Travels with Music Class Clips


Travels with Music

Video clips for the classroom. A showcase of musical sounds, styles and rhythms of the world, from Afro-Peruvian music to an Andalusian orchestra in Morocco.


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Transcript


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All over China, you see this range of instruments.

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They all look the same, but some are wider,

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some are more narrow. They have a different amount of strings

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and it first originated in the warring period of China,

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about 771 to 221 BC.

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It was...popularised during the Qing dynasty, in China.

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In the beginning, we have five notes.

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The tone was a lot softer, and it's harder to bend.

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The wood has always been paulownia wood for the face board,

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right here - the sound chamber.

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They use paulownia wood.

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Over the dynasties, they changed it from five strings

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to 12 strings. Later on, it evolved to 14 and 15 strings.

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For a while, China was war torn, and a lot of the traditional music

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was disappearing.

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But later it was brought back, and towards the 1960s

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they developed the instrument a little bit more,

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and then you get the 16 strings,

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18 strings and you have 21 strings, 23 strings...

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And up through...for common use, up through 26 strings.

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A lot of the contemporary music still takes a lot of the folk flavour

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or even the folk melody, and brings it to a new area,

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a new level.

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Towards the mid-19th century,

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the guzheng musicians did a lot more to turn this instrument

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into more of a solo instrument.

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They developed a lot more techniques,

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a lot more new techniques. Instead of just using the right hand,

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as I've been doing this side, the left hand on this side,

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doing the bending, the vibrato,

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they bring it over and the left hand plays chords.

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so we have arpeggios...

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And then we have bass...

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So they have a lot of accompaniment

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and second, third supporting parts to accompany the melody,

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so you have this full... full structure in their music,

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not just a simple melody.

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In China, there's people starting music at any age.

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People don't just take it up as a hobby, but as a lifelong career -

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their profession.

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But because of that, they also have a lot of private lessons,

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and that's how I learned, is private lessons.

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In the past, a lot of the music is taught orally and visually.

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So...although we do have our own music,

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our own way of writing the music,

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we don't use the grand staff, we use simplified music.

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In the past, they didn't really just say, "OK, here's the music.

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"Read from it." OK, and then go from there.

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The teacher plays a phrase.

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And then the student listens, and then...

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I guess you could say mimics the teacher. Or repeats after the teacher.

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And that's the way I actually was taught.

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Through this playing and repetition.

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The instrument I'm holding right now, in Chinese name we call hulusi.

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It translates in English, we call gourd pipe.

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It's very popular in the southern part of China,

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the province called Yunnan province.

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It's very popular with minority groups.

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This instrument has seven holes -

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six in the front, one in the back.

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And it only contains one octave.

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Maybe eight notes.

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And it sounds very smooth.

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This part is real gourd - that's why we call it the gourd pipe.

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And we have three bamboo inserts inserted into the gourd.

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People will ask, "How come if you only need one bamboo in the centre,

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"why you have two on the side?"

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There's different versions of this instrument.

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More traditionally, which is the one you see right here,

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the one in the middle contains most of the notes.

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The two on the side... Sometimes, because the notes are so limited,

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we want to promote this instrument, so what we do is...

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put two on the side. Nowadays, we put two extra reeds inside,

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so sometimes we can have one or two extra notes.

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This instrument, we call suona.

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In English, it translates as double-reed trumpet.

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This instrument originally came through the Silk Road

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from the Middle East. Even nowadays, you go to India,

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go to Middle East, you still can see similar instruments.

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Of course, there's different styles in China,

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because our country is so big.

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Up north, near the border with Russia...

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their local area is very cold,

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because all the mountains...snow,

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and very cold in the winter.

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And because they always see really tall trees,

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they always see really big mountains,

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so when they're playing, it's wide open - you can hear

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for miles away - bang, bang, bang!

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Also, if you close your eyes when I'm playing...

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..it's supposed to bring you to some open area,

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it's very wide open. You can think...

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maybe not on a beach, maybe on a really wide open mountain.

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That's how their music translates -

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how they're language translates to their music.

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The way my people learn kulintang music is...

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through exposure.

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Through playing with other musicians.

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My parents are musicians -

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I learned this music when I was very young,

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from my mother, from my parents.

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I always watched old people, when I was a child,

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playing the music. I started learning it from my mother.

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I remember she had to put me on her lap, guiding my hands

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to hit the gong.

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And eventually, I learned through exposure.

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Because this is a music that is handed from generation to generation.

