13/07/2017 BBC News at Ten


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13/07/2017

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Another big step towards Brexit, as the Government publishes

:00:00.:00:00.

its plans to convert EU law into British law.

:00:07.:00:11.

Ministers call for all parties to work with them,

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but already the opposition is calling for changes.

:00:14.:00:17.

The Prime Minister faces a difficult path ahead

:00:18.:00:19.

She says she was devastated by the election result.

:00:20.:00:23.

We'll be looking at the challenges ahead.

:00:24.:00:37.

The parents of baby Charlie Gard return to court, as an American

:00:38.:00:45.

doctor says a trial therapy could give him a chance

:00:46.:00:47.

On a visit to Paris, just weeks after President Trump

:00:48.:00:52.

said he'd pull America out of the Paris climate accord,

:00:53.:00:55.

World leaders pay tribute to one of China's most prominent

:00:56.:01:01.

political dissidents, Liu Xiaobo, after he dies

:01:02.:01:04.

And the end of a dream for Johanna Konta, as she fails

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to become the first British woman in 40 years to reach

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And coming up in Sportsday on BBC News:

:01:15.:01:19.

Chris Froome loses the yellow jersey in the Tour de France,

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as he struggles on the final climb in today's 12th stage.

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It's another major step on Britain's path to leaving the European Union.

:01:48.:01:51.

The Government has finally published its long-awaited plans

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to pave the way for EU law to be transferred into British law.

:01:56.:01:59.

The European Union Withdrawal Bill is being described as one

:02:00.:02:02.

of the largest legal projects ever undertaken in the UK.

:02:03.:02:07.

The Government's called for all parties to work together

:02:08.:02:09.

But already Labour is calling for significant changes,

:02:10.:02:13.

and the Liberal Democrats are warning they will make life

:02:14.:02:16.

The bill will take an estimated 12,000 EU laws and copy them into UK

:02:17.:02:22.

law on the day that the UK leaves the European Union.

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The Government will then have powers to amend laws as it sees fit.

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Our political editor, Laura Kuenssberg, has this report.

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A warning - it contains some flashing images.

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Still doing the handshakes, rolling out the red

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carpet for royalty - Spanish, this time.

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Still embarking on the task of taking us out of the European Union.

:02:50.:02:53.

For the first time today, the Prime Minister explaining her

:02:54.:02:58.

I felt, um, I suppose, devastated really, because,

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as I say, I knew the campaign wasn't going perfectly, but still,

:03:04.:03:07.

the messages I was getting from people I was speaking to,

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but also, the comments we were getting back

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from a lot of people, that were being passed on to me,

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were that we were going to get a better result than we did.

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And then you obviously have to brush yourself down.

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You have a responsibility, you are a human being, you have been

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But I was there as leader of the party and Prime Minister.

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I had a responsibility then, as we went through the night,

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to determine what we were going to do the next morning.

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Today, the bill that will legally take us out of the European Union

:03:52.:04:01.

Broadly, the withdrawal bill cuts and pastes thousands of EU laws that

:04:02.:04:08.

govern so much right now into British law.

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But with Theresa May's shaky grip, MPs will inevitably try

:04:13.:04:17.

I think there is a big understanding now amongst ministers,

:04:18.:04:25.

right the way across the board, that there will need to be a bit

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of compromise, there will need to be inevitable changes.

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So you think ministers have understood that,

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The withdrawal bill is such a huge undertaking.

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It also gives ministers the power to try to change or strike out

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swathes of regulation without guaranteeing MPs a say.

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This bill, as it stands though, would give ministers

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like you sweeping powers to change, get rid of bits and pieces

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of regulation that you don't like, without MPs having a guaranteed vote

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These are hardly massive changes, these are technical changes

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And it's up to the House of Commons, if a statutory instrument is placed

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front of the House of Commons, the House of Commons

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decides whether it debates it and votes on it.

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But they're not guaranteed votes unless today you want to give

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That's in the call of the House of Commons, what it chooses

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But no, it's not just a ministerial signature,

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it is what they call a statutory instrument, which can be

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Asking for its own meetings in Brussels.

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Trying to get the EU's negotiator onside.

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Barnier, you are now playing for Arsenal!

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Although it might take more than an Arsenal shirt to do that!

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But there's no way, as it stands, that Labour will back the bill.

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We will make sure there is full Parliamentary scrutiny,

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We have a Parliament where the government does

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not have a majority, we have a country that

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has voted in two ways, on Leave and Remain.

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Obviously the majority voted to leave, we respect that.

