actually watered the drill

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on the base because the ground is so dry at the moment.

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I'm then going to just cover that up,

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and once it's totally covered, I would also water it in,

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but it's so important that the seeds are actually in contact

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with a bit of moisture so that they will germinate.

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And to take out the drill, all I use is the tip of the trowel.

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But as an alternative,

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because maybe you just have a balcony or a small decking area,

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what you could do is also sow them in modules.

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And here I've got a pansy.

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Same sort of technique, really.

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But if I just tap some of these out,

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all I'll do is use my finger as a bit of a dibber.

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I'm going to sprinkle, just at the most,

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maybe half a dozen seeds there, cover it up.

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And that can then sit on your balcony,

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or perhaps if you have a cold frame,

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then give it a bit of protection.

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But, again, make sure you water it well,

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and my suggestion with something like this,

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with the compost being so dry, is sit it in a tray of water,

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let the moisture go right the way up,

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and then you'll know that it's been well watered.

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And as a result, hopefully,

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we're going to have lots of spring bedding for next year.

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I've seen this part of the garden before, George.

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What's this one all about?

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Well, this is what we used to call the Secret Garden,

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but, really, it's getting a bit tired.

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And it doesn't act as a decent backdrop

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for your magnificent Alpine Garden.

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Nah, letting it down, George.

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It is.

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So what do you think we should do, then?

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Well, if you remember the panel that was up before, painted blue,

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so when we were down there,

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it looked like the blue sky.

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-And the backdrop to the mountaintop.

-Yes?

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So I'm wondering, maybe, still keeping with the same theme,

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if we could use plants so they've got the colour for the blue sky,

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-but they add to the textures of the area here.

-Right.

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So some blue and white plants, that sort of thing,

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mixed together and planted in this area,

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so that you are looking up to it,

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-and merging into the top of the mountain.

-Yeah.

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So we'll need to take... What?

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-Develop this area here, take this out?

-Sadly.

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All right, stuff at the back of us which can all be pruned,

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and, you know, titivated up.

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But that area there will need to be cleaned out. So... A lot.

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Get your gloves on, pal, cos you've now given yourself a big job.

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Thanks very much.

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The first thing to do is to get the ugly fence posts removed.

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-Have I got the harder job, George?

-Um, possibly.

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-Thanks.

-It's a good idea, when you are pruning plants back

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like this, when you are going to be removing them,

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don't cut them flush with the ground.

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Leave a stump.

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Because then, when you dig round them,

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you can use the stump just as a lever and you get them out faster.

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-There you go.

-Right, chop underneath. Got it?

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GEORGE GROANS

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Here you go, George.

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I loosened it for you.

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GEORGE LAUGHS

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-Have you got a minute, Brian?

-Yeah.

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Could we take out these pieces of glass? Can you manage it?

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Just give it a rock and it will come out. Here we go.

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They're quite heavy, though.

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-They are not going to blow away.

-They're very nice.

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Shove them there. They're good when the light comes through them.

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Right, now.

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I thought, what we would do with this would be lift its skirt

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and cut out... You know, when you've got a big conifer,

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that's been in here about 10 years.

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It's getting a bit overgrown.

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One or two dead bits in it, and we just want to rejuvenate it.

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-If I lift this up, and then you cut out...

-Take out these lower ones.

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Take out the lower ones, aye. We'll see how that looks.

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Take it right back in there. Have you got it?

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-There we go... You can afford to...

-Keep going, eh?

-Aye. Keep...

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Not the bottom one. Take this one here.

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There you are.

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-Aye.

-Go on, take it out, take it out.

-If in doubt, take it out.

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-That's the best of it done.

-Hard work out of the road.

-Aye.

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Now, here's your plants.

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-Here's this wonderful blue, isn't it?

-Beautiful blue flowers.

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-Yeah.

-Heavenly blue.

-Right.

-It's lithodora.

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It's going to tick this blue-sky box perfectly.

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We are going to get it interplanted with the lavender.

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When you're down there looking up,

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-it's going to look like that blue sky.

-Absolutely.

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Now, I've also got some blue grasses round there, got eryngiums,

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I've got some blue junipers. They are drying in the sun.

