Episode 17 The Beechgrove Garden


Episode 17

Gardening magazine. Jim and Carole enjoy a red cabbage success story, while Chris plants a range of hostas. George visits a garden at Kierfiold House on Orkney.


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Transcript


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-Where's the sun gone, Jim?

-Aye.

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-I mean, there's a touch of autumn about the air today.

-There is.

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Hello there. Welcome to Beechgrove -

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and we're off to look at some autumn and winter cabbage.

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It's very appropriate, is it not?

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It certainly is, Jim. And what an array...

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Now, there are ten different varieties,

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-but I don't think you can tell too much.

-I know.

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I mean, I'm just like Joe Bloggs, as I say, I say,

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"Well, red cabbage is red cabbage, is red cabbage."

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-But all the different seedsmen have their own strains...

-They do. I mean, if anything, for example,

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the Ruby Bull has a slight sort of blue tinge to it,

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but, you know, we're going to have to wait and see, aren't we?

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It's what it tastes like in the yield and whether it hearts up

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and all the rest of it, but it does... There is a sequence...

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-There is.

-The ones at the top all need to be ready first.

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Red, Red Rookie is meant to be ready first.

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-Now, these were also in about the middle of March...

-Yes, yes.

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..planted out early May.

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-And of course, we do have to protect them.

-Yes.

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We've got some pretty voracious birdies about.

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-Don't they look good? They do look good at the moment.

-Yes, they do.

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Meanwhile, in the rest of the programme,

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Mr B is back, and he's going to be telling us all about hostas.

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And whilst we were on Orkney for our first roadshow,

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well, we left George there.

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I'm still in windy Orkney, where shelter is so important.

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But if you want to see what's over this wall,

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you'll have to join me later.

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Well, here we are, back again on the decking

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and it's all about growing plants and containers -

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and it's time to harvest our tatties.

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Mari, these are second earlies, 15 weeks.

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Three varieties, but we had two different types of containers.

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How did you find the two bags?

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Well, I found the dark green one there, the cheaper of the two...

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-Just a pound.

-Yeah. It was really flimsy,

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difficult to fill, the compost went all over the decking.

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So I much preferred the sturdier of the two bags there.

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Yeah, this bag's been really good, cos we used that last year...

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I reckon we'll be able to use that for several years.

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But the whole idea is we're going to cut back the shaws,

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harvest them, weigh them and we can come back with the results.

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-So, shall we get cracking?

-Yeah, let's see what's there.

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Oh, look, already. Nice-looking potato, though.

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I can't imagine us using this bag again.

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Not as flimsy as I first thought, now that I handle it with the...

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It's well stuck. Ooh, these look really nice, don't they?

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Well, here are the results of cropping our tatties.

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The ones here are the flimsy bag, Mari with four tubers, so

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slightly more than the ones there, which only had three tubers in.

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Which one do you particularly like?

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I think the centre one, Elfe,

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looks a bit more appetising than the other two.

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Certainly! These are pretty white, aren't they?

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The only thing is, I think it's all about tasting the tatties.

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-And the ones either end are salad potatoes.

-Mm-hm.

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Jazzy is actually meant to be a little bit like a Jersey Royal.

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-OK.

-So, we'll have to wait and see.

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Weight-wise, Elfe has won, from that particular point of view.

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But we'll have a taste test at the end of the programme.

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Now then, I have a timely reminder for you.

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We're constant reminded, ourselves, by people passing

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us in the street who say, "You were rough with these camellias

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"when you knocked them out their pots."

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We took some of the root ball away

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and we put in some fresh soil

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and we brought them out here for their holidays,

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and they're looking fine.

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One or two needed a little bit of pruning just to balance

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them up, but on the whole, they're doing OK.

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But did you notice this one

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and the one behind are tending to lean forward, looking for the light?

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So, be reminded that you can give them a bit of a twist round,

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turn them so that they've got to go the other way.

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The other thing that I would remind you of at this moment, as you

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pack your bags for Dubrovnik, or wherever, the holiday season,

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plants in pots need water.

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Plants at the bottom of a wall are often growing in dry soil

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and it's at this time, from August onwards, that the plants

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actually produce and initiate the buds for next year.

