09/03/2018 BBC News at Ten


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


09/03/2018

The latest national and international news, with reports from BBC correspondents worldwide.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 09/03/2018. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

The army on the streets

of Salisbury, as specialist troops

0:00:020:00:04

arrive to deal with the scene

of the nerve agent attack.

0:00:040:00:08

Military equipment and personnel

trained in chemical warfare

0:00:080:00:10

make an unusual sight

in the cathedral city.

0:00:100:00:16

They have the detection equipment

that will allow them to properly,

0:00:160:00:22

safely a very detail

survey of those areas.

0:00:220:00:24

And if there is any contamination,

they can then safely remove

0:00:240:00:27

that and have it destroyed.

0:00:270:00:28

A forensic team examine the grave

of the son of Sergei Skripal,

0:00:280:00:32

the former Russian spy

who was targeted in the attack.

0:00:320:00:37

Tonight, he and his daughter

are still critically ill.

0:00:370:00:39

The people of Salisbury

are urged to stay calm.

0:00:390:00:41

Also tonight:

0:00:410:00:42

After the insults, a surprise

meeting is to take place

0:00:420:00:45

between President Trump

and the leader of North Korea.

0:00:450:00:48

A court sees the contents

of the bomb that partially exploded

0:00:480:00:56

in a Tube carriage in London last

September.

0:00:560:00:58

Why increasing numbers of young

British Muslim women are deciding

0:00:580:01:00

to wear a headscarf.

0:01:000:01:05

And banging the drum

for Great Britain -

0:01:050:01:07

our athletes arrive in South Korea

for the biggest ever

0:01:070:01:10

Paralympic Games.

0:01:100:01:11

Coming up on Sportsday on BBC News.

0:01:110:01:12

We'll preview the penultimate

weekend of the Six Nations,

0:01:120:01:15

which could prove pivotal

to Ireland as they attempt

0:01:150:01:17

to win the title again.

0:01:170:01:24

Good evening.

0:01:390:01:42

These are the scenes that greeted

the people of Salisbury today

0:01:420:01:45

as just under 200 military personnel

arrived in the city

0:01:450:01:48

and onto the streets.

0:01:480:01:51

Specialist troops, with training

in chemical warfare,

0:01:510:01:53

will be working in the area

where the former Russian agent

0:01:530:01:59

Sergei Skripal and his daughter

Yulia collapsed on Sunday.

0:01:590:02:00

Forensic examinations are also

taking place at the cemetery

0:02:000:02:04

at the gravestone of Skripal's son,

Alexander, who reportedly died

0:02:040:02:07

of liver problems at the age of 43.

0:02:070:02:09

The Home Secretary will chair

another meeting of the Government's

0:02:090:02:12

emergency Cobra committee tomorrow.

0:02:120:02:15

Our home affairs correspondent,

Tom Symonds, reports from Salisbury.

0:02:150:02:18

It began with unprotected police

officers dealing with

0:02:180:02:21

an unexplained medical emergency.

0:02:210:02:27

This evening, the military

was called in at Salisbury Hospital.

0:02:270:02:35

Troops, trained to tackle chemical

warfare, supporting a British

0:02:370:02:39

police investigation.

0:02:390:02:40

Their mission includes securing

possibly contaminated evidence -

0:02:400:02:42

painstaking work.

0:02:420:02:43

The stakes are high.

0:02:430:02:44

As Ministry of Defence we have been

supporting the police

0:02:440:02:46

in their investigations

through the work of military

0:02:460:02:48

scientists at Porton Down.

0:02:480:02:49

We will continue to do that.

0:02:490:02:51

Another task - dealing

with contaminated vehicles.

0:02:510:02:55

This police car may have been driven

to the hospital after the incident.

0:02:550:02:58

180 troops will be involved in this

phase of the investigation.

0:02:580:03:03

They have all the chemical agent

monitors, the personal

0:03:030:03:11

protective equipment,

respirators etc that allow them

0:03:130:03:15

to safely, and they will probably

take this kit to Porton Down

0:03:150:03:17

or perhaps Winterbourne Gunner,

where it can be

0:03:170:03:19

decontaminated effectively.