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But they didn't vote to lose jobs, they didn't vote to have Parliament

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Nicola Sturgeon with her own Kodak moment in Brussels today too.

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The Scottish Parliament can't technically veto the plan,

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As the bill stands just now, in good conscience I could not

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recommend to the Scottish Parliament that it gives legislative

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This bill takes powers away from the Scottish parliament

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This bill takes powers away fromt the Scottish Parliament

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and undermines the very foundations of the devolution settlement that

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As Whitehall begins this enormous process, ministers

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are all too well aware that there will be conflict ahead.

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The question, how they balance, compromise and hang

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And what ends up on the statute books does not just sit

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on the shelf, but shapes how ministers govern, how

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And Laura's in Westminster for us tonight.

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It is clear that there is a rocky road ahead for the government.

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Absolutely. Ministers know this will be very difficult and there will be

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all sorts of attempts to change the legislation. One joke doing the

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rounds at Westminster is that MPs are going to try and hang so much on

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this bill that it's going to end up dressed up like a Christmas tree.

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Ministers know they'll have to concede in some areas. The question

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is, where will they compromised and when? Will they try and fight day by

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day, once MPs are back in the autumn, on every issue? If you sniff

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very hard, there is a vague whiff of compromise in the air, maybe for the

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first time. Talking to Brexit Secretary David Davis earlier, he

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did suggest the UK might be able to have some sort of associate

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membership of the nuclear safety agency it sounds a bit obscure, but

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that is a green rebellion that has been gathering steam in the last few

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days he also sketched out the idea of what he had described as

:08:16.:08:18.

arbitration mechanisms, a potential way around the brick wall that has

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built up between Westminster and Brussels over what you do over who's

:08:23.:08:27.

in charge of life after Brexit. Remember, Louisa May is adamant that

:08:28.:08:34.

European judges must no longer have control over what happened in the

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UK. -- Theresa May. In Brussels, they believe European judges will

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have to continue having a role to police the things that have come

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down through European law over the time. I think David Davis was

:08:48.:08:51.

deliberately sketching out a possible way out of that particular

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quagmire. Ministers want to stick to their guns as much as they can, but

:08:58.:09:03.

since the election, with their political authority dilutive, and

:09:04.:09:07.

the clock ticking louder and louder, they know, as things proceed, they

:09:08.:09:10.

are going to have to concede or compromise politically, but they

:09:11.:09:14.

don't want to be seen to back down. An American doctor has told

:09:15.:09:16.

the High Court that a trial therapy in the States could give a chance

:09:17.:09:19.

of meaningful improvement to the condition of the terminally

:09:20.:09:22.

ill baby Charlie Gard. Charlie's parents returned to court

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today for the latest stage of their legal battle

:09:25.:09:27.

to keep him alive. The judge says he will only

:09:28.:09:29.

change his ruling - allowing Great Ormond Street Hospital

:09:30.:09:31.

to withdraw life support - Our Medical Correspondent,

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Fergus Walsh, reports. Save Charlie Gard,

:09:35.:09:41.

save Charlie Gard. They call themselves Charlie's Army,

:09:42.:09:43.

some of the half a million people who signed the petition calling

:09:44.:09:46.

for him to be allowed abroad Chris Gard and Connie Yates reject

:09:47.:09:49.

evidence from Charlie's doctors that their son has

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irreversible brain damage. If he is still fighting,

:09:56.:10:02.

then we are still fighting. Charlie is terminally ill,

:10:03.:10:11.

cannot move or breathe unaided. Four courts have already ruled

:10:12.:10:14.

he should be allowed to die. The key evidence today came

:10:15.:10:19.

via video link from the American He said he now had a better

:10:20.:10:21.

understanding of the benefits Of nine patients treated so far,

:10:22.:10:29.

none of whom has the same genetic mutation as Charlie,

:10:30.:10:36.

five now spent less time each day on a ventilator, and one of them

:10:37.:10:41.

could breathe completely unaided. He said this led him to conclude

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there was at least a 10% chance of meaningful

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improvement for Charlie. It's a powder added to food,

:10:50.:10:54.

which aims to boost energy Six-year-old Art Estopinan has

:10:55.:11:02.

a muscle-wasting condition and is one of those treated with it

:11:03.:11:09.

in the US. We were able to give him

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the medications, and little by little he started

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to get stronger. I didn't care if he was the first

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human to try these medications, because they only told us

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he was going to die. But Great Ormond Street says

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Charlie's catastrophic brain damage The final decision

