11/07/2017 BBC News at Ten


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11/07/2017

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The NHS contaminated blood scandal more than 30 years ago -

:00:00.:00:11.

the Government finally orders an inquiry.

:00:12.:00:13.

More than 2,000 people died and thousands of other victims

:00:14.:00:26.

were left infected with HIV and hepatitis C.

:00:27.:00:28.

The inquiry, that I've announced today, will give them those answers,

:00:29.:00:31.

so they will know why this happened, how it happened.

:00:32.:00:33.

This was an appalling tragedy and it should never have happened.

:00:34.:00:35.

Andy Evans was infected when he was five and contracted AIDS at 16.

:00:36.:00:39.

He's campaigned for an inquiry for years.

:00:40.:00:40.

At the very minimum, we were let down.

:00:41.:00:42.

At the worst, I think there are people to blame for a lot

:00:43.:00:45.

We'll be asking why victims have had to wait so long for answers.

:00:46.:00:53.

President Trump's son publishes emails showing he was keen to accept

:00:54.:00:57.

an apparent Russian offer to help his father's

:00:58.:00:59.

Orphans of war - victims of so-called Islamic State.

:01:00.:01:08.

We report on the desperate plight of the Iraqi children

:01:09.:01:10.

but don't receive any benefits should qualify for sick and holiday

:01:11.:01:20.

pay according to a Government commissioned report.

:01:21.:01:24.

British tennis mystery is made. It's been 39 years. -- history is made.

:01:25.:01:30.

And Johanna Konta becomes the first British woman to reach

:01:31.:01:33.

the Wimbledon semifinals since Virginia Wade in 1978.

:01:34.:01:34.

A moment of history that she celebrated on centre court.

:01:35.:01:37.

Standing in between Johanna Konta and the Wimbledon final,

:01:38.:01:40.

Venus Williams - a five-time champion, who becomes the oldest

:01:41.:01:43.

semifinalist at the tournament in 23 years.

:01:44.:02:03.

"An appalling tragedy that should never have happened."

:02:04.:02:07.

That's what the Prime Minister called the contaminated blood

:02:08.:02:11.

scandal of the 1970s and '80s, as the Government announced

:02:12.:02:14.

It's been called one of the biggest disasters in the history of the NHS.

:02:15.:02:24.

patients were infected with viruses, such as hepatitis C and HIV,

:02:25.:02:28.

after being given blood products by the NHS.

:02:29.:02:30.

Andy has had a life on medication because he was given

:02:31.:02:40.

At the age of five, he was infected with HIV and hepatitis C.

:02:41.:02:45.

Since then, all he's wanted is answers.

:02:46.:02:53.

I'm very worried that there was deliberate acts behind these

:02:54.:02:56.

infections, as I say, at the very minimum

:02:57.:02:57.

At the worst, I think, there are people to blame for a lot

:02:58.:03:04.

It's been called the worst disaster in the history of the NHS.

:03:05.:03:11.

Patients expected safe treatment - haemophiliacs needing

:03:12.:03:13.

blood clotting agents and others needing transfusions.

:03:14.:03:17.

But they were given products tainted with life-threatening viruses.

:03:18.:03:21.

Much of the inquiry's focus will be on Whitehall and what was happening

:03:22.:03:24.

Victims and their families have long argued that senior Government

:03:25.:03:31.

officials were aware of the dangers with contaminated blood products,

:03:32.:03:34.

but allowed patients to continue receiving them.

:03:35.:03:38.

After that, they say, there was a cover-up.

:03:39.:03:41.

A Scottish inquiry by a judge Lord Penrose was dismissed

:03:42.:03:44.

An earlier inquiry in England was privately funded

:03:45.:03:51.

Today a Labour MP, whose campaigned on the issue,

:03:52.:04:06.

told the Commons those affected by the scandal were owed

:04:07.:04:08.

They deserve to be told what went wrong, why it went wrong

:04:09.:04:12.

and who is responsible for what happened.