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From families to families.

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Many people in the Philippines,

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especially the non-Muslim Filipinos in the northern part

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of the Philippines, they think that this music

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is Muslim music. It's not.

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It has nothing to do with our religion.

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If we have a wedding, for example - without this music,

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you don't expect many people to attend.

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It's the music that attracts them to come.

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It is an opportunity for young men and women to be able to see each other in public,

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because traditionally, we are not even allowed to speak to a woman in public

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unless she is your relative.

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But with the playing of the music, you have a chance to communicate with them.

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SHE SINGS IN NATIVE TONGUE

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I belong to Islam,

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and I come from Pakistan, and there's all Muslim people.

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So...there's like some people...

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very hardcore Muslim, you know, like, very strict.

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So what I'm singing, this is like Sufi music.

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And Sufi's always free.

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'You can dance, you can move, you can do whatever.

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'Classical music is basic music, you know?'

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Any music...like, I'll give you examples.

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Bollywood songs, bangla, folk, Sufi music, kawali...

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If you don't learn classical raga, you don't know anything.

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Everything is a note, like seven notes, you know?

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The whole music has seven notes.

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If you don't learn those notes, and you don't learn basic,

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so you don't know music!

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SHE SINGS IN NATIVE TONGUE

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The tabla is always tuned to the tonic pitch.

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That means, suppose I'm playing with somebody,

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and that artist, his...skill,

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or his tonic pitch at that time is C sharp...

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Now, in Indian music, when a person is singing or playing in C sharp,

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he does not change the pitch.

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His whole entire concert will be in C sharp.

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And so we have to tune our instrument according to that tonic.

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OK, say for example this is now... in C.

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And if I want to change it to C sharp, what I will do, usually,

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I will hit the pegs down.

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And...once I do that,

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the straps get tightened, and it tightens the skin.

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And that's then...you know, the...

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the pitch goes up. See, it's already up?

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So...

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It's already there.

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-It is called...the phrasing is...

-HE SPEAKS RHYTHMICALLY

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HE SPEAKS IN TIME TO THE BEAT

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First note - "tage".

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Look at the similarity here...

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"Tage".

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"Tage Tete".

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"Tete". "Tage Tete".

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So it is all related.

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So if I don't practise,

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I may think differently than I am playing.

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When you are playing,

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it is so fast that things come to your head,

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that even before you think, everything will be there.

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My instrument is called the sarode,

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it's a 25-stringed instrument that comes from India.

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And we play north Indian classical music on my instrument.

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It has...goat skin on the top,

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a steel, fretless plate...

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..a bell on the back, for added amplification.

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We pretty much play four strings on the sarode.

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These are our main playing strings,

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and these two strings, which are called chikari strings...

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..which we tune to our tonic note.

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These strings here are called jawari strings.

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And then we have a whole bunch of strings...

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We have a whole bunch of strings up here, which are called taraf strings

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or sympathetic strings.

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And there's 15 of them. We tune them to all the notes in the scale.

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And that's how the sarode gets that resonating sound.

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When you play a note on it that corresponds with a note here,

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it resonates.

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We play on our nails to get the sliding sound on the instrument.

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There's no frets on this,

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so we have to practise for many years,

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and learn where the notes are placed.

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And that's really important -

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the most important thing is to be in tune,

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and to be in rhythm.

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Before anything else, that's the most important thing -

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being in tune. So you have to learn where the notes are.

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Like in Western music you say "Do re mi",

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you know, you have the names for the notes,

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we have "Sa", which I tune to C.

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"Sa...ray...ga

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"ma...pa...da...

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"nee and then sa again".

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So, "sa"...

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There are ten main scales in Indian classical music -

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we call them "thats" - T-H-A-T-S.

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Thats, or that.

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And in these ten scales, we...all the 75,000 different ragas

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are derived from. They come from these ten scales.

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So when you're playing a certain raga,

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certain moods should be expressed. Like sadness, joy,

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detachment, attachment,

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these kind of things will be expressed through the ragas and certain notes.

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Our music is taught strictly from mouth to ear.

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So whatever the teacher says, you hear it like that,

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you learn it first from your teacher's mouth,

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singing, or demonstrating - you learn it from their playing to your ear,

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and you memorise it.

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Nowadays, I think it's very necessary to record,

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and that's where technology is good, because otherwise,

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the teachings may be lost.

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And you can get...the way it sounds from your teacher,

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and having them on recording is very important.

