Episode 4 Made in Northern Ireland


Episode 4

Stephen Nolan and Sarah Travers meet the country's most innovative entrepreneurs. Here, they look at an invention aimed at relieving period pain among other business ideas.


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Transcript


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In last year's series, I travelled the length and breadth

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of the country meeting some of Northern Ireland's

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most innovative entrepreneurs.

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Who could forget Welly Wet Suit from Belfast,

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See.Sense from Newtownards and the yoga bag from Cullyhanna?

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Ah!

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Now that we've got a second series,

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we've even more hungry entrepreneurs to show you.

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This year, we're bringing in Sarah Travers. Hello, Sarah.

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-Hello, Stephen.

-What are we doing this year, then?

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Well, this time I'm going to be giving you a little bit of a helping

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hand as we travel across the country to meet some of the brilliant

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entrepreneurs out there.

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We'll be hearing all about manufacturing in Moira.

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And beds in where?

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-Ballymena.

-Mm!

-Ballymena?!

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I know exactly what's going to be going on at home now.

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People will be watching this and they love one idea.

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Yeah, and then some of you at home will be saying,

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"That's never going to work,"

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so that's why we've created the people's panel,

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members of the public like you and I looking at the products and thinking

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to themselves, "That is going to actually work."

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Or not.

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Stephen's off to meet a dental technician who's invented a product

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to protect his good looks,

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if he ever takes up a sport like rugby or cage fighting.

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Now, we all know the dangers of head injuries in MMA fighting and rugby.

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And particularly cauliflower ear.

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# Protect your ears. #

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But Finaghy-based dental technician Brenda Phillips has come up with a

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possible solution.

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-Brenda, nice to meet you.

-Nice to meet you, Stephen.

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-And you've got a parrot on your shoulder.

-I have indeed.

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She comes into work with me every day and goes home with me

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every night.

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Cauliflower ear!

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But more importantly, you've got an invention in your hand.

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Absolutely. This is Caulear.

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I came up with this idea through watching television and there was

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a rugby match on and the story with John Afoa,

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charging up the pitch, he got tackled

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and his ear burst open.

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At that point I thought, "Ah, there must be a need for some protection

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"to stop cauliflower ears,"

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so I went into work and I made a shield

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and tried it on to Connor there.

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How does this work?

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Well, this is a strong,

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flexible rubber-type material that is custom-made to fit your ear.

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-Now, if a double-decker bus hits you, Stephen...

-Yes.

-..you know,

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-it's not going to do you any good.

-Would you stop touching my belly?

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I've told you about this earlier before!

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Amazingly, in a small dental technician's lab,

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Brenda has invented the world's first tailor-made ear-guard

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and already she's getting some international interest.

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It's sold in America, Mexico, Italy and France.

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Do you see people having to go in somewhere to get a mould every time

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they want to buy one of these or will there be a little package that

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-you buy that you do it at home?

-There's a couple of things

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they can do. They can come down to the laboratory and get their moulds

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made, but if anybody out there anywhere else,

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what's happening, the ones that got it in America and France and so

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forth, we send them out the kit, they take their own moulds,

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send it to us, we manufacture their ear shield

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and then post it out to them.

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Wow.

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Now, my rugby days might be well behind me but I've decided to let

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Brenda take a mould of my ears.

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These two compounds together will harden.

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What are these two compounds?

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-These are just two pieces of putty.

-HE CHUCKLES

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-Just two pieces of putty...

-OK.

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..and we're just mixing them together here and then

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we're going to take a wee mould of your ear.

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-Have I got fat ears, too?

-Erm...

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Well, does your mother lick your ears?

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Can you have fat ears?

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-You can have all different types of ears.

-Can you?

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-Yep.

-So if I lost weight, would my ears get skinnier?

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I don't know about that because I think your ears and your nose grow

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-throughout your life.

-Do they?

-Yes...

-I'll tell you what,

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nothing else grows.

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SHE LAUGHS

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Now, that's not hurting you, so stop you messing about.

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-There you go. There you go.

-Banging me ear?!

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Just checking. Just checking.

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And once the putty's hardened, it's time to remove the mould.

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You'll see the big lump of wax coming out with it.

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No, that's not too bad.

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-Oh, that's not too bad.

-That's not too bad.

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I know what you're all thinking,

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that you would all pay big money for a mould of my ear, wouldn't you?

