13/11/2017 BBC News at Ten


13/11/2017

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The Government backs down and offers

MPs a chance to vote on the detail

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of the final Brexit deal.

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It's a last-minute concession,

ahead of a controversial

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Brexit legislation debate,

which returns to

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the Commons tomorrow.

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Parliament will be given time

to debate, scrutinise and vote

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on the final agreement we strike

with the European Union.

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This agreement will only hold

if Parliament approves it.

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These questions have been

pressing for months.

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This last-minute attempt

to climb down brings them

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into very sharp focus.

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But the Government's warning that

a vote against the deal means the UK

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will leave with no agreement leaves

some MPs unimpressed.

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Also tonight:

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A BBC investigation reveals a deal

to allow so-called IS fighters

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to escape the Syrian city of Raqqa.

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Where are they now?

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It's here that they realised

that they might live

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to fight another day.

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The deal to get them out

of here is the deal that no-one

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wants to talk about.

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It's Raqqa's dirty secret.

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The force of the earthquake that

struck Iraq and Iran,

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killing over 350 people.

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The British woman

imprisoned in Iran.

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The Foreign Secretary apologises

for mishandling her case

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and increasing her distress.

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And the ten million tonnes of food

we throw away every year -

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that experts say is mostly good

enough to eat.

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And coming up on

Sportsday on BBC News:

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1958 was the last time Italy failed

to make it to the World Cup.

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Can Sweden prevent them

from reaching Russia next year?

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Good evening.

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In a political climbdown,

the Government has offered MPs

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the opportunity to debate the final

Brexit agreement line

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by line - and potentially

vote to amend it.

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But the Brexit Secretary,

David Davis, couldn't guarantee

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the bill will happen before Brexit

day, in March 2019, and warned

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that if MPs use the bill

to vote against the deal -

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whatever it is - Britain will simply

leave the EU without an agreement.

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It appears to have been a move

to appease Tory rebels, ahead

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of a key Brexit debate tomorrow.

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But it's infuriated many MPs on both

sides of the Commons.

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Here's our political

editor, Laura Kuenssberg.

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The trappings of power at the Prime

Minister at London's glittering

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Guildhall tonight. An evening away

from the Parliamentary grind, trying

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to avoid being hit by the Golden

mace. Less surprising were her

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reassurances about her Brexit

approach.

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There will be ups and downs along

the way. But I believe we should

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embrace this period with confidence

and optimism.

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The Government is not too cheery

about getting their Brexit

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legislation through the Commons.

Secretary David Davis. This

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afternoon, at -- a concession, a new

act of Parliament on the final

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Brexit deal.

I can confirm that once we reach an

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agreement, we will bring forward is

Pacific Pisa primary legislation to

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implement that agreement. Parliament

will be given time to debate,

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scrutinise and boat on the final

agreement we strike with the

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European Union.

This will only hold a Parliament

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approves it.

Giving in Sorum Tory

and Labour demands for Parliament to

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have a proper decision if and when a

deal is done.

It is a recognition by

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the Government that it is about to

lose a series of boats on the

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Withdrawal Bill. Mr Speaker, these

questions have been pressing for

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months, this last-minute attempt to

climb down brings them into very

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sharp focus and we are entitled to

clear answers.

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Stop Brexit! In other words, what

took you so long to admit that

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Parliament would need a make or

break Brexit moment?

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Stop Brexit!

There has been the is resistance to

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the laws already going through the

Commons and this was meant to take

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some of the wind out of the sails of

the rebels but if there is no deal

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and no time, could there be no vote?

If we run out of time, none of these

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suggestions that have been put

forward is that the time has to be

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extended under Article 50 so that

all parties are able to deal with

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it.

If the House of Commons votes

down the new Withdrawal Bill, will

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the consequence be that we will

still leave on the 29th of March

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2019 but without an agreement?

Yes.

What was that?

The Secretary of

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State said, yes.

So does it change that much? There

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is still an happiness swirling

around.

I have to say a lot of us

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were insulted by this because it

sounded so good and when you dug

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into the detail, you realised this

so-called meaningful vote was

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completely meaningless.

It matters not so much here, but in

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the real world. European business

equipped in Number 10 today to make

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it plain to the Prime Minister.