0:03:190:03:21

They're also expected to secure

Sergei Skripal's car

0:03:210:03:23

and there are ambulances which may

have traces of the nerve agent.

0:03:230:03:28

Across the city, scenes that might

have come from a disaster movie.

0:03:280:03:33

This is just a graveyard,

but it contains the graves

0:03:330:03:35

of Sergei Skripal's wife and his son

Alexander.

0:03:350:03:37

He died last year.

0:03:370:03:41

Again, no official

explanation for all this.

0:03:410:03:45

The dates on Alexander's

grave may be relevant.

0:03:450:03:47

Last week, before

the nerve agent attack,

0:03:470:03:48

was the anniversary of his birth.

0:03:480:03:50

Did his father and sister visit

the grave at some point?

0:03:500:03:56

The Home Secretary was the first

senior government representative

0:03:560:03:59

to come to Salisbury this morning.

0:03:590:04:01

Ministers have stressed

the importance of getting

0:04:010:04:04

to the bottom of the alleged plot

before pointing fingers.

0:04:040:04:12

She met and praised those

who've helped the victims

0:04:120:04:15

and decontaminated the area,

including these firefighters.

0:04:150:04:16

I am in awe of their sympathetic

approach and professionalism

0:04:160:04:19

as they engage with these people.

0:04:190:04:23

And now as they reflect,

they are quite concerned sometimes

0:04:230:04:27

for themselves and their families,

but they've all said to me

0:04:270:04:29

that they wouldn't have done

anything differently.

0:04:290:04:31

Then to the hospital,

continuing to provide the highest

0:04:310:04:34

level of care to three victims.

0:04:340:04:37

Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey,

exposed to nerve agent

0:04:370:04:39

during the incident,

is now making good progress.

0:04:390:04:43

He's an officer who has

been widely praised.

0:04:430:04:46

Always really easy to speak

to and he delivers effectively

0:04:460:04:53

and efficiently and he's always got

this sense of humour around him,

0:04:530:04:56

so he does it easily and nothing

is ever too much trouble for him.

0:04:560:05:00

Sergei Skripal remains

in a critical condition.

0:05:000:05:01

His daughter Yulia the same,

but she is responding

0:05:010:05:03

better to treatment.

0:05:030:05:05

Salisbury has become

a multi-location crime scene,

0:05:050:05:09

a city of disturbing images

and unanswered questions.

0:05:090:05:12

Who wanted to kill them?

0:05:120:05:13

Why? How did they do it?

0:05:130:05:15

What will happen next?

0:05:150:05:18

Tonight the evidence

is being gathered.

0:05:180:05:22

Tom Symonds, BBC News, Salisbury.

0:05:220:05:26

Sergei Skripal is still fighting

for his life in hospital

0:05:260:05:29

alongside his daughter Yulia.

0:05:290:05:31

He came to the UK in 2008 as part

of a spy swap with Russia.

0:05:310:05:35

But what led him to betray his

country and seek refuge here?

0:05:350:05:38

Our security correspondent,

Gordon Corera, has been given

0:05:380:05:40

exclusive access to details

and photos from his past.

0:05:400:05:48

The man behind the story. Friend of

Sergei Skripal have provided the BBC

0:05:480:05:53

with the first detailed account of

his life, including these personal

0:05:530:05:56

pictures. Here Skripal is in the

centre with his daughter Yulia, just

0:05:560:06:01

after her birth in 1984. Both are

now fighting for their lives.

0:06:010:06:07

Skripal

0:06:070:06:12

Skripal was grew up listening to the

world service on the radio. He

0:06:140:06:20

joined the eairborne troop and

became a charm beyondship army

0:06:200:06:23

boxer. This was him a few years

later with colleagues serving in

0:06:230:06:27

central Asia. When Soviet troops

went into Afghanistan in 1979, he

0:06:270:06:31

was among the first to go in. Soon

after he was talented spotted by the

0:06:310:06:37

GRU military intelligence. He served

undercover in Europe twice in the

0:06:370:06:43

80s and the 90s. It's during that

time it's thought hes with

0:06:430:06:47

approached by British intelligence

to spy for them. In 2004 he was

0:06:470:06:54

arrested, friends say his shoulder

was wrenched out of its socket in

0:06:540:06:59

the process. He was sentenced to 13

years in a labour camp but in 2010

0:06:590:07:07

he was released as part of a spy

swap. He had dreamed of ice-cream

0:07:070:07:12

and it was the first thing he asked

for on his release. He was reunited

0:07:120:07:16

with his wife and they began to

rebuild a life in Salisbury shech

0:07:160:07:21

grew roses while he liked to

barbecue sausages. It was short

0:07:210:07:26

lived. In 2012 she died of cancer.