:04:13.:04:14.

The story of the injustice they have suffered also needs to be set out

:04:15.:04:17.

The Prime Minister later said their voices would be heard

:04:18.:04:23.

They have waited too long for these answers.

:04:24.:04:31.

What we want to do is talk with the families, talk to them

:04:32.:04:35.

about the shape that this inquiry should take, so we ensure

:04:36.:04:37.

that it is able to provide the answers and the justice

:04:38.:04:40.

The former Health Secretary, Andy Burnham, who's alleged

:04:41.:04:43.

it is a criminal matter with medical records falsified and said

:04:44.:04:45.

there were failures by successive governments.

:04:46.:04:47.

All political parties have let down those who've suffered as a result

:04:48.:04:50.

And all parties must now put differences aside,

:04:51.:04:55.

work together and give them truth and justice without further

:04:56.:04:58.

And for this campaigner, who has hepatitis C,

:04:59.:05:04.

there's only one thing which really matters.

:05:05.:05:07.

Whether that full truth emerges after this long campaign will depend

:05:08.:05:20.

on what sort of inquiry is convened and its powers.

:05:21.:05:23.

And our health editor, Hugh Pym, is with me now.

:05:24.:05:28.

Why have the victims had to wait so long for this inquiry? Well, Sophie,

:05:29.:05:36.

the Government line is that it's always had an open mind but in the

:05:37.:05:41.

last few weeks, new evidence has emerged. Some published in a

:05:42.:05:44.

newspaper and there's other material held by Andy Burnham, alleging

:05:45.:05:47.

criminality that he is ready top hand over to police. And there is a

:05:48.:05:52.

political issue only on Sunday the leaders of the main opposition

:05:53.:05:55.

parties at Westminster, including the DUP, wrote jient letter calling

:05:56.:05:59.

for a public inquiry into this scandal. That's highly significant,

:06:00.:06:02.

given parliamentary arithmetic these days. So with a debate due to start

:06:03.:06:11.

at twoemsd, called by -- to start at Westminster, called by a Labour MP,

:06:12.:06:15.

the Government moved. The Scottish Government has welcomed this and

:06:16.:06:19.

said it would be a UK-wide exercise. Whatever the reasons, whatever the

:06:20.:06:23.

facts, the victims and their families have welcomed what they see

:06:24.:06:27.

this, as a landmark move, but they've yet to be convinced it

:06:28.:06:29.

really will deliver the truth. President Trump's son has

:06:30.:06:31.

published a chain of e-mails, which show that he was keen

:06:32.:06:33.

to accept an apparent offer from the Russian

:06:34.:06:35.

government last year, to help his father's

:06:36.:06:37.

presidential campaign. Donald Trump Jr is promised

:06:38.:06:39.

official documents that would incriminate his father's

:06:40.:06:41.

rival, Hillary Clinton. It led to a meeting in New York

:06:42.:06:43.

between a Russian lawyer, Mr Trump Jr and two of his

:06:44.:06:48.

father's key advisors. Our chief correspondent, Gavin

:06:49.:06:51.

Hewitt, is outside the White House. For nearly six months there has been

:06:52.:07:05.

a shadow over the Trump administration, with the allegations

:07:06.:07:09.

that the Trump campaign last year in some way colluded with the Russians.

:07:10.:07:14.

But today a series of highly-damaging e-mails were

:07:15.:07:17.

published, suggesting that Russian officials were actively trying to

:07:18.:07:25.

help the Trump campaign. Congratulations dad, we love you.

:07:26.:07:32.

Donald Trump Jr was at the heart of his dad's election campaign. Today

:07:33.:07:38.

he embarked on a high risk strategy. He decided to disclose the e-mails

:07:39.:07:42.

today between himself and the publicist who arranged the meeting.

:07:43.:07:46.

The e-mails raised serious and disturbing questions. The four pages

:07:47.:07:53.

of e-mails reveal exchanges between Trump June rye, Rybarikova junior

:07:54.:07:57.

and a British pub list, Rob gol Steyn.

