11/01/2018 BBC News at Ten


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11/01/2018

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Patients are dying prematurely

in hospital corridors -

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the stark warning to

the Prime Minister from

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dozens of senior doctors.

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They've written to Theresa May

saying safety is being compromised

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at some A&E units in England

and Wales, and conditions

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are at times intolerable.

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There is a clear emergency

and what a number of other observers

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have clearly described as a crisis.

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The doctors' warning comes with A&E

waiting time levels in England

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and Wales amongst the worst

since records began.

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Also on tonight's programme.

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Dealing with plastic pollution -

the government promises to eliminate

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all avoidable plastic waste by 2042.

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Still searching for survivors -

rescue dogs are brought

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in to look for the missing,

after California's deadly mudslides.

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A mixed bag of Christmas results

on the high street -

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with some winners and big losers.

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I'm 22 years old.

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I bought my first house

for $6.5 million...

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The famous video blogger

punished by YouTube -

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after posting footage of a suicide

victim for his millions

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of followers.

0:01:080:01:12

The New York Times was barred

from publishing any more classified

0:01:120:01:17

And Steven Spielberg's new film

on Nixon and the press,

0:01:170:01:19

and why the director sees echoes

of Donald Trump.

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Anybody that offends, you know,

there is a label that is immediately

0:01:210:01:26

attached to them which is called,

well that can't be true

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because they're all fake news.

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And coming up on Sportsday on BBC

News, slam dunks and Celtics -

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the bright lights of the NBA hits

London again this evening.

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Good evening.

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Dozens of senior doctors who run

Accident and Emergency departments

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in England and Wales have written

a stark letter to the Prime Minister

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warning that patients are dying

prematurely in hospital corridors

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and conditions are at

times "intolerable".

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They say thousands of patients

are left in the back of ambulances

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waiting to get into A&E.

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And very high rates of flu recently

mean that some hospitals

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are running out of beds.

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Today, there's fresh evidence

of the pressure A&E units are under.

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More than 300,000 patients waited

longer than they should in December.

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Staff managed to see 85%

of patients within four hours -

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that's well below the 95% target -

and some of the worst figures

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since records began.

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Our health editor Hugh Pym reports.

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A long wait in an overcrowded A&E

unit, that's what 87-year-old

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Yvonne had to endure.

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It was ten hours before she saw

a doctor, and hours more before

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she was admitted to a ward.

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Her daughter, Esther, used her scarf

to secure her in a wheelchair,

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because for some of the time,

there was no trolley.

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It was just heaving with ambulances,

ambulance drivers, patients

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on the ambulance trolleys,

and it was literally wall-to-wall,

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both sides, corridors

just full of patients.

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It was like, "Gosh, how long is it

going to take us to get through?"

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And with scenes like this

filmed by a patient,

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senior A&E doctors say they're

so concerned they've written

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to the Prime Minister setting out

some of their own experiences.

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Over 120 patients a day

managed in corridors,

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some dying prematurely,

an average of 10-12 hours

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for a decision to admit a patient

until they are transferred to a bed

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and patients sleeping in clinics

as make-shift wards.

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They say NHS winter planning failed

to deliver what was needed.

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There is no doubt that our emergency

departments are facing

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the biggest crisis that we have had

for over 15 years.

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We absolutely must work together

as system leaders at every level

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in order to find both short-term

and medium-term solutions.

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The Prime Minister insisted again

there had been extensive measures

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to prepare for winter.

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For the first time ever,

urgent GP appointments

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being available throughout

the Christmas period,

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that was a decision taken to improve

the service for people but also

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to ensure that the NHS had that

better capacity to deal

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with these winter pressures.

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For the opposition, the problem

is really about funding.

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Money's got to go in now,

but it should have gone in earlier.

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Even if the Chancellor

announced billions today,

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you can't spend it all by tomorrow.

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While the debate goes on,

Rosie can only reflect

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on a humiliating experience in A&E.

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She was in severe pain

because of a gynecological problem

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and was bleeding heavily

but she was examined

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in a crowded corridor.

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I think I was trolley number 12.