Jobs, millions of families

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livelihoods depend on her getting

Brexit right.

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Laura, the timing of this

intervention by the Government

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is key, but how meaningful is this

suggested new bill and is it enough

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to keep the Government out

of difficulty with its own MPs?

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I think it is certainly not enough

to keep the Godman out of trouble

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with its own MPs. The timing of this

is absolutely crucial. It is no

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current system is the Government

caved on this particular issue

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today. Tomorrow, the Withdrawal Bill

as it is known gets into its next

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stage in the House of Commons and

there will be between now and

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Christmas line by line, day by day,

arguments on hundreds of amendments

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over how the Government wants to

take us out of the EU as they try to

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transpose European law back onto the

British statute book. But the idea

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that suddenly emerged by surprise

today of having another Withdrawal

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Bill much later in the stage to give

MPs a Finals Day was intended to

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calm down all the tempers that were

already fraying over what would

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happen in the next few months and

has it allowed those tempers to cool

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down? It does not seem that way to

me. I am told by people on both

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sides inside the Tory Party that

there was a stormy meeting between

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the Chief Whip, in charge of party

discipline, and a dozen key Tory

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rebels about this matter this

afternoon. Both sides concede it was

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stormy, that is political code for

quite grim and probably with a lot

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of shouting involved. Ministers know

that they are going to have to give

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ground in the coming months and may

have known for a long time they

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would have the net and took and

compromise here and there, but

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today's attempt at conceding, which

is not something a competent

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government would have done, has

knocked -- has not waved a magic

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wand to make this all go away.

Thank you.

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When US-backed Syrian fighters took

full control of the city of Raqqa,

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it ended three years of rule

there by so-called Islamic State.

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But now the BBC has uncovered

details of a secret deal that let

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several hundred IS fighters escape.

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IS made Raqqa, in northern Syria,

its headquarters in early 2014.

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Last month, Raqqa fell,

but this programme has learnt that

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in exchange for a deal to save lives

and bring peace to the city,

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a convoy carrying several

hundred IS fighters,

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their families and weapons

and ammunition were able

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to leave the city freely.

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The question now is,

where are they now?

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Our Middle East correspondent,

Quentin Sommerville,

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has this exclusive report.

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Even at peace, with the so-called

Islamic State gone, Raqqa

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is still deadly dangerous.

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Few of its roads have been cleared.

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The fighting stopped here a month

ago, but there are still mines

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and booby traps everywhere.

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Most of the city is a no-go zone.

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Hardly anyone has been

allowed to return.

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But we made it inside,

searching for a trail

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through the debris, looking

for clues to the Islamic

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State's escape route.

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The city hospital was their last

refuge and it's here

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where our journey begins.

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The group's final defeat came thanks

not to a battle, but to a bus ride.

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The convoy left from here,

the city hospital.

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They'd been holed up

inside for months.

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On it were IS fighters,

their families and hostages,

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but we're told the mood was not

dejected, it was not defeated.

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They were defiant.

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It was here that they realised

that they might live to fight

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another day.

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The deal to get them out

of here is the deal that no

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one wants to talk about.

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It's Raqqa's dirty secret.

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So did Kurds, Arabs and the Western

coalition get together and agree

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a deal that not only allowed

IS to escape from Raqqa,

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but also allowed its fiercest

fighters to roam far and wide

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from the confines of this city?

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They left a city lonely,

empty and in ruins.

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The hunt begins here in Raqqa,

but would take us across

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northern Syria and beyond.

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The deal started

with a media blackout.

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The Islamic State's escape

was not to be televised.

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But, thanks to amateur footage...

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We see that this was a convoy

and a deal too large to hide.

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The world was told only a few dozen

local fighters were being let go.

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No foreigners and no weapons.

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But the trucks were crammed

full of fighters, some

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wearing suicide belts.

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All were heavily armed.

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After days of searching,

we picked up the trail at a truck

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stop on the outskirts of Tabqa.

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Here, we discovered the drivers,

all civilians, who drove

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IS to freedom.

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They had been hired

by the Kurdish-led Syrian

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Democratic Forces.

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It was the longest

journey of their lines.

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Their trucks were rigged

with IS bombs, in case

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the deal collapsed.

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They had been told they were picking

up only a few hundred civilians,

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that it would be a quick job.