:07:58.:08:09.

- - - to Donald Trump Jr. The e-mail continues:

:08:10.:08:21.

In reply Mr Donald Trump Jr says: The meeting was set up by a British

:08:22.:08:32.

publicist, Rob Goldstein. Much was promised but the Russian lawyer

:08:33.:08:35.

today denied any links with the Kremlin. She was asked, why those at

:08:36.:08:42.

the meeting thought she was going to deliver any information on Hillary

:08:43.:08:47.

Clinton. It is possible they were looking for such information, they

:08:48.:08:52.

wanted the so bad lid. But the reaction from politicians today

:08:53.:08:54.

shows that these drip, drip revelations are proving damaging to

:08:55.:08:56.

the Trump administration. It's serious and this is a serious

:08:57.:09:01.

situation and one that is a long way from over. It doesn't appear that

:09:02.:09:06.

when they had information that this person might be connected with the

:09:07.:09:09.

Russian Government or a Russian national, that they didn't

:09:10.:09:12.

immediately call the FBI This is very problematic. We cannot allow

:09:13.:09:16.

foreign governments to reach out to anybody's campaign and say - we'd

:09:17.:09:19.

like to help you. It is a non-starter. What does President

:09:20.:09:24.

Trump make of it all? Today he says that his son was a high-quality

:09:25.:09:27.

person and praised his transparency. But the President is also said to be

:09:28.:09:33.

frustrated that after today the questions are only likely to get

:09:34.:09:36.

more searching. Tomorrow the President goes back to Europe, to

:09:37.:09:41.

France, determined to avoid the impression that his is an

:09:42.:09:42.

administration under siege. The United Nations say as many

:09:43.:09:48.

as 3,000 civilians remain trapped in the Iraqi city of Mosul,

:09:49.:09:51.

despite government forces declaring Skirmishes continue between Iraqi

:09:52.:09:53.

troops and so-called Islamic State. Those trapped are mostly

:09:54.:09:59.

the young or the elderly, who've become separated

:10:00.:10:02.

from their families. From Mosul, our defence

:10:03.:10:03.

correspondent, Jonathan Beale, This is an orphan of

:10:04.:10:05.

the Battle of Mosul - a baby whose parents

:10:06.:10:13.

have been killed. He's one of the victims

:10:14.:10:22.

of the fight against the group He was left at this

:10:23.:10:24.

clinic, malnourished The medics here say there

:10:25.:10:27.

are many more like him. Yeah, I mean, kids,

:10:28.:10:31.

without parents, a lot of them. You know, they've either been killed

:10:32.:10:33.

by Isis or killed by air strikes There is a massive

:10:34.:10:36.

amount of devastation. That's the only way

:10:37.:10:40.

I can put it into terms. Iraq's Prime Minister may have

:10:41.:10:47.

declared victory but there's still pockets of resistance

:10:48.:10:49.

and streams of civilians trying They often collect the children

:10:50.:10:51.

of others along the way. Seeba says she was shot at by IS

:10:52.:11:06.

snipers as she tried to escape. The baby she's now

:11:07.:11:09.

holding is not hers. She said the mother and father

:11:10.:11:13.

were both buried under group. There are dozens of women

:11:14.:11:20.

and children here, waiting to be taken to safety and they're not just

:11:21.:11:25.

war weary, they are weak And if you listen, the only sound

:11:26.:11:28.

you can hear is babies crying. At West Mosul's main hospital,

:11:29.:11:37.

they're just about coping. They're still having

:11:38.:11:41.

to treat the wounded, as well as the weak -

:11:42.:11:43.

this man's barely alive And there are more

:11:44.:11:46.

orphans here, too. This is Galeb who's crying out,

:11:47.:11:53.

"Where's my father?" He only stops when they manage

:11:54.:11:55.

to distract him with a game. He is crying, asking

:11:56.:12:04.

for his father, mother. I can't be his father,

:12:05.:12:11.