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And there were trolleys,

then, all the way up.

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You can't see to someone's dignity,

you can't ensure that they're having

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a private conversation and that

if they break down in tears,

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which, I think I did,

I'm pretty sure that I cried as well

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but you can't look into

anybody's right to privacy

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or anything like that.

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At some hospitals like Ipswich

they say careful planning paid off

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and though staff were stretched,

they coped with the pressures.

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At times over the really busy

New Year period there were trolleys

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down the corridor here but at this

A&E unit things do seem to have

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calmed a little this week,

with fewer patients coming

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through the front door

of the hospital, though no-one's

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complacent about what the weeks

ahead may bring.

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The medical director told me that

flu was a significant concern.

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We've worked very well

to get our staff vaccinated

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but we're not at all complacent.

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I think the next two months

are going to be a challenging time.

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We are looking still to get flu

vaccinations for vulnerable

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patients and staff members

and the battle isn't over.

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And with the latest figures showing

the highest numbers of flu

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figures in seven years,

health leaders call for vaccinations

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for NHS staff to be compulsory.

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Some hospitals have greater

than 90% vaccinations

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for their health workers,

others less than 20%.

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This has to be an issue

of leadership but we need people

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in the health care sector

to protect their patients.

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We have a duty of care

to our patients.

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Flu's been an even bigger problem

for Scotland's hospitals,

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a teenager died after catching

the virus which developed

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into pneumonia.

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Scotland and Wales as well as

England have missed A&E

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waiting time targets.

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One answer, say the consultants

in their letter, is a big increase

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in social care funding to allow more

patients to leave hospitals to be

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cared for in the community.

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It's a debate gaining momentum

as the NHS's bleak winter continues.

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Hugh Pym, BBC News.

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Our Political Editor Laura

Kuenssberg is in Westminster.

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Certainly a very stark letter to the

Prime Minister from these very

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senior doctors. Politically, how

awkward is this for the government?

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This isn't the first government

that's had to grapple with these

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agonising pressures on the health

service in the winter and they are

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not the first government to have

been around and in charge when a

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conversation about the longer term

needs and sustainability of the NHS

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has done the rounds at this time of

year. However, there does seem to be

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something a bit different this year,

not just because of how stark

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warnings are, how awful the

experiences of some patients that

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are emerging have been, but because

there is a mood in the Tory party,

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the governing party, there are more

and more voices speaking out,

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raising the question of whether or

not the current model can last

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without some significant change.

Either in how we pay for it, or in a

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significant extra amount of cash

going in. Now Number Ten and number

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11 of course who are in charge of

the money, are not yet in a place

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either publicly or behind closed

doors where they would acknowledge

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that something does have to budge,

but it's well worth noting that the

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Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, who

remember Fort and won the battle to

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stay in his job this week, said MPs

in the House of Commons, not just

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that he would quite like to have a

10-year funding deal for the health

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service, but that in the coming

years significantly cash,

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significantly more money would have

to go into the health service. Now,

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plenty of debates and conversations

about the long-term model, should

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there be radical change, have

frankly hit the buffers, but there

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is a sense round here right now that

perhaps in the coming months the

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political pressure on the

government's position in the NHS is

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going to build and build and

something might have to give.

What

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the Prime Minister did want to talk

about today was in fact the

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environment?

yes, very telling.

Theresa May's first big speech of

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this first New Year was basically

her message to say, if you will want

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to go green, you have to vote blue.

She launched the government's big

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environmental plan to cover the next

25 years today. Top of her hit list,

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a crackdown on plastics, with the

environment now seeming to be one of

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her top political priorities.

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What do you think I should look for?

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A grand vision, we were promised,

a plan to look after the spaces

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around us for years to come,

and the Prime Minister trying

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to spot political opportunity, too.

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The environment is something

personal to each of us but is also

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something which collectively we hold

in trust for the next generation,

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and we have a responsibility

to protect and enhance it.

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Top of the list, cleaning

up plastics that harm

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wildlife on land and sea,

more charges for plastic bags,

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possible taxes on containers,

encouraging shops to use less.