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They ended up driving day

and night for three days.

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Everybody's been saying only

a couple of hundred at the absolute

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maximum IS fighters left Raqqa.

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You took them out, tell us how

many you transported.

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TRANSLATION:

We were 47 trucks

and 13 buses, and IS militants

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took their own vehicles, as well.

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Our convoy was 6-7 kilometres long.

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We took out around 4,000 people,

including women and children.

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Tell me about the foreigners

that were on the trucks,

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where were they from?

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TRANSLATION:

France, Turkey,

Azerbaijan, Pakistan,

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Yemen, Saudi, China,

Tunisia, Egypt.

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There was a huge

number of foreigners.

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This couldn't look like the Islamic

State's escape to victory,

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so the SDF insisted there would be

no flags and no banners.

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Instead, IS fighters sat boldly

on top of the trucks.

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The axle on one lorry broke, it was

so overloaded with IS weaponry.

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When they made it to the village

of Shenina, they stopped

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at this person's shop.

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Pale and hungry, the IS fighters

cleared his shelves.

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TRANSLATION:

We were at the shop

here and an SDF vehicle stopped

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to say there was a truce agreement

between them and IS.

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They wanted us to clear the area.

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As soon as we did so,

an IS convoy came passing through.

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There were about 4,000 people

leaving Raqqa on that road here.

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It took them about 2-3 hours.

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It was bumper-to-bumper.

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Coalition aircraft flew

above them, but did nothing.

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The convoy drove on.

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We kept close on its tracks, for

here is where IS hoped to disappear.

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They left the main road.

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Mahmoud watched as they took a dirt

trail into the desert.

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As they passed, they warned

that they would behead

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the people who'd betrayed them.

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TRANSLATION:

There

were loads of vehicles.

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I could not count them all.

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It took them about four

hours to pass through.

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We have been living in terror

for the past four, five years.

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It will take us a while to

rid ourselves of that

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psychological fear.

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We feel that they may

be coming back for us,

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or send sleeper agents.

0:13:350:13:39

We're still not sure

that they have gone for good

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and will not ever return.

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Responding to our investigation,

the coalition now admits that

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thousands were allowed

to leave here.

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But foreigners did not

escape, it maintains.

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Some of those who escaped have

already made it here to Turkey.

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Raqqa was their capital,

but it was also a cage.

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There, they were trapped.

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The deal brought peace to the city,

but it also allowed some of the most

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battle-hardened IS fighters

to escape not just Raqqa,

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but also Syria, and arrive

here on Europe's doorstep.

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The winds have carried news

of the Islamic State's defeat,

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but they bring with them a warning

and a threat from a smuggler

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and a former IS fighter.

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TRANSLATION:

After IS crumbled

in Raqqa and Deir ez-Zur,

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the smugglers here noticed a surge

in the numbers of those

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who are trying to cross into Turkey.

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They are mostly IS fighters and

families from Raqqa and Deir ez-Zur.

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They are both

foreigners and Syrians.

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TRANSLATION:

There are some French

brothers from our group who left

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for France to carry out attacks

in what would be called

0:14:520:14:55

a day of reckoning.

0:14:550:14:57

The caliphate has gone,

but the Islamic State

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is still out there.

0:15:000:15:02

Quentin Sommerville,

BBC News, Istanbul.

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More than 400 people

have been killed

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in a powerful earthquake that's

struck the northern

0:15:080:15:11

border of Iran and Iraq.

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Another 7,000 were injured

and the casualty figure

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is expected to rise on both

sides of the border.

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A major rescue operation is

underway, but it is being hampered

0:15:210:15:23

by landslides and power cuts.

0:15:230:15:25

The epicentre of the quake,

which measured 7.3,

0:15:250:15:28

was just under 20 miles

south of Halabja.

0:15:280:15:30

One of the worst-hit

areas was Sarpol-e Zahab,

0:15:300:15:32

as James Robbins reports.

0:15:320:15:36

The moment the Earth

starts shaking violently.

0:15:360:15:38

A man runs for his life

from the control room of this dam,

0:15:380:15:41

as massive boulders

are hurled around outside.

0:15:410:15:46

The dam wall was not breached.

0:15:460:15:48

But, elsewhere, devastation.