Friends told the BBC he spent his

0:07:260:07:34

time playing World War II tank games

on his computer and visiting local

0:07:340:07:37

military museums. The BBC

understands from friends that during

0:07:370:07:41

his time in the labour camp Skripal

would imagine being a home in his

0:07:410:07:44

mind. They say they hope he'll be

using the same trick now as he

0:07:440:07:49

fights for his life. Gordon Corera,

BBC News.

0:07:490:07:56

Our home affairs correspondent, Tom

Symonds, is in Salisbury for us now.

0:07:560:07:59

An extraordinary week in Salisbury,

what can people expect to see

0:07:590:08:01

in the next few days or weeks?

0:08:010:08:05

Well here more evidence gathering.

That's going to take days and

0:08:050:08:08

possibly weeks. I think we can

expect that this process will go on

0:08:080:08:13

and on. There are going to be no

quick, easy answers. The Litvinenko

0:08:130:08:18

case took years to get to the bottom

of. I don't think we can expect the

0:08:180:08:23

police to give what they often call

a "running commentary" on their

0:08:230:08:28

progress. Ministers will be watching

them every step of the way. There is

0:08:280:08:33

a meeting of the Government's Cobra

emergency committee tomorrow.

0:08:330:08:36

Ministers say we can expect tough

action once they get to the bottom

0:08:360:08:40

of what this was all about. Of

course the big question is - will

0:08:400:08:43

the finger be pointed at Russia?

Fiona.

Tom Symonds in Salisbury.

0:08:430:08:51

Thank you.

0:08:510:08:59

The Old Dotard is to

meet Little Rocket Man.

0:08:590:09:01

President Trump has agreed to meet

the North Korean leader Kim Jong-un

0:09:010:09:04

in a surprise move after months

of tension and name calling.

0:09:040:09:07

But the White House added tonight

that no meeting could take

0:09:070:09:09

place until North Korea

takes concrete action.

0:09:090:09:11

South Korea claims that Kim Jong-un

is committed to denuclearisation

0:09:110:09:13

and an end to nuclear

and missile tests.

0:09:130:09:15

Our North America correspondent,

Nick Bryant, reports.

0:09:150:09:18

Like the kid who couldn't keep the

secret. Donald Trump slipped into

0:09:180:09:21

the White House press room and told

reporters to expect a huge statement

0:09:210:09:26

on a big subject.

Here we go, here

we go.

Sure enough, a delegation

0:09:260:09:31

from South Korea soon stepped before

the microphones to make one of the

0:09:310:09:36

most jaw dropping diplomatic

announcements in decades. After

0:09:360:09:39

delivering to the President a

personal message from Kim Jong-un.

0:09:390:09:45

He expressed his eagerness to meet

President Trump as soon as possible.

0:09:450:09:51

President Trump appreciated the

briefing and said he would meet Kim

0:09:510:09:58

Jong-un by May to achieve permanent

denuclearisation.

Prior to arriving

0:09:580:10:03

in Washington, they had held a

meeting in Pyongyang with Kim

0:10:030:10:07

Jong-un offering a warm hand of

friendship rather than rattling his

0:10:070:10:12

usual sabre. On state TV the

soundtrack doubled as diplomatic

0:10:120:10:19

mood music because the North Korean

leader offered to abandon his

0:10:190:10:25

nuclear arsenal in return for if

security guarantees in the United

0:10:250:10:29

States. Kim Jong-un sent them off

not just with a wave, but an

0:10:290:10:33

invitation to Mr Trump the most

improbable of overtures. Donald

0:10:330:10:40

Trump abreed to the invitation

instantly, apparently without

0:10:400:10:44

pre-conditions, without even con

youing aides. Perhaps that explains

0:10:440:10:49

the confusion at the White House

with aides playing catch-up and

0:10:490:10:53

demanding actions by North Korea

before the summit can take place.