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You can't influence what happened yesterday,

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but you can influence what's going to happen next spring.

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You need to give these plants plenty of water at this time

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and a bit of feed. Sulphate of potash is the answer to that,

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and they will be absolutely super next spring, I can assure you.

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On a warm, sunny day like this, the water garden is just wonderfully

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appealing and there's one group of plants that is inextricably

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linked to not only waterside planting but also bog gardens, too.

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And it is of course this, the hosta.

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This one is Sum and Substance.

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It is the most bold, brassy and beguilingly exotic

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plant, that is happy, actually, in the sun or in the shade.

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And that is one of the remarkable things about hostas,

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is that there is one for just about every location in the garden.

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Of course, it goes without saying that all hostas will revel not

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only in damp soils, but dappled, or even full shade,

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but if you are looking for something a little bit more unusual

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and in a more difficult situation, then what about full sun?

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Well, there is a group of hostas, in fact, this group,

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the sieboldiana group, that are fabulous at sitting in really

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quite baking sunshine and quite dry soils,

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although they will thank you if you keep them a little bit damp too.

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These are all derivatives of Halcyon.

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El Nino, for instance, is a really

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rather quaint blue with an ice white edge.

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Or, you could go for the pure Halcyon itself -

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a very subtle and rather sophisticated-looking foliage.

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My favourite is this one.

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This is Blue Mouse Ear which is such a diminutive specimen.

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Perfect for pot culture even in a windowsill, or, dare I say it,

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hanging basket or trough.

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It's perfectly at home just in a crack or crevice in a wall to.

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Hostas being loosely related to lilies will carry not just a

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similar-shaped flower, but also that

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wonderful, sweet fragrance of lilies.

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Many of them now are being bred specifically for that fragrance.

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So, in addition to growing just about anywhere, there is

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also a huge variety.

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In fact, if this doesn't fill the pantry full of hostas,

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then you might want to contemplate the fact there's about 4,000

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different cultivars, shapes, sizes, colours and everything in between.

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Fabulous plants.

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Whatever type of hosta you choose, and, in truth,

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wherever you locate it in the garden,

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the key to success with these plants is all to do with

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the type of roots they have

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because they're very succulent rooted specimens, which

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means that they like to be good and moist during the summer months,

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and free draining during the winter.

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Now, of course, some garden soils oblige, but most don't,

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so, the thing to do is to dig in lots of organic matter.

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So, about, if you can manage it, 50% organic matter,

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50% garden soil, and that organic matter can come from garden

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compost or well rotted farmyard manure or leaf litter.

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Plant the specimens just a little deeper than

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they are in the pot because these are herbaceous plants

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and they will produce the most robust crown

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if they are slightly deeper.

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Leave them too proud and they all become a little bit too loose

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and dry out very quickly.

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Of course, it's all very well extolling the virtues of hostas

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and the beauty that they bring to the garden, when the reality,

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for most of us, is this - a great handsome clump of hostas

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completely annihilated by molluscs.

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Slugs and snails having a wonderful time here.

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And, in fact, if you have a rummage around in here,

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you'll probably find one or two of the culprits.

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Sometimes, it's not immediately obvious where the...

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Oh, there's one. There it is. Look at that. Prise him off.

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Look at that. Now, the anatomy of a slug and snail,

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well, it's quite curious.

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You can see that there's four protuberances at the front.

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There are two eyes,

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and then two antennae which are essentially smelling the atmosphere.

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Underneath, there is then a mouth.

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That has a single tooth and is doing

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all of the munching on your hostas, and, what they do, is they use that

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single tooth in their mouth to graze away

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on the underside of the hosta leaf.

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They take all the fresh tissue and, of course,

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without an underside and without a central part of the leaf,

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all the spongy mesophyll has been grazed away,

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the top part then just falls out and the plant

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looks as though it has been shot blasted.

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Gardeners traditionally of course would turn to

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something like a jam jar, fill it full of your favourite beer,

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and then plunge that in the garden

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and then the molluscs will come along, they go for a swim

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and they drown while slightly drunk but happy, presumably.

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Limited effect to be honest.

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Then, you find you have things like the slug pellets,

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traditional pellets, and this is as ferric phosphate.