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But over time, a long time, with no

new law to underline the change.

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In years to come, I think people

will be shocked at how today

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we allow so much plastic

to be produced needlessly.

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This truly is one of the great

environmental scourges of our time.

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So we will take action at every

stage of the production

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and consumption of plastic.

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You're talking about ideas that

will take place over 25 years

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with no legal guarantees.

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If actions speak louder than words,

do you really believe this problem

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is acute and urgent?

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This is an inspiring plan,

it is a long-term plan,

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it's about the next 25 years.

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But it's a plan that speaks

to everybody who has

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an interest in our environment.

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Everybody who wants to ensure that

future generations are able to enjoy

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a beautiful environment

and a beautiful place

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in which to live.

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Looking on, alongside

the white-faced whistling ducks,

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green campaigners pleased

there is a plan.

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But not quite convinced that

a government that also believes

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in fracking and building high-speed

rail really means it.

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The problem about talking

about a 25-year plan right now,

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in the absence of hard measures

about what they will do

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here and now, is this

is a government where most

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commentators question if it

will last 25 months,

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or possibly even 25 days.

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What we need is to know

what are the actions happening

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in 2018 to make a difference.

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Theresa May says conservation

and Conservatism have

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always gone hand in hand,

but this isn't just

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about principles, or policy,

or this new environment plan,

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it's also about politics and how

the Tories fell back

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at the general election.

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Anxious that millions of younger

voters turned to Labour then,

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the Tories have tried

to detox their image with those

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groups, greening their credentials,

banning microbeads, plans to end

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the sale of ivory.

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What does Labour make

of the plastics plan?

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25 years is far too long.

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The plastic culture

has to be challenged.

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The throw-away society culture has

to be challenged and the pollution

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of our rivers and our seas

by plastic waste is

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absolutely dreadful.

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The Prime Minister believes her

promise is the right one to make.

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Her hope - to create a habitat more

friendly to her political breed.

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Laura Kuenssberg, BBC News.

0:12:380:12:42

Our environment analyst

Roger Harrabin joins me now.

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Plastics and dealing with them is

what has grabbed the headlines, but

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what the Prime Minister announced

today was much broader and ambitious

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plans to improve our environment.

Its ironic she focused on plastics

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because that's one of the weakest

areas of the document she produced

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today. If she wants to be a world

leader in plastics, which she says

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she does, maybe someone should have

told her that Bangladesh banned

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plastic bags back in 2002. We are

lagging in the UK behind many

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African countries in that. Having

said that, she has set the tone for

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government, one that we haven't seen

before. Ministers have been nervous

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about talking about the environment.

The plan itself is in many ways

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really quite radical. It talks about

not just holding the environment

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study, which governments have tried

to do before, but actually improving

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it, improving wild flowers, which

are almost down to 2% now of their

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previous range, in improving forests

and rivers, perhaps bringing more

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greenery back to people's

playgrounds, children's playgrounds,

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bringing the environment into

people's lives. All that looks

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radical. Some caveats. Nothing on

how they will reduce CO2 emissions

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in line with the Paris agreement and

that crucial caveat, no underpinning

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by law, no firm policies, no money,

nice pictures of bunnies but it

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could be on the shelf within a year.

Roger Harrabin, thank you.

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A brief look at some of the day's

other other news stories.

0:14:130:14:15

The former Ukip leader Nigel Farage

says he's on the verge of supporting

0:14:150:14:18

a second referendum on Britain's

membership of the European Union.

0:14:180:14:21

He said a second vote to leave

could "kill off" the Remain

0:14:210:14:23

campaign for a generation.

0:14:230:14:25

He said he thought the leave vote

would be even higher

0:14:250:14:27

if there were another poll.

0:14:270:14:30

The Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson

has joined with other

0:14:300:14:32

European foreign ministers to call

on Donald Trump not to reintroduce

0:14:320:14:35

sanctions against Iran.

0:14:350:14:38

Mr Johnson said the current

arrangement was the best way

0:14:380:14:41

of stopping Iran acquiring nuclear

weapons, and no one had yet come up

0:14:410:14:45

with a better diplomatic solution.