0:10:530:10:56

President will not have the meeting

without seeing concrete steps and

0:10:560:11:00

concrete actions take place by North

Korea. So the President would

0:11:000:11:04

actually be getting something.

Frankly, the world would be getting

0:11:040:11:06

something.

North Korea's nuclear and

missile capability has posed the

0:11:060:11:12

toughest foreign policy dilemma for

successive administrations. US

0:11:120:11:16

presidents have turned down offers

of face-to-face meetings. Only

0:11:160:11:21

yesterday America's top diplomat

ruled out directing talks with any

0:11:210:11:25

US officials.

In terms of direct

talks with the United States and US

0:11:250:11:31

negotiations, we're a long way from

negotiations.

What the White House

0:11:310:11:34

is certain is about that the

President's tough talk has exerted

0:11:340:11:38

maximum pressure on Pyongyang.

They

will be met with fire and fury like

0:11:380:11:44

the world has never seen. Rocket Man

is on a suicide mission for himself

0:11:440:11:51

and for his regime.

This is a huge

gamble which offers Pyongyang a

0:11:510:11:58

propaganda coup without much ground

work and wouft a guarantee of

0:11:580:12:01

success. All of Donald Trump's

presidential predecessors have

0:12:010:12:06

failed to halt North Korea's nuclear

programme, so perhaps it's worth

0:12:060:12:10

this dramatic new gesture. Two

leaders dealing with what is

0:12:100:12:16

potentially the world's most

combustible problem. Diplomacy akin

0:12:160:12:19

to a Las Vegas title fight. The

international summit of the century.

0:12:190:12:24

Nick Bryant, BBC News, Washington.

0:12:240:12:29

Today's announcement follows

something of a thaw in relations

0:12:290:12:31

between North and South Korea,

that saw them march under a single

0:12:310:12:34

flag at the Winter Olympics.

0:12:340:12:36

The South Korean President,

Moon Jae-in says the planned meeting

0:12:360:12:38

is "like a miracle."

0:12:380:12:39

But how has the news gone down

in the capital, Seoul?

0:12:390:12:42

Laura Bicker has been finding out.

0:12:420:12:44

For months, Seoul wondered

if it faced the prospect

0:12:440:12:46

of war once again.

0:12:460:12:49

Today, it woke to better news.

0:12:490:12:54

The prospect of a stunning Trump/Kim

summit has turned an impending

0:12:540:12:56

crisis into an opportunity.

0:12:560:13:04

The horror of the Korean War

is not forgotten here.

0:13:040:13:07

The fighting ended

with no peace treaty.

0:13:070:13:12

Now future generations hope

these talks will prevent

0:13:120:13:14

further confrontation.

0:13:140:13:15

TRANSLATION:

I think this

will be a turning point,

0:13:150:13:18

and through this our future children

will benefit from living in a more

0:13:180:13:23

free and peaceful world.

0:13:230:13:27

TRANSLATION:

I think it is a good

thing for both countries,

0:13:270:13:32

and as a South Korean citizen,

it's good that the threat of war has

0:13:320:13:35

reduced, even by a little.

0:13:350:13:39

TRANSLATION:

Even if things turn out

well, it won't benefit

0:13:390:13:41

the people in North Korea.

0:13:410:13:44

In the past, when the South Korean

President provided aid

0:13:440:13:47

to North Korea, I heard almost none

of it went to the common people.

0:13:470:13:50

So I don't think it's

going to turn out well.

0:13:500:13:55

Decades of distrust and suspicion

divide North and South.

0:13:550:13:58

People have learned that

hope can be a bad thing.

0:13:580:14:01

I'm told it's hard to tell

what is real progress

0:14:010:14:04

and what is propaganda.

0:14:040:14:06

A strong word of caution.

0:14:060:14:08

The road ahead is very long,

very complicated, very complex,

0:14:080:14:12

and there's no guarantee

that the North will ever

0:14:120:14:16

give up its nuclear

weapons easily, if at all.

0:14:160:14:20

These talks are a huge

political gamble.