I can't be his mother. Even trying to identify the dead

:12:12.:12:16.

is proving difficult. Search and rescue teams

:12:17.:12:24.

are looking out for any forms of identity as they sift

:12:25.:12:27.

through the debris of war. Iraq will not just have

:12:28.:12:30.

to rebuild this city, but mend broken lives,

:12:31.:12:32.

too, Jonathan Beale, All work in the UK's economy should

:12:33.:12:34.

be fair and decent, according to a Government-commissioned review

:12:35.:12:45.

of employment practices. It looks particularly

:12:46.:12:49.

at the so-called gig economy - a growing sector of workers

:12:50.:12:53.

who currently work flexibly but do not receive employee benefits -

:12:54.:13:01.

though the review says they should. It also examines the use

:13:02.:13:03.

of zero-hour contracts and recommends that everyone should

:13:04.:13:05.

enjoy a baseline of protection. With more, here's our economics

:13:06.:13:08.

editor, Kamal Ahmed. Whatever work we do, we spend

:13:09.:13:10.

half our waking hours doing it. Steady or insecure,

:13:11.:13:17.

full-time or self-employed, high pay or low pay,

:13:18.:13:21.

the world of work is changing. Appearing alongside Theresa May,

:13:22.:13:24.

Matthew Taylor said Our national performance

:13:25.:13:26.

on the quantity of work is strong. But quantity alone is not enough

:13:27.:13:33.

for a thriving economy We believe now is the time

:13:34.:13:36.

to complement that commitment in creating jobs with the goal

:13:37.:13:42.

of creating better jobs. Flexible, work the hours

:13:43.:13:46.

he wants, few benefits. I just switch on and off

:13:47.:13:54.

whenever I wanted. And in the middle of my day,

:13:55.:13:56.

if I want to pop down to the seaside or watch a Spiderman movie,

:13:57.:14:00.

I can do that. For Felicity, it is a different

:14:01.:14:03.

story from the world I could never budget because some

:14:04.:14:07.

weeks I'd get too much work, Some weeks, I wouldn't get enough

:14:08.:14:14.

work so I just really That, actually, caused me

:14:15.:14:18.

quite a bit of stress. There are certainly many

:14:19.:14:22.

new ways of working, The gig economy, that's those

:14:23.:14:24.

food delivery drivers, those minicab drivers,

:14:25.:14:31.

there are around 1.3 million people And people with no guaranteed hours

:14:32.:14:33.

of work, on zero-hours contracts, there are about 905,000

:14:34.:14:43.

people on those. Then, there is what the report

:14:44.:14:48.

calls the hidden economy. That is the cash in hand payments

:14:49.:14:51.

to your window cleaner that avoid The report says that is worth

:14:52.:14:54.

?6.2 billion a year and should Mr Taylor said in his review,

:14:55.:14:59.

much of this new world of work is good work,

:15:00.:15:04.

but for those being Sick and holiday pay benefits,

:15:05.:15:06.

a right to an enhanced minimum wage because the work does

:15:07.:15:13.

not guarantee hours. Then there's talk of better

:15:14.:15:19.

enforcement of the present laws and higher taxes

:15:20.:15:21.

for those gig firms. Paying National Insurance

:15:22.:15:23.

for the first time, which many of them avoid

:15:24.:15:26.

at the moment. The big question -

:15:27.:15:29.

will any of this ever happen, given the Conservatives lack one

:15:30.:15:32.

important thing - a majority. You cannot give any guarantees that

:15:33.:15:36.

you will be able to pass a report like this and the recommendations it

:15:37.:15:42.

has had through Parliament? I would hope, as I said

:15:43.:15:46.

in my speech, people will see across the political world,

:15:47.:15:50.

will see the importance It is about the future

:15:51.:15:54.

of our economy. There seems little

:15:55.:16:02.

chance of consensus. Labour said the report

:16:03.:16:04.

was a huge missed opportunity, particularly when it came to not

:16:05.:16:07.

banning zero-hours contracts. We have to get rid of

:16:08.:16:11.

zero-hours contracts. Obviously, we have to get rid

:16:12.:16:13.

of the gig economy and the bogus self-employment which actually

:16:14.:16:16.

is a wonderful way for a minority of employers to avoid paying

:16:17.:16:21.