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-I'd better get them planted.

-I'll go and attend to the wall.

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So when we constructed the Alpine wall,

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we packed the stones with soil,

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and that way, we could plant into the wall.

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But this time, we've left a hollow top.

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We've left a hollow wall, and because the roots,

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they might not like touching the concrete, what we've done is,

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we've put in a plastic planter, in which case we can plant into it.

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We've got our usual Alpine mix.

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John Innes No 3 soil-based compost with lots of grip,

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nice free draining.

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Hey presto. We can plant up the wall.

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Well, continuing the mountain theme,

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we are right up here on the top of the hill.

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And what we've got is this, that's wee fine juniper,

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so there is juniper here,

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and I'm going to plant another one over there.

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That's a thing called blue star.

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And that will give us this blue theme.

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But to carry on this thing about clouds and mist and blue skies,

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I've got this wonderful plant from China and the Himalayas.

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This is a thing called...

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So it is a beautiful thing

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which comes up with white everlasting flowers.

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That will go in there.

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And that will be like some of the mist

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rolling over the tops of the hills.

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We've got some of the perennial oat grass.

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This is...

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And that's going to be planted in.

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We've got two or three in there already.

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That will give us height, and we'll see that from down the bottom there.

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And then, in amongst all that, we've got the sea holly.

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Not maybe a mountaintop plant, but it will still give us the blue,

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and this one, again, is called blue star.

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Now, the wall creates this shady corner.

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I want us to create that collapsed wall look,

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so what I've done is, I've got the wheelbarrow, and I've just tipped

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some excess stone that we had, just to create this sort of natural look.

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And in between it, I've just got some soil,

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and I'm packing all the gaps so that I can plant it up.

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And in the front, I've got a...

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Look at the size of the leaves.

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At the other end of the scale are the silver saxifrages

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that we planted in the Alpine Garden.

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I've got a wee fern here, a shuttlecock fern.

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It's going to get about a metre high.

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But my favourite plant here is this hosta,

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completely different to the hostas

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that we normally associate, the big, large leaves,

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blue or variegated edges.

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This one is called Praying Hands.

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It's got lovely furled and twisted foliage, which, hopefully,

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is going to look a nice wee feature in amongst all these stones.

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-Can you remember where they went?

-No. Not a clue.

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-Braw. Look at that.

-Aye, aye.

-Fabby-dozy.

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Well, George, I think that was a great idea,

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just covering that hard path with chips just really finishes it off.

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That was simple, and that was easy, you know,

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but the whole marriage of the Alpine Garden and the Secret Garden

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wasn't quite so easy, but I think we've pulled it off.

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A wee drink to finish it off now?

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It's been a hot day the day,

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-so they're all going to need a good soaking.

-They'll need a soaking.

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I'll need a soaking tonight, I'll tell you.

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Well, you know, if we come back in a year and have a look,

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and looking up the hill,

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and seeing this blue haze up here, then it's been a success.

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-You did a good job well done, George, I think.

-Thank you.

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Yes, I think so.

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Well, I tell you what, this is the first time

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we've been to see the tomatoes

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since they were first planted.

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All in the same compost,

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but using different techniques and about eight different varieties.

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You can hardly tell the difference at the moment,

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but when they start fruiting, we'll begin to pick out.

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And they are all doing superbly well, so it's about how you

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constantly keep them going in the right direction.

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And here we have a plant which is already starting to flower.

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And as I look down the stem, there are side shoots.

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These side shoots are coming out at the base,

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but they may appear at any leaf joint in between.

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And they would just be taking energy away from the potential crop.

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So we take them out altogether. We have a clean stem. And you notice...

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And I often tell people, you know, when you're twisting,

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you twist the string round the plant and not the plant round the string.

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So you manipulate this string,

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and that's why you always leave a bit of slack.

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We'll pop it round there.

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Get that leaf out.

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Now, by so doing,

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I'm taking the whole plant and the leader round there, you see?

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And that's the string in there.

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If I came through there, which would be much easier,

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and then the string slips...

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It could strangle this truss here.

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So always try and give it a bit of support below the truss

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as you're twisting.