0:14:200:14:21

Presidents Moon and Trump could be

being played by Pyongyang,

0:14:210:14:25

or this peninsula could be

on the verge of something it's been

0:14:250:14:29

searching for for nearly seven

decades, a peace treaty.

0:14:290:14:35

This statue portrays two

brothers divided by the war,

0:14:350:14:39

in a last, desperate embrace.

0:14:390:14:41

There's a sense of cautious optimism

that this unresolved conflict

0:14:410:14:45

could now have a happier ending.

0:14:450:14:48

Laura Bicker, BBC News, Seoul.

0:14:480:14:53

In a moment, we'll speak

to Nick Bryant at the White House,

0:14:530:14:56

but first Laura Bicker joins

us from Seoul.

0:14:560:15:00

It's an extraordinary diplomatic

turnaround to move the US

0:15:000:15:01

and North Korea from trading insults

to having a meeting.

0:15:010:15:04

How did South Korea pull this off?

0:15:040:15:12

I think we have lost Laura in Seoul.

We will go back to her if we can.

0:15:150:15:21

Nick, first we heard that Mr Trump

was going to meet Kim Jong-un,

0:15:210:15:24

now he's putting

preconditions on any meeting.

0:15:240:15:25

Is it likely to happen?

0:15:250:15:29

Fiona, listening to the White House

briefing, we wondered whether

0:15:290:15:34

President Trump was getting cold

feet, but according to senior aides,

0:15:340:15:38

they say he really wants this to

happen. It is impulsive, the way he

0:15:380:15:42

likes to conduct foreign policy. It

gives him a reality TV moment for

0:15:420:15:47

the ages, his version of Nixon goes

to China. Another reason he finds it

0:15:470:15:52

attractive is that no President has

ever done this before and he loves

0:15:520:15:55

flying in the face of residential

orthodoxy. When it comes to North

0:15:550:16:01

Korea, he believes with some

justification that his

0:16:010:16:04

unconventional approach has worked

so far.

Laura, we have got you back.

0:16:040:16:10

How has South Korea pull this off,

if it happens?

0:16:100:16:19

if it happens?

President Moon saw an

opportunity and grabbed it. He heard

0:16:190:16:22

Kim Jong Un's speech on New Year's

Day, peaceful overtures, invited the

0:16:220:16:27

north to take part in the Winter

Olympics, which has seen a dizzying

0:16:270:16:32

level of visits and diplomacy

between North and South,

0:16:320:16:35

commentating in this moment. But

critics believe that President Moon

0:16:350:16:38

is too close to the north. He is the

son of North Korean refugees and he

0:16:380:16:44

has family based in the North. When

it comes to failed talks, he has

0:16:440:16:47

been part of those before. So when

it comes to what he has to gain,

0:16:470:16:52

that is obvious, that elusive peace

treaty and end to hostilities and

0:16:520:16:57

perhaps a place in the history

books. But he has a lot to lose.

0:16:570:17:02

Where does he go if this fails? And

when it comes to an end to

0:17:020:17:07

diplomacy, what options will the US

put on the table if they decide

0:17:070:17:12

diplomacy will not work? Those

military options will be back, and

0:17:120:17:16

people here do not want to see that.

I am glad we managed to get hold of

0:17:160:17:21

you. Thank you both.

0:17:210:17:25

Let's take a brief look at some

of the day's other news stories.

0:17:250:17:28

The first aid convoy since Monday

has crossed into the besieged Syrian

0:17:280:17:31

rebel-held enclave of Eastern

Ghouta.

0:17:310:17:32

The Red Cross sent 13 trucks loaded

with food but says it's not nearly

0:17:320:17:36

enough to feed the thousands

of civilians there.

0:17:360:17:38

They were also prevented from taking

in medical supplies.

0:17:380:17:41

Britain is close to agreeing

a multi-billion pound deal to supply

0:17:410:17:44

Saudi Arabia with 48

Typhoon fighter jets.

0:17:440:17:46

The announcement coincided

with the last day of a visit

0:17:460:17:49

by the new Saudi leader

Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman.

0:17:490:17:52

The trip has attracted criticism

because of the Saudi's role

0:17:520:17:55

in the humanitarian crisis in Yemen.