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Back in the old days, they didn't have tape recorders,

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so they had to memorise it, or they used this notation system.

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But mostly, our music is not notated. Just through discipline

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and practise, you memorise these things and you keep on practising,

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learning them, and your teacher keeps checking you on it.

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TRANSLATION: The raita is a traditional instrument, similar to the modern saxophone.

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I can play both of them, but I prefer the raita.

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Some people don't care for the raita, but others like it very much.

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For example, when people listen to music, they might start dancing.

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But in Morocco, there are people who hear raita, and they just start dancing unconsciously.

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THEY SING IN NATIVE TONGUE

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TRANSLATION: The origin of this music is Arabic.

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It has six chords,

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and we use a pick to play it - a piece of ivory.

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TRANSLATION: I play the flute and the violin.

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This kind of music is different - it's full of poetry.

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It has two kinds of poems. The first one is in classical Arabic.

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The second is in Arabic dialect.

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And there is no relationship between the Andalucian music

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and Oriental music.

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The orchestra of Andalucian music has a lot of instruments,

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like the lute, percussion, cello, bass, violin.

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TRANSLATION: The rebab is over 2,000 years old.

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It came before the violin and the lute.

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It comes from Spain as well.

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I also play the lute in the orchestra.

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TRANSLATION: My nickname is Ghninou.

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I'm from Fez, Morocco.

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I play all the instruments of percussion,

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but I'm professional on the darbukkah.

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I'm a professional, and I love its melody.

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When I play this kind of music, I play it with my soul

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and blood, and I feel that I'm in a different state.

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When I was growing up, I found myself playing percussion,

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just like a young sportsman would learn a sport.

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I found myself playing on my schoolbag, walking to school.

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I would play on the table before my mum would bring dinner.

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And I found that people were listening.

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I really liked it, and they applauded me.

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I would walk down the street and hear music playing,

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and unconsciously, I would start playing music myself.

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In Morocco, there are traditional and modern styles.

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They are both 12:8 time,

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but the way they are played is different.

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A lot of times, we get recordings from the East,

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of Arabic music.

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And we hear that they've tried to add Moroccan percussion.

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But a lot of the times they make mistakes.

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It's not played correctly, because it's difficult.

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Most of the time, Moroccan music begins with four bars of percussion,

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with no other instruments playing accompaniment.

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People in other countries don't really care for this,

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but Moroccan people get really excited as the percussion builds.

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I do this.

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If I'm outside over there drinking my tea, talking to friends,

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they can just play what I just played...

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..for me to come.

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They don't have to yell my name.

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So if they want me there, I'm outside, they just play this.

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I know they play this to call me and I know this is my rhythm

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for my family.

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I don't have to stop and tell my friends,

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or tell my brother or my nephew we're going to switch rhythm.

0:30:500:30:54

To go to a second rhythm.

0:30:540:30:56

What I have to tell my brother,

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I can just say it with the drums. It's all speaking.

0:31:000:31:04

That's why we call...that's why we say "Talking drums".

0:31:050:31:09

Or sabar, djembe, djum djum,

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all those kind of different drums.

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And every time I'm with my family,

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or relatives, friends,

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I always see the happiness round.

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That's what we want to share to the world.

0:31:330:31:35

To outside Senegal, outside Africa,

0:31:350:31:40

inside Africa, we want to share that, we want to show the world

0:31:400:31:44

you can learn this to save people,

0:31:440:31:49

make people happy.

0:31:490:31:51

Make people gathering together.

0:31:510:31:53

Make people work together.

0:31:530:31:56

This is a cowbell.

0:32:490:32:51

Cowbell is universally known here.

0:32:510:32:54

And this is a two-tone agogo.

0:32:580:33:01

We call it agogo.

0:33:010:33:03

And in the village...

0:33:050:33:06

..this is one of the first instruments they you how to play.

0:33:070:33:11

And if you can hold this down...

0:33:120:33:14

..while the masters play solo on top of it,

0:33:160:33:20

then you have passed the audition.

0:33:200:33:22

But if you cannot,

0:33:220:33:24

then you've got more to learn.

0:33:240:33:26

On top of that, there will be a lot of criss-cross rhythm

0:33:350:33:40

being played to confuse you.

0:33:400:33:42

But you may not get confused!

0:33:430:33:46

We have shekere here.

0:33:480:33:50

Of course, most people here are familiar with...

0:33:530:33:56

..the shaker. The maracas.