0:14:450:14:49

Dominic Chappell, who was in charge

of BHS when it went bust in 2016,

0:14:490:14:53

has been found guilty on three

charges of failing to provide

0:14:530:14:56

information demanded

by the Pensions Regulator.

0:14:560:14:59

The scheme had 19,000

members and a shortfall

0:14:590:15:02

of £571 million when BHS collapsed.

0:15:020:15:06

He'll be sentenced at a later date.

0:15:060:15:09

Lingerie company Rigby & Peller said

it was "deeply saddened"

0:15:090:15:12

at losing its most prestigious

customer - the Queen.

0:15:120:15:15

It had held the royal

warrant since 1960.

0:15:150:15:19

But the decision to cancel it came

after the retailer's

0:15:190:15:21

director wrote a book -

Storm In A D-Cup -

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revealing details of life

inside Buckingham Palace.

0:15:280:15:30

Shares in Marks and Spencer dropped

sharply today after the retailer

0:15:300:15:33

posted disappointing Christmas

results, with falls in both

0:15:330:15:35

food and clothing sales.

0:15:350:15:36

But there was good news for Tesco

and for some more recent arrivals

0:15:360:15:40

on the retail scene,

as our Business Correspondent

0:15:400:15:42

Emma Simpson reports.

0:15:420:15:50

The show's over, we've moved

on, but the Christmas

0:15:500:15:52

story for retailers is only

now becoming clear.

0:15:520:15:55

So who are some of

the winners and losers?

0:15:550:16:00

Tesco's done well with sales

up today, so have many

0:16:000:16:02

of the other grocers.

0:16:020:16:04

But food sales, usually a bright

spot for Marks & Spencer,

0:16:040:16:09

went into reverse, and there have

been profit warnings at Debenhams,

0:16:090:16:12

Mothercare and Moss Bros.

0:16:120:16:14

Things are certainly

more challenging here on

0:16:140:16:16

the High Street.

0:16:160:16:18

Take House of Fraser,

a business under pressure,

0:16:180:16:21

it saw another fall in sales today.

0:16:210:16:27

And you don't have to go far to see

how the gap between the weaker and

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the stronger players is widening.

0:16:310:16:34

Here at John Lewis,

it had no problems.

0:16:340:16:37

Pulling customers in.

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It's one of the winners today.

0:16:380:16:43

There's a sort of slight air

of caution about people's attitudes.

0:16:430:16:45

They're not coming in for all sorts.

0:16:450:16:47

For perfectly

understandable reasons.

0:16:470:16:51

But there is demand there, you just

have to go and find it and you have

0:16:510:16:54

to create the conditions where

people want things and of course

0:16:540:16:57

that comes to down to

having fabulous products.

0:16:570:16:59

And it actually means

you have to be outstanding

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at online and shops.

0:17:010:17:03

Boohoo is a small but

fast-growing online retailer,

0:17:030:17:05

which is doing very

nicely without shops.

0:17:050:17:07

...And is expecting to grow

sales by 90% this year.

0:17:070:17:13

But some are predicting

problems for the High

0:17:130:17:17

Street ahead.

0:17:170:17:21

This is going to be the year

of retail distress.

0:17:210:17:24

We've already seen bits

of distress percolating through

0:17:240:17:28

even before Christmas and I think

that the weaker players are going to

0:17:280:17:31

find it too tough to really survive.

0:17:310:17:34

It's been a season of mixed

fortunes for retailers.

0:17:340:17:40

The New Year heralds

the clearance sales and some

0:17:400:17:44

uncertainty about

what 2018 will bring.

0:17:440:17:49

Emma Simpson, BBC News.

0:17:490:17:53

Hundreds of rescuers

are using helicopters,

0:17:530:17:55

search dogs and thermal imaging

equipment to try to find 8 people

0:17:550:17:58

who are still missing in California

after the devastating

0:17:580:18:00

mudslides on Tuesday.

0:18:000:18:03

17 people are known to have died

after a torrent of mud carrying

0:18:030:18:06

boulders the size of small cars

smashed through the

0:18:060:18:08

town of Montecito.