0:17:550:18:00

The EU has said it may challenge

Donald Trump's decision to impose

0:18:000:18:03

tariffs on steel and aluminium.

0:18:030:18:04

It claims they are in breach

of World Trade Organisation rules.

0:18:040:18:07

The British government said

that, as a close ally

0:18:070:18:10

of the United States,

it would seek exemption

0:18:100:18:12

from the tariffs.

0:18:120:18:16

A leaked internal email

from the medical director

0:18:160:18:18

of Northampton General Hospital

claims an elderly man waiting to be

0:18:180:18:22

seen in A&E died "due entirely

to dangerous overcrowding

0:18:220:18:26

in the department".

0:18:260:18:29

Our correspondent James

Waterhouse is here.

0:18:290:18:31

James, what more can you tell us?

0:18:310:18:38

At 4pm on Wednesday, an 85-year-old

man went to Northampton General

0:18:380:18:42

Hospital with stomach pains. He was

seen an hour and a half later and

0:18:420:18:46

told he would have to stick around

because blood tests suggest a heart

0:18:460:18:50

problem. He was put in a chair where

he would remain for seven hours

0:18:500:18:54

before suffering cardiac arrest at

1am. And now you have this leaked

0:18:540:19:00

e-mail from the medical director of

the trust which reads, last night a

0:19:000:19:02

patient died, due entirely to the

dangerous overcrowding of the

0:19:020:19:07

department. The risk we have all

been aware of but may have felt

0:19:070:19:12

hypothetical, has just happened. The

trust has apologised to the family

0:19:120:19:15

and called the outcome unacceptable.

Ideally the patient would not have

0:19:150:19:19

waited so long, it goes on, we do

not know what difference this might

0:19:190:19:22

have made to the final outcome. This

A&E unit has had 400 patients each

0:19:220:19:27

day for the last few months, an

increase of 30% compared with the

0:19:270:19:30

same period in the year before.

0:19:300:19:34

The man accused of carrying out

the London Tube bombing

0:19:340:19:36

at Parsons Green made no attempt

to deny he was responsible

0:19:360:19:39

when he was arrested

the day after the attack,

0:19:390:19:41

a court heard today.

0:19:410:19:42

The prosecution claims Ahmed Hassan,

who denies attempted murder,

0:19:420:19:44

told a detective

that he made the bomb.

0:19:440:19:46

30 people were injured in September

last year when the bomb partially

0:19:460:19:50

exploded in a Tube carriage.

0:19:500:19:50

June Kelly was in court.

0:19:500:19:53

Ahmed Hassan on his way to Brighton,

hours after leaving a bomb

0:19:530:19:56

on an underground train in London.

0:19:560:19:59

Two years on from his arrival

in the UK, the teenage asylum seeker

0:19:590:20:03

had caused mayhem

in its capital city.

0:20:030:20:06

Hassan later headed for Dover,

where he made for the port area.

0:20:060:20:11

The jury at his trial has seen this

CCTV footage of his movements.

0:20:110:20:16

On the run, he hung around this area

until the following morning.

0:20:160:20:20

And it was here, 24 hours

after the Tube attack,

0:20:200:20:22

the police identified him

as a wanted man.

0:20:220:20:26

In an initial interview

with counter-terrorism

0:20:260:20:29

detectives from Scotland Yard,

Hassan was asked,

0:20:290:20:33

"Who made the device?"

0:20:330:20:35

And he replied, "I did."

0:20:350:20:36

In response to further questions,

he said there might be a few

0:20:360:20:39

grams of the explosive,

TATP, at his home address.

0:20:390:20:43

Hassan's device created a fireball

when it partially exploded

0:20:430:20:46

on an Underground train at Parsons

Green station in west London.

0:20:460:20:51

The jury was told today the bomb

was packed with shrapnel,

0:20:510:20:54

including nuts, bolts,

screws, drill bits and knives.

0:20:540:21:01

And it contained 400 grams

of the explosive TATP.

0:21:010:21:05

It would have been lethal if it

had fully detonated.

0:21:050:21:08

This was the evidence

from an explosives expert,

0:21:080:21:10

who went on to the train.