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Now, the feeding's all going perfectly well at the moment,

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and the biggest single problem we have is it gets too hot.

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So you must do your damnedest to keep the temperatures down,

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cos as I've said on many an occasion before, once the temperatures,

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day temperatures, get up above 25, they get up, you know,

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80 and plus, that will affect fruit quality,

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so you leave the doors open, you provide a little bit of shading

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if at all possible, especially through the hot of the day.

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And, most important of all, we often tell people

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when they are doing a greenhouse,

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never ever slab the whole thing.

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You need water-absorbent surfaces, because once you start,

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and let me get the water started...

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Once you start, you want to lash plenty of water about.

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And finish up walking out the door and spraying the plants themselves.

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Because this cold water, as it evaporates,

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helps to reduce the temperature.

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And once you do spray it over the tops of the plants

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in this kind of condition,

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that humidity around the trusses

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will actually allow the pollen to swell

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and you get a good set of fruit.

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So, do you hear me?

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Plenty water lashed about during the hot days.

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Now then...

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Before we leave the subject of tomatoes, we've had a lovely letter,

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a big, long letter from a viewer in Horsham in Sussex.

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And he's having problems with his tomatoes.

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He sent us pictures and all the rest of it.

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But he's berating himself wrongly in some respects.

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He talks about the history being that the previous season's crop

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was badly affected by blight, and he blames himself

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for not cleaning the greenhouse before he planted it.

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The blight comes in through the ventilators, dear boy.

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You could do nothing about it unless you would keep them shut,

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and as we know, that's not a very good thing.

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But his photographs are also interesting.

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And I've got one printed out here.

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Look at that.

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Now, he says, "What's causing this mould?"

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This is a physiological problem. That is phosphorus deficiency.

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Phosphate deficiency. Now, NPK is nitrogen, phosphorus and potash.

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Phosphorus is slow to move.

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It's a curmudgeonly kind of element,

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but it's necessary there, to get good growth in the crops.

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So you have to examine what the compost is that you've put them in,

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is there NPK in it, and if not, why not?

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And you should start feeding,

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because that's all that's wrong with the plants.

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It will probably grow out of it. But get your feeding right.

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There you go.

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I'm up in the fruit cage,

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and this is where we've got the mini apple orchard that we established.

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Lots of different varieties and different rootstocks,

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some vigorous, some not so vigorous, some very dwarf.

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Now, we've had a couple of problems in here.

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One, rabbits got in over the winter period,

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and they gnawed round the stems.

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So what they did was, they've taken off the bark, and, really,

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it looks as though they were going to kill the whole tree.

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But what we got the garden staff to do

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was just to put some ordinary clingfilm round them.

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Good idea if there is a wound on the stem.

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And then that enclosed it,

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helped it to heal much faster, and that is indeed what has happened.

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So that we've now got these wonderful extension shoots here,

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which we wouldn't have had

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if the stems had been completely girdled

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and, therefore, it had been killed.

0:16:010:16:04

But there's another problem as well.

0:16:040:16:06

And that is that we've got canker here.

0:16:060:16:09

Now, apple canker is a common disease across apple-growing areas,

0:16:090:16:14

particularly where it's damp.

0:16:140:16:16

And that's what's happened here.

0:16:160:16:18

We've got canker in the stems,

0:16:180:16:19

and what we can see is dead bits going right back, like that.

0:16:190:16:22

And if we cut this out, just there, OK?

0:16:220:16:26

But before I go and prune any more of this,

0:16:260:16:29

what I've got to do is, I've got to sterilise these secateurs.

0:16:290:16:33

Now, I've got here some methylated spirits,

0:16:330:16:35

and all that I need to do

0:16:350:16:37

is just to pour some meths over the blade, like that.

0:16:370:16:40

Give it a rub.

0:16:430:16:44

I've got something here to rub it with. There we are.

0:16:440:16:46

Just give it a rub like that and then I can go and prune elsewhere.

0:16:460:16:50

Because if we don't do that,

0:16:500:16:51

we transfer the spores from the secateurs

0:16:510:16:53

onto the next tree that we prune,

0:16:530:16:55

and that is NOT what we want to do.