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A thousand quid a pop.

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Well, I have moulded other body parts.

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Breasts and torsos and things like that, but

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I just didn't pursue it with you.

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Why would you mould someone's breasts?

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Breasts? Well, not completely breasts, sort of their torso.

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-Why would you do that?

-Well, if you get a muscleman,

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-they like to have it as a piece of art on their wall.

-Oh, right!

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Brenda's an inventive woman, but what about the future?

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-I was looking at the 3D printing side of things...

-Uh-huh.

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..so that you could maybe scan on your phone. Could you picture that?

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Scan your ear on your phone and send it through to a 3D printer and 3D

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print one. But I don't think they've got the right material yet to 3D

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-print...

-Yet.

-..but it's something, if it's not going to happen now,

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-it'll probably happen in the future.

-And how much would they cost?

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But again... These are around £80. Depending.

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You could get ones with different flags on it.

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-Flags.

-Flags.

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Are you serious, red, white and blue ones?

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Yes, I have got a set of red, white and blue there.

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-Do you?

-Mm-hm.

-I hope you've got white and gold, too.

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I do have. Ah-ha, got you there now, big guy.

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-Stop touching my belly!

-No, Stephen!

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As they say, actually, if they push the belly button ten times, your

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eyes pop out. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten.

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-This woman is crazy.

-No.

-Caulear.

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Caulear protect.

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Chocolate. What you doing?

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Crazy or not, this small dental studio in Finaghy could become

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a worldwide centre for ear protection.

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I think it's a really unique idea.

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-I actually don't have any ears, I was born without them, so...

-Mm.

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..the whole idea of protecting my ears sounds a bit strange,

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but it's quite interesting.

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It's basically if you rip your ligament in your ear,

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it does bleed a lot and then it just swells up.

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And it sort of stays there, does it?

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It just stays there, if you don't get it treated there and then,

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you get cauliflower ear.

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Basically, the guard is protecting the trauma directly to the ear,

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so I think it will work.

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But where do you stop? Are you just going to mould the whole head, then?

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-THEY LAUGH

-And then you've got this big plastic

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rubbery clear thing that you pop over your face.

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Exactly, yeah.

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The 3D printing would be great for that sort of thing, especially if

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you could scan and do it yourself.

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Some of the best ideas come from life experience.

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Our next inventor today was living with chronic pain and that's

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led her to develop a product that's now being distributed

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all across the world and all from her living room in East Belfast.

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Originally from Kesh in County Fermanagh,

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Fiona Bennington is a design engineer and the inventor of Hug,

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a wearable wraparound heat pack

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that helps with tummy, back and period pain.

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Fiona, lovely to meet you.

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We're here to see the Hug, basically, today.

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Tell us first of all why you invented it.

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OK, well, it's a little bit of a personal story, Hug.

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Because I suffer from really bad period pain

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and I would have liked to have used a hot water bottle in work

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but there's a bit of a stigma about sitting in the office with a hot water bottle

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and you don't want to answer the questions people have and things

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so I was looking for something I could wear next to my skin,

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that I could hide under clothes, basically,

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and I went on the internet and I searched for ages

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and I couldn't find anything that I was happy with.

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Fiona set about developing the product herself,

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after creating a proof-of-concept prototype using basic materials from

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around her home. She was able to use her knowledge of the manufacturing

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industry to source a factory in China

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that would help move her designs

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towards a more production-ready model.

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-So this is the Hug?

-It is indeed, yes.

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Well, go on, show us how it works, then.

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So, Hug is filled with gel beads.

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It is very soothing as a material.

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You can put it in the microwave and warm it up.

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It takes about two minutes to get it to a comfortable heat.

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Or you can put it in the freezer for an hour or so

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and then you can use it for cool relief, too.

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Hug is designed to be worn under the clothes and around the waist.

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Its adjustable straps mean that it can fit different sizes, while still

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targeting those areas associated with period pain and a more extreme

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condition called endometriosis.

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It's through an online community of women suffering with this condition

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that Fiona has discovered just how beneficial her product can be.

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Hi, guys, I'm Jessica Duffin from thisendolife.com.

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As most of you know who follow me...

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..I have endometriosis.

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Endometriosis is a gynaecological condition causing internal bleeding,

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cramping and really extreme pain.

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But, today, I want to talk about Hug.