0:21:100:21:14

The prosecution evidence at this

trial is now drawing to a close

0:21:140:21:17

and Hassan's defence case is due

to start next week.

0:21:170:21:21

June Kelly, BBC News,

at the Old Bailey.

0:21:210:21:27

Increasing numbers of young

British Muslim women are choosing

0:21:270:21:29

to wear a hijab or headscarf.

0:21:290:21:30

It's not without controversy.

0:21:300:21:31

Women in some Muslim

countries, like Iran,

0:21:310:21:33

are campaigning against it

as a symbol of oppression.

0:21:330:21:36

But here some women

are taking the opposite view,

0:21:360:21:38

seeing it as empowering,

even a feminist statement.

0:21:380:21:41

It's increasingly evident in the

world of fashion and social media.

0:21:410:21:45

And a major modelling agency has

just signed its first British

0:21:450:21:48

catwalk model who wears a hijab.

0:21:480:21:51

Nomia Iqbal investigates.

0:21:510:21:57

The spotlight is on the hijab.

0:21:570:21:59

Many Muslim women choose

to wear it proudly.

0:21:590:22:02

For some, it's an act of modesty.

0:22:020:22:04

For others, in countries like Iran,

forced to wear it, it's a symbol

0:22:040:22:07

to remove in protest.

0:22:070:22:10

It may divide opinion,

but hijab is going high fashion.

0:22:100:22:17

20-year-old model, Shahira Yusuf,

has been signed up by Storm,

0:22:170:22:21

the agency that found supermodel,

Kate Moss.

0:22:210:22:26

Shahira is one of the first

British models with a hijab

0:22:260:22:29

taking to the catwalk.

0:22:290:22:32

Yeah, definitely don't want to be

considered a token girl.

0:22:320:22:36

I don't want these models

like ethnic models or models

0:22:360:22:39

from different religious backgrounds

to just pave the way,

0:22:390:22:42

I want the way to stay there,

become the norm within society.

0:22:420:22:45

Because it is the norm outside

of the modelling sphere.

0:22:450:22:52

Shahira is becoming

the face of Modest Fashion.

0:22:520:22:56

At the show in London,

Muslim designers have come

0:22:560:22:59

from all over the world

to promote their clothes.

0:22:590:23:02

The market for Modest Fashion

is on course to be worth billions.

0:23:020:23:07

I grew up in a Muslim family

and none of the the women

0:23:070:23:10

in my family wore the hijab.

0:23:100:23:11

None of my Muslim

friends wore it either.

0:23:110:23:13

But now, more and more young

women are wearing it.

0:23:130:23:18

The reason why I wear

it is to number one, cover my hair.

0:23:180:23:22

And number two, to be honest,

I actually enjoy wearing the hijab,

0:23:220:23:24

I enjoy covering my hair,

I enjoy the Hijabs I have today

0:23:240:23:27

I feel like it makes a statement.

0:23:270:23:31

It's part of who I am,

it's my crown.

0:23:310:23:33

The hijab to me is empowerment

and it's feminism and it's taking

0:23:330:23:36

control and ownership

of what I choose

0:23:360:23:37

to show to the world.

0:23:370:23:40

Being online has given some women

a powerful platform.

0:23:400:23:43

Social media star, Mariah Idrissi,

has a huge following on Instagram.

0:23:430:23:48

The hijab is a part of me,

it's part of my career

0:23:480:23:50

and its representation.

0:23:500:23:52

You know, we shouldn't be ashamed

or shy to represent who we are.

0:23:520:23:56

If you are a model wearing a hijab,

and you're on Instagram and having

0:23:560:23:59

thousands of people following you,

aren't you doing the opposite

0:23:590:24:01

of what the hijab is

supposed to be about?

0:24:010:24:05

The mainstream media,

western media isn't

0:24:050:24:09

representing Muslims on TV,

in fashion, anywhere.

0:24:090:24:12

The only time we are represented

is for something bad.

0:24:120:24:14

I just saw this as, you know I'm

going on the news and I'm talking

0:24:140:24:18

about something that's not

about terrorism, not

0:24:180:24:20

about women being oppressed,

I'm talking about fashion.