0:15:480:15:53

In Iran, the border town

of Sarpol-e Zahab was hit hardest.

0:15:530:15:56

As entire walls collapsed,

many families did manage

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to flee their homes,

but others were crushed or buried.

0:15:580:16:05

At a local hospital, there were

many stories of narrow escape.

0:16:050:16:08

TRANSLATION:

I fell from the balcony down.

0:16:080:16:10

The earthquake was very strong.

0:16:100:16:13

TRANSLATION:

The earthquake

shattered the window,

0:16:130:16:16

which fell on me, and it

wounded my hand and my face.

0:16:160:16:20

Rescue has been made more difficult

by the mountainous terrain.

0:16:200:16:25

Iranian authorities are pouring

resources in, but landslides

0:16:250:16:28

and power cuts are slowing

both rescue efforts and

0:16:280:16:32

the task of establishing

the full extent of casualties.

0:16:320:16:35

This quake was 7.3 in magnitude

and happened in a known danger zone.

0:16:350:16:41

The surface of the Earth is made

up of tectonic plates,

0:16:410:16:44

and, in this case, the Arabian plate

has been moving roughly northwards

0:16:440:16:49

against the Eurasian plate at a rate

of two centimetres -

0:16:490:16:51

just under an inch a year.

0:16:510:16:54

Forces build up

and eventually are very suddenly

0:16:540:16:56

released with devastating effect.

0:16:560:17:01

The destruction in Iran is greater

than in neighbouring Iraq,

0:17:010:17:05

where a major rescue

operation is also under way.

0:17:050:17:09

BBC correspondent

Rami Ruhayem is there.

0:17:090:17:11

This area is one of the hardest hit

in Iraq by Sunday's earthquake.

0:17:110:17:15

We are told seven people were inside

this home when it collapsed.

0:17:150:17:19

Two of them were killed

and others were injured.

0:17:190:17:23

Several other buildings suffered

similar damage to this one,

0:17:230:17:26

but, fortunately, they seem to be

the exception rather than the rule,

0:17:260:17:29

and most of the other homes

in the region managed to withstand

0:17:290:17:32

the impact of the earthquake.

0:17:320:17:36

For the survivors,

night-time is the toughest.

0:17:360:17:40

In rapidly falling temperatures,

families are huddled around fires.

0:17:400:17:42

Even where buildings are intact,

0:17:420:17:44

fear of after-shocks

will keep people outdoors.

0:17:440:17:47

James Robbins, BBC News.

0:17:470:17:54

The Foreign Secretary has admitted

for the first time that he made

0:17:540:17:57

a mistake in his handling

of the case

0:17:570:17:58

of Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe -

the British woman held

0:17:580:18:00

in prison in Iran.

0:18:000:18:02

Boris Johnson apologised

for the distress and suffering

0:18:020:18:06

he had caused her and her family

by wrongly saying that she was

0:18:060:18:09

training journalists in Iran,

as opposed to being on holiday.

0:18:090:18:12

He also confirmed that he would be

meeting Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe's

0:18:120:18:14

husband this week.

0:18:140:18:15

Our special correspondent, Lucy

Manning, has been speaking to him.

0:18:150:18:18

THEY SING

0:18:180:18:21

A mother singing with her daughter

just a week before her arrest.

0:18:210:18:28

Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe has now

been separated from three-year-old

0:18:280:18:30

Gabriella for a year and a half.

0:18:300:18:35

With her health deteriorating

in an Iranian prison and the words

0:18:350:18:40

of politicians here appearing

to harm her case, her

0:18:400:18:43

husband has this message

for the Foreign Secretary.

0:18:430:18:44

I want you to solve

this mess in your name.

0:18:440:18:47

And I stand by that.

0:18:470:18:48

I think it's not a mess that's

entirely the Foreign Secretary's

0:18:480:18:51

making, by any means,

but it is a mess that his name has

0:18:510:18:54

been attached to and it is getting

deeper and more complicated

0:18:540:18:56

because of that.

0:18:560:18:58

He will take these requests

to a meeting with the Foreign

0:18:580:19:01

Secretary this week.

0:19:010:19:02

You're going to go to Iran.

0:19:020:19:03

And when you go, I'd

like to go with you.