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I say that my period pain is crippling, but it's nothing

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compared to the ladies that are suffering from endometriosis,

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so I think the feedback from them is Hug has allowed them to just get on

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with their lives a little bit more

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and to get out and about and do things.

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Many women get their relief from taking painkillers,

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so Fiona sees Hug as a healthier, more effective alternative

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and at £19.99, it seems like money well spent.

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Having said that, what I love about this,

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and I'm sure other people will feel the same, is that it is like a hug.

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I just, I think it's a really good product for endometriosis.

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Every Hug purchased online

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is shipped directly from what was once Fiona's dining room.

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And with her spare bedroom now being used as a workshop,

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I wanted to see where someone so productive comes up with all of their best ideas.

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Ooh, I'll have a wee lie down, as well.

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From a device that automatically empties your kitty litter tray to

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an inflatable sleeping bag, it seems that Fiona is constantly inventing.

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I must start writing things down. What was my idea earlier?

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THEY LAUGH

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But her passion lies in creating products to help people in need.

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The feedback online has been great,

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but I think the thing which touches me the most is when someone takes the time to write an e-mail and say,

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"Look, this has changed my life. I'm able to leave the house now."

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That has really moved me, because that is what I was aiming for

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and you wouldn't understand how much it means to me.

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It means so much when somebody says that and it only needs

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to be one person to just make my day or my week.

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Well, fair play to you to actually deal with something that a lot of

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people find difficult to talk about and you are making a difference.

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-Good for you.

-Thank you very much.

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Fiona has sold Hugs to customers as far afield

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as New Zealand and America

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and, with a bit of luck, her product will soon be helping millions more

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women all over the world.

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# You need a hug... #

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That's very clever

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and if it means you're not taking as many painkillers...

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Your heating runs out, and everybody's huddled around it.

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-For a lot of people, it's heat.

-Yeah.

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Heat really helps all types of pain, and so does cold.

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So two of those would allow someone to have a few hours of...

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of real genuine relief.

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-And in fact, that price point, it's accessible.

-Yeah.

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You don't feel you're being taken advantage of

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-because of something you can't help but go through.

-Can't control.

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Pain relief is our next best friend but a lot of patients

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might not even be able to control the pain with the pain relief.

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-Mmm.

-Yeah, this definitely, without the side effects.

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Well, apps are really the sort of window to technology infrastructure

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or a service that's been delivered.

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Don't want to go and spend a bunch of money

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writing code and then design some graphics

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or create a user interface

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and then find out that, actually,

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if you had made some changes earlier on in the process,

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that customers would have liked that more.

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What we tend to do is kind of prototype again and again and again.

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So, rinse and repeat.

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The code isn't really the expensive part.

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It's really sort of things like back-end infrastructure,

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it's how you're storing customer data.

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You know, is it protected?

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Are there other kind of

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third-party frameworks that are connected to the app?

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How much research have you done?

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And really, what's the cost of running the application

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once it's up and running?

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You know, it might look easy, but presenting can be very tough.

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It can be an exhausting job.

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So we've decided to give Sarah a bit of a rest.

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ALARM CLOCK BEEPS

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I just had a nightmare that I was...

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lying in bed in the middle of Ballymena.

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# ..I received my sight, and now I am happy all the day... #

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OK, it wasn't a nightmare.

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But with the traffic whizzing by,

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I have to say the last thing I want to be doing in Ballymena town centre

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is changing a duvet cover in my pyjamas.

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So with the sound of the church choir ringing in my ears,

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I think I need some help.

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So, we're going to see if

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the good people of Ballymena can actually fit a duvet.

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It is a complete nightmare.

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How long will it take them to do it?

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Right, the clock's ticking.

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Off you go. No pressure.

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-It's easy.

-You just put it inside out.

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-Get the corners.

-Job's a good 'un.

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Let's see the inside-out technique.

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Er, that was pretty quick.

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So, some people find it easier than others,

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but most of us could definitely use

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a helping hand with changing the duvet.

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Look at that. Isn't that beautiful?

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I have a gadget at home like that at home, too. It's called a wife.

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Surely someone has come up with a way to make scenes like this

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a thing of the past?

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It might not be too comfortable.

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-There's nothing down here.

-Ooh...

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Cue our next inventor, Wilbert Garvin, and his ingenious creation,

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the Duvet Doo.