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Now, although it is sold as an organic and environmentally

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and nature friendly, there is

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some suspicion that even these are causing a major problem

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amongst anything which eats the molluscs after

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they have been poisoned by the ferric sulphate.

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Granny used to suggest these.

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Crushed eggshells. Now, the idea is that you scatter

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these around the surface of your pot or on the surface

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of the soil around your plant and the sharp nature of them

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is irritant to any mollusc covering the surface

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and they go somewhere else and that's true to a certain extent,

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but, remember, snails stay on the surface

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so eggshells may be efficient, but, slugs - predominantly under

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the surface, so eggshells certainly wouldn't work as well for them.

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You could go for coffee grinds and there is some evidence, although,

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it is really quite slight,

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and you do need an awful lot of coffee grinds.

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You do need to create a complete blanket on the surface

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and, again, it only works for snails and not slugs.

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Personally, I go for sheep's wool.

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This is ground and composted, pelleted sheep's wool.

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It's an irritant to the mollusc as it travels across the surface.

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You put it around the plant, you water the plant heavily,

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it creates a sort of cowpat-like structure

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which smells awfully of sheep,

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but it does keep your hostas free of slugs and snails.

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Or, if you want something that's really smelly...how about this?

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A cocktail for molluscs.

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There is a couple of bulbs of garlic which have been crushed

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and then boiled in a couple of pints of water for about five

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minutes or so, and then you take your simmered garlic, and you tip

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it into a jug with about two pints of liquid - there's all the debris

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coming out of it - look, there's all the garlic that's been taken away.

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That's the concentrate.

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You can dilute that by about 100%, so you can double the quantity,

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put it into your favourite sprayer

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and spray it over your hostas.

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All around

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the foliage, underside as well,

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and what happens is that all of this garlic will

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dry as a veneer on the surface of anything that it touches

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and that becomes a dissuading mechanism for any of the molluscs.

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They just simply don't like the taste of garlic apparently.

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Of course, if all else fails then you can always retreat to the safe

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position of growing hostas which

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the breeders tell us are slug proof.

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Now, there is one rather unimaginatively entitled

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Slug Proof, but, for me, this is the one that you absolutely

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have to grow if you want clean hostas

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free of slug and snail damage.

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This one is called Devon Green.

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It's a young specimen, the leaves will double in size.

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It remains this wonderful verdant green and has lavender blue flowers.

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And, certainly in my garden, this one stands

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head and shoulders above anything else.

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Well, if our postbag is anything to go by,

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some of you are having a bit of a problem with your tomato

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crops under glass this year and it's not disease,

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it's not the feeding, it's not virus, or anything like that,

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or chemicals, it's due to the environment that we've created,

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that we have had created in the greenhouses this year.

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The two key points are temperature and humidity.

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The temperatures go shooting through the roof

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because modern glasshouses don't have enough ventilation.

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If you go away to your work in the morning and it goes really hot,

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even although you have left the ventilation on,

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it gets up over 80, it's going

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to affect the quality of the growth and the quality of the fruit.

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So, there's not a lot you can do in that regard, but the second

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one was equally important, and that is humidity.

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When it gets dry under these conditions,

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the fruit just doesn't set, so you may have flowers

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but they just drop off without setting

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because the humidity is necessary, not only to help reduce

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the temperature, but also

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to actually create the pollen absolutely

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ripening and bursting and doing the business to give you a crop.

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At home, I have conquered the business about humidity

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but I still get too high a temperature and so the growth is

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fine and I have got a set, but not as good as the set here, you see.

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See, we're halfway in between

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in this greenhouse which has reasonable ventilation.

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So, how do we compare? Well, we've got Shirley at the end there.

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It's a variety I use to compare others

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because it's very easy to grow, it's a good cropper

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and it's coming away nicely, if a bit slow, because of the conditions.

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As we come through these other varieties,

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you get a whole range of very strange colouring

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because not only does that condition affect the growth,

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because it's affecting nutrition.

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You can get the nutrition as normal

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but you're still going to get this sort of effect on the foliage.

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Crops are coming away nicely, Rosella is doing rather nicely -

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the one I hope everybody will walk past

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because I think it's the best of the lot.

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And, we've a new one this year

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and one of the team looked at this one...

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This is Indigo Blue Berries.