0:19:030:19:05

I'd like to be on that plane,

I'd like to be standing next to you,

0:19:050:19:09

for the symbolism that has.

0:19:090:19:10

The second thing is that Nazanin be

given diplomatic protection.

0:19:100:19:13

That is within the gift

of the Government.

0:19:130:19:15

Mr Johnson had been less than clear

in backing the family's account that

0:19:150:19:19

Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe was in Iran

visiting relatives

0:19:190:19:21

when she was arrested.

0:19:210:19:22

When you look at what

Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe

0:19:220:19:24

was doing, you just,

you know, she was simply

0:19:240:19:27

teaching people journalism,

as I understand it.

0:19:270:19:31

Today, Labour demanded answers

about Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe's case

0:19:310:19:36

from the Foreign Secretary,

who had to return from Brussels.

0:19:360:19:38

It is not good enough.

0:19:380:19:39

If it is a matter of pride

that the Foreign Secretary

0:19:390:19:42

is refusing to admit simply

that he has made a mistake, well,

0:19:420:19:46

then I feel bound to say to him

that his pride matters not one ounce

0:19:460:19:50

compared to Nazanin's freedom.

0:19:500:19:54

Mr Johnson was apologetic.

0:19:540:19:55

It was my mistake.

0:19:550:19:56

I should have been clearer.

0:19:560:19:57

I apologise for the distress...

0:19:570:20:03

I apologise for the distress

and anguish that has been caused

0:20:030:20:06

to Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe

and her family.

0:20:060:20:07

Ministers are considering

if diplomatic protection can be

0:20:070:20:09

given to Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe,

which would turn it from a consular

0:20:090:20:12

issue into a more serious dispute

between the UK and Iran.

0:20:120:20:21

But it's not clear if

this would help her.

0:20:220:20:24

Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe's employers

were insistent her job

0:20:240:20:26

was an administrative one.

0:20:260:20:27

We don't work in Iran.

0:20:270:20:29

To start with, the Thomson Reuters'

condition doesn't work there.

0:20:290:20:31

And we have no relations with Iran.

0:20:310:20:33

But on top of that,

she was really on holiday.

0:20:330:20:35

And let me tell you,

she's not spy material at all.

0:20:350:20:38

Her family just want her home.

0:20:380:20:42

Young Gabriella cried when her visit

to her mum in prison this

0:20:420:20:45

weekend was cut short.

0:20:450:20:46

Lucy Manning, BBC News.

0:20:460:20:50

A man has been has been found guilty

of carrying out an acid attack

0:20:500:20:53

at a London nightclub

in which 16 people

0:20:530:20:55

were seriously injured.

0:20:550:21:05

In CCTV, you can see

25-year-old Arthur Collins

0:21:060:21:10

throw the corrosive substance

at the Mangle Club,

0:21:100:21:12

in east London, in April.

0:21:120:21:13

He was convicted of 14 charges,

including grievous bodily harm.

0:21:130:21:15

An inquest has heard

that Welsh Government

0:21:150:21:17

minister Carl Sergeant -

who was sacked after allegations

0:21:170:21:19

about his conduct - hanged himself.

0:21:190:21:21

His body was discovered at his home

in Flintshire last week.

0:21:210:21:23

Mr Sergeant was facing

a Labour Party investigation

0:21:230:21:25

following claims about his behaviour

by a number of women.

0:21:250:21:27

Bob Geldof has returned his honour

granting him freedom of the city

0:21:270:21:31

of Dublin in protest at the Myanmar

leader Aung San Suu Kyi

0:21:310:21:34

receiving the same award.

0:21:340:21:37

She has faced criticism

for the treatment of the Rohingya

0:21:370:21:39

minority in her country.

0:21:390:21:41

MPs in Westminster have

been debating a budget

0:21:410:21:43

for Northern Ireland,

ten months after the power-sharing

0:21:430:21:46

government at Stormont collapsed.

0:21:460:21:48

Despite talks, the DUP and Sinn Fein

have failed to agree a deal

0:21:480:21:51

to restore devolution since then.

0:21:510:21:53

Our Ireland correspondent, Chris

Buckler, is at Stormont tonight.

0:21:530:21:55

Chris, this is not something

Westminster wanted.