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# Golden years... #

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And at 79 years of age,

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he's proof that you're never too old to come up with a great idea.

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# Golden years... #

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So, this is all perfectly normal, isn't it, Wilbert?

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Me sitting with you on a bed in the middle of Ballymena.

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-Indeed!

-By the bandstand, busy lunchtime, and me in my pyjamas.

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Fascinating.

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The age-old problem of changing duvets - it is a nightmare.

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I never get it right.

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-Yes.

-But you have sought to change

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how we change duvets for ever.

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Well, it was such a big problem

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and I think, when you get older, you think of older people,

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you think of people with arthritis and so on and I thought, "Oh, I'll try to come up with something."

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And then I always like to have a wee bit of humour in things,

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so that's how I came up with the idea of calling it the Duvet Doo.

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See, that just reminds me of that song Zou Bisou Bisou.

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Is that what you were thinking?

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Scooby-Doo, you know.

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-Oh, Scooby-Doo?

-Scooby-Doo came to mind, and then Duvet Doo.

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So, this is it?

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It's kind of a little bit...

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..a huge mousetrap meets a kind of snow ski.

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-It's basically a clamp.

-Yep.

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A particular type of clamp.

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I want to see how it works.

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-Will you show me?

-I will indeed.

-Brilliant, Wilbert.

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So, as the rest of the town go about their daily business,

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I'm finally getting around to making my bed.

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This goes down between the mattress and the headboard.

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These clamps hold one end of the duvet in place,

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allowing you to pull the cover on with more ease.

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And then you take the corner of the duvet and push it into the clamp

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and then clamp it nice and tightly.

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Gradually, pull it down.

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And that just keeps it nice and secure at the top?

0:16:470:16:50

Yes.

0:16:500:16:51

Right, that was easy.

0:16:510:16:53

That's the way it goes.

0:16:530:16:55

And there is...our duvet.

0:16:550:16:58

Just like that.

0:16:580:17:00

I wonder how long that took.

0:17:000:17:02

So, the Duvet Doo not only helps people with dexterity problems,

0:17:020:17:06

but it makes things a lot quicker for everyone else as well.

0:17:060:17:09

And then I began to think about places where

0:17:100:17:13

there are a lot of beds needing changing.

0:17:130:17:16

I found out in America

0:17:160:17:17

that they were going to do away in the hotel trade

0:17:170:17:20

with duvets and then when they got the blankets, the clientele...

0:17:200:17:24

-Didn't like them.

-Didn't like them.

-They wanted the comfort again.

0:17:240:17:27

-So they're back to the duvets.

-Actually, I've noticed that

0:17:270:17:29

when you go in now. It's definitely back to duvets.

0:17:290:17:31

Can you imagine how these would change a chambermaid's life,

0:17:310:17:35

-going round?

-Exactly.

-And look at the amount of hotels

0:17:350:17:37

-being built in Northern Ireland at the minute.

-That's right.

0:17:370:17:40

So I think there's quite a market there for it.

0:17:400:17:42

And what do your family think of this?

0:17:420:17:44

Because I know you've got kids and you're a grandad as well.

0:17:440:17:46

I think they're just waiting to see what's going to happen with it.

0:17:460:17:49

Is this going to make them millionaires?

0:17:490:17:51

Oh, I don't think that's the way they would be thinking.

0:17:510:17:54

Honestly, what I wanted to do with this was to help people.

0:17:540:17:59

OK, if I make some money, fair enough,

0:17:590:18:02

but it was really to help people,

0:18:020:18:04

particularly older people that I was thinking about in the first place.

0:18:040:18:08

That's lovely, Wilbert.

0:18:080:18:09

# I've washed my robes in Jesus' blood... #

0:18:090:18:13

Whether you make beds in a hotel or you just want to make your daily

0:18:130:18:17

chores around the home that little bit easier, one day,

0:18:170:18:20

the Duvet Doo could be the solution to one of life's tedious tasks.

0:18:200:18:24

# ..make them white as snow. #

0:18:240:18:31

And for some people...

0:18:320:18:34

Slow and steady wins the race.

0:18:340:18:36

..that day can't come soon enough.

0:18:360:18:39

-We're nearly there.

-Yeah.

-Nearly there.

0:18:390:18:42

What do you think, it's quite a nice cover, isn't it?

0:18:420:18:44

-It is, lovely.

-Nice and modern.