National Insurance contributions. The world, frankly, does not lack

:16:22.:16:26.

for government reviews on everything The question now, will this one make

:16:27.:16:29.

a difference or just be left to gather dust on some

:16:30.:16:35.

Whitehall shelf? Johanna Konta made history tonight,

:16:36.:16:38.

after becoming the first British woman in almost 40 years to make it

:16:39.:16:45.

to the Wimbledon semi-finals. The world number seven beat

:16:46.:16:49.

the Romanian second seed, She'll now take on Venus Williams

:16:50.:16:52.

for a place in the final, On Centre Court, a British woman

:16:53.:16:57.

in a Wimbledon quarterfinal. Never mind the rest of her career,

:16:58.:17:02.

Johanna Konta's progress here had Where every mood, every

:17:03.:17:06.

move is scrutinised. Johanna Konta first played

:17:07.:17:14.

at Wimbledon as a junior, When her Hungarian-born parents

:17:15.:17:16.

moved to Britain, she followed. Really Konta is not a product

:17:17.:17:21.

of one nation or a tennis system but a product

:17:22.:17:26.

of her own intense motivation. Against her here, Simona Halep,

:17:27.:17:31.

a player ranked higher, capable of matching Konta,

:17:32.:17:34.

almost nothing between them. Just look at Hawk-Eye,

:17:35.:17:37.

a fraction off. At crucial moments, Konta

:17:38.:17:42.

was making more mistakes. Still, adversity is just

:17:43.:17:49.

an opportunity for resilience, The second set went

:17:50.:17:55.

to another tie-break. Deep breath, deep

:17:56.:18:00.

breath, now ex-hail. Into the third, could Konta

:18:01.:18:06.

break the Halep serve? Match point and the

:18:07.:18:12.

crowd on the brink. Listen for a scream

:18:13.:18:20.

and watch the reaction. Halep distracted, while retaining

:18:21.:18:27.

focus is everything - 40 years since you won,

:18:28.:18:30.

Virginia, 40 years. Konta says she's

:18:31.:18:33.

believed she could be a champion Regardless of whether it was

:18:34.:18:35.

going my way or not, I felt I really struck to my true

:18:36.:18:40.

self and tried to create as many I knew going into the match

:18:41.:18:44.

against Simona, that she was really not going to give me

:18:45.:18:51.

a match for free. Well perseverance was a thing today,

:18:52.:18:54.

off-court and on it and who sums it up better than Venus Williams,

:18:55.:18:58.

into another semifinal at 37 History will always hang over

:18:59.:19:03.

British players here, but the future, the present

:19:04.:19:08.

is nothing to be scared of. Smile and Centre Court

:19:09.:19:11.

smiles with you. An aristocrat, who wrote an online

:19:12.:19:14.

post, offering ?5,000 for the businesswoman

:19:15.:19:22.

and campaigner, Gina Miller, to be run over, has been found

:19:23.:19:25.

guilty of two charges Rhodri Colwyn Philipps,

:19:26.:19:28.

the 4th Viscount St Davids, wrote the message four days

:19:29.:19:33.

after Gina Miller won a Brexit legal Philipps, who called

:19:34.:19:38.

his comments "satire", There have been fresh calls

:19:39.:19:42.

for drastic improvements in the care given to people with learning

:19:43.:19:48.

disabilities in England. More than 2,500 of them

:19:49.:19:51.

remain in secure units, that's despite Government promises

:19:52.:19:54.

that they would close. In one year alone, 50% of all deaths

:19:55.:19:57.

of people with a learning disability were recorded as avoidable,

:19:58.:20:02.

compared to 23% for Our social affairs correspondent,

:20:03.:20:06.