0:33:590:34:02

The original is a fruit. When you caught it,

0:34:020:34:05

you scoop the stuff out of it, and you dry it.

0:34:050:34:08

And...you make the beads...

0:34:100:34:13

..around it. You can play it in different ways.

0:34:150:34:18

You can play it this way...

0:34:180:34:20

You can play it this way...

0:34:240:34:25

Or you can play it this way...

0:34:290:34:30

My name is Yehuda Glantz,

0:34:460:34:47

and I live in Israel, in Shiloh.

0:34:470:34:50

To be here is a big honour for me.

0:34:500:34:54

You have many places - that's the energy of this place -

0:34:540:34:59

the energy that you get is very strong and powerful.

0:34:590:35:02

The inspiration that I receive is from the silence of the place

0:35:040:35:08

that I live here. I get a lot of inspiration when I come to this area,

0:35:080:35:14

alone, with myself the sky. And God.

0:35:140:35:19

So I get a lot of energy from that.

0:35:200:35:23

That gives me the possibility to create new music,

0:35:230:35:28

and the inspiration to do other things.

0:35:280:35:32

The accordion was my first instrument,

0:35:330:35:35

and I have something very deep with the accordion.

0:35:350:35:39

First of all because the sound of the accordion is a very happy sound.

0:35:390:35:43

HE SINGS IN NATIVE TONGUE

0:37:370:37:40

Firstly, I want to tell you we tune the violin differently to the Western violin in Arabic music.

0:40:060:40:11

This string...we tune it G, D, G, D.

0:40:130:40:19

And the Western music is G, D, A, E.

0:40:190:40:22

So the reason we tune it that way is because it makes the makam scales,

0:40:220:40:26

which we think resonate better.

0:40:260:40:28

Because we play a lot more times on the G.

0:40:280:40:31

The scales on G. So the two strings resonate...

0:40:310:40:33

..together...

0:40:340:40:37

..better, and also, it makes it easier to play the quarter tones,

0:40:380:40:41

if you want to switch to upper scales.

0:40:410:40:44

So the more you practise, the more you become lean and faster.

0:40:510:40:54

So...

0:40:540:40:55

You go over the scales, then when you learn a few scales,

0:41:040:41:09

you can connect those scales together by...

0:41:090:41:12

Then we give them a piece of music to learn on that scale,

0:41:220:41:27

so it's like an example of that scale.

0:41:270:41:29

So they can hear it...with rhythm,

0:41:360:41:41

with time and rhythm,

0:41:410:41:43

and they can hear it with other instruments too.

0:41:430:41:45

Brake drums from the motor car. That will keep you safe,

0:41:510:41:55

when you hit the brake.

0:41:550:41:57

And as I said, you can tune them,

0:41:570:42:01

well, they come already tuned.

0:42:010:42:03

Sometimes we heat them in Africa, to bend them

0:42:030:42:07

and get different song. You can have a whole range of them,

0:42:070:42:11

and then when you have that with other parts of percussion,

0:42:110:42:14

we call that the engine room!

0:42:140:42:15

So somebody might just play...

0:42:150:42:18

Another...

0:42:190:42:21

Another...

0:42:230:42:24

Then, like what I was saying earlier, about the rhythm

0:42:250:42:29

which would be played on two drums, right?

0:42:290:42:33

Either part...right?

0:42:330:42:35

But if you play what we call on the double iron,

0:42:350:42:38

where you're using that pattern, it's like...

0:42:380:42:40

Right? So...

0:42:470:42:48

So when you put a lot of all these different patterns together...

0:42:560:42:59

# People are interested

0:43:050:43:07

# To know where calypso originated

0:43:070:43:10

# People are interested

0:43:100:43:13

# To know where calypso originated

0:43:130:43:16

# Some said it came from Cuba

0:43:160:43:19

# Some say British Guiana

0:43:190:43:21

# Some contend seriously it was sung by Moses crossing the Red Sea

0:43:210:43:26

# But I told them, "No, no, no"

0:43:260:43:30

# Trinidad is the land of Calypso

0:43:300:43:33

# No, no-o, no

0:43:330:43:36

# Trinidad is the land of Calypso

0:43:360:43:38

# Bam ba-ba da dibi bam ba-da

0:43:380:43:41

# Bam-du bam ba-dam ba-dam ba-dam

0:43:410:43:44

# Bam ba-ba da dibi bam ba-da... #

0:43:440:43:48

And it's... # Bo Diddley, Bo Diddley Have you heard?