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of the court is aimed to be at Charlie's best interest,

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and that would be a balance It's not black-and-white,

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but it's going to be a summation of all the possible benefits

:12:03.:12:06.

and all the possible risks, and what that could do for Charlie,

:12:07.:12:10.

not what it does for anybody else. In court, Connie Yates insisted

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Charlie is not suffering or in pain, and both parents briefly walked out

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of the hearing after the judge said they had agreed their son currently

:12:19.:12:23.

had no quality of life. So this desperately sick boy

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remains in intensive care, kept alive on a ventilator,

:12:28.:12:32.

as arguments over what is in his President Trump has hinted America

:12:33.:12:38.

could still shift its policy on the Paris climate accord,

:12:39.:12:48.

despite his decision last month to withdraw from the global

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agreement to limit climate change. He made the comments

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in Paris after talks with the French President,

:12:57.:12:58.

Emmanuel Macron. He also faced questions

:12:59.:13:00.

about the controversy surrounding his son's meeting

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with a Russian lawyer during the presidential

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campaign last year. This report contains

:13:05.:13:08.

some flashing images. If diplomacy is about power

:13:09.:13:14.

disguised as flattery, there are few more potent greetings

:13:15.:13:16.

than a ten-second handshake. Emmanuel Macron welcomed

:13:17.:13:19.

Donald Trump today with a visit to the tomb of France's and military

:13:20.:13:25.

leader, Napoleon, the impressive location designed to flatter both

:13:26.:13:27.

the visitor and host. Both these two men see

:13:28.:13:31.

themselves as modern-day political revolutionaries,

:13:32.:13:37.

sweeping away the old But Mr Macron also sees nothing

:13:38.:13:40.

wrong with using France's imperial history and military might

:13:41.:13:46.

to put its current diplomatic The two men have been battling

:13:47.:13:49.

for the role of alpha male ever since their first handshake

:13:50.:13:56.

on the sidelines of the G7 summit. Donald Trump later pulled out

:13:57.:13:58.

of a key climate change deal brokered in Paris,

:13:59.:14:01.

prompting Mr Macron to issue a video parodying the US

:14:02.:14:08.

President's campaign slogan. But Mr Macron, keen to boost

:14:09.:14:12.

French influence abroad, And Mr Trump's comments today

:14:13.:14:21.

on climate change suggest Something could happen with respect

:14:22.:14:27.

to the Paris accord. But we will talk about that over

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the coming period of time. And if it happens,

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that will be wonderful, and if it doesn't that

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will be OK, too. TRANSLATION: I want to continue

:14:44.:14:48.

discussions with the US and President Trump on this

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very important subject. I think it's compatible

:14:51.:14:53.

in the Paris Agreement. Now we have to let the US

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work on its road map And amid allegations that Russia

:14:59.:15:01.

interfered in the US election, Mr Trump was also asked

:15:02.:15:07.

about his son's contact I have a son who is a great young

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man, he is a fine person. He took a meeting with

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a lawyer from Russia. It lasted for a very short period

:15:18.:15:19.

and nothing came of the meeting. And I think it's a meeting that

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most people in politics Today, no differences were allowed

:15:24.:15:27.

to mar the transatlantic ties. But what do French voters think

:15:28.:15:34.

of Mr Trump's visit? I don't like him much,

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but what do I have to say? Trying to understand

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what he wants and where he's Even if he does not appreciate him

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as a person, or what he stands for. So I think French

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diplomacy at its best. In a visit where symbolism

:15:56.:15:58.

was the substance, the two couples A place labelled pragmatic,

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rather than pretty, to cement an alliance imperfect but crucial

:16:03.:16:08.

to France's place in the world. A brief look at some

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of the day's other news stories. A Russian military court has jailed

:16:13.:16:21.

five members of a Chechen gang for killing the leading opposition

:16:22.:16:24.

politician Boris Nemtsov. Mr Nemtsov, a former deputy

:16:25.:16:28.

prime minister and fierce critic of President Putin,

:16:29.:16:31.

was shot close to The gang's ringleader was sentenced

:16:32.:16:33.

to 20 years in prison. A former soldier who raped

:16:34.:16:40.

and killed a 15-year-old schoolgirl has been found guilty

:16:41.:16:43.

of her manslaughter more Stephen Hough killed Janet Commins

:16:44.:16:45.

in Flint in north Wales in 1976. Another man has already served six

:16:46.:16:51.

years for the crime. Hough will be sentenced

:16:52.:16:55.

at a later date. Train drivers working

:16:56.:16:59.

for Southern Rail have announced Members of the Aslef union,

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who are already in a dispute with the firm about driver-only

:17:02.:17:06.

operated trains, have voted Southern's parent firm was fined

:17:07.:17:09.