0:18:080:18:09

More than 500 homes have been

damaged or destroyed.

0:18:090:18:11

James Cook is there for us.

0:18:110:18:19

James? Yes, Sophie, we have details,

in the past few seconds, the police

0:18:190:18:27

released the name of all 17 of those

who confirmeded to have died.

0:18:270:18:32

Including four children, aged,

three, six, attendant twelve and the

0:18:320:18:36

oldest person to have been killed so

far, an 89-year-old man. There seems

0:18:360:18:42

little hope of finding more

survivors from the terrible tragedy.

0:18:420:18:46

We've been getting details about the

harrowing moment when the mud

0:18:460:18:50

landslide roared down this mountain

in the dead of night.

0:18:500:18:55

Turn around!

0:18:550:18:56

The flash flood is right there!

0:18:560:18:58

Get out of here, go!

0:18:580:18:59

This was the moment it began.

0:18:590:19:00

Oh, my God, Mom!

0:19:000:19:01

And then panic.

0:19:010:19:03

Close the door!

0:19:030:19:09

It was a million miles

an hour in slow motion,

0:19:090:19:11

if that makes sense.

0:19:110:19:13

I clicked into survival

gear, survival mode.

0:19:130:19:16

Wake Dad up!

0:19:160:19:20

Every second, it is just roaring

and banging against the house

0:19:200:19:22

and the most vicious and violent

sounds you have ever heard.

0:19:220:19:28

Montecito is only just beginning

to grasp the scale of the disaster

0:19:280:19:30

which will bear its name.

0:19:300:19:32

For this idyllic little town

of just 9000 people,

0:19:320:19:35

recovery will be long and hard.

0:19:350:19:41

People walked their dogs

through here, there are trails,

0:19:410:19:43

my kids have grown

up riding their bikes.

0:19:430:19:46

Noelle Strogoff fled with her three

children just before the storm.

0:19:460:19:49

But many of her neighbours did not.

0:19:490:19:52

Two young boys were swept

out of their home,

0:19:520:19:57

along with their mother

in the middle of the night.

0:19:570:19:59

And the dog is gone.

0:19:590:20:01

And they're lucky to be fine.

0:20:010:20:03

It is like a war zone here.

0:20:030:20:06

There are homes that

are just missing.

0:20:060:20:08

And I walk down the street

and I see balls, and toys,

0:20:080:20:11

and bicycles and shoes and socks.

0:20:110:20:12

And knives and hammers.

0:20:120:20:13

It's like people's lives are just

washed to the ocean.

0:20:130:20:21

Much of that debris ended up

clogging the main coastal motorway.

0:20:210:20:23

We were told the people

in this car escaped.

0:20:230:20:26

Above the town, the scorched hills

are scarred by rivers of mud.

0:20:260:20:30

Well, the mudslide came

roaring down here,

0:20:300:20:35

sweeping everything before it

and if you want to know how houses

0:20:350:20:38

can be swept from their foundations

so easily, well, this is the answer.

0:20:380:20:44

Just look at the size

of the boulders that were pushed

0:20:440:20:49

down from the mountains.

0:20:490:20:52

To drive through this little town

is to be stunned by the

0:20:520:20:55

power of this mudslide.

0:20:550:20:58

Southern California

was once famed for its

0:20:580:21:02

agreeable climate.

0:21:020:21:03

These days, it reels

from drought, fire and flood.

0:21:030:21:05

James Cook, BBC News, Montecito.

0:21:050:21:13

Personality disorder -

it affects more than three million

0:21:130:21:16

people in the UK and costs the NHS

around £10 billion a year.

0:21:160:21:19

Now health professionals

are demanding better access

0:21:190:21:20

to treatment for those affected

saying that one in 10 people

0:21:200:21:23

diagnosed with it end up

taking their own lives.

0:21:230:21:25

Our Home Editor Mark Easton reports.

0:21:250:21:33

I'd seen bar codes on the back of my

victim's neck, that were sending

0:21:370:21:43

messages to me, telling me to poison

her.