0:21:550:22:03

But not having a budget has had an

effect. Yes, public services have

0:22:030:22:09

been running out of cash without a

power-sharing executive Westminster

0:22:090:22:13

has had to step in and the

announcement tonight the promise of

0:22:130:22:18

an extra 15 million for health and

education, money that has come from

0:22:180:22:22

the million pound deal the DUP did

to support the Tories at Westminster

0:22:220:22:28

but relationships there have not

helped relationships that Stormont

0:22:280:22:32

and Sinn Fein and the DUP are deeply

divided. James Brokenshire I was at

0:22:320:22:37

pains in the Commons to say it was

not the start of direct rule, where

0:22:370:22:42

London would take over the running

of departments in Belfast. He wants

0:22:420:22:46

a deal between parties here he said.

Sinn Fein said negotiations are over

0:22:460:22:52

for the moment and the DUP have been

taking the instruction of direct

0:22:520:22:57

rule in a matter of weeks. We have a

limbo for Northern Ireland

0:22:570:23:01

government between devolution and

direct rule and without anyone able

0:23:010:23:07

to make decisions. Frankly, that

cannot go one for ever.

0:23:070:23:10

Global carbon-dioxide emissions

are projected to rise

0:23:100:23:12

for the first time in four years.

0:23:120:23:14

Scientists at a United Nations

climate conference in Germany say

0:23:140:23:16

the main cause of the growth

is the greater use of coal in China,

0:23:160:23:19

as its economy grows.

0:23:190:23:21

Researchers say cuts in emissions

are needed to avoid dangerous global

0:23:210:23:24

warming later this century,

as our science editor,

0:23:240:23:27

David Shukman, explains.

0:23:270:23:31

For more than a week now,

the people of Delhi have been

0:23:310:23:34

suffering in air that

has become toxic.

0:23:340:23:39

Smog created by countless

engines burning fossil

0:23:390:23:41

fuels, including coal.

0:23:410:23:44

Coal is one of the biggest sources

of pollution worldwide.

0:23:440:23:46

Power stations such as this one

in Poland belch out gases

0:23:460:23:49

including carbon dioxide,

and despite promises to clean up,

0:23:490:23:53

emissions are actually increasing.

0:23:530:23:57

For countries in the path

of devastating hurricanes,

0:23:570:23:59

like the ones that struck

the Caribbean earlier this year,

0:23:590:24:01

this is depressing.

0:24:010:24:04

Because global warming may bring

more extreme weather.

0:24:040:24:08

And it seems to them that little

is being done to stop it.

0:24:080:24:12

This is very worrying for us.

0:24:120:24:13

I would hate to say that it

sounds a death knell,

0:24:130:24:17

but it translates into that,

given this summer we have had such

0:24:170:24:20

an active hurricane season.

0:24:200:24:21

We know what Irma and Maria

did to the region.

0:24:210:24:25

This new research finds that more

and more carbon dioxide

0:24:250:24:27

is being released from power

stations, factories and different

0:24:270:24:30

forms of transport.

0:24:300:24:33

And this matters because the gas

traps heat in the atmosphere.

0:24:330:24:35

This graph shows how emissions

of carbon dioxide have risen over

0:24:350:24:38

almost three decades.

0:24:380:24:43

In the last few years,

they have been levelling off,

0:24:430:24:46

which was seen as a positive sign.

0:24:460:24:48

But this year, there has suddenly

been an increase of 2%.

0:24:480:24:51

So what is happening and who is to

blame around the world?

0:24:510:24:54

In America, emissions of carbon

dioxide have fallen slightly

0:24:540:24:59

and that is despite President Trump

wanting to leave

0:24:590:25:01

the Paris agreement.

0:25:010:25:03

In Europe, they are on course

to be down as well.

0:25:030:25:05

But in China they are up,

as the economy picks up

0:25:050:25:08

and more coal is burned.

0:25:080:25:12

Climate scientists say it is vital

that less coal is used

0:25:120:25:15

if we are to have any chance

of heading off the worst

0:25:150:25:17

of global warming.

0:25:170:25:18

But President Trump is promoting

the coal industry and he wants

0:25:180:25:21

America to help other countries

to use it.