?13 million this morning for poor performance,

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during a period which saw a number An aristocrat has been jailed

:17:15.:17:18.

for posting menacing messages online Rhodri Philipps, the 4th

:17:19.:17:27.

Viscount St Davids, offered ?5,000 to anyone who would kill Gina Miller

:17:28.:17:31.

after she won a legal challenge saying Parliament had to be

:17:32.:17:34.

consulted about Brexit. It's being hailed as the biggest

:17:35.:17:39.

shake-up of ambulance response times At the moment, when an urgent

:17:40.:17:46.

999 call is received, the call handlers have to decide

:17:47.:17:51.

within 60 seconds whether or not The upshot is that a quarter

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of ambulances end up being stood down when it turns out

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they're not needed. Now call handlers are going to be

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given more time to assess the needs of a caller,

:18:02.:18:04.

to try to make the system Breathe normally for me,

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I'm just going to have Paramedics in the West Midlands

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today, with a 92-year-old patient. After a checkup, they decide it's

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safe to leave him at home. Try to keep your

:18:17.:18:19.

breathing nice and slow. The Ambulance Service is under great

:18:20.:18:21.

pressure but the way it works now allows too many vehicles to go

:18:22.:18:24.

to urgent cases, leaving other The new way of working will mean

:18:25.:18:27.

that we can identify and get to the sickest patients faster,

:18:28.:18:36.

that all patients will get the best response, rather

:18:37.:18:39.

than just the nearest... Under the current system,

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in a control room like this, call handlers have just 60 seconds

:18:46.:18:48.

to decide whether to dispatch an ambulance, and whether it should

:18:49.:18:52.

be a blue light for the most The problem is, that sometimes isn't

:18:53.:18:55.

long enough to decide the most appropriate response,

:18:56.:19:01.

and ambulances can be That decision time will be extended

:19:02.:19:04.

for serious but not critical cases. And while for the most urgent cases

:19:05.:19:13.

under the current system the target is for an ambulance to arrive at 75%

:19:14.:19:16.

of patients within eight minutes, under the new one there will be

:19:17.:19:19.

a target of 90% seen Service leaders say fewer 999 calls

:19:20.:19:24.

will be treated as life-threatening, and some people needing urgent care

:19:25.:19:32.

will have to wait longer, but they can be more certain

:19:33.:19:35.

of getting the right response. Willie Wynne says the system

:19:36.:19:39.

as it is failed his family. His daughter, Ingrid,

:19:40.:19:42.

had a heart condition. She had palpitations and he called

:19:43.:19:45.

999 six times and no ambulance You have people with a broken arm

:19:46.:19:48.

and a broken leg going, I know I'd love them to have it,

:19:49.:19:55.

but, you know, that is not We are talking about emergencies,

:19:56.:20:00.

and an emergency is an emergency. But nobody done anything

:20:01.:20:04.

about an emergency. The local ambulance trust,

:20:05.:20:08.

South Central, said it extended At the time, many of its resources

:20:09.:20:12.

were tied up elsewhere. Some argue that while the reforms

:20:13.:20:16.

are welcome, they won't solve From the patients' point of view,

:20:17.:20:19.

this could be good, in terms of one part of their journey,

:20:20.:20:26.

as it were. But it's no good if they get messed

:20:27.:20:28.

up in A, or can't get a bed Reforms have already been

:20:29.:20:32.

introduced in Wales. There is a pilot scheme

:20:33.:20:40.

under way in Scotland. Trials in England suggest more

:20:41.:20:42.

ambulances can be freed up to get to a wider range of patients,

:20:43.:20:46.

but the real test will come this winter, when it's

:20:47.:20:49.

introduced nationally. One of China's most prominent

:20:50.:20:52.

political dissidents, Liu Xiaobo, has died of cancer a month

:20:53.:20:59.

after he was moved He'd been serving an 11-year

:21:00.:21:02.

sentence for "inciting Mr Liu won the Nobel peace prize

:21:03.:21:07.

in 2010 for his pursuit There have been tributes

:21:08.:21:11.

from around the world. The leader of the Norwegian Nobel

:21:12.:21:16.

Committee said the government in Beijing bore a heavy

:21:17.:21:19.

responsibility for his death. Our China Editor,

:21:20.:21:23.