0:16:550:16:58

It's a bad enough disease without helping it to spread.

0:16:580:17:00

Now, there's a better job round here.

0:17:000:17:02

Right, so I've come round to the gooseberry cordons.

0:17:040:17:06

These are the ones which we're growing

0:17:060:17:08

in a tall, slender form like that, single shoot, lots of side shoots.

0:17:080:17:11

At this time of the year,

0:17:110:17:13

the thing that we would expect to find here

0:17:130:17:15

would be gooseberry sawfly.

0:17:150:17:16

Now, these are the larvae of the sawfly

0:17:160:17:19

that you're particularly looking for.

0:17:190:17:21

Little caterpillars which will defoliate

0:17:210:17:23

the whole of the gooseberry bush, almost overnight.

0:17:230:17:25

What we recommend you do is that you make a note

0:17:250:17:28

in your diary of when that happens.

0:17:280:17:30

So let's say, for example, it happens in the middle of June.

0:17:300:17:33

Well, you make a note in your diary, and then the following year,

0:17:330:17:36

you order up some nematodes

0:17:360:17:38

which are specific to attacking the gooseberry sawfly.

0:17:380:17:41

And you apply them a fortnight before the date

0:17:410:17:44

when you noticed it happened. And that will kill off the sawfly.

0:17:440:17:48

And it will actually, then, this wonderful biological control

0:17:480:17:52

will keep the gooseberries pristine and clean.

0:17:520:17:54

At this time too, as well as looking for the sawfly larvae,

0:17:540:17:58

we would be thinking about summer pruning.

0:17:580:18:01

This is where we take off the long extension shoots

0:18:010:18:03

in order to let the vigour go to the fruit

0:18:030:18:06

and also to let the sun get into the fruit.

0:18:060:18:08

So these shoots which are sticking out here,

0:18:080:18:11

there's one there, for example,

0:18:110:18:13

that, I just take back to two or three buds.

0:18:130:18:15

There it goes. That comes off like that.

0:18:150:18:17

This one comes off like that, as well.

0:18:170:18:20

And then round this side, we've got one which we can take off.

0:18:200:18:23

And you go round the whole bush like that until, eventually,

0:18:230:18:26

it's almost like a pillar of growth.

0:18:260:18:30

The light gets in, the fruit ripen quickly, Bob's your uncle.

0:18:300:18:33

Last autumn, when the Beechgrove Roadshow

0:18:390:18:41

came to Strathkinness in Fife,

0:18:410:18:43

I visited this garden just a couple of miles north at Blebo Craigs,

0:18:430:18:47

belonging to Julia Young and her family.

0:18:470:18:50

And eight months later,

0:18:560:18:58

this place is bursting with late springtime colour.

0:18:580:19:01

But the unique central feature of this ever-changing mature garden

0:19:010:19:05

is this former quarry,

0:19:050:19:07

which, a couple of hundred years ago,

0:19:070:19:09

was supplying much of the sandstone

0:19:090:19:11

used to build St Andrews and the surrounding villages.

0:19:110:19:14

Julia, it's great to be back.

0:19:160:19:18

Coming here at a different season,

0:19:180:19:20

it means we're going to look at different plants.

0:19:200:19:22

Very different plants and things, yes.

0:19:220:19:24

And I want to start off with a fairly common plant,

0:19:240:19:26

the marsh-marigold, which is quite happy in the water situation.

0:19:260:19:29

They're lovely. Very happy.

0:19:290:19:31

They come early and they're cheerful and yellow.

0:19:310:19:34

It's a good marginal plant.

0:19:340:19:35

And then, you know, we move up to a bog-loving plant, really -

0:19:350:19:38

so, in other words, the roots like the moisture - the rodgersias.

0:19:380:19:41

-You've got loads of those.

-Wonderful value.

0:19:410:19:43

Look, it's seeded itself all round the pond

0:19:430:19:46

and you have season-long colour.

0:19:460:19:49

After the flowers die down, you get lovely autumn colour in it.

0:19:490:19:52

But at the moment,

0:19:520:19:53

you're just enjoying that foliage and the bronze tints to it.