0:44:090:44:12

# Hey... # I wanna do this.

0:44:120:44:14

We do this in schools, and I wanna show you the answer and call,

0:44:140:44:18

because all of today's music is answer and call.

0:44:180:44:21

So I'll sing the lead line, then you sing, and I want everybody to sing.

0:44:210:44:26

I just want to get the impact on film - that whole answer and call.

0:44:260:44:30

So everybody here, follow Dave.

0:44:300:44:33

And I'll...as all music goes, we have an intro,

0:44:330:44:36

to get you on the rhythm, to get you into the beat,

0:44:360:44:41

and then I'll start my lead line, and you...spread it out.

0:44:410:44:45

All right, "Hey, bo diddly".

0:44:450:44:46

And this is definitely the oldest form of black music right here.

0:44:460:44:50

# Bo Diddley, Bo Diddley, have you heard?

0:45:020:45:04

ALL: # Hey, Bo Diddley!

0:45:040:45:06

# I'm gonna buy you a mockingbird

0:45:060:45:09

# Hey, Bo Diddley!

0:45:090:45:11

# And if that mockingbird don't sing

0:45:110:45:14

# Hey, Bo Diddley!

0:45:140:45:16

# I'm gonna buy you a diamond ring

0:45:160:45:18

# Hey, Bo Diddley! #

0:45:180:45:20

The thing that was so unique about Elvis - he was good!

0:45:200:45:24

And what they've done - they said, "We can't call this music blues,

0:45:240:45:29

"but that's what he's singing." So they said, "Let's call it rock-a-billy.

0:45:290:45:33

So they called it rock-a-billy, which was just really rock'n'roll.

0:45:330:45:37

You know, and the whole term...

0:45:370:45:39

every rocker from the '40s, '50s, '60s,

0:45:390:45:42

this was part of their music...

0:45:420:45:44

Like the Rolling Stones...

0:45:460:45:47

HE PLAYS "Satisfaction by The Rolling Stones

0:45:470:45:53

That's the same fingering as...

0:45:530:45:55

Only they didn't use... He used actually two fingers,

0:45:560:46:01

he didn't use the...

0:46:010:46:02

Now everybody knows Satisfaction, but that was part

0:46:070:46:10

of that whole blues thing.

0:46:100:46:11

And rock music - the only thing again is the beat

0:46:110:46:15

was stretched out, and rock music is much more shuffle,

0:46:150:46:19

or much more driving shuffle than blues.

0:46:190:46:22

Other than that - back to the sound and the guitar and the effects of the guitar.

0:46:220:46:26

It would almost become hypnotic -

0:46:260:46:28

and to this day, if you go to a Rolling Stones or...

0:46:280:46:31

even the Grateful Dead used a lot of black rhythms in their music.

0:46:310:46:35

And you become hypnotised, because it's almost the pace of the heart.

0:46:350:46:40

And then, you know, the drummer would put a counter-melody there,

0:46:450:46:48

then the bass, but everything would be on the one,

0:46:480:46:51

and again - James Brown music - all his music is still on the one.

0:46:510:46:54

I'll give you an example. Now, with James Brown, he's famous, again,

0:46:540:46:58

we're talking about the rhythm and the rhythm that the slaves used

0:46:580:47:02

because rhythm, when they say rhythm and blues,

0:47:020:47:05

the key to a lot of blues is the rhythm of the song.

0:47:050:47:07

And James Brown would use that same...only James Brown used what's called an E9 chord musically,

0:47:070:47:13

we're talking music now! And he would use that...

0:47:130:47:15

And yet, you hear artists like Prince use that...

0:47:290:47:31

And no change! Same thing, and if you listen,

0:47:330:47:36

you still hear that click...

0:47:360:47:38

The music, the folk music of Chile,

0:47:470:47:50

is...kind of,

0:47:500:47:54

you encounter it in different areas.

0:47:540:47:58

In the north, you have a music that is more related with the Andean music.

0:47:580:48:04

Which is a close relation with Ecuadorian music,

0:48:040:48:11

Bolivian music, with Peruvian music.

0:48:110:48:15

And of course, instruments like the charango,

0:48:150:48:18

some ponas, bombo, are in all that zone.

0:48:180:48:24

SHE SINGS IN NATIVE TONGUE

0:48:240:48:27

In the centre, we have something more directed from the Spanish culture.