0:18:440:18:45

-You hold that wee bit.

-Oh, helping.

0:18:450:18:47

That's so useful for so many people,

0:18:520:18:55

people who have problems gripping and,

0:18:550:18:58

you know, maybe only have the proper use of one side of their body.

0:18:580:19:03

It's a problem solver, isn't it?

0:19:030:19:04

Solving his own problem.

0:19:040:19:06

At first, I was like, before he even tried it, I was thinking, "What?

0:19:060:19:09

"How is this going to work?" And I had this idea in my head he was going to put them on his feet.

0:19:090:19:13

They looked like mini skis.

0:19:130:19:15

Yeah, so he can clamp the sheet onto his feet and then pull it up.

0:19:150:19:18

I had no idea where it was going to go.

0:19:180:19:20

I think it would definitely speed things up, you know,

0:19:200:19:22

if you have an extra pair of hands.

0:19:220:19:24

-Yeah.

-And anything that lets somebody keep their independence

0:19:240:19:27

or their mobility that bit more, it definitely is a good thing.

0:19:270:19:32

On this programme, we love hearing the stories behind our start-up

0:19:350:19:38

businesses and entrepreneurs,

0:19:380:19:40

but we love celebrating, too, the big best-known businesses

0:19:400:19:43

that Northern Ireland produces, and here's just one of them.

0:19:430:19:47

Randox Health is a world leader in health care diagnostics.

0:19:490:19:52

-Hiya.

-Would you like to follow me this way?

0:19:520:19:54

The company has a comprehensive full-body health screening package,

0:19:540:19:58

assessing hundreds of unique markers within your body

0:19:580:20:02

and that will give you a full MOT,

0:20:020:20:05

providing you with a better understanding

0:20:050:20:07

of your personal health.

0:20:070:20:09

Tests range from iron status to pancreatic health,

0:20:090:20:12

a service that they're currently offering to a staggering

0:20:120:20:17

370 million people worldwide.

0:20:170:20:20

But this global success is in huge contrast to its humble beginnings

0:20:200:20:24

near Crumlin in County Antrim.

0:20:240:20:26

My father and I built a small laboratory

0:20:260:20:29

at the back of my parents' house

0:20:290:20:30

in a place called Randox Road, hence the name of the company,

0:20:300:20:33

and we decided that we would

0:20:330:20:34

make some clinical chemistry diagnostics.

0:20:340:20:37

So I experimented in the evenings and at the weekends

0:20:370:20:40

and it was basically a hen house converted into a laboratory.

0:20:400:20:44

It wasn't easy raising finance for a business in the early 1980s

0:20:440:20:48

and Dr Peter Fitzgerald had some tough decisions to make.

0:20:480:20:51

We had to buy a machine called a freeze drier.

0:20:530:20:55

So it was either buy the freeze drier or get married.

0:20:550:20:58

So I decided to buy the freeze drier!

0:20:580:21:01

The company's success is based on its rigorous testing procedures

0:21:020:21:06

and Peter recognised the benefits of these tests

0:21:060:21:09

from his own personal perspective.

0:21:090:21:11

I suffer from iron deficiency and B12 deficiency.

0:21:130:21:16

You're disappointed to find it,

0:21:160:21:18

but then it explained why I was starting to feel very tired

0:21:180:21:21

and once I rectified that, very easily,

0:21:210:21:24

you can change and improve your life.

0:21:240:21:26

Northern Ireland Olympic 49er Matt McGovern

0:21:300:21:32

had a family history of bowel cancer

0:21:320:21:35

so he decided to take the Randox tests.

0:21:350:21:39

Even I felt a little bit apprehensive,

0:21:390:21:41

a little bit nervous, you know,

0:21:410:21:43

it's safe to say, whenever I was going for my Randox test,

0:21:430:21:46

you know, kind of wondering what are they going to find out

0:21:460:21:48

and I got the all-clear

0:21:480:21:49

and "there's a few little things you have to work on"

0:21:490:21:52

but then I can work on that every year for the rest of my life and

0:21:520:21:55

basically keep myself in check.

0:21:550:21:57

From those early days at a hen shed,

0:21:590:22:01

the company now employs over 1,400 people and their ambition

0:22:010:22:05

is as strong as ever.

0:22:050:22:06

The idea is that we would have centres throughout the world.