Alison Holt, has the story. The front room of the family home

:20:07.:20:14.

in Essex, 34-year-old Ian Shaw lies quietly comforted

:20:15.:20:17.

by having his parents at his side. He has learning disabilities,

:20:18.:20:21.

autism and epilepsy. He also has terminal cancer,

:20:22.:20:30.

which his parents say should have I was told there was no

:20:31.:20:33.

treatment because it had They couldn't treat it

:20:34.:20:40.

because it would be too much. The family asked us to tell Ian's

:20:41.:20:46.

story because they believe it shows how the system still fails people

:20:47.:20:54.

with learning disabilities. As he grew up, Ian's

:20:55.:20:58.

behaviour became challenging. When in pain, he'd throw things

:20:59.:21:02.

and bang his head scarring himself. In 2007, he was sent to the first

:21:03.:21:07.

of three secure units. Because things became out

:21:08.:21:10.

of control, the secure So once he was there, it felt

:21:11.:21:17.

like you couldn't get him back out? This weighty family file tells

:21:18.:21:23.

the story of Ian's life It shows his mum raising numerous

:21:24.:21:31.

concerns about levels of medication, There are records of Ian

:21:32.:21:40.

being restrained as well as family letters fighting to get him moved

:21:41.:21:45.

to a supported home It took nine years, but Ian left

:21:46.:21:49.

the last secure hospital in 2016. Within months, testicular

:21:50.:21:58.

cancer was found. The family believes in the secure

:21:59.:22:01.

unit early signs were first missed Bernadette Adams provided

:22:02.:22:05.

the family support in meetings Jan has been saying for many months

:22:06.:22:12.

that Ian was in pain or Ian had infections and she was,

:22:13.:22:22.

you know, on many occasions, In a statement, the Department

:22:23.:22:27.

for Health says: It and NHS England

:22:28.:22:35.

also insist they are making progress in improving care and

:22:36.:22:43.

closing secure units. But not fast enough

:22:44.:22:46.

for Sir Steve Bubb, author of two He's written to the Prime Minister

:22:47.:22:51.

calling for an Independent Commissioner to speak up

:22:52.:22:55.

for people like Ian. It's scandalous and very sad the use

:22:56.:22:58.

of physical restraint, overmedication, secclusion

:22:59.:23:08.

and a serious neglect of health It's all too typical and it has

:23:09.:23:10.

led me to believe that institutional care is,

:23:11.:23:14.

at root, abusive and we must The Government says it has no

:23:15.:23:16.

plans for an Independent Ian's family want his legacy to be

:23:17.:23:21.

that in future others The head of the bank JP Morgan,

:23:22.:23:28.

one of the City's biggest employers, has told the BBC that Brexit

:23:29.:23:37.

could easily mean thousands of his In an exclusive interview,

:23:38.:23:41.

Jamie Dimon said there was no question that Europe had more cards

:23:42.:23:46.

at the negotiating table. His words come as the new French

:23:47.:23:49.

government makes a pitch for bankers to relocate to Paris,

:23:50.:23:52.

after the UK leaves the EU, as our gusiness editor,

:23:53.:23:56.

Simon Jack, reports. The Prime Minister of

:23:57.:23:59.