0:21:430:21:46

It was only when Kathleen was moved

from a mental clinic, after being

0:21:460:21:53

accused of trying to poison a work

colleague, she was finally diagnosed

0:21:530:21:57

with a mental disorder.

It is one of the darkest places in

0:21:570:22:01

my head, I have ever been. I would

have preferred death to that.

0:22:010:22:07

Kathleen tried to control a lifetime

of chronic self-harm and suicidal

0:22:070:22:12

thoughts, she is not cured. But part

of her therapy is helping the NHS

0:22:120:22:19

getting people with personality

disorder into treatment.

0:22:190:22:22

People are waiting months and months

and months for treatment and these

0:22:220:22:26

people are dying waiting, Mark.

Because they could kill themselves?

0:22:260:22:30

It has happened to a lot of my

friends, I'm afraid.

0:22:300:22:34

What is a personality disorder? A

mental diagnosis with two common

0:22:340:22:40

types, border line or emotional

unstable personality disorder,

0:22:400:22:47

involving disturbed ways of thinking

and problem in solving emotion, Many

0:22:470:22:52

kill themselves. Anti-social

personality disorder disorder is

0:22:520:22:57

similar. Around 70% of the prison

population are thought to have PD. A

0:22:570:23:03

decade ago, mental health

campaigners were trying to convince

0:23:030:23:08

that personality disorder existed,

even now some psychiatrists question

0:23:080:23:14

if it is a mental illness. But there

is a big change on the estimated

0:23:140:23:20

three million people with the

disorder should get.

0:23:200:23:23

Sometimes it may be appropriate...

This treatment in group in wind

0:23:230:23:27

isson agreed to let us witness the

way that therapy helps them deal

0:23:270:23:34

with problematic behaviour, linked

to a past trauma.

0:23:340:23:38

Passively suicidal all the time.

You

are self-destructive and push

0:23:380:23:43

everyone away.

It's been a lifetime of depression,

0:23:430:23:50

trauma, sexual abuse, rape...

You

lose a sense of wanting to survive.

0:23:500:23:56

Sometimes doing the simple things

can be the hardest thing in the

0:23:560:23:59

world. You can't help it sometimes.

Unfortunately, people with

0:23:590:24:04

personality disorder, what hits the

headlines is often violent

0:24:040:24:08

behaviour.

They see them as bad people?

0:24:080:24:10

Absolutely. That then adds to the

problem of those people are not

0:24:100:24:16

offered the treatment that they may

need.

They are, I think, the most

0:24:160:24:21

let down group of people within the

NHS.

Today in the Houses of

0:24:210:24:27

Parliament, campaigners and health

professionals launched a consensus

0:24:270:24:31

statement, demanding help for people

with PD. NHS England says getting

0:24:310:24:36

people the help that they need close

to home is at the heart of their

0:24:360:24:40

plans.

We need early intervention asking

0:24:400:24:43

people when younger, what happened

to you, how can we help? Giving them

0:24:430:24:48

tools and skills to help them manage

their live, emotions and

0:24:480:24:52

relationships.

Like Katherine and others diagnosed

0:24:520:24:57

with it, personality disorder does

not conform to traditional labels.

0:24:570:25:02

It causes untold misery and country

beauties to countless tragic early

0:25:020:25:06

deaths. It is surely time we helped

to understand it better.

0:25:060:25:10

It is surely time we helped

to understand it better.

0:25:100:25:12

Details of organisations offering

information and support with mental

0:25:120:25:14

health are available at:

bbc.co.uk/actionline,

0:25:140:25:16

or you can call for free on:

08000 564 756.

0:25:160:25:23

YouTube has cut business ties

with the video blogger Logan Paul -

0:25:230:25:27

after he posted video appearing

to show the body

0:25:270:25:29

of a suicide victim.

0:25:290:25:31

Logan Paul, whose channel has

15 million subscribers,

0:25:310:25:33

subsequently apologised

for the video, which was filmed

0:25:330:25:36

on a location in Japan.

0:25:360:25:39

Here's our Media Editor Amol Rajan.