0:25:210:25:26

There are countries that have said

that coal is going to be

0:25:260:25:29

part of our energy mix

for the foreseeable future, many

0:25:290:25:31

in Asia and some in Africa as well.

0:25:310:25:34

And they have been clear that

because coal is going to be part

0:25:340:25:38

of their energy mix in the future,

they want support for

0:25:380:25:40

cleaner coal technology.

0:25:400:25:44

There is now a battle over a fuel

that many economies rely on.

0:25:440:25:47

There are plans to make

coal cleaner, to use it

0:25:470:25:51

without releasing carbon dioxide.

0:25:510:25:52

But this is not much of a reality

so far and, in the meantime,

0:25:520:25:56

there are warnings that emissions

need to fall rapidly,

0:25:560:25:59

not rise, as they are now.

0:25:590:26:05

Now, it looks pretty revolting.

0:26:050:26:09

Just some of the ten million tonnes

of food we throw away each year.

0:26:090:26:13

And despite what it looks

like here, experts say much

0:26:130:26:15

of it is good enough to eat.

0:26:150:26:17

There is waste throughout

the food supply chain,

0:26:170:26:19

but it's thought that the biggest

problem lies with consumers -

0:26:190:26:22

that's us - and campaigners

are urging families to be much more

0:26:220:26:25

careful about what they throw away,

as Jeremy Cooke explains.

0:26:250:26:33

OK, it is past its sell-by date.

0:26:330:26:35

But this is, or was, food.

0:26:350:26:36

What's this?

0:26:360:26:37

Sushi.

0:26:370:26:39

Grown, produced,

processed, and discarded.

0:26:390:26:42

A super-sized serving

of stinking waste.

0:26:420:26:47

It's amazing how much food is thrown

out, and it's amazing how long it's

0:26:470:26:51

taken the message to get through.

0:26:510:26:52

If you don't have to

eat it, don't buy it.

0:26:520:26:55

The striking thing here

is the tonnes of food waste

0:26:550:26:58

that we all throw away all the time.

0:26:580:27:00

This stuff has come from bars

and restaurants and businesses

0:27:000:27:04

and there are mountains of it piling

up here every day.

0:27:040:27:09

Across the country,

we throw away 10 million

0:27:090:27:11

tonnes of food every year.

0:27:110:27:15

That's £17 billion worth in the bin.

0:27:150:27:19

And we're told 60%

of that is avoidable -

0:27:190:27:22

food that could have and should

have been eaten.

0:27:220:27:25

There is waste through

the entire supply chain.

0:27:250:27:29

From in the field,

in the manufacturing,

0:27:290:27:31

in the restaurant, in the retail,

in the supermarket, distribution,

0:27:310:27:34

and in the kitchen at home.

0:27:340:27:37

Overproduction is a fact

of the modern food industry.

0:27:370:27:41

Most of the surplus - good,

nutritious stuff - goes to waste.

0:27:410:27:44

But here there's another way.

0:27:440:27:49

All of this, if it wasn't

for Fareshare, would end

0:27:490:27:51

up going in the bin.

0:27:510:27:53

At the Fareshare charity,

they take the surplus and use

0:27:530:27:55

it to feed the hungry.

0:27:550:27:58

The thing that really drives us nuts

is it is going to waste

0:27:580:28:01

while there are people going hungry.

0:28:010:28:03

We feed at the moment half

a million people a week,

0:28:030:28:06

half a million people a week,

with this food.

0:28:060:28:12

We do that to 7000 front-line

charity and community groups.

0:28:120:28:15

Which is good news here

at the Melton Learning Hub,

0:28:150:28:18

where disadvantaged kids get

good, fresh food.

0:28:180:28:23

For our kids it means

they get hot meal.

0:28:230:28:25

They definitely get

a hot meal every day.

0:28:250:28:29

Lots of different circumstances

the young people come to us

0:28:290:28:32

in and it is a brilliant way

of using food that would,

0:28:320:28:35

as you say, go to waste.

0:28:350:28:36

But Luke and his mates know

that this is the exception.

0:28:360:28:41

Most surplus food is

simply thrown away.

0:28:410:28:44

This stuff, if it was like left

on the shelf, it would get put

0:28:440:28:48

into storage and get put

in landfills and that

0:28:480:28:50

and that's not good.