France today rolled out his own red white and blue carpet

:24:00.:24:05.

to the UK's finance industry. Here in Paris's financial

:24:06.:24:08.

district, there is There is a sense the UK's financial

:24:09.:24:18.

services industry has been wounded by Brexit and Paris has been

:24:19.:24:26.

the most aggressive capital of those trying to nibble away at London's

:24:27.:24:32.

dominant position in global finance. France is bending over backwards

:24:33.:24:36.

to attract an industry its former President once

:24:37.:24:41.

described as an enemy. Loose employment laws

:24:42.:24:43.

and new international schools It is a list aimed

:24:44.:24:47.

squarely at international bankers like Jamie Diamond,

:24:48.:24:56.

chief executive of JP Morgan, who employed 16,000

:24:57.:24:59.

people in the UK. He has warned thousands

:25:00.:25:01.

of those may go before Brexit and today that

:25:02.:25:03.

could just be the beginning. We're at the negotiating table and

:25:04.:25:10.

sometimes the other person has more cards. There's no question Europe

:25:11.:25:13.

has more cards to play here. You once said 4,000 jobs, you say that

:25:14.:25:18.

may well yet be true? Yes, easily, yeah. Even more? I'm hoping it's

:25:19.:25:23.

just a few hundred. Again, we hope it's none. But yes, the negotiation

:25:24.:25:29.

will determine how many. Back in London, giving evidence to the House

:25:30.:25:34.

of Lords, David Davis said the banks need for quick answers was being

:25:35.:25:41.

used for leverage by EU negotiators. Enough American banks are saying oh,

:25:42.:25:44.

we'll go to Paris. Good luck to them. Even Frankfurt, even better

:25:45.:25:49.

luck to them. They encourage the other side therefore to hold back.

:25:50.:25:53.

There's no holding back the man of the moment, though. New president

:25:54.:25:58.

Emmanuel Macron has a gnaw preach that is -- has a gnaw preach that is

:25:59.:26:03.

resonating with businesses big -- has a new approach that is

:26:04.:26:07.

resonating with businesses. We know things like Brexit or Donald Trump

:26:08.:26:10.

are factors into why they're looking to coming and work here. Obviously

:26:11.:26:14.

there's a huge Macron effect as well, with the new president. I

:26:15.:26:18.

think for once, we're starting to have a probusiness image. The French

:26:19.:26:23.

government is hoping that will make banks consider Paris less a tourist

:26:24.:26:26.

attraction and more like a permanent home. Simon Jack, BBC News, Paris.

:26:27.:26:30.

Tonight marks a month since the Grenfell Tower fire

:26:31.:26:33.

in which at least 80 people lost their lives.

:26:34.:26:36.

Police believe 255 people managed to escape the building that night.

:26:37.:26:39.

One of them was Antonio Roncolato, who lived in a flat

:26:40.:26:42.

He's been recounting the events of that night

:26:43.:26:48.

with our correspondent, Jeremy Cooke.

:26:49.:26:54.

The memories, though, are sharp, clear, fresh in the mind.

:26:55.:27:01.

For those who survived, the events of a month ago

:27:02.:27:08.

Antonio shared a flat in Grenfell Tower with his son,

:27:09.:27:15.

Christopher, who came home late that night to find the building on fire.

:27:16.:27:20.

When my son called me around 1.30am, he told, "Pappy, wake up,

:27:21.:27:25.

get dressed and get out of there because the tower is burning."

:27:26.:27:29.

The flames came down Christopher's room, on the outside.

:27:30.:27:32.

Smoke was very thick, very horrible smell,

:27:33.:27:38.

I said, there's no way I can go out there, no way.

:27:39.:27:43.

For the fire brigade, Grenfell Tower was an unprecedented challenge.

:27:44.:27:56.

Antonio knew he was in mortal danger, but he could do nothing

:27:57.:28:00.

They banged on the door very strongly.

:28:01.:28:05.

They said, follow me and we'll tell you to do.

:28:06.:28:07.

They told me to grab on his jacket in the back.

:28:08.:28:10.

We went through so synchronised with these two firemen,

:28:11.:28:12.

A lot of water coming down from above.

:28:13.:28:18.

A lot of debris, a lot of mud, water on the floor, really noisy.

:28:19.:28:23.

Hundreds did escape the tower that night.

:28:24.:28:26.

Some even filmed as they made it out, made it to safety.

:28:27.:28:31.

For Antonio, a breath of sweet, fresh air.

:28:32.:28:36.