0:25:390:25:45

We're going to take a break

from vlogging and take

0:25:450:25:48

a break from each other.

0:25:480:25:51

Low budget, confessional and often

astonishingly popular.

0:25:510:25:53

This couple announced

they were breaking up on YouTube

0:25:530:25:57

in a video seen 15 million times.

0:25:570:26:01

If I can do it, you

can do it, for sure.

0:26:010:26:03

They're part of a phenomenon called

vlogging, or video blogging,

0:26:030:26:06

very often on Google-owned YouTube.

0:26:060:26:11

This 21st-century cottage industry

has created a vast new fleet

0:26:110:26:14

of online celebrities.

0:26:140:26:19

Many vloggers have a committed

following among those

0:26:190:26:22

aged between 18 and 34 -

a demographic prized by advertisers.

0:26:220:26:24

Vloggers like Logan Paul.

0:26:240:26:26

The 22-year-old American

is a YouTube star - or was.

0:26:260:26:33

I think this definitely marks

a moment in YouTube history.

0:26:330:26:37

This morning, YouTube cut

business ties with him

0:26:370:26:39

after he naively posted a video

from Japan's Aokigahara forest,

0:26:390:26:42

infamous as a suicide spot.

0:26:420:26:46

Paul issued an apology to his 15

million subscribers on YouTube.

0:26:460:26:49

I have made a severe and continuous

lapse of my judgment and I don't

0:26:490:26:52

expect to be forgiven.

0:26:520:26:56

I'm simply here to apologise.

0:26:560:26:58

YouTube declined to be interviewed.

0:26:580:27:00

In a statement, they said: It's

taken us a long time to respond,

0:27:000:27:03

but we've been listening

to everything you've been saying.

0:27:030:27:05

We know that the actions

of one creator can affect

0:27:050:27:08

the entire community.

0:27:080:27:10

Vlogging is now a hugely profitable

business with the likes

0:27:100:27:13

of Logan Paul making vast sums

of money in a variety of ways.

0:27:130:27:18

They get paid between £1

and £3 per 1000 clicks

0:27:180:27:21

and can top up their income

through merchandising

0:27:210:27:23

and deals with brands.

0:27:230:27:27

And they do all of that

without the more stringent controls

0:27:270:27:30

applied to traditional media.

0:27:300:27:31

OK, rolling that.

0:27:310:27:34

Licensed broadcasters in Britain

are regulated by Ofcom

0:27:340:27:36

and have to vet material

before publishing it.

0:27:360:27:38

Vloggers however face

no such constraints.

0:27:380:27:42

They are only censored

after the event.

0:27:420:27:44

The boss of Britain's

biggest media agency wants

0:27:440:27:46

to see smarter regulation.

0:27:460:27:50

I would definitely like to see

vloggers with this much reach

0:27:500:27:53

and this much influence

to have the sorts of regulation that

0:27:530:27:55

traditional broadcasters have

to adhere to, particularly around

0:27:550:27:59

content that can be dangerous,

can be glamorising or condoning

0:27:590:28:03

anti-social behaviour,

dangerous behaviour,

0:28:030:28:06

that can be copied by children.

0:28:060:28:11

I'm going to be the biggest

entertainer on the planet.

0:28:110:28:14

Logan Paul and his ilk portend

a new kind of celebrity -

0:28:140:28:17

one that is intimate,

incessant and ever more devotional.

0:28:170:28:20

For all of the glory of the open

web, the danger is that his kind

0:28:200:28:24

of immaturity exposes

audiences to material that's

0:28:240:28:26

in nobody's interest.

0:28:260:28:28

I'm just getting warmed up.

0:28:280:28:31

Amol Rajan, BBC News.

0:28:310:28:34

The Hollywood film director

Steven Spielberg says he believes

0:28:340:28:36

the Trump administration

is using the same tactics

0:28:360:28:38

as President Nixon to "try

to silence the press."

0:28:380:28:40

Tomorrow sees the release

of his latest film 'The Post',

0:28:400:28:42

which tells the story of the leaking

of the classified Pentagon papers -

0:28:420:28:45

to American journalists -

during the Vietnam war.