0:24:200:24:23

Some campaigners for Muslim womens'

rights think the hijab's popularity

0:24:230:24:26

is a political statement.

0:24:260:24:29

They feel uneasy about its use

as an expression of identity.

0:24:290:24:33

Modest does not mean

you need to wear the hijab.

0:24:330:24:38

Modesty goes beyond that in your

behaviour and your way of dressing.

0:24:380:24:43

I don't need to prove to anybody

what I am, but in the hijab,

0:24:430:24:46

you are singling yourself

and proving something unnecessary,

0:24:460:24:51

especially in the Western world.

0:24:510:24:56

The hijab means different things

to different people.

0:24:560:25:00

Shahira believes you can wear it

and be a successful model.

0:25:000:25:02

Her dream?

0:25:020:25:05

The cover of British Vogue,

wearing her hijab.

0:25:050:25:08

Nomia Iqbal, BBC News.

0:25:080:25:16

Sir John Sawers then has died. His

work in decoding the sequence of

0:25:210:25:28

human DNA, the building blocks of

life, saw him awarded the prize back

0:25:280:25:31

in 2002.

0:25:310:25:34

The Winter Paralympics

are under way in South Korea.

0:25:340:25:36

North and South Korea didn't march

together under a unified flag

0:25:360:25:40

in the opening ceremony as they did

at last month's Winter Olympics

0:25:400:25:42

because they failed to agree

on which version to use.

0:25:420:25:45

Britain is being represented by 17

athletes, as Kate Grey

0:25:450:25:47

reports from Pyeongchang.

0:25:470:25:49

The biggest Winter

Paralympics to date.

0:25:490:25:50

Drummers and dancers,

the traditional charms

0:25:500:25:51

of Korea opening the show.

0:25:510:25:52

The weather playing its part too -

nothing could be done

0:25:520:25:55

about the fog-covered fireworks.

0:25:550:25:57

And heavy snow had prevented a full

rehearsal so a slight flag

0:25:570:26:00

hiccup could be forgiven.

0:26:000:26:02

But the flags were in full flight

when it came to the parade,

0:26:020:26:05

some more than others.

0:26:050:26:10

And here they come, Great Britain.

0:26:100:26:13

Owen Pick leading the way,

a great honour for the soldier

0:26:130:26:16

turned snowboarder.

0:26:160:26:17

And the British team certainly

enjoying the party atmosphere.

0:26:170:26:21

The International Paralympic

Committee had wanted North Korea

0:26:210:26:24

and South Korea to march out under

a unified flag but these Games

0:26:240:26:27

will be North Korea's debut

Winter Paralympics so the team

0:26:270:26:30

preferred to walk out separately.

0:26:300:26:34

The host nation completed

the procession but the cold

0:26:340:26:36

temperature meant no hanging around,

with all teams snaking

0:26:360:26:40

in and out of the stadium.

0:26:400:26:42

The crowd were treated

to an eclectic mix -

0:26:420:26:45

a snowboarding bear,

weird and wonderful contraptions

0:26:450:26:48

on wheels, and the floor putting

on its own dazzling show

0:26:480:26:51

with the help of performers.

0:26:510:26:59

Paralympics GB have a target of six

to 12 medals here in South Korea

0:26:590:27:02

and their best chances could come

from the ski slopes.

0:27:020:27:05

Rising stars Menna Fitzpatrick

and her guide, Jen Kehoe,

0:27:050:27:08

will compete across the five Alpine

skiing events and could be two

0:27:080:27:12

the big names of these Games.

0:27:120:27:16

There's a really good buzz

in the camp, the mood

0:27:160:27:18

is really, really positive.

0:27:180:27:19

It feels like a real family.

0:27:190:27:20

There's a real identity,

there's a real cohesion,

0:27:200:27:22

you can feel the support.

0:27:220:27:26

With the cauldron lit

and the fog finally clearing

0:27:260:27:28

for the firework finale,

organisers will hope it

0:27:280:27:31

will now be about the sport

and not the weather.

0:27:310:27:34

Kate Grey, BBC News, Pyeongchang.

0:27:340:27:39

That's it.

0:27:390:27:40

Now on BBC One, it's time

for the news where you are.

0:27:400:27:43