0:28:500:28:51

Tackling the issue will mean dumping

less food and doing more

0:28:510:28:55

with whatever goes in the bin.

0:28:550:28:57

Here it is used to make valuable

fertiliser to generate

0:28:570:29:00

gas and electricity.

0:29:000:29:02

But most of our discarded food

still goes to the incinerator

0:29:020:29:04

or to landfill - perhaps

the definition of waste

0:29:040:29:06

in a hungry world.

0:29:060:29:09

Jeremy Cooke, BBC News.

0:29:090:29:14

The four-time winners

of football's World Cup - Italy -

0:29:140:29:17

have been eliminated from the finals

next year in Russia.

0:29:170:29:20

The Italians could only draw nil-nil

in the second leg of their match

0:29:200:29:23

against Sweden in Milan.

0:29:230:29:25

It's the first time Italy

has failed to qualify

0:29:250:29:27

for the World Cup finals since 1958.

0:29:270:29:33

The new stage adaptation

of the 1970s film Network -

0:29:330:29:36

a satire on television news's

obsession with ratings -

0:29:360:29:38

has had its world premiere

tonight in London.

0:29:380:29:41

Its star, Bryan Cranston,

from the cult television

0:29:410:29:43

series Breaking Bad -

has been speaking to our Arts

0:29:430:29:46

editor, Will Gompertz,

about his concerns about the impact

0:29:460:29:49

of social media on news and

the current climate in Hollywood.

0:29:490:29:52

They met at the National Theatre.

0:29:520:29:54

A very interesting perspective.

0:29:540:29:57

Because I've never sat out

here, looking that way.

0:29:570:30:00

OK.

0:30:000:30:03

It's quite an impressive

set, though, isn't it?

0:30:030:30:10

You were an overnight success,

you could argue, at fifty-ish.

0:30:100:30:13

Although they may look the same.

0:30:130:30:14

Bryan Cranston became

an international superstar

0:30:140:30:15

in the hit TV show Breaking Bad.

0:30:150:30:18

Playing Walter White,

a chemistry teacher who becomes

0:30:180:30:21

a drug-dealing criminal.

0:30:210:30:26

Breaking Bad was a phenomenal

experience for me.

0:30:260:30:28

It changed my life completely.

0:30:280:30:34

And here he is in another

life-changing role.

0:30:340:30:36

I'm as mad as hell and I'm not

going to take it any more!

0:30:360:30:44

In the National Theatre's stage

adaptation of the 1970s film

0:30:440:30:47

Network, in which his character

loses it on air and becomes

0:30:470:30:50

a ratings sensation.

0:30:500:30:53

In the '70s it was clearly a satire.

0:30:530:30:56

Network in 2017 is no

longer a satire.

0:30:560:31:02

It is profound and it is

what we are living in.

0:31:020:31:08

This inundation of information

is not necessarily a good thing.

0:31:080:31:16

That our children can

access not only horrific

0:31:160:31:25

acts of real violence

on their cellphone, but pornography.

0:31:250:31:28

Anything and everything

is accessible now.

0:31:280:31:32

It's not good for society.

0:31:320:31:35

It's starting to feel

like a dark age in Hollywood.

0:31:350:31:41

Is there a way back

for the Weinsteins and

0:31:410:31:43

Spaceys of this world?

If they were to show us

0:31:430:31:46

that they put the work

in and are truly sorry,

0:31:460:31:49

and making amends, and not

defending their actions,

0:31:490:31:53

but asking for forgiveness,

then maybe down the road

0:31:530:31:55

there is room for that.

0:31:550:32:03

Character transformation is becoming

a theme of Bryan Cranston's

0:32:030:32:05

late career as a star

of stage and screen.

0:32:050:32:10

From crystal-meth-cooking teachers

to mad-as-hell newscasters.

0:32:100:32:11

Will Gompertz, BBC News.

0:32:110:32:13

Newsnight is coming up on BBC Two.

0:32:130:32:15

Here's Evan Davis.

0:32:150:32:20

On August 30th this year,

a massacre occurred in a village

0:32:200:32:23

called Tula Toli, in Mynamar.

0:32:230:32:25

Our team has been piecing together

what happened that day.

0:32:250:32:28

The testimony they've acquired

makes a disturbing film,

0:32:280:32:30