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Look at that. ..the first thing she said

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when she saw it was, "These are evil looking."

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Well, I haven't tried to taste them yet.

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I'm a wee bit scared,

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but they could be quite interesting on the plate.

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The bearded iris, or, if you're a bit old-fashioned,

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Germanic iris, are wonderful early summer flowering specimens

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with their very thick belt-like foliage.

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But, once they've finished flowering,

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if their clump's about three to five years old,

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it's well worth just gently lifting them out of the bed here in the

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gravel bed, and the time to do that is as soon as they have finished

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their flowering flush.

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You can see here the faded flower stems, and what we can also see

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once it's out of the ground is the way that these plants grow.

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They are rhizomatous.

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The rhizome is basically just a stem

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that lies on the surface of the soil,

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roots protruding beneath. You can see some thick, fleshy roots and

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the leaves coming out on top. And with a plant like this, what happens

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over time is that the rhizome just simply runs out of energy,

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so it dies away, and every year it produces a new piece of rhizome.

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So, the reason that we lift them

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and divide them is to reinvigorate the plant, spur it into a bit

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more growth, and then it produces new, fresh rhizome and flowers.

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And there it is on the end, look.

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You can harvest that by cutting about two inches or so.

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You can either take your secateurs

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or knife, slide it in, and cut through the rhizome.

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So, there, if you tease out as much root as you can,

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you can see the roots beneath, a good healthy collection, two inches

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or so of rhizome and then some good, healthy leaves coming off of that.

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And that's the perfect plant to propagate.

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Any shorter than about two inches

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and you will find it doesn't have enough energy to get itself motoring

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for next season and it won't flower, so better to have more than less.

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Once you have got your cutting and propagation material,

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a bit of compost - this is multipurpose compost -

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mixed with grit,

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that's 75% multipurpose, 25% grit,

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the grit is there to give it good drainage. I'm trying to

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replicate the conditions that the bearded iris love.

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And then just...

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..twist the roots round in the pot a little.

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It doesn't matter if they are all at the same level in the compost.

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And what's curious is that you bury the plant a little deeper

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than it was when it was growing in the garden.

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There's two reasons for doing that.

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The first is to make sure that the rhizome is

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spurred into action to keep growing,

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and the second reason is very simply

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that you need to stop the plant blowing around in the wind.

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So, a good idea to put a stake in just alongside the rhizome there

0:17:550:18:00

and then a piece of twine or wire just long enough to go

0:18:000:18:07

around the leaves and the cane, just give it a bit of a tie off and that

0:18:070:18:11

will stop it moving around.

0:18:110:18:13

The problem with these plants is, that the more they move,

0:18:130:18:15

the less the roots are able to develop,

0:18:150:18:18

so a good, rigid structure is essential.

0:18:180:18:21

And then, of course, a bit of water on the top.

0:18:210:18:24

And then you want to put this into a location which is very

0:18:240:18:27

similar to the location in which the iris thrives -

0:18:270:18:31

full sun and sheltered from the wind.

0:18:310:18:34

And if you have been generous enough with your rhizome,

0:18:340:18:37

you will find that this will root very quickly, within a few weeks,

0:18:370:18:41

and then will flower again early next summer.

0:18:410:18:44

We have these wonderful views of Orkney farmland but, you know

0:18:510:18:54

the price you have to pay for that is that the wind

0:18:540:18:56

whistles across here and hits anything that you try to grow.

0:18:560:18:59

So, what do you do? You provide shelter. And, normally,

0:18:590:19:02

you would build a stone enclosure at the front of your house

0:19:020:19:04

and then you would put some trees up the side of it to break the wind.

0:19:040:19:08

Because the wind normally just whistles over the top

0:19:080:19:11

and causes eddies, breaks anything inside.

0:19:110:19:13

So, here, that's what they've done.

0:19:130:19:15

This is the garden of Kierfiold House and it is owned by Fiona

0:19:150:19:19

and Euan Smith, and I am off to see Euan.

0:19:190:19:22

Gosh, Euan, this is just fantastic. What an array of plants!

0:19:270:19:32

They're packed in and there is hardly a weed to be seen.

0:19:320:19:35

Which in itself has its advantages.