0:22:080:22:11

We're opening one in Liverpool very shortly and we'll have one in LA

0:22:110:22:15

in the autumn and Dubai

0:22:150:22:17

and we value sort of creativity and problem solving,

0:22:170:22:20

so creativity is vital to everything we do.

0:22:200:22:23

For me, a test of a really good idea is being able to imagine yourself

0:22:280:22:33

actually needing it and actually using it, and that's it.

0:22:330:22:37

This next guy is just 19 years of age and what he has done

0:22:370:22:42

is he's had that idea, he's cut out in his A-level school class

0:22:420:22:48

a prototype and he's making it happen for himself.

0:22:480:22:51

Let's have a look.

0:22:510:22:52

Our young inventor this week is Daniel Laverty

0:22:540:22:57

and taking inspiration from modern defibrillators,

0:22:570:23:00

he decided to create a first-aid kit

0:23:000:23:02

that guides the user through each step as they treat an injury.

0:23:020:23:06

And yet again, I'm left feeling extremely jealous

0:23:080:23:11

that I didn't come up with the idea first.

0:23:110:23:14

I just feel like such an old man now

0:23:140:23:16

and, in my day, I wasn't doing anything like this

0:23:160:23:18

and it's deeply irritating

0:23:180:23:20

that people like you are going to be so successful.

0:23:200:23:22

I think it's a brilliant idea, right.

0:23:220:23:24

So let's compare before your product...

0:23:240:23:26

-Yeah.

-..to what you've got.

0:23:260:23:29

OK. So here we've got the normal first-aid kit

0:23:290:23:31

that you would see everywhere.

0:23:310:23:32

You would bring this maybe to a football match,

0:23:320:23:35

you see it in the office, in the boot of your car

0:23:350:23:37

and you've got all the essentials in here.

0:23:370:23:39

-But what do you do with it? You know, someone's injured.

-Yeah.

0:23:390:23:42

-Do you know how to help them?

-No, I wouldn't have a notion.

0:23:420:23:44

-Not a notion.

-They're bleeding, you know, you're looking for stuff.

0:23:440:23:47

So let's say you dropped here, right, and you've split your head

0:23:470:23:50

and there's blood, so I'd be coming up here

0:23:500:23:52

and looking at this triangular bandage.

0:23:520:23:54

-No idea what even it is.

-Exactly.

-No notion.

0:23:540:23:57

You don't know what you're doing.

0:23:570:23:59

You're in a panic. Even if you were first-aid trained, you still maybe

0:23:590:24:02

don't have the confidence,

0:24:020:24:03

-you're thinking, "Was it that or was it this?"

-Yeah.

0:24:030:24:06

So you've come up with this locker.

0:24:060:24:07

-Yes.

-Class name.

0:24:070:24:10

Have you trademarked it yet?

0:24:100:24:11

-In the process.

-In the process?

0:24:110:24:13

-Yes.

-Which means, if a wee gangster like me gets up there and trademarks it, you'll have to buy it off me?

0:24:130:24:17

Aye, I'll be raging. I'll be raging.

0:24:170:24:19

-Right.

-So here's my solution.

0:24:190:24:21

So here we've got an interface.

0:24:220:24:25

So if I go down to the ground, cut my head, let's say "bleed".

0:24:250:24:28

Bleed, yeah. So the light comes on

0:24:280:24:30

to tell you that's the one you've selected and on the screen there

0:24:300:24:32

you can see the different instructions and it will tell you

0:24:320:24:35

what to use and when to use it and how to use it.

0:24:350:24:37

So, all the pressure is taken off you.

0:24:370:24:40

I'm so jealous I didn't come up with this.

0:24:420:24:44

With only one in five people in the UK knowing even basic first aid,

0:24:440:24:48

Daniel's invention could prove to be the difference

0:24:480:24:51

between life and death if an accident were to occur.

0:24:510:24:54

Now, it may still be in the prototype stage,

0:24:560:24:59

but I managed to convince a member of the public to help test it out

0:24:590:25:02

and see if it works.

0:25:020:25:03

So if I fell down to the ground, God forbid, split my head open...

0:25:040:25:07

-What's your name?

-Thomas.

0:25:070:25:08

Thomas, you'd be going, "Nolan, I need to save you."

0:25:080:25:11

-I would indeed.

-Would you know what to do with all the stuff in there?

0:25:110:25:13

I wouldn't have a clue.