0:19:530:19:55

Wonderful.

0:19:550:19:57

-The fish, I can see one or two fish. They're happy?

-Very happy, yes.

0:19:570:20:00

They all go down to the bottom of the pond for the winter,

0:20:000:20:05

and as soon as sort of March comes, I get edgy if they haven't appeared,

0:20:050:20:10

and I think they've all died.

0:20:100:20:11

And this year, they were about two weeks later in coming up

0:20:110:20:15

because it's all to do with water temperature.

0:20:150:20:17

-Yeah, it's been quite a cold season.

-But they're all back.

0:20:170:20:20

-And happy to be fed again.

-Happy to be fed again, yes.

0:20:200:20:22

And then moving up the canopy,

0:20:220:20:24

we've got to mention that rhododendron, because what a colour!

0:20:240:20:27

You can't not mention the rhododendron and things.

0:20:270:20:29

That's right.

0:20:290:20:30

And you've got quite an array of them,

0:20:300:20:32

because they flower for a long time.

0:20:320:20:34

I've got them staggered right through till July.

0:20:340:20:36

So that's a long flowering period, isn't it?

0:20:360:20:38

They are mostly down in the glen which you didn't see last time.

0:20:380:20:41

-Oh, let's go and have a look at that, then.

-OK.

0:20:410:20:44

OK, Carole, so this is what I was telling you about.

0:20:580:21:00

This is my glen, or my half-glen.

0:21:000:21:04

I visited Ardvorlich on the shores of Lochearn

0:21:040:21:07

a couple of years ago and thought, "I want a glen."

0:21:070:21:10

-That was your inspiration?

-That was my absolute inspiration.

0:21:100:21:13

OK, and then you went about planting.

0:21:130:21:15

-So, obviously, you've got one or two rhododendrons.

-Yes.

0:21:150:21:17

-That one's looking good just now.

-Decorum cordatum, isn't it gorgeous?

0:21:170:21:21

-Absolutely lovely.

-A rather delicate colour,

0:21:210:21:24

as opposed to the bright one.

0:21:240:21:26

The in-your-face. That's right.

0:21:260:21:28

And then the greens, the shuttlecock fern.

0:21:280:21:30

They spread like mad, but, again, they keep the bank together

0:21:300:21:33

quite well because once I'd cleared the bank,

0:21:330:21:36

it began collapsing.

0:21:360:21:38

Now, you have lots of bluebells in the garden,

0:21:380:21:40

but it's not the native, it's the Spanish.

0:21:400:21:42

Yes. Well, I've got plenty of room.

0:21:420:21:46

They spread, they're colourful,

0:21:460:21:48

I've got blue, I've got white,

0:21:480:21:50

-I've got pink.

-I think it's fine in this environment, isn't it?

-It is.

0:21:500:21:54

-In this landscape.

-It is, yeah.

0:21:540:21:55

And then there's also a pink flower, is that a Valerian?

0:21:550:21:58

It is, yes. A sort of, a woodland Valerian unlike the usual...

0:21:580:22:03

-So that enjoys the moisture.

-Absolutely loves the moisture.

0:22:030:22:06

And the shade.

0:22:060:22:08

Now, I think you need to explain to me

0:22:080:22:10

a bit about your cardiocrinums here

0:22:100:22:12

because you've left the old flowering spikes.

0:22:120:22:15

Yeah, well, they are very spectacular, aren't they?

0:22:150:22:17

I had five.

0:22:170:22:18

It took some years till they were ready to flower,

0:22:180:22:21

and just before they were going to flower, about five days,

0:22:210:22:25

a deer came in and took one out.

0:22:250:22:28

So I thought, "Right, I've waited long enough,

0:22:280:22:30

"I'm going to leave the seed heads up."

0:22:300:22:31

-And it gives you that sense of scale.

-Scale, I know.

0:22:310:22:34

So, deer, you mentioned, how do you deal with deer?

0:22:340:22:38

Well, I tried various things that I found online,

0:22:380:22:43

and ideas that people gave me.

0:22:430:22:47

But what I've ended up with, as you might see,

0:22:470:22:50

is miles and miles of blue string.