I was out, I say, oh, my God, I said thank you,

:28:37.:28:39.

I say thank you, right and left, up and down.

:28:40.:28:42.

Then they escorted me out of the building.

:28:43.:28:44.

I had to walk a few steps to the ambulance.

:28:45.:28:47.

Then I could see a glimpse of the tower burning.

:28:48.:28:50.

Antonio escaped the chaos, still he mourns neighbours

:28:51.:28:53.

Two in particular, brother and sister, that

:28:54.:29:01.

And still, so many questions about how all of this could have

:29:02.:29:15.

happened in our capital city one month ago.

:29:16.:29:22.

The ancient network of trade routes known as the Silk Road brought goods

:29:23.:29:30.

Now China's president is resurrecting the route

:29:31.:29:36.

with a 7,500 mile railway - costing more than ?1 trillion.

:29:37.:29:40.

But is it a win for all or a bid for strategic influence?

:29:41.:29:44.

In a series of special reports this week, our China editor,

:29:45.:29:46.

Carrie Gracie, is travelling the length of China's

:29:47.:29:49.

Tonight, she continues her journey starting in Western China.

:29:50.:30:00.

This is the face of the new Silk Road.

:30:01.:30:07.

Behind the stage make-up, Buhalima is a Muslim

:30:08.:30:11.

Her people left behind by China's growth.

:30:12.:30:16.

Here in Xinjiang, the state fears radical Islam.

:30:17.:30:21.

And ethnic unrest has kept many away.

:30:22.:30:26.

TRANSLATION: Tourists I met told me they heard Xinjiang was unsafe,

:30:27.:30:30.

that they couldn't be sure to get out unharmed if they came here.

:30:31.:30:35.

Some people did some bad things and it's affected all of us.

:30:36.:30:41.

China is trying to re-write the script.

:30:42.:30:45.

At this theatre, a grand narrative of ethnic unity

:30:46.:30:48.

The wealth gap between West China and the coast, a challenge

:30:49.:30:56.

This economy is addicted to building but the coast now has as much road

:30:57.:31:08.

So China's seeking new frontiers at home and abroad.

:31:09.:31:16.

To solve economic and security problems with one blow.

:31:17.:31:23.

The Silk Road was once unimaginably remote to most Chinese.

:31:24.:31:27.

In less than a decade, China's built twice as much rail

:31:28.:31:34.

as the rest of the world combined and pushed it out to the far west,

:31:35.:31:39.

towards the fabled Silk Road oasis of Dunhuang,

:31:40.:31:44.

a magnet for the biggest tourist force in the world.

:31:45.:31:53.

One government hopes will kick start growth and stabilise the region.

:31:54.:31:55.

Heading west to troubled Xinjiang, do they fear

:31:56.:31:59.

There are people looking after our safety everywhere we go.

:32:00.:32:10.

TRANSLATION: A small group of people are causing

:32:11.:32:13.

At Xinjiang's Grand Theatre, they're spending $250 million

:32:14.:32:22.

on a Silk Road centre-piece but the more China invests,

:32:23.:32:27.

The ancient Silk Road story has moments of danger.

:32:28.:32:38.

And China's grand new narrative is fraught with peril.

:32:39.:32:45.

Deliver on the spin of opportunities for all, or forever scan the crowd

:32:46.:32:52.

And Carrie continues her journey tomorrow in Kazakhstan,

:32:53.:33:05.

where China is challenging Russia's influence.

:33:06.:33:12.

Newsnight is coming up on BBC Two. Tonight, we'll be delving deep

:33:13.:33:15.

into the Trump e-mails, the disclosure today that one

:33:16.:33:19.

Watergate prosecutor described as a smoking cannon.

:33:20.:33:22.

And we've an exclusive investigation into one work place,

:33:23.:33:25.

where staff have been paid the equivalent of one third

:33:26.:33:33.

Here on BBC One, it's time for the news where you are.

:33:34.:33:37.