0:48:270:48:33

And mainly la tonada,

0:48:360:48:39

um...other things like vals too,

0:48:390:48:43

and using the accordion,

0:48:430:48:45

also the guitar,

0:48:450:48:47

and the bomba.

0:48:470:48:50

Then going to the south, this has some original, um...

0:48:540:48:59

..influences. Like in the south of Chile,

0:49:000:49:03

where the persons of Mapuches are,

0:49:030:49:07

and other...Indian cultures are,

0:49:070:49:11

it is also the influence of this part of the population.

0:49:110:49:15

This instrument is called charango.

0:49:250:49:27

And it comes from Bolivia.

0:49:280:49:30

It was first created in Potosi, Bolivia,

0:49:300:49:37

and...it's also played in the folk music of Peru,

0:49:370:49:42

and the north of Chile and Argentina.

0:49:420:49:44

This charango is used mainly in the Andean music,

0:49:470:49:52

as as soloist instrument or also along with other instruments,

0:49:520:49:59

like these panpipes.

0:49:590:50:01

Before, it was made with the shell of an armadillo.

0:50:050:50:08

There...some of them are made with the shell of an armadillo.

0:50:080:50:13

Today, that practice has been forbidden,

0:50:130:50:17

and they're made with wood.

0:50:170:50:20

TRANSLATION: This quatro is based on a Venezuelan quatro,

0:50:410:50:45

although the Venezuelan quatros are wider.

0:50:450:50:48

This one is much thinner.

0:50:480:50:50

And we in Chile love the quatro.

0:50:500:50:54

Well, because all musicians love different sounds and pitches,

0:50:540:50:59

and this pitch is much higher.

0:50:590:51:01

So I came across the quatro because I love Venezuelan music

0:51:110:51:16

and I think Venezuelan music.

0:51:160:51:18

The quatro is my friend because it accompanies me

0:51:270:51:31

and my Venezuelan music.

0:51:310:51:33

In the new songs I'm creating, I also use Venezuelan rhythms,

0:51:350:51:39

because it's Venezuelan, but it also is ours.

0:51:390:51:43

It's a Latin American rhythm.

0:51:430:51:45

SHE SINGS IN NATIVE TONGUE

0:51:530:51:56

TRANSLATION: The musica criolla comes from a mix of black,

0:53:260:53:30

Indio and Spanish people.

0:53:300:53:32

The name of cajon this is in an African language.

0:53:430:53:46

"Nka" is a drum, and "kwa" is wood.

0:53:490:53:51

"Wooden drum".

0:53:510:53:53

Black people were forbidden to play music.

0:54:050:54:07

Their instruments were stolen from them, so they had to make the cajon smaller.

0:54:070:54:12

The technique of the cajon - it has highs...

0:54:320:54:34

lows...

0:54:360:54:37

The cajon has first variation, second variation and third variation.

0:54:370:54:41

We have bass, complement and ornament.

0:54:410:54:46

These are the parts of the cajon.

0:54:460:54:48

For instance, in a festejo, the cajon has to play bass,

0:54:480:54:52

a complement and ornament.

0:54:520:54:54

This instrument is called cajita, or "small box",

0:55:220:55:26

and it comes from churches.

0:55:260:55:28

TRANSLATION: Later on, a stick was incorporated.

0:55:340:55:38

And then another stick was added to beat the cajita.

0:55:410:55:45

Here we have the quijada - "donkey's jaw".

0:56:210:56:25

It is also known as caracha, or carachacha.

0:56:250:56:28

It is called donkey's jaw because it comes from a donkey.

0:56:280:56:32

We play it like this...

0:56:320:56:33

The donkey's jaw, along with la cajita,

0:56:430:56:46

were the very first instruments that black Peruvians played after la cajon.

0:56:460:56:51

This is a tambor.

0:57:000:57:02

A drum to mark dancers' movements so there's more brightness in the music

0:57:020:57:07

that is played when they perform.

0:57:070:57:09

Normally, there is the cajon.

0:57:090:57:12

And then the tambor.

0:57:120:57:15

When the dancer does this...

0:57:340:57:35

..we play like this...

0:57:360:57:38

When a dancer moves this way...

0:57:390:57:41

we play it like this...

0:57:410:57:42

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:510:58:54

E-mail [email protected]

0:58:540:58:57

Video clips for the classroom. A showcase of musical sounds, styles and rhythms of the world. An engaging selection which highlights world music, from the unusual Afro-Peruvian sounds to the varied instruments which form an Andalusian orchestra in Morocco.


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