Carrie Gracie, reports. Reunited with his wife

:21:24.:21:28.

only at the end. And still, under the watchful

:21:29.:21:38.

eye of the state. Two foreign doctors were allowed

:21:39.:21:42.

to visit his bedside. The pictures released abroad

:21:43.:21:46.

to support the Government's claim Along with videos to deflect

:21:47.:21:50.

the charge that his cancer But he was denied his dying

:21:51.:21:55.

wish - to leave China. We have been through these kind

:21:56.:22:04.

of cases one after another, but it has still come

:22:05.:22:08.

as a big shock. Because, not only because I know

:22:09.:22:10.

him, but also because he has been such a symbol for China's human

:22:11.:22:16.

rights, or democratic movement. The Tiananmen Square

:22:17.:22:26.

democracy protests. He tried to secure

:22:27.:22:33.

students safe passage out. Before the army moved

:22:34.:22:39.

in to kill unknown numbers. In and out of jail,

:22:40.:22:44.

for demanding political freedoms. TRANSLATION: As a survivor

:22:45.:22:52.

of the Tiananmen Square democracy movement, I feel I have a duty

:22:53.:22:56.

to uphold justice for those In 2010 he won the Nobel Peace

:22:57.:22:59.

Prize, but he was back "Empty chair" became a banned

:23:00.:23:09.

expression on China's internet. His once irrepressible wife,

:23:10.:23:18.

Lui Xia, was placed under house arrest, where she fell

:23:19.:23:21.

victim to depression. It was only two weeks' ago the world

:23:22.:23:28.

learned of Liu Xiaobo's illness. Hong Kong, the one place in China

:23:29.:23:32.

citizens could call for his release. Chinese censorship is formidable,

:23:33.:23:39.

and few here know of Liu Xiaobo's life, his death or his Nobel Peace

:23:40.:23:42.

Prize. Many Chinese see the one party state

:23:43.:23:49.

as an unavoidable fact of life, and under the strong arm rule

:23:50.:23:54.

of President Xi Jinping it has become even more

:23:55.:23:58.

dangerous to challenge that. Liu Xiaobo once warned,

:23:59.:24:05.

"If you want to enter hell, He felt no ill-will

:24:06.:24:07.

toward his jailers. He said he'd committed no crime,

:24:08.:24:12.

but had no complaints. The Chinese political

:24:13.:24:20.

dissident Liu Xiaobo, An Italian delegation has been

:24:21.:24:22.

in Libya today in a new attempt to stop the people smugglers sending

:24:23.:24:31.

thousands of migrants Most of them set out to sea

:24:32.:24:33.

from Libya, which has no Italian coastguards have taken

:24:34.:24:38.

to burning the smugglers' boats to stem the flow,

:24:39.:24:43.

despite criticism that it makes Our Europe Editor, Katya Adler,

:24:44.:24:45.

is here with more. The number of migrants arriving

:24:46.:24:53.

in Europe has fallen dramatically But Italy is still under

:24:54.:24:58.

immense pressure. More than 85,000 people

:24:59.:25:03.

have arrived this year, In total, Italy has received over

:25:04.:25:05.

600,000 newcomers over the last four years,

:25:06.:25:11.

while around 13,000 people have died Alongside that human tragedy,

:25:12.:25:16.

the political and economic impact is huge, and Italy says

:25:17.:25:21.

it can't cope. Amnesty International is warning

:25:22.:25:25.

that 2017 is set to become the deadliest year on what it calls

:25:26.:25:29.

the deadliest migration Italy is keen to crackdown

:25:30.:25:34.

on the people smugglers, but charities working on the front

:25:35.:25:41.

line accused the EU of cutting back on rescue missions,

:25:42.:25:44.

in an attempt, they say, to put other migrants off

:25:45.:25:47.

trying to come to Europe. This footage was filmed by the BBC

:25:48.:25:51.

off the Libyan coast. Throughout the day the Italian

:25:52.:25:58.

coastguard has been moving around, trying to set fire to as many

:25:59.:26:00.

of these smugglers' The EU says this is the most

:26:01.:26:04.

important thing to do In addition to saving lives,

:26:05.:26:10.

to disrupt the business model of the smugglers,

:26:11.:26:14.

and this is how they do it. So where are the

:26:15.:26:18.

migrants coming from? At the height of the crisis,

:26:19.:26:23.

two years ago, many Hundreds of thousands made perilous

:26:24.:26:26.

crossing from Turkey to Greece That route has now been slammed

:26:27.:26:30.