0:28:450:28:47

Here's our Arts Editor,

Will Gompertz.

0:28:470:28:55

This is a devastating security

breach that was leaked

0:28:550:28:58

out of the Pentagon.

0:28:580:28:59

Before the Watergate Scandal,

there were the Pentagon Papers.

0:28:590:29:01

The first expose of a cover-up

in the Nixon government

0:29:010:29:04

by the Washington Post,

led by its legendary editor Ben

0:29:040:29:08

Bradlee and publisher Kay Graham.

0:29:080:29:12

Do you have the papers?

0:29:120:29:15

Set in 1971.

0:29:150:29:17

Yes.

0:29:170:29:19

But you have described

it as a timely movie.

0:29:190:29:21

Well, obviously you just flip the 1

and the 7, or the 7 and the 1,

0:29:210:29:25

and you really get to see the great

arc of the pendulum that has brought

0:29:250:29:28

us right back to the same tactics

that Richard Nixon used

0:29:280:29:31

to try to silence the press.

0:29:310:29:33

I'm talking about the current

administration and their absolute

0:29:330:29:35

broadsiding of media,

social media, news,

0:29:350:29:37

anybody that offends.

0:29:370:29:45

You know, there is a label

that is immediately attached

0:29:470:29:52

to them, which is called,

well, that can't be true,

0:29:520:29:55

because they're all fake news.

0:29:560:29:58

I mean, it's a lot more

insidious today, by the way,

0:29:580:30:00

than it was in 1971.

0:30:000:30:01

If you publish, we'll be

in the Supreme Court next week.

0:30:010:30:04

Meaning?

0:30:040:30:05

We could all go to prison.

0:30:050:30:09

There's been another massive press

expose in the last six months,

0:30:090:30:11

which is what looks like the endemic

sexual harassment and exploitation

0:30:110:30:19

which is, what looks

like the endemic sexual

0:30:190:30:21

harassment and exploitation

0:30:210:30:22

of women in Hollywood.

0:30:220:30:23

I mean, you're a really senior

figure in Hollywood and you've

0:30:230:30:25

been around a long time.

0:30:250:30:28

Do you ever think, you know what,

I think I could have done

0:30:280:30:31

a bit more to stop this?

0:30:310:30:33

Well, you know, I can only basically

react to that question

0:30:330:30:36

within my own workplace environment.

0:30:360:30:38

Within my organisation,

there weren't incidences,

0:30:380:30:40

except for just a couple of years

and years ago, that I would say

0:30:400:30:43

gave me the experiences to be

the authority on that

0:30:430:30:46

question you ask.

0:30:460:30:47

What happened in those incidences?

0:30:470:30:49

There were just

a couple of incidences.

0:30:490:30:51

I don't go into detail on them,

but they happened years

0:30:510:30:53

and years ago, where we had

to let somebody go.

0:30:530:30:56

People are concerned about having

a woman in charge of the paper.

0:30:560:30:59

That she doesn't have the resolve

to make the tough choices.

0:30:590:31:03

Thank you for your frankness.

0:31:030:31:06

My prediction is that this

watershed moment for women,

0:31:060:31:10

in extolling the courage of women

who, like Katherine Graham,

0:31:100:31:13

with the Pentagon Papers,

and with her decision to publish

0:31:130:31:15

or not to publish, so many women

have found their voices

0:31:150:31:19

and they have been given

so much support.

0:31:190:31:22

Not just by other women,

but also by certain men.

0:31:220:31:26

I think this is not just

another news cycle.

0:31:260:31:32

I think this is not just

another news cycle,

0:31:320:31:34

I think this is a permanent

change in the culture.

0:31:340:31:37

Maybe.

0:31:370:31:38

But as Kay Graham showed

with her courageous leadership

0:31:380:31:40

of the Washington Post,

exposing deeply rooted corrupt

0:31:400:31:42

behaviour is one thing -

changing it is quite another.

0:31:420:31:44

Will Gompertz, BBC News.

0:31:440:32:05