0:19:350:19:37

THEY LAUGH

0:19:370:19:38

It does. So, Euan, what's the history of the site and garden?

0:19:380:19:41

Well, the house was built between 1850 and 1852 and we believe

0:19:410:19:46

that the garden, the walled garden, was built at the same time.

0:19:460:19:49

We are guessing that the garden was serving all functions.

0:19:490:19:52

So, it would be a kitchen garden, decorative,

0:19:520:19:54

and probably also fruit was grown here as well, so, I think

0:19:540:19:57

it was performing all the functions that a big house needed at the time.

0:19:570:20:00

And all these big houses had these gardens, didn't they?

0:20:000:20:02

A lot of the houses up here, yes, the estate houses,

0:20:020:20:05

because I think things like apples and suchlike would have been

0:20:050:20:07

very difficult to get in Orkney any other way.

0:20:070:20:09

We have been here 12 years now and before us,

0:20:090:20:12

the previous owner, John Munro, had spent a lot of time

0:20:120:20:15

working on the garden.

0:20:150:20:16

So, a lot of the geranium collection particularly was initiated by him,

0:20:160:20:20

but they are also of great interest to my wife, Fiona,

0:20:200:20:23

and there's also a local breeder of some import and we are trying

0:20:230:20:27

to get some more of his breeds into the garden as time goes by.

0:20:270:20:31

That's quite interesting because there is an old

0:20:310:20:33

friend of Beechgrove here, and somebody who you know, who is

0:20:330:20:36

also interested in geraniums, so I'm just going off to meet her.

0:20:360:20:40

-Brilliant. I hope you enjoy yourself.

-I will.

0:20:400:20:42

HE CHUCKLES

0:20:420:20:44

Last week, we met Caroline Critchlow in her own beautiful garden.

0:20:470:20:51

This year she organised the first Orkney Garden Festival,

0:20:510:20:54

and the garden here at Kierfiold was one of the main attractions.

0:20:540:20:58

Well, Caroline, when we met at the roadshow, you said that you

0:21:020:21:05

were interested in establishing a collection of geraniums.

0:21:050:21:08

Look! Well, no better place to come than this garden,

0:21:080:21:12

it's absolutely stuffed with them.

0:21:120:21:14

Apparently there are 150 geraniums in this garden, and when

0:21:140:21:18

I started planning my garden, this garden was an inspiration for me.

0:21:180:21:21

You have got this wonderful Candyfloss,

0:21:210:21:23

you've got a magenta one over there, we've got blue ones,

0:21:230:21:26

we've got everything, all levels, all different levels as well.

0:21:260:21:30

What I love about them is that they will grow through other plants.

0:21:300:21:33

So, you might have an astrantia, you might have an inula,

0:21:330:21:36

and that geranium will just go through,

0:21:360:21:38

and the important thing here is that they will stand wind.

0:21:380:21:42

HE LAUGHS

0:21:420:21:43

That's so important, isn't it? Especially in Orkney.

0:21:430:21:46

My favourite one is the pratense Striatum which is up there,

0:21:460:21:49

and it has got the white with the purple stripe going through

0:21:490:21:53

and it just doesn't know whether it wants to be blue or white.

0:21:530:21:56

-A wee bit uncertain isn't it, yeah?

-Yep.

0:21:560:21:58

Now, the ones you're interested in, Caroline,

0:22:050:22:07

-are, what, the Orkney hybrids, weren't they?

-Yes, that's right.

0:22:070:22:10

My friend Alan Bremner, who is a local farmer, and he breeds

0:22:100:22:13

geraniums as a hobby, has bred these 60 Orkney geraniums, 60!

0:22:130:22:18

-And we have got one here and that's the Orkney Cherry.

-Right.

0:22:180:22:22

Now, the thing about Orkney Cherry is

0:22:220:22:24

it tells you from its name that it grows well in Orkney.

0:22:240:22:27

It doesn't like frost so it's not fully hardy,

0:22:270:22:30

and it likes good drainage and it likes sun, but not too much sun.

0:22:300:22:35

Is not difficult then, is it?

0:22:350:22:36

THEY LAUGH

0:22:360:22:38

But that would be a tricky plant for me to grow

0:22:380:22:39

because I couldn't give it the conditions that it needs.