0:22:500:22:54

I wrap it round trees, and thread it through things at different heights,

0:22:540:22:59

and it's a deer discourager.

0:22:590:23:02

But it doesn't hurt the deer?

0:23:020:23:04

No, no, it doesn't hurt them,

0:23:040:23:06

it just discourages them from coming this way.

0:23:060:23:10

Makes them take a different route.

0:23:100:23:12

So I bet you've got miles of string.

0:23:120:23:13

I've got about three miles left.

0:23:130:23:16

-What a wonderful show of Candelabra primulas.

-Aren't they great?

0:23:280:23:32

You've caught them at their absolute prime.

0:23:320:23:35

You know, you've got the dark, dark pink and then the paler,

0:23:350:23:39

and then really pale. I just love them, and they spread.

0:23:390:23:43

Have you let them naturally sort of set seed?

0:23:430:23:46

That's just what I've done.

0:23:460:23:48

I just let them set seed, transplant seedlings,

0:23:480:23:51

-and then when they're big clumps...

-Oh, you divide them up.

0:23:510:23:54

I divide them.

0:23:540:23:55

But I'm always going to run out of space to put them,

0:23:550:23:57

-there are so many.

-I could take some home, then.

0:23:570:24:00

The magnolia, as well.

0:24:000:24:01

-Lots of buds still to come.

-It's been in about five years.

0:24:010:24:05

And this is the best it's been.

0:24:050:24:07

I've especially got one that flowers late. It's called Yellow River.

0:24:070:24:13

So that it doesn't come into bud until after frost...

0:24:130:24:16

-Yes, the risk of frost.

-..is over.

-Yeah.

0:24:160:24:19

Cos it's such a shame to lose the flowers.

0:24:190:24:21

That would be so soul-destroying.

0:24:210:24:22

And then the flowers of the meconopsis,

0:24:220:24:25

that beautiful blue. I would have thought it would be a bit dry there.

0:24:250:24:28

You might have thought that,

0:24:280:24:30

with all the trees taking up the moisture.

0:24:300:24:33

I mulch a lot with leaf mould.

0:24:330:24:36

And that holds the moisture in terrifically well.

0:24:360:24:39

Shall we go and look at a completely different bit of the garden now?

0:24:390:24:41

-I'd love that.

-OK. Let's go.

0:24:410:24:43

OK then, so this, here, is the original cottage garden...

0:24:570:25:02

..that has been a garden for quite a long time.

0:25:030:25:06

-How old is the house?

-1815.

0:25:060:25:08

-Gosh, 200 years?

-Yeah.

0:25:080:25:10

And this is the original garden,

0:25:100:25:12

so have you kept the lawn, basically?

0:25:120:25:14

I've kept the lawn.

0:25:140:25:15

I've kept the shape the same,

0:25:150:25:17

the big trees, the big shrubs, and I've done all the other planting.

0:25:170:25:22

-And it's a lot of planting.

-A lot of planting.

0:25:220:25:24

The wallflower, the perennial wallflower, Bowles's Mauve,

0:25:240:25:26

-just stunning at the moment.

-They're gorgeous.

0:25:260:25:29

Gorgeous, and it's been out

0:25:290:25:31

before the other stuff in the garden came out.

0:25:310:25:34

Gave us colour.

0:25:340:25:35

I think it's a fairly short-lived plant, so, you know,

0:25:350:25:37

I'd suggest taking cuttings.

0:25:370:25:39

I'm not patient enough to do cuttings.

0:25:390:25:41

I can make it last three years.

0:25:420:25:44

Well, you say that,

0:25:440:25:45

I think you are a pretty patient gardener, cos, I mean,

0:25:450:25:47

the things that you have done from the cottage garden

0:25:470:25:50

to the unique quarry to the glen, it's just magical. Thank you.

0:25:500:25:55

Yeah, it's what I do, I love it.

0:25:550:25:57

On next week's programme,

0:26:030:26:05

I'm going to be looking at the mulching trial,

0:26:050:26:07

you know, different types of stuff that you've got to buy

0:26:070:26:10

and replenish every now and again.

0:26:100:26:12

To be frank, this is my kind of mulching, ground cover.