shut, partly due to an EU deal with Turkey to stop

:26:31.:26:35.

the people smugglers. But Italy's story

:26:36.:26:38.

is a different one. Migrants are heading there

:26:39.:26:40.

from across sub Saharan Africa, They set off to Europe

:26:41.:26:43.

from conflict torn Libya. most are not refugees

:26:44.:26:49.

but economic migrants - The International Organisation

:26:50.:26:52.

for Migration says we're facing this for the long-term

:26:53.:26:57.

because people are attracted It is not something that is going

:26:58.:27:01.

to go away in a year or two. It is something that is going

:27:02.:27:09.

to stay for a variety of reasons. What is complicated is the fact

:27:10.:27:12.

that the response is left to just The front line and a couple

:27:13.:27:16.

of others more in the interior of the EU that are ready to come

:27:17.:27:21.

and share the responsibility Germany's Angela Merkel

:27:22.:27:24.

and France's Emmanuel Macron met the Italian Prime Minister

:27:25.:27:33.

yesterday. But Italians say they have heard

:27:34.:27:35.

lots of empty promises. Italy could send economic migrants

:27:36.:27:43.

back home, since they are neither refugees nor asylum-seekers,

:27:44.:27:49.

but many have no ID papers. Their countries of origin are often

:27:50.:27:54.

reluctant to issue new ones, and they can't be returned to Libya

:27:55.:27:59.

safely because of the EU countries have pledged to improve

:28:00.:28:02.

lives in Africa so fewer people feel the need to move,

:28:03.:28:09.

but that is a long-term goal. In the meantime, lives

:28:10.:28:12.

continue to be lost at sea, Johanna Konta's dream of becoming

:28:13.:28:17.

the first British woman to reach the Wimbledon finals in 40

:28:18.:28:27.

years is over. She crashed out of the championships

:28:28.:28:29.

after being beaten in straight sets by the five-time champion Venus

:28:30.:28:31.

Williams. Joe Wilson was watching

:28:32.:28:35.

the match on centre court. Everyone knows your name,

:28:36.:28:40.

everyone wants your name. For Johanna Konta,

:28:41.:28:42.

it's all been new. For Venus Williams,

:28:43.:28:45.

it's been her life. Venus has seen it all,

:28:46.:28:47.

returned it all. But Konta, well, she wasn't

:28:48.:28:52.

here to be intimidated. Konta created an opportunity

:28:53.:28:56.

in the first set. For Konta the methodical,

:28:57.:28:58.

the reliable, the match Double fault and broken

:28:59.:29:12.

in the second set. Centre Court yearned for the Konta

:29:13.:29:17.

we had seen in previous rounds. Now, come on, it's a lovely

:29:18.:29:21.

afternoon, we'd like to Well, this match lasted just one

:29:22.:29:26.

hour and 14 minutes. Williams, too good and too

:29:27.:29:31.

composed when it mattered. Overwhelmed by a Williams

:29:32.:29:36.

at Wimbledon. Quite honestly, I think

:29:37.:29:39.

I was in just as much of a shot I think today it came down

:29:40.:29:46.

on the day and Venus I mean, I think I've definitely got

:29:47.:29:51.

a lot more to improve on and there's a lot of exciting things I can

:29:52.:29:59.

still get better at. Well, we always felt this

:30:00.:30:02.

was an open women's tournament, full of possibility,

:30:03.:30:05.

because somebody was missing. With Serena Williams

:30:06.:30:07.

happily enjoying pregnancy, An opportunity, it turns

:30:08.:30:09.

out, for her sister. Last week, Venus was in tears,

:30:10.:30:17.

talking about the car Now, she's in another final, at 37,

:30:18.:30:19.

at the place she loves. I thought the crowd was very

:30:20.:30:24.

nice to me, actually. They could have really been

:30:25.:30:27.

even more boisterous. I thought the crowd was so fair,

:30:28.:30:30.

and I know that they love Jo I thought she handled it well,

:30:31.:30:33.

and I think my experience Dealing with this disappointment

:30:34.:30:41.

is Jo Konta's next challenge. She's ranked high enough to expect

:30:42.:30:45.

titles, but the future offers no guarantees of more opportunities

:30:46.:30:48.

like this one. Tonight, the government tells us

:30:49.:31:15.

that in the wake of the Grenfell disaster, it except that building

:31:16.:31:17.

regulations are not up to the job and will be fully reviewed.

:31:18.:31:20.

Here on BBC One, it's time for the news where you are.

:31:21.:31:23.