0:22:390:22:42

Yeah, it has been a tricky plant for me to grow

0:22:420:22:44

because I have had four goes, but I don't give up.

0:22:440:22:46

Keep going. And there's also that lovely little pink thing

0:22:460:22:49

going down over the wall.

0:22:490:22:50

That one is called Westray, and you can see that just by the side

0:22:500:22:53

of it, there's a light pink one

0:22:530:22:55

-called dalmaticum and that's its mother.

-Right.

0:22:550:22:57

And the father is macrorrhizum,

0:22:570:22:59

and that's the one with the lovely fragrant leaf.

0:22:590:23:01

That's right, it's a common ground cover, macrorrhizum,

0:23:010:23:03

and you can see there's wonderful ground cover that that has as well.

0:23:030:23:06

That's right.

0:23:060:23:08

There's a white one over there.

0:23:080:23:09

That's another one that I'm determined to

0:23:090:23:11

have in my collection, determined, and it is called St Ola.

0:23:110:23:14

It likes a sunny position.

0:23:140:23:15

It can be a bit tricky, and that one is fully hardy

0:23:150:23:18

so I might stand a better chance with that one, George.

0:23:180:23:20

It's got that lovely white flower.

0:23:200:23:22

So, for me, these plants which have these Orcadian names are

0:23:220:23:27

the Orkney geraniums, but, any time I try to grow them,

0:23:270:23:30

I would need to be careful to look at the conditions on them.

0:23:300:23:34

Well, Caroline, I don't think I have ever been

0:23:440:23:47

so excited at looking at one plant collection

0:23:470:23:51

and this collection of geraniums is just absolutely astonishing.

0:23:510:23:54

The variation which you have got here!

0:23:540:23:56

So, what's going to happen to these specially-bred Orkney geraniums?

0:23:560:23:59

Well, together with my friend Fiona, who gardens here with Euan,

0:23:590:24:04

who you met earlier, we are

0:24:040:24:06

going to get these 60 Bremner geraniums

0:24:060:24:09

back onto Orkney and we're going to

0:24:090:24:11

build the collection up.

0:24:110:24:13

Because, we're both very worried that we'll lose those

0:24:130:24:17

geraniums because there are so many things on the market now, but,

0:24:170:24:20

to us, they're special and we want to preserve them and treasure them.

0:24:200:24:24

We're looking forward to researching that

0:24:240:24:27

and getting them from here, there and everywhere,

0:24:270:24:29

but we want them back here where they started and where they belong.

0:24:290:24:32

-It's a part of this island's heritage, after all.

-Absolutely.

0:24:320:24:35

And the best way to keep something is actually to give it away,

0:24:350:24:39

-to share it, to pass it around.

-Yes, yes.

0:24:390:24:42

And then we can get collections.

0:24:420:24:44

That's right. And if two of us are working on it,

0:24:440:24:47

there's more chance of this project succeeding.

0:24:470:24:49

Here's power to your elbow.

0:24:490:24:51

Thank you very much, I'm going to need it.

0:24:510:24:54

I'm on the weather theme again

0:25:020:25:04

because the weather conditions have led to our potato crop

0:25:040:25:07

getting blight, but not all the varieties are affected.

0:25:070:25:10

You can see the affected plants there, the blackened leaves.

0:25:100:25:13

The leaves are falling off and that's Maris Bard, known to be

0:25:130:25:16

affected by blight. Look at this one.

0:25:160:25:18

This is called Athlete, clean as a whistle, absolutely fine!

0:25:180:25:22

Then we go on to another variety, this is Kestrel,

0:25:220:25:25

beginning to be affected, but if you

0:25:250:25:27

haven't done anything about it, now it's too late, they're affected.

0:25:270:25:31

So, what do we do with these?

0:25:310:25:32

Well, we take all the affected material off the top

0:25:320:25:35

of the drills and dispose of it. Hap the tatties up and they'll be

0:25:350:25:38

all right in the ground, but they're not going to grow very much more,

0:25:380:25:41

but there's no real panic in getting the potatoes out of the ground.

0:25:410:25:44

What I am more interested in, of course,

0:25:440:25:46

is the varieties that are showing resistance.