0:26:120:26:16

Here is simple periwinkle, look at that.

0:26:160:26:18

In this area it's taken a couple of years to completely cover it.

0:26:180:26:23

That suits me fine.

0:26:230:26:24

Geranium phaeum is one of the British native geraniums,

0:26:260:26:29

but this one grows in deep shade in woodland,

0:26:290:26:32

and at this time of the year, it looks absolutely magnificent.

0:26:320:26:34

Look at the dark markings on the leaves down there.

0:26:340:26:37

The whole thing

0:26:370:26:39

just exudes brilliance.

0:26:390:26:41

Now this is the variety Samobor,

0:26:410:26:43

so it's just a little bit different

0:26:430:26:45

from the native species.

0:26:450:26:46

Well, this is rather bonny looking foliage.

0:26:470:26:49

It's the variegated form of the field maple.

0:26:490:26:52

But when you look at the whole plant,

0:26:520:26:54

we've a huge problem because it's reverting back to the native form.

0:26:540:26:58

Loads of green foliage.

0:26:580:27:00

We have tried to keep it under control in the past,

0:27:000:27:03

but this reversion is a huge problem for us, so,

0:27:030:27:06

in my opinion, we should either replace this plant

0:27:060:27:10

or find something else suitable in the garden.

0:27:100:27:12

But the one thing we could do is maybe try some material here

0:27:120:27:16

and take one or two cuttings.

0:27:160:27:17

What do we have to lose?

0:27:170:27:18

Well, I think it's salad sampling time, George.

0:27:210:27:24

-And it's looking very colourful, if I may say so.

-Look at that.

0:27:240:27:27

Isn't that just brilliant?

0:27:270:27:28

-I think you've been into my 8' by 6' greenhouse.

-I have.

-Oxalis.

0:27:280:27:31

-That would be Oxalis.

-Yes.

-I'm going to try that.

0:27:310:27:35

Right, well, if you taste it, it's actually...

0:27:350:27:38

-..slightly lemony.

-Definitely citrusy.

0:27:390:27:42

-A wee bit acid in there.

-Mm.

0:27:420:27:44

-The white, of course, is the...

-Do you not like it, Jim?

-Mm...

0:27:440:27:47

I think you're improving, Jim. Um, George.

0:27:470:27:49

THEY LAUGH

0:27:490:27:51

-I'm George.

-Yes.

-But that, I mean, the white radish is brilliant.

0:27:510:27:54

That's fine, yes.

0:27:540:27:55

When's the book coming out?

0:27:550:27:57

-Don't know.

-Anyway, what about the bog garden?

0:27:570:28:00

I think the astilbe there, which I believe is Kvele,

0:28:000:28:03

the foliage is lovely, isn't it?

0:28:030:28:05

-Globeflower.

-That is the normal species there, Jim.

0:28:050:28:08

That's just europaeus.

0:28:080:28:09

But the wee one took my eye, I'll tell you that.

0:28:090:28:11

-That wee one down there. What is it?

-Alabaster.

-Absolute cracker.

0:28:110:28:14

Love it.

0:28:140:28:16

Anyway, while we finish the salad,

0:28:160:28:18

if you'd like any more information about this week's programme,

0:28:180:28:20

it's all in the fact sheet

0:28:200:28:22

and the easiest way to access that is online.

0:28:220:28:24

-Next week, George?

-Next week, we're in the shade.

0:28:240:28:26

We're going into the Woodland Garden, you and I.

0:28:260:28:29

-I bet you have the loppers again.

-Possibly.

0:28:290:28:32

I shall stick to my little greenhouse, I think.

0:28:320:28:35

-Until next time... ALL:

-Bye-bye.

0:28:350:28:37

In the Beechgrove Garden it's fire and water as Carole and George don waders and climb into the pond to clear the blanketweed, while Jim also wages war on weeds with a new flamethrower.

Brian and George plant up a new alpine wall with blue and white plants that will create sky beyond the alpine mountains. Carole is in the water again as she visits Julia Young's unique garden in a quarry at Blebo Craigs, near Strathkinness, as Julia has a small rowing boat to weed and plant around the quarry.


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