0:25:130:25:15

Right, Daniel, tell him.

0:25:150:25:17

You open up the wee doors here

0:25:170:25:19

-and we've got the interface.

-This is a prototype.

0:25:190:25:21

Instantly, you can see there, "bleeds" -

0:25:210:25:23

he's down on the ground, he's bleeding.

0:25:230:25:25

This will then tell you what to do. Isn't that a cool idea?

0:25:250:25:28

-I think it's an excellent idea.

-Isn't it?

0:25:280:25:30

Right. It's my head. Direct pressure on the wound.

0:25:300:25:33

-I'm going to need to use...

-Direct pressure on the wound.

-Oh, right.

0:25:330:25:36

And then use a bandage to stop the bleed.

0:25:360:25:38

-There we go.

-Come on, Daniel, I'm bleeding.

0:25:380:25:40

-Get that.

-I'm bleeding.

0:25:400:25:42

So you've taken pressure off the wound.

0:25:420:25:44

Pressure's back.

0:25:440:25:46

What happens next?

0:25:460:25:48

We're raising the bleeding area to stop the blood.

0:25:480:25:50

So it's OK as it is because it's above his heart at the minute.

0:25:500:25:54

And then the next step is to treat for shock

0:25:540:25:57

so you just need to sit down and have the legs raised.

0:25:570:26:00

Hold on, keep pressure on the wound.

0:26:000:26:02

-Pressure on the wound.

-Get his legs raised.

-Pressure.

0:26:020:26:05

-Raise the legs.

-Raise the legs.

0:26:050:26:07

And then get someone to call 999.

0:26:070:26:09

-999, please!

-999!

-Help!

0:26:090:26:11

-He's getting into this.

-Somebody's going to ring it for real.

-I know.

0:26:110:26:15

What would they do if someone actually answered that?

0:26:150:26:17

I doubt I'll be getting a job on Casualty any time soon,

0:26:170:26:20

but Daniel has shown that he's on the right track with

0:26:200:26:23

a great idea that can help people when they need it most.

0:26:230:26:27

I think we'd better leave before we get into real trouble here.

0:26:270:26:30

-This is just wrong.

-And then that's us.

-That's us.

0:26:300:26:33

SIREN WAILS

0:26:350:26:38

Maybe if there was, like, a tablet inside it

0:26:440:26:47

that you could pull out and it would,

0:26:470:26:49

it would be your interface then

0:26:490:26:50

and you could bring it beside the patient, you wouldn't have to go back and forward so much.

0:26:500:26:54

The good thing is it gives you instructions.

0:26:540:26:57

It's like, don't throw away all your first-aid training kits just yet.

0:26:570:27:00

It's very essential.

0:27:000:27:02

We should have one in every house.

0:27:020:27:04

But even somebody who is first-aid trained, it does no harm to have

0:27:040:27:09

that little memory jog.

0:27:090:27:10

Even if you had some little cartoon character dancing about

0:27:100:27:13

-telling you what to do, kind of thing.

-Showing you what to do, yeah.

0:27:130:27:16

You know, the ability to give somebody the right treatment

0:27:160:27:19

they need for a start and save a lot of...

0:27:190:27:22

problems further down the line.

0:27:220:27:24

What a clever idea.

0:27:240:27:25

-A good idea.

-I think it's one of the best things I've seen

0:27:250:27:29

in terms of helping people.

0:27:290:27:31

I don't know about you,

0:27:350:27:37

but when I see some of the people in this series,

0:27:370:27:40

it changes my thinking around how you take an idea from in here

0:27:400:27:44

-and you make it happen.

-And that's what we've done in this programme -

0:27:440:27:47

we're seeing inside their heads and we're seeing the whole process

0:27:470:27:50

from the idea to the product.

0:27:500:27:52

It's about confidence, isn't it? And drive and a self-belief.

0:27:520:27:56

-Yeah.

-Thanks for watching and we'll see you next time.

-Bye-bye.

0:27:560:27:59

Stephen Nolan and Sarah Travers travel around Northern Ireland meeting some of our most innovative entrepreneurs. This week, they look at a potential solution for cauliflower ear, an invention targeted at relieving period pain, they meet a man in his 70s who hopes to transform the way you change your duvet and road-test a young man's invention designed to revolutionise the way first aid is administered. They also find out more about a local company that is a global leader in healthcare diagnostics.


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