0:25:460:25:48

Athlete, Carolus here - we grew this last year

0:25:480:25:50

but didn't get a chance to taste it. And, after all,

0:25:500:25:52

that's what it's about - do we like them or do we not?

0:25:520:25:55

We'll try them again this year and see if we can get a nice boiling

0:25:550:25:57

of them. And these are the Sarpo varieties.

0:25:570:25:59

These two here, this is Kifli and this is Sarpo Mira.

0:25:590:26:03

Absolutely clean as a whistle,

0:26:030:26:05

so if you're liable to have a blight in your area at any time,

0:26:050:26:09

when you are choosing your varieties, give a thought to

0:26:090:26:12

the fact that you can get varieties that are resistant.

0:26:120:26:15

This is my fertiliser trial

0:26:180:26:20

and it's all to do with that beautiful begonia, Illumination.

0:26:200:26:24

Now, I have six different types of fertilisers, plus the control,

0:26:240:26:29

and the control doesn't have any fertiliser at all and I think

0:26:290:26:32

you can see with this one that, yes, it's starting to peter out, OK.

0:26:320:26:37

I've still got the flowers, but look at the foliage.

0:26:370:26:39

It's starting to go a little bit yellow.

0:26:390:26:42

However, when you look at these six,

0:26:420:26:44

I don't think there's a lot of difference at the moment.

0:26:440:26:47

If anything, this one, which is

0:26:470:26:49

one of the controlled-release fertilisers, the foliage is

0:26:490:26:52

perhaps a little bit greener and the same with the one at the end here.

0:26:520:26:56

And that was the fertiliser that said you would have 400%

0:26:560:27:00

more blooms or possibly... Well, definitely not at the moment

0:27:000:27:04

but we need to come back in a few weeks' time and take another look.

0:27:040:27:07

Jim, before we start tasting the tatties,

0:27:100:27:13

I know, what about the sweet peas and the smell? They look glorious.

0:27:130:27:16

-Fantastic.

-Aren't they good? Let's start with Jazzy,

0:27:160:27:18

which is meant to be like a Jersey Royal.

0:27:180:27:21

OK, can you remember when you last had a Jersey Royal?

0:27:210:27:24

-Oh, that's nice.

-Terribly watery.

0:27:260:27:30

Oh, I don't think so. I like that. OK...

0:27:300:27:34

-That's what makes people different.

-Yes.

-Right...

0:27:340:27:37

-Gemson also meant to be a salad potato.

-Mm-hmm.

0:27:370:27:40

And it was quite a white one.

0:27:400:27:42

I had my eye on that bit, but never mind.

0:27:420:27:45

Definitely more substance to that.

0:27:470:27:49

No, I think that one has got more flavour.

0:27:490:27:52

We'll be here for a while.

0:27:520:27:54

Yes, now let's try Elfe, this was the one that was

0:27:540:27:57

best cropper, and both Mari and myself liked the colour of it.

0:27:570:28:00

So, we should have done a blind tasting so we didn't know.

0:28:020:28:05

Well, maybe.

0:28:050:28:07

Mm...

0:28:080:28:10

-I would go for Elfe.

-I would go for Jazzy.

0:28:120:28:14

-It's a pity we didn't have a bit of butter, mind you.

-Oh, I know.

0:28:140:28:18

-Definitely. Butter and salt.

-This is true.

0:28:180:28:20

Anyway, if you would like any more information on this week's

0:28:200:28:23

programme, it's all in the fact sheet,

0:28:230:28:25

and the easiest way to access that is online. Next week, Jim...

0:28:250:28:27

We have a week off next week for some people

0:28:270:28:30

running around the track. I'll be shouting for Laura Muir,

0:28:300:28:32

but until the following week... BOTH: Goodbye.

0:28:320:28:35

Right, I'm going to stick with Jazzy.

0:28:350:28:37

In the Beechgrove garden, Jim and Carole enjoy a red cabbage success story. Chris plants a range of hostas in the Beechgrove cottage garden. Since hostas are usually tasty morsels for slugs and snails, Chris also tries out a range of preventative measures. George visits Fiona and Euan Smith's garden at Kierfiold House on Orkney. The garden is a lesson on how creating shelter allows for planting in exposed conditions and is home to a large collection of